The East Carolinian, September 28, 2006












ill
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m
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EastCarolinian
VOLUME 82. ISSUE 12
www.theeastcarolinian.com
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THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
Sean Penn and Kate
Winslet star in the
new film All the King's
Men. Read what the
East Carolinian has
to say about the
filmPageBI
Read about the retro
stylings of The Scissor
Sisters, as reviewed
by WZMB DJ John
BoscoPageB2
Some incorrectly
believe it's less
dangerous to drive
under the influence
of marijuana than it is
to drive drunk. Learn
why this assumption
is falsePage A3
The East Carolinian
staff football
predictions are in
once again. See who's
winningPage B5
Aundrae Allison
broke numerous ECU
receiving records in
fresh out of junior
college in 2005. Find
out what he plans to do
in 2006PageB2
8 3 5 7 2 49 4 6 1 8 31 2 7 6 9 5
9 1 62 5 78 3 4
6 5 7 18 9 2 4 38 3 42 1 9
5 7 2 6 9 14 6:3 7 5 8
5 6 8 3 9 2 V 14 1 9 7 6 8 3 2 53 7 2 5 4 1 98 6
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPageA6
NEWSPageA2
PULSEPageBI
SPORTSPageB5
OPINIONPageM
COMICSPageAB
CLASSIFIEDSPageA6
New surplus store offers
great deals to students
Cameras like these, and other items, will be for sale at the surplus store.
ECU opens a cash
surplus store
ADELINE TRENTO
STAFF WRITER
Most college students want
to furnish their living spaces
with good quality merchandise,
but they must do so on a tight
budget. With theopeningoftheECU
Surplus Property Cash Sales Store,
students will be able to do
just that.
The ECU Surplus Property
Cash Sales Store, which is located
off of 10th Street on 1104 Clark
Street, held its ribbon cutting
ceremony and public preview
of the merchandise Wednesday,
Sept. 20.
There was a great turnout for
the first preview of the store on
Wednesday, and even more people
came for the first day of sales on
Thursday, Sept. 21.
"We had about 300 people
at the ribbon cutting ceremony
yesterday and we have already had
more than 350 people here so far
today said Tim Daughtry, central
stores manager for ECU.
The large turnout was
expected, and with good reason.
The warehouse style store offers
a wide variety of items that most
students need for their living
spaces at incredibly low prices.
"This store is absolutely a great
place for students to shop Daugh-
try said. "There are some really
good deals that students should
take advantage of. We have desks,
chairs, computer tables and even
computers for very cheap prices
The store also offers couches,
coffee tables, lamps, dishes, filing
cabinets, mini refrigerators,
bookshelves and more, with
most of these items costing less
than $20.
The merchandise in this
store comes from departments
and facilities at ECU that no
longer need the furniture or elec-
tronics. These items are held
in storage at ECU to be viewed
by other departments and if no one
has a use for them, they are brought
to the surplus store and sold
to the public for bargain prices. The
merchandise comes from over 200
locations on campus, including the
dorms, athletic buildings, research
facilities and academic buildings.
These locations either have no use
for the furniture anymore or have
gotten new furniture, so most of
the items are in great condition.
New merchandise will
be brought to the store every
week for the public to purchase.
Previews of the new merchandise
will be offered every Wednesday
afternoon from 1 to 3 p.m.
"The public previews give
people the chance to come
in and view the merchandise,
check prices and if planning
on making a purchase, it will give
them time to arrange for remov-
ing the items said Leslie Craigle,
director of marketing for business
services.
Sales will take place only on
Thursdays from 8:30 to 11:30
a.m and items must be removed
from the store within 24 hours of
the purchase.
The surplus store only accepts
cash, they wont take checks or
credit cards, but most students
don't seem to mind.
"The cash only policy doesn't
bother me said Will Caudle,
senior photography major.
"The prices are dirt cheap, so
it doesn't matter that you can't
use a card
Students who wish to check
out the merchandise should
get there early. The store oper-
ates on a first come first serve
basis and with such cheap prices
for quality furniture, it doesn't
seem like any of the items will be
in the warehouse for long.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastacarol inian.com.
Alcohol and other drug use can lead to unwanted sexual encounters.
Date rape drugs a
threat to students
Ways to stay safe on
campus and downtown
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
The downtown area is where
many ECU students go to have
fun after a long week of classes,
but some might not be aware
of the risk of date rape while
out relaxing.
According to Peter Romary,
director of student legal services,
the legal definition of date rape in
North Carolina is having sexual
intercourse with a person by force
and against the victim's will.
Romary says increasing the
amount of communication and
education about ways to prevent
date rape would be beneficial
to students.
Students should be aware of
the ways date rape can occur and
ways to make sure that they will
not be victims of the crime, and
notes that when going out to clubs
or a party, students should make
sure to be aware of the contents of
their drinks.
GHB and Rohypnol, better
known as roofies, are two main
types of drugs used to incapacitate
victims, according to Romary.
These drugs can be slipped into
drinks left unattended.
Common effects of these drugs
includes disorientation, loss of con-
sciousness and a lost of memory.
These drugs are so strong that
a victim might not even realize
that the drug is in their system or
that they have been raped.
An item called Drink
Detective is a tool that test drinks
for these types of drugs. The
tool is affordable and produced
by Waypoint Biomedical, Inc. of
California, according to Romary.
Romary feels ECU should take
a stand against date rape by edu-
cating and training faculty, RAs,
staff and students.
According to Romary, look-
ing at the average for the nation,
ECU does have a problem with
date rape.
When asked if she felt date
rape is a problem at ECU, Rashma
Patel, senior child life major,
said, "Personally, I haven't heard
anything about any date rape
incident happening here, but
it could happen because of the
downtown scene
"I feel safety on campus is
growing, but not as much as it
should be, but I feel pretty safe
because I take the right precau-
tions when I'm out such as staying
with friend and keeping an eye on
my drink Patel said.
About 430,000 sexual assault
cases are reported every year in
the U.S according to Romary.
On the other hand, a large
see DATE RAPE page A5
TEDI BEAR center
receives large grant
Greenville home to one
of three centers
VANESSA CLARKE
STAFF WRITER
The TEDI BEAR Children's
Advocacy Center facility, which is
supported by both ECU and the
Pitt County Memorial Hospital,
recently received a large grant
from the Duke Endowment, total-
ing $720,000 over three years.
The funds, which will be given
out in installments of $240,000
per year, will be used to pro-
mote collaboration, as well as
expand services into 12 eastern
North Carolina counties, accord-
ing to the endowment's Web
site. It will be used to assess chil-
dren who are potential victims of
physical or sexual abuse in those
counties.
The money will also be used
to hire an outreach coordinator.
"The coordinator will go out to
communities and try to help build
child abuse teams said director
Julie Ocker. "So many children fall
through the system
These multi-disciplinary teams
are a huge part of the center's
approach to child advocacy. Each
team is composed of members from
the division of social services, law
enforcement, mental health profes-
sionals and various people from
TEDI BEAR, such as a physician's
or nurse's assistants, forensic inter-
viewer and child life specialist.
"The team approach is child-
centered and collaborative
Ocker said.
Each member of the team
has his or her own specific
function. For example, the medi-
cal personnel perform the med-
ical exam. They collect what
physical evidence, in this case,
sexual trauma there may be,
if any exists at all. "Often,
there is no physical finding
she said, "and that is completely
normal
The forensic interviewer
performs a "scientific" inter-
view; that is, an interview that
will hold up to court scrutiny
should the case go to trial. These
interviews are recorded
onto DVD, and the rest of
the team watches them. This
eliminates the need to inter-
view the child multiple times.
"The interviewer goes in with a
'blank slate Ocker said. "They
want to get the information
from the child without tainting
it at all
Finally, the child life
specialist's job is to make the child
feel comfortable. "This person
is an advocate for the child that
helps them to understand what
will happen to them Ocker said.
For example, they may take the
child on a tour of the facility, to
make them feel more secure with
their surroundings.
The team-based approach is
also very useful if the case goes
to trial. The, medical profession-
als often testify as experts. Even
the DVDs from the interview are
used, which is beneficial, especially
to the child. "Children don't make
good witnesses, usually Ocker
said. "The whole secrecy that
shrouds sexual abuse makes it
hard to talk about In the court-
room, they have the odds stacked
against them
The center is also starting
a new program that deals espe-
cially with primary prevention.
"Primary prevention is trying to
get kids from being abused ever
she said.
The program tries to educate
parents to protect their kids,
instead of the old way of telling
children to protect themselves
by not talking to strangers, for
example. It also seeks to educate
parents about the dangers of
the internet, regarding sexual
stalkers, especially with the
growing popularity of sites
such as MySpace.
They also deal with second-
ary prevention, which seeks to
give guidance to victims of abuse
and their caregivers. They only
go to families who want the help,
however. Since this type of
prevention is not mandated by the
courts, it is done on a volunteer
basis only.
The Children's Advocacy
Center is also expanding, moving
to a bigger facility just down
the road from their current one.
This is important, Ocker said,
because it will allow them to help
more children.
"It will decrease the amount
of time it takes for a child to be
evaluated she said. "All child
advocacy centers have huge wait-
ing lists and we're trying to close
see TEDI BEAR page A5
The American Supply Association hosts a convention in Chicago, III.
Distribution students attending
tradeshow in Chicago this week
Program has high job
placement rates
TIM CUNNINGHAM
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
Six ECU industrial distribution
and logistics students are attending
the American Supply Association
convention this week in Chicago, 111.
Tim Cunningham, Kris-
tin Adams, Kathryn Barnum,
Tim Potocki, Meagan Clontz,
Brian Fardo and Professor Mark
Angolia will be representing
the ECU Distribution Program
while attending the convention
and tradeshow.
The trip is funded by the
school, which will allow these
students the opportunity to meet
and interview with an array of dif-
ferent distribution companies from
all over North America.
The East Carolina Distribu-
tion Department will be one of
only six other schools to attend
this three-day convention and
tradeshow which is being held at
the historic Palmer House Hilton
in downtown Chicago
One of the students' main
goals while attending the con-
vention will be to network and
make contacts for the future.
The student also wants to spread
the word about the distribution
program at ECU, which continues
to excel and grow in enrollment
each semester.
One of the main staples for
the ECU Distribution Program
is their impressive job placement
percentage, which currently sits
at over 95 percent. Along with
trips to Chicago and Las Vegas,
the program continually hosts
guests from various industries.
The speakers come to chat with
students about co-op internships
that are offered throughout each
semester, and more importantly,
about possible job opportunities
that await them upon graduation.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.





News
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28 , 2006 PAGE A2
Campus & Community
Announcements:
Thursday, Sept. 28
7:20 - 9 p.m. in Bate
1028
Breaking the Sickle Cycle
The Lambda Mu Chapter of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Inc
will be hosting a program
called "Breaking the Sickle
Cycle" which will explain
what Sickle Cell Anemia is,
and how it affects society
today. The guest speaker will
be Jacqueline Cannon, who has
been impacted by Sickle Cell
Anemia in her family. Additional
Information about sickle cell will
be provided
Thursday Sept. 28
ACHIEVE: Learning to Drive
Series
The First Driving Test, some-
times you make the perfect
three-point turn, sometimes
it takes more than once!
Location: Garret Hall Lobby
at 7 p.m.
Taking tests in college is a
skill! There are several styles of
tests as well as a large amount
of material you are expected to
know. Come learn some tips
on how to master test taking
and do well!
ECU'S Third Eastern Liter-
ary Homecoming on Friday,
Sept. 29
8:30 a.m. to 5 p.m. at
ECU'S Willis Building, First
and Reade Streets.
The J.Y. Joyner Library at ECU
will host the Third Eastern North
Carolina Literary Homecoming.
The free event will feature
authors who have written about
eastern North Carolina.
Saturday's Featured authors
include: Michael Parker, Nancy
Roberts, Barbara Braveboy-
Locklear, Elisa Carbone, James
Ransome, Louise Shivers
and Linda Beatrice Brown.
Sponsored by the North Carolina
Humanities Council and the
North Carolinian Society. A
Friday night reception will honor
historian William S. Powell at
7:30 p.m.
ECULoessin Playhouse
Presents: Chicago
Oct. 5 to 10
Based on the play Chicago by
Maurine Dallas Watkins. When
two murderesses have been
jailed, they compete for the
attention of the press and their
lawyer. Add to this a cast of
characters and a dazzling score;
you have Chicago and "All That
Jazz with music by Jon Kander
and lyrics by Fred Ebb.
Hedda Gabler from Nov.
16 to 21
Employing methods that
virtually defined the modern
psychological drama, this
masterpiece reveals the conflicts
and emotions that lie below the
surface of daily life. Was it
murder or suicide? Originally by
Henrik Ibsen, the adaptation is
being presented by Christopher
Hampton.
Gray Gallery Alumni
Exhibition
The Wellington B. Gray Gallery
will host the 2006 Alumni
Exhibition, "Bringing it All
Back Home The exhibition
is scheduled for Sept. 6 and
will continue to run through
Oct. 7. This also becomes
an early kickoff for the ECU
centennial celebration.
Students passed and present
are invited, as well as the public.
Questions and concerns can be
directed to Susan Nicholls at
nichollssecu.edu or Gina Cox
at coxc@ecu.edu
Taste, of Japan - ECU's
Japan Center East
Wednesday Sept. 20th and
Thursday the 21st at 6
p.m.
The second annual Taste of
Japan event will offer a dinner
prepared by Japanese Chef Rie
Ishida and feature a Japanese
Tea ceremony. Tea master
Makiko Hoshikawa will lead
the tea ceremonies for both
sessions.
Tickets are $40 per person and
required. Space is extremely
limited.
ecu.educs-acad
japancentereastprograms.
cfm
28 2gFri 30sat 1
Sun
2
Mon
3 Tue 4 Wed
Bringing International
Health Care to Eastern
North Carolina: Why
Should our Trainees
Study Abroad?
worldaffairsnc.org
Monroe Conference
Center of Eastern
AHEC
7 - 9 p.m.
ECU's Third Eastern
Literary Homecoming
ECU'S Willis Building,
First & Reade Streets
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Volunteer Friday for
Habitat for Humanity
Brickyard of
Mendenhall Student
Center
3 - 5 p.m.
Deadline to apply for
SGA Class Council
Applications can be
picked up in the SGA
Office - Suite 101,
Mendenhall Student
Center
5 p.m.
ECU'S Third Eastern
Literary Homecoming
continues
ECU'S Willis Building,
First & Reade Streets
8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m.
ECU Symphony Orches-
tra Performance
St. Pauls Episcopal
Church, Fourth Street
7 p.m.
Jazz vocalist Tierney
Sutton
Wright Auditorium
Visit ecu.eduSRAPAS
for more information
Local:
Major biodiesel plant opens in
NC to convert chicken fat to fuel
(AP)A company that
began by making alternative fuel
from french fry grease is now
ready to start major production
of biodiesel.
Piedmont Biofucls plans to
convert chicken fat into 1 million
gallons of biodiesel per year at the
factory, making a fuel that creates
less pollution and provides an
alternative to oil.
It's the first of three biodiesel
production plants being built in
North Carolina, which is among
the nation's top consumers of
biodiesel fuel.
"This whole thing has been
driven by a quest for more fuel
said Lyle Estill, a Piedmont Bio-
fuels executive. "I was making it
for my tractor at home. In some
ways, this represents a continua-
tion of our quest. A million-gallon
plant is our attempt to meet more
fuel needs
The factory was launched
Monday in Pittsboro west of
Raleigh, though actual production
is still a few days away.
When it begins, liquid chicken
fat, delivered in 7,500 gallon
tanker trucks will be pumped into .
a 2,000 gallon reactor vessel where
it will be mixed with methyl alco-
hol and a catalyst such as potash,
a chemical, to change the fat into
fuel. The factory could also use
vegetable oil as the feedstock, or
raw material base, for biodiesel.
Once the biodiesel is cleaned,
it is ready for sale.
Car stolen by N.C. man wanted
in slaying of wife found in Tenn.
(AP)A car believed stolen by
a man accused of gunning down
his estranged wife at a western
North Carolina women's shelter
was found in a bus station park-
ing lot in Tennessee, authorities
said Tuesday.
Investigators confirmed
that the abandoned 2006 Honda
Civic was the car John "Woody"
Woodring, 35, allegedly stole last
week from a neighbor in Sylva,
N.C, about 116 miles east of Knox-
ville on the other side of the Great
Smoky Mountains.
The getaway car was parked at
the bus station for four or five days
before the security officer called
police Monday night to check
its history and discovered it was
connected to what has become a
national manhunt for Woodring.
The car was next to a passen-
ger boarding area, but authorities
did not know if Woodring fled
on a bus.
Knoxville police impounded
the car but did not examine its
contents, DeBusk said. That
will be done back in North
Carolina, where the car was
shipped Tuesday.
Woodring, a teaching assistant
studying for his master's degree in
counseling at Western Carolina
University, reportedly begged for
forgiveness in one of his last mes-
sages to his wife on his Web site.
He promised he would change and
the violence would end.
Campus food co-ops grow
into educational tool
(MCT) Sprinkled across
college campuses, food coopera-
tives are often tucked away in the
far corner of the student union
behind glowing signs for McDon-
ald's and Taco Bell. Walls that
encase hand-painted murals and
the lithe scent of incense often go
largely unnoticed to the majority
of the university population.
What most don't know is that,
behind the alternative and at times
anarchical exterior, a lot of college
food co-ops are rolling up their
sleeves both in the kitchen and
the community to raise awareness
about such vogue issues as healthy
eating habits and sustainability.
Food Cooperatives became
popular at the end of the '60s and
early '70s as an alternative, healthy
dining option.
Though traditionally politi-
cally active and environmen-
tally conscious, some food co-ops
located on campuses are expand-
ing their horizons as universities
begin to offer curriculum directly
correlating to co-op causes like
sustainability and eco-friendli-
ness, enabling co-ops to interact
with other students and faculty
and raise awareness and interest
for their causes.
The California university school
system sponsors, the California
Student Sustainability Coalition,
an organization that offers pro-
grams "for the purpose of uniting
students to fight for a sustainable
University of California accord-
ing to the coalition's Web site.
Education in Sustainable
Living Program, one of the pro-
grams sponsored by CSSC offered
at the state universities in Santa
Cruz, Los Angeles, Davis, Santa
Barbara, San Diego and Berkeley,
is an opportunity for students to
listen to guest lecturers and par-
ticipate in action research teams
that conduct experiments about
their topic of choice.
"A lot of classes are always the-
orizing everything, but the action
research teams and speakers teach
you a lot about life experiences
said Jesse Lee, a senior environ-
mental studies major at UC Santa
Cruz who's been involved with
ESLP for two years. In addition
to helping coordinate the program
last spring, Lee participated in the
socially sustainable community
and the sustainable gardening
action research teams.
In addition to taking advan-
tage of new opportunities through
academic programs, many co-ops
have maintained their connection
with the campus community by
working with faculty, students and
local farmers.
At Earlham, the co-op sup-
ports students living and working
on an on-campus farm. They get
fresh honey and produce from the
farm.
"It's part of the co-op philoso-
phy of staying small and staying
as close to the earth as possible
Eikler said. Working with local
organizations enables the co-op
to "support our economies and a
better way of living
The Davis Food Co-op, located
off the UC-Davis campus, employs
173 students and community mem-
bers, said Eric Stromberg, the co-
op's general manager. Their size
enables the co-op to have a widely
spanning community outreach
program.
One of their programs, Carrots
in the Classroom, sends volunteers
to local schools to give presenta-
tions about cooking, music and art,
all of which have themes related
to food, co-ops and sustainability,
Stromberg said.
ECU's Jarvis Lecture
on Christianity and Cul-
ture
Theologian Phyllis Trible
will visit ECU as the
speaker for the annual
Jarvis Lecture.
Willis Building, First
and Reade Streets
7:30 p.m.
Featured Event:
ECU's Third Eastern Literary Homecoming
Friday, Sept. 29 in the Willis Building on First and Reade
Streets from 8:30 a.m. to 5.p.m. North Carolina writers
will receive awards and perform readings.
Russian Film Series:
"Burnt by the Sun"
Bate 2011
6:30 p.m.
Weird:
Family sues over Oregon girl's
PE class death
(AP)The family of a girl
who died after being hit in the
head with a basketball during gym
class filed a $562,000 law-
suit against the Springfield
School District.
The parents allege the
district failed to provide proper
medical care.
Jazmin Montalvo, 15, died in
April, 2005. It was a day after
collapsing in the locker room
after class.
A preliminary medical
examination suggests that the
Springfield High School freshman
suffered a brain hemorrhage.
Montalvo complained of diz-
ziness and severe headache after
class. She lost consciousness
shortly afterward and died the
next day. Family members say she
had no known medical problems.
A Springfield School Dis-
trict spokesman says that district
officials could not comment because
they have yet to see the lawsuit.
Ex-Wife Attacks Hasselhoff
Over Alleged Suicide Call
(AP)David Hasselhoff
and ex-wife Pamela Bach are
fighting mad again after the
actresssinger's claims the
Baywatch star lied to cops
when reporting their teen-
age daughter's alleged
suicide attempt.
Hasselhoff allegedly called
police to report that his daugh-
ter Hayley, 14, had attempted
suicide at the family home Sunday
night, but now Bach accuses
her ex of making the call out of
pure revenge.
Bach spoke exclusively to
website TMZ.com Monday
morning and insisted her daughter
never attempted suicide, claiming
Hasselhoff threatened her
with the police call, telling her in a
phone conversation, "You're going
down. I'm calling the police
Bach insists her daughter
was scratched by the family cat
on Sunday night and was crying
uncontrollably, so she called her
ex and suggested that it might
be appropriate for the girl to
see a psychologist.
But, she claims, her ex-hus-
band launched a verbal attack
on her and called in a
suicide, prompting police and
paramedics to come to the
house and take the 14yearold
to the hospital.
Hasselhoffs publicist Judy
Katz insists her client became
alarmed when his older daugh-
ter called to say her sister was
bleeding. She denies claims
that the actor reported a suicide
attempt but accepts the operator he
spoke to may have interpreted it
that way.
Hasselhoff denies he
even spoke with Bach on Sunday
night, and says her allegations
are false.
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PAGE A2
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358
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28, i(m
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE As
Taking
Care of
Business!
Driving stoned, carefree
Come learn more
about the different
majors and
concentrations
offered by the
College of Business.
Accounting:
Monday, October 2nd
5 -6:30pm
Bate 1032
MIS:
Tuesday, October 3rd
5-6:30pm
Bate 2015
Finance:
Wednesday, October 4,h
5-6:30pm
Bate 1032
Management:
Monday. October 9th
5-6:30pm
Bate 1032
Marketing:
Tuesday. October 10,h
5-6:30pm
Bate 3007
Socials will be held after presentations.
Pizza and sodas will be provided.
Not sure which major is right for you?
Come to all of our programs to help you
decide.
- Meet your professors
- Explore career options
Speak to alumni with real world
experience
m College Of Business fjg
m Please Call 328-6077 to RSVP M
(MCT) Over the last
eight years, liigh school stu-
dents who have gotten in trouble
for drugs and alcohol have told
counselor Cathy Cratty the same
alarming story about driving
under the influence.
"It just kept coming up,
left and right: 'We know we
shouldn't drive after drinking,
hut it's OK to drive after smok-
ing pot said Cratty, who works
for Highland Park, 111baaed
School District US.
According to national sur-
veys, high school students
are as likely to drive high as
they are to drive drunk. But
experts say many of those
teens never hear a warning about
taking to the road while stoned
and don't think they're doing
anything dangerous
"They perceive them-
selves as being less impaired
when smoking marijuana
said Jocelyn Boudreau, a
social worker at the Rose
crance adolescent treat-
ment center in Rockford, III.
"The overarching and clear mes-
sage (to teens) has been: 'You
drink, you drive, you die
"There really hasn't been that
same kind of consistent message
for marijuana
That's largely because pot's
role in fatal crashes is far from
clear. The National Highway 3
Traffic Safety Admtnistra-s
tion, which keeps statistics on
wrecks involving alcohol, does
not have enough data to generate
similar numbers for marijuana.
Heidi Coleman, chief of
the safety administration's
impaired driving division, said
many police officers likely
never detect pot because they
aren't trained to read physical
cues - such as pupil size, body
temperature and lieart rate - that
suggest the drug's presence.
"They may suspect that a
driver is impaired, but if they
don't test positive for alcohol,
(officers) may let them go
she said.
Research into marijuana's
impact on driving is similarly
limited, she said.
Some studies have linked
marijuana to decreased attentive-
ness, slower reactions, diminished
motor skills and a worsened
Marijuana can affect driving abilities in
ability to estimate distance, hut
there is no consensus about how
severe the effect! are or how long
they last.
The debate o er w hat
really constitutes impairment
will likely play out in a Lake County,
III courtroom later this year
when Richard Wood, 17, faces
trial in the deaths of two friends
who were passengers in a car he
wrecked Nov. 18,
Prosecutors, who say the
Mundelein teen had used pot
within '2 I- flours of the crash,
have charged him with aggra-
vated driving under the
influence of drugs and reck-
less ho m i c i d e . Wood 's
attorney, Robert Gevirtz, would
not comment on his client's
alleged marijuana use but said
he would prove that his client
a manner similar to alcohol.
was not impaired at the time of
the crash.
Tabitha Fischer, 19. has no
doubt that marijuana worsened
her driving when she was grow-
ing up in Belleville, even though
she saw nothing wrong with it at
the time.
"When I was doing it, I thought
I was a better driver said Fischer,
who recently completed a year of
substance abuse treatment at
Rosccrancc. "As I look at it now
I'd go through stop signs, stop-
lights, and I'd just laugh it off. I
didn't focus on anyone else on the
road, from what I can remem-
ber. It was like I was the only
person there
www.theeastcarolinian.com
PLAYB0YIS LOOKING FOR EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
COEDS TO APPEAR IN THE MAGAZINE'S MAY 2007
"GIRLS OF THE CONFERENCE USA" PICTORIAL
AUDITIONS:
OCTOBER 2nd & 3
nents
Sated
2006PAHTICOUEgMj
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i WAS A STUDENT AT SAN DIEGO
lWSWE UNIVERSITY WHEN
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HAS BEEN ONE OF THE BEST
WPERIENCESOFMYLIFE!
-Alison Waite
, Playmate & Cover Girl, May 2006
z
o
u
a
D
sept. 30 Family Fall Fling
10:00 am, Student Recreation Center
oct. i Introduction to Rock Climbing
Pilot Mountain, $40 SRC member
$50 SRC non-member
Oct. 2 Intramural Climbing Competition
5:00 pm, $10 for SRC members
$15 for non-SRC members
Registration Deadline
Oct. 2-6 Cancer Prevention Week
oct. 5 Wheelchair Basketball Drop-in game
8:30 pm - 9:30 pm, SRC Sports Forum
oct. 7 River Sweep Clean-up
Tar River, Register by October 5th
oct 9 Intramural Sports Captain's Certification
5:00 pm, MSC Multi-Purpose Room
Oct. 9 Soccer Team Registration
5:00 pm, MSC Multi-Purpose Room
oct. 9 Sports Official Interest Meeting
9:00 pm, SRC 238
FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO SCHEDULE AN AUDITION,
call (312) 401-7341, or visit www.playboy.compose
Cand i! ill 5 musl be al least 18 yean ol
ti,o hu i,n ln ol ID willi them 111 the audihon one






THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28,2006 PAGE A4
THL
inion
Not just for Pirate Rants
Liar, liar, pants
on fire
Perhaps honesty is not the best policy
RACHEL KING
NEWS EDITOR
When we are young, we are taught that
the truth should be valued. It should be
sought in times of uncertainty, it should be
upheld in times of trouble; it should even be
preferable over sparing someone's feelings.
Kingdoms have been fought over, wars have
been started and love has been broken on the back
of the beast we call the truth. This idea has been the
cornerstone for innumerable other values such as
honor, valor and integrity. Have you ever stopped
to ask yourself why we are brought to be honest?
Are there ever times when maybe, just maybe, t;
the truth is the worst thing you can bestow upon
someone?
In the last issue of Cosmopolitan that I read, I
was really shocked at one article I came across. The
premise behind it was that you had hypothetically
cheated on your significant other. The sugges-
tion was that you shouldn't tell himher that you
cheated, but only under certain circumstances Ini-
tially, I thought, "Wow. That's so freaking wrong
but, the more I thought about it, the more I think
the article made sense. ,
The circumstances, according to Cosmo, stipu-
late that if you went astray only once and were not
tempted to do it again, then you shouldn't tell. Live
with your guilt, it said, because telling that person
would cause more harm than good. The catch to it
being OK not to tell the truth was that you needed
to figure out what you were dissatisfied with in
your relationship that led you to cheat in the first
place. If it can be fixed, talk to himher about that,
and not your wrongdoing. Let it go, in other words,
as long as it doesn't happen again.
That makes a good deal of sense to me So why
do I feel guilty for even hypothetically assuming that
a one-time mistake can be remedied without spill-
ing your guts all over the place to this person about
what you did wrong? I'm telling you why: Teachers
slapped our wrists for lying, and the sting lives on.
Of course, if you are a serial cheater with a shady
past, I don't believe that lying about it could ever be
acceptable. I don't even know what I would do if I
ever cheated on someone Therefore, I decided to
save myself the trouble of debating and just, well,
not cheat. It is an interesting question, though.
What about our parents? Remember when you
were young and you broke something in your house
and blamed it on your sibling? Remember when the
dog did it, not you? Lies are convenient and easy.
The problem is, in many instances, they can build
and build and backfire.
I know that I have lied to my parents. I think
we all have. I think a lot of the time it is minor
stuff, and that's actually OK by me. I'm not going
to be upset about the fact that I have allowed my
parents to believe I was returning to my dorm
room at the end of the night when my intention
was to stay the night at my boyfriend's house.
I'm telling you right now that in those cases, I
don't mind omitting the truth, and that's another
thing. Are omissions as bad as lies? Are they
lies in and of themselves? What is the difference
between a lie that is acceptable and a lie that is not?
In closing, I'm going to lay out my entire theory
on lies for your enjoyment and education. If the lie,
or omission, is something that could hurt someone,
you have to consider two things. Will not telling
the truth cause a major problem in your life or
someone else's? If the answer is yes, come on out
with it. If telling the truth is not the easier option
(like it ever is), but it's necessary for the well-being
of those involved, tell it. Conversely, if it's harm-
less or a one-time thing, you may as well keep it
to yourself, but make sure you actually do keep it
to yourself. Telling people outside of the situation
is a bad idea as the truth may eventually get back
around to the person that wasn't supposed to ever
find out. Basically, as you knew before you picked
this paper up, the choice to tell the truth (or not)
is a judgment call.
After all, didn't you ever wonder where "liar,
liar, pants on fire even came from? Whose pants
were on fire and why didn't they tell the truth
about it?
1
PIRATE RANTS
The Fraternity intramurals
league is so weak compared
to the rest of teams. Basically
all the frats are competing to
decide who is least crappy. I
would like to see the frats play
some of the real teams, that
would be a funny sight to see.
Who takes the elevator to
the second floor? You spend
more time waiting for the
elevator than it would take to
climb the one flight of stairs.
Sorry to my classmates for
laughing in class, but the
girl sitting beside me had
a huge dangling booger
hanging out of her nose!
Freshmen girls: Do not come
up to me in a barclub and
ask me to buy you a drink.
You may be fine, but I'm
not getting busted for you!
Stop sending e-mails asking
when a test is but not telling
me which class you're in.
Also, maybe you should
try reading the e-mail our
professor sent out the same
day that you e-mailed me.
I am infatuated with the
freshmen varsity girl
cheerleaders.
Smokers and non-smokers
will never get along. Greeks
and non-Greeks will never get
along. Why don't you guys
just live with each other? We
are all on this Earth together.
We have every right to smoke,
to join a Greek organization,
to not smoke and to not
join a Greek organization.
I hate the pink soap in the
bathrooms on campus. It
smells so bad!
The other day I overheard a
sorority girl talking about how
she would love to go to Italy if
only it wasn't in South America!
Is anyone else as offended
as I am about the ad for
adult entertainers in a school
newspaper?
I am so tired of hearing
my roommate complain
it is driving me insane.
Is it just me or is it weird that
"Dora the Explorer" is on the TVs
at the Croatan every morning?
I love country boys!
Why is it that all the girls
walking around campus with
fake blonde hair are always
on their cell phones if they
aren't walking with one of their
other fake friends? Do they
not know how to walk all by
themselves without having to
talk to someone? Quite sad.
My roommate is excessively
hot. Plus he doesn't seem
fond of clothes I love my life.
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
There is a really pretty girl in
one of my classes, but I don't
know how to talk to her and
she is in a sorority and I'm
not in a frat, so do I really
even have a chance anyway?
What makes you think that I
must walk around you? Are you
better than me? No. So move.
I have a thing for girls
that wear baseball caps, I
don't know why, I just do.
I think I have a crush on you
but I am oh so shy.
I graduated last spring and I
go to graduate school out of
state. The paper here doesn't
hold a candle to the TEC
and it doesn't have Pirate
Rants. I miss them so.
When I'm on the bus in the
afternoon, I've more than likely
had a long day of classes.
The last thing I need to hear
is someone on the bus with
the most annoying laugh.
I'm not asking you not to
talk, but I am asking that
you keep the volume down!
People in the library
Get off your damn phone.
Is anyone else tired of
professors not knowing how
to work the computers and
projectors? Mine waste half
of the period by stopping and
starting while struggling to even
find the right Web site. This is
pathetic. Someone teach them
how to use the technology!
To the guy dressed exactly like
me lay off. You're cramping
my style.
Why are you such a jerk all
of the sudden? Everyone
who use to like you agrees.
Guys look silly when they are
on the elliptical machines.
To the girl I overheard say that
she was afraid of cheerios.
I just want to know why?
You're looking for the "good
single, non-drinking, non-
smoking and non-sorority
girls"? Sorry, we do exist.
We're just hiding from all of the
people who do those things.
I just want to thank the
custodial staff of Rivers. They
are so friendly every time I see
them, even if it is 7:30 a.m.
It is really nice to know that
people can still be friendly and
kind with an ulterior motive.
To the lesbian that gets stared
at on the campus shuttle.
I completely understand
your pain. It's amazing
how people act like they've
never seen a lesbian before!
I'm a guy ana I watch
"Gilmore Girls" Is that bad?
Dame mas Gasoli na !
To the person who asked if
chivalry was dead. Maybe
guys would be more
inclined to be gentlemen if
girls still acted like ladies.
To the guy who wondered
where all the non-drinking,
non-smoking, non-sorority girls
are. We're definitely here but
you're probably not going to
find us out clubbing or going
to frat parties. We go to the
library, like sports and love God.
Why is it that ECU only has
one bus that goes on the
hour to the outside world?
If you need to go grocery
shopping and don't have a car,
it can take over two hours!
You're so vain, you probably
think this rant is about you.
Superior huh? Last time I
checked, God was the only
one in a position to look
down on anyone. We all bleed
red, so get over yourself.
You want advice on how to
approach a girl, then why don't
you look at the rest of the
opinions page and just ask Jane.
When you're going up the
stairs and you take a step,
kick the other leg up high
behind you to keep people
from following to close.
Is it me or has the Hill gotten
way more ghetto this year?
I am terrified to go up to
and talk to beautiful girls.
I wonder how many other
smokers at ECU are also
embarrassed about their nasty
habit.
Who cares if you are a Teaching
Fellow and you get to register
early and get to have your own
dorm and get to go on trips?
Really you just have a loan
that you must pay back by
working this dead end job as
a teacher making on $30,000
a year. Wow way to go!
Why is that when I come into the
computer lab in Mendenhall the
two computer techs are acting
like computer Nazis? Guys it's
not that serious it's just the
computer lab chill out! Thanks!
Maybe if the athletic
department had spent more
time preparing for Saturday's
game and less time writing
"apologetic e-mails" and
lecturing the entire student
population, the football team
might have beat West Virginia.
Stop putting naked pictures
of yourself on Facebook.
We don't want to see that.
I welcome the weekend! Hurry!
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Rachael Utter
Multimedia Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Campbell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, the East Carolinian prints
9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednes-
days during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. The East Carolinian welcomes letters to the
editor which are limited to 250 words (which may be
edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to
edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editorfltheeastcarolinian.com or to the East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, N.C. 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for mwe information. One copy
of the East Carolinian is free, each additional copy is1.
The flip side of
fraternity rush
Some fraternities live up to the stereotypes
RYAN COBEY
OPINION WRITER
Loud music, women and drinks. No, I'm not
describing your typical rock concert or rap video,
but rather the typical environment you'd expect at a
fraternity house. And that was, in fact, exactly what
I experienced during last week's Rush events. In my
opinion, many people seem to hold kegs and beer
cans a higher priority than papers and exams and
many students focus more on social acceptance than
on their academic status.
It took me only four days to realize that, unfortu-
nately, many fraternities seem to hold the same ideals too.
Before I continue, let me first say that not all
fraternities have these "flaws as I like to call them.
I attended a number of fraternities that focused more
on friendship and academics than anything else.
However, I recently found out that a fraternity that
requires the highest GPA and disapproves of hazing
only received four members in their pledge class and
it's the smallest pledge class this fall.
Unfortunately, my experience wasn't an entirely
positive one. In fact, it was quite the opposite at some
of the houses I decided to return to throughout the
week. I remember entering each fraternity house
with a group of guys, sitting down in front of their
televisions and watching at least five minutes of their
fraternity members being kissed by girls. And not just
one girl, one wasn't enough for each guy. Apparently,
they thought ifeach guy had two or three girls kiss-
ing on him at the same time, the message would be
more effective. I had to respect the honesty of some of
them though. One fraternity in particular told all of
us exactly what they were about. "We do two things
well, sports and women
It wasn't just like that at one house. In fact, the
videos seemed to get even longer and include even
more women with each house I attended. I even over-
heard one fraternity member whisper a comment to
another that the "girls seemed to be working
What exactly is this showing freshmen guys?
many of whom are away from their homes and
families for the first time in their lives. I don't think
it's fair, honestly. These fraternities are promoting
the entirely wrong ideals to freshmen and they
are doing it in a way that triggers the needs and
desires that all men have. I mean, face it guys, we
think about women more than anything. When
someone fresh out of high school sees a smil-
ing guy with Greek letters on his shirt and three
women kissing him, he's going to picture himself in
that guy's place. Too bad that probably won't ever
happen to him, even if he does get in.
What about the no alcohol rules in effect during
Rush? How many of you really think that most fra-
ternities really follow that rule? I took a tour of the
first fraternity house I visited on Wednesday, and
the brother taking me around had a cup of bourbon
in his hand.
The alcohol rule was not put in place just to annoy
fraternities. Can't a fraternity hold out on alcohol
for at least four days? I think it's honestly a test of
responsibility more than anything. Can your broth-
erhood be responsible enough to not drink around
possible new pledges for a total of about 20 hours
during a five-day rush week?
However, in my opinion, the most severe issue
can be summed up in one word - arrogance.
I know some of you are probably thinking "How
can that possibly be a more touchy subject than smok-
ing marijuana and breaking the no alcohol law during
rush week?" Because honestly, you can tie arrogance
into everything I have previously said. And for many
fraternities, it seems arrogance can be a huge catalyst
for breaking the rules.
How do fraternities go about getting members?
The answer is simple; they show possible pledges
how much better they are than the other fraternities.
They can do this in many ways - serve alcohol, bash
the other fraternities and tell you about their "con-
nections" with important places. I mentioned those
three because, well, those were the most common
ways they tried to persuade me to join. I was listening
to one fraternity speak about how they raised more
money for non-profit organizations than any other
on campus last year. However, when I hinted that I
was fairly interested in the party aspect of their frat,
they were very quick to tell me that they tend to get
quite drunk before doing a lot of their community
service work. The same fraternity even went on to
say that because they do so much work for the com-
munity, they rarely have their parties busted due to
their "connections" with the police.
I couldn't help but to bust out laughing after that.
Fortunately, I followed it up with a quick "that is awe-
some so they wouldn't think that I took offense to
what they said. In this case, blind arrogance makes
these people think their parties are safe for life.
Obviously, not all fraternities are like this, but
there is something about a fraternity that not only
promotes brotherhood, but also gives a sense of
superiority over other "normal" students simply
because they are a part of something. That, of course,
is not the purpose of a fraternity. However, it is very
unfortunate that, from my observations, I think a
great deal of fraternities here promote exactly that
- a sense of superiority, which very quickly turns
into blatant arrogance. And from the experiences
I already presented, that blatant arrogance can be
downright dangerous at times.
While I pointed out the positive aspects of Greek
Life on Tuesday, I think many fraternities are going
beyond the acceptable and legal limits just to recruit
more brothers. It is sad that some need to resort to
these tactics, but what's more sad is that the fraterni-
ties that focus heavily on academics - the main reason
why we all came here in the first place - received such
a low number of pledges this semester. I guess some
stereotypes really are true.
i
Oi
to
Al
he
M
ar
Al
pr
t-
Have something you want
to say to East Carolinian
readers? Submit your let-
ters to the editor online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com.
.iijt.





PAGEA4
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A5
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Volunteer fridays
DATE RAPE
continued from Al
majority of cases aren't reported,
and that could be the root of
the problem.
If the suspect of the crime
is caught after the incident is
reported, they could face up to
2G1 months in prison.
If the' perpetrator uses a
deadly weapon, causing serious
bodily or mental injury or com-
mits the crime with an accom-
plice, the crime is considered
first-degree rape and could result
in a life sentence, according to
Romary.
"I have personally seen people
who do not officially report
and who felt alone and dropped
out as a result and this
should never happen Romary said.
Some other tips listed by
the Waypoint Biomedical Inc.
of California include knowing
your drinking limits, drink-
ing from tamper proof bottles,
getting a new drink if you
leave it unattended and various
others.
To find out more about ways
to prevent date rape, visit the
office of Student Legal Services
in Mendenhall or call Peter
Romary at 328-5138.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
TEDI BEAR
continued from Al
September 29
October 20
3:00-5:OOp.m. MSC Brickyard
Help us help others.
We need you to SIGN UP to build a birdhouse.
www.ecu.educs-studentlifevolunteerVolunteer-Fridays.cfm
FREE FOOD FREE T-SHIRTS
On three Fridays this fall, you can help buildpaint birdhouses
to raise money for the ECU chapter of Habitat for Humanity.
All money earned will go towards the building of a Habitat
house in Greenville.
Meet new people, "tool around develop leadership skills,
and discover that volunteering isn't just for the birds.
All skill levels welcome. All tools and equipment will be
provided. Free food and music will also be available. Free
t-shirts will be given to participants.
the gap. I think some kids don't
come because of the wait
TEDI BEAR stands for
Tender Evaluation, Diagnosis
and Intervention for a Better
Abuse Response.
The facility deals mainly
with sexual abuse cases, though
they do handle child victims of
physical abuse as well. They see
between 400 and fiOO alleged
child victims per year. The center
started in 199'2, with the support
of large organizations such as
ECU's Brody School of Medicine
and PCMH.
It is also an accredited child
advocacy center and member of
the National Children's Alliance.
There are standards for accredi-
tation, such as: a child-friendly
facility, multi-disciplinary teams,
forensic interviews and ther-
apeutic intervention, among
others, according to the NCA's
Web site. It also means that the .
center provides experts, such as
trained pediatricians, to diagnose
the children.
TEDI BEAR Children's
Advocacy Center is one of only
three in eastern North Caro-
lina, the other two being in
Elizabeth City and Wilmington.
"It's exciting Ocker said. "It's
important work and we have a
lot of dedicated people who have
the compassion and experience to
do it right
The Duke Endowment
has been serving both North
and South Carolina since
1924. It seeks to service the
people in these two states by
supporting local programs
dealing with higher education,
health care, children's welfare and
spiritual life.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com.
Wimple's
Steam Bar & Cajun Cafe
Laissez le boo temps Router!
RIGHTLY SPECIALS
Louies
?olunteer fridays
East Carolina University
3f Habitat
"l 11 for Humanity
Campus Chapter
monDflv
Crab Legs
$10.99
per pound
TUESDAY
Steamed Shrimp
$13.99
per pound
UlEDilESDflY
Crab Cakes or Stuffed
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355-4220 nionSat. 5 PID Until ujuiui.wimpiescajun.com
You are cordiaCCy invited
to share in the
Induction Ceremony
of new members
to the
East CaroCina "University
Chapter
of
goCden TCey
InternationaC Leadership Honour
Society
Thursday, September 28, 2006
fit sio' cCocin the evening
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greenviCCe, North CaroCina
A reception will immediately follow the ceremony.
RSVP to the Office of Campus Involvement by email at GoldenKey(5)ecu.edu
or call 252-328-4718 of your intent to attend the reception.





Classifieds
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28,2006
PAGE A6
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
FOR RENT
Large 2BR 2.5BA townhouse,
Full basement, WD Hook-up, great
storage, enclosed patio, ECU bus
route, No pets 752-7738
WILDWOOD VILLAS- 1450 square
foot, two bedrooms, 3 12 baths,
recreation room, furnished kitchen
remodeled, on ECU bus route,
$675, no pets. 717-9872
Available Now- 2bed2bath duplex
@ Eastgate off Moseley Dr on ECU
bus route, short term lease thru May
07. new carpet, energy efficient,
sorry no pets. $595.00 Pinnacle
Property Mgmt 561-RENT (7368)
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6, 9,12
month leases Water Cable included ECU
bus Wireless Internet pets dishwasher
disposals pool laundry (252) 758-4015
4 Bedroom, Walk to Campus, 2
story Town Home, Completely
remodeled including new carpet,
new stove, nice side by side
refrigerator, dishwasher, washer
dryer included! New central Heat
& Air, Very efficient with Low
Utilities! Fireplace in Large Living
Room. Very Nice and Clean. New
Paint. Large backyard, maintained
by owner. This home was designed
for Students! Unbelievable $875
per month! Call 258-4373
ROOMMATE
WANTED
APARTMENT FOR RENT: Wanted:
Female roommate for a 4 bedroom
apartment at the Exchange, $440
per month with all utilities included
(electricity, cable, high speed
internet). First month $220 with
signed lease. Lease runs through
July 2007. Call Sarah at (252)333-
9357 for more information.
ROOMATEWANTED3000SF HOUSE
1 BLOCK FROM CAMPUS VERY nice
house close to everything 714-8474
Roommate wanted to share a
4BD4BA all inclusive apartment
for $349mo. Male or female, Close
to ECU, on ECU bus route, great
amenities. Call 752-9995.
FOR SALE
University Area FSBO 2410 East
4th Street 4BR, 2.5BA, Hardwood
throughout. Fenced yard, screened
porch, storage bldg.
HELP WANTED
Tiara Too Jewelry. Colonia Mall.
Part-time retail. Sales associate.
Available year round. Day and night
hours. Apply in person.
WANTED: student strong in
Geometry to help kids ages 14, 13,
and 9 with homework. Minimum
3.2 GPA, non-smoker, reliable
transportation, available evenings
and some weekends. Call 917-
6787 for interview
Food delivery drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-
time positions $100-300week.
Perfect for college students
Some lunchtime (llam-2pm)
Mon-Fn advantagious and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must. Call
252-551-3279 between 2-5pm
only. Leave message if necessary.
Sorry Greenville residents only.
Do you need a good job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Part-Time Position ISP looking for
part-time Customer Response Team
members to Job-Share. Morning
to mid-day hours (7:30 am to
3:00 pm), Monday thru Friday.
Some flexibility in work schedule
provided. Job duties: communicate
product to customer, maintain
customer data base, marketing
research & phone calls. Good
cpmmunicatoin & computer skills
required. Approximate! 15 to 20
hours per week. Send resume' to
candidate@wavelengthmail.com or
fax to (252) 321-8186.
WANTED: student strong in English
Grammar to help kids ages 14, 13,
and 9 with homework. Minimum
3.2 GPA, non-smoker, reliable
transportation, available evenings
and some weekends. Call 917-
6787 for interview.
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
PERSONALS
Attention Chinese Indian Medicine
& Political science students! The
Card Post Report 552 via News &
Observer 924 classified personals
& Chancellor (3 pages)
Ground
Is kwidtig li MCKAOB I1AMM JKS hIm vbhs
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pauthtc Application tan rv lillrd o ai S33B Northland
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Spring Break with STS to Jamaica,
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you connected? Sell trips. Earn
cash, travel free! Call for group
discounts. Inforeservations 800-
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Spring Break 2007 Celebration
20th Anniversary with Sunsplash!
Free trip on every 12 before Nov. 1
Free Meals & Parties, Hottest Deals
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7710 www.sunsplashtours.com
ANNOUNCE-
MENTS
LOST: DELL LAPTOP COMPUTER
in a black book bag. If found, please
call (252) 378-5626 $750 Reward.
House hunting is
hard.
Being evicted is
harder.
Remember the Rule of Three:
Greenville City Code
says no more than
three unrelated people
can live together in a
house townhouse,
apartment or condo.
For more info contact Student
Neighborhood Relations at 328.2847
mm
Got
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Crossword
ACROSS
1 Mil. branch
4 Of richer
consumers
11 Type of sch.
14 Bandleader
Winding
15 Tobyhanna's
mountains
16 Approx.
17 Bus. Itr. abbr.
18 Dodge model
19 "Miami"
20 Halt!
22 Delhi dresses
23 Colorado resort
24 First of billions
26 E. Lansing sch.
27 Having paddles
28 Sports venues
30 Make a law
32 "Picket Fences"
star
34 Frequently,
poetically
37 Columbus sch.
38 Mathematician
Byron
39 Seller's $
equivocation
40 Can. province
41 Pas' mates
42 Fruity dessert
45 Of an arm bone
46 Itty-bitty
47 Figure out
50 Natl. network
52 Floating ride
53 Bird's crop
54 Bread bit
56 Arp's art
58 Shortened bk.
59 Knitted shoes
61 Taxi
62 Bridge action
63 Le Guin and
Andress
64 Needle hole
65 Religious figs.
66 Boastful people
67 Hrs. of summer
DOWN
1 Hawaiian
guitars, briefly
2 Island off
Pensacola
3 National Historic
Site in Kansas
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10 Snaky shape
11 Episcopal cleric
12 Actor Davis
13 Youngster
21 Kitchen utensils
23 Dyeing container
25 Like an easy
shot
27 Supreme Court
opening month
28 Small bit
29 Car type
31 Ready for the
pitch
33 Stumbled upon
34 Like some
sandwiches
35 Saintly
celebrations
36 Word with sum
or up
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44 Enjoy a book
45 T-X connection
47 Wound covers
48 Planet's path
49 Covers with fat
51 Funt's request
54 Mrs. Dithers of
"Blondie"
55 Yogi or Smokey
57 Aid in
wrongdoing
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To sponsor
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call the
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A7
Friday, September 29
IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS
TH
30CONTA
DENT ACTIVITES
CENT
252-38-96





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
ti
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CHECK OUT OUR NEW COLLECTIONS OF DORM
ROOM FURNITURE AT WALMART.COMC0LLEGE.
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i
,i
to
ii
Pulse
THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28, 2006 PAGE B1
Arts & Entertainment
Horoscopes:
ARIES
You don't have to do everything,
although you think you can.
Share the load and have more
fun. Be a team player.
TAURUS
Follow through on a promise you
made to yourself. If you can't
. think of one, make one now. It
won't be a burden; it'll be an
inspiration. If nothing else, you
will feel much better about it.
GEMINI
If you're smart, and you are,
you're not in this alone. You have
at least one strong assistant. Get
that person to take over some of
the management duties.
CANCER
You have an opportunity now to
greatly enhance your reserves.
Stash away as much as you can.
As you well know, more is better
at least in this case.
LEO
There's no point in sitting around
feeling sorry for yourself. Get
busy and figure out a way to get
back into the game.
VIRGO
Figure out what you really want,
and get rid of a lot of the rest. Be
practical, but allow yourself a few
luxuries, too.
LIBRA
You have a couple of good
ideas, but don't go bounding
off. There's more planning to be
done, if you don't want to race
right off a cliff. And even more
if you do. Don't rush things,
take your time and then make
a change.
SCORPIO
You don't have to do without for
long, you can always come up
with another source of revenue.
Don't tell anybody about it.
SAGITTARIUS
You exude trustworthiness, and
that's partially why people often
ask you taintervene and help
them to decide. Tell them the
truth, not what they want to hear.
It's your duty.
CAPRICORN
Pick each step carefully, as you
climb up to the top. Even an
impossible dream is achievable,
this way. Keep your objective
in mind.
AQUARIUS
The reason people like to do
things for you is obvious. You're
always available to them when
they need assistance. What goes
around comes around.
PISCES
If at first you don't succeed,
don't turn around and give up.
Ask again, and again, and again.
Eventually, you'll wear them
down or get where you need to
be to succeed. There is an old
saying that goes like that
Local Concerts:
Perpetual Groove will be
performing tonight, Thursday,
Sept. 28 downtown at the Red
Rooster.
Staind, along with 3 Days Grace,
Black Stone Cherry and Breaking
Benjamin will be performing at
the Alltel Pavilion in Raleigh on
Sunday, Oct. 1 at 3:30 p.m.
On Saturday, Oct. 14, Toby Keith
will be performing at the Alltel
Pavilion in Raleigh at 7:30 p.m.
Mendenhall
Movies:
Pirates of the Caribbean
Dead Man's Chest
Wednesday 927 at 7 p.m.
Thursday 928 at 9:30 p.m.
Friday 929 at 7 p.m.
midnight
Sunday 101 at 7 p.m.
An Inconvenient Truth
Wednesday 927 at 9:30 p.m.
Thursday 928 at 7 p.m.
Friday 929 at 9:30 p.m.
Sunday 101 at 9:30 p.m.
Butt-Numb-A-Thon
24-Hour Movie Marathon:
Saturday 930 to Sunday 101
From noon to noon
Fall movie preview
Ferrell GyitenXaal Hoffman latifah Thompson
Stranger
than
Fiction

Htrtm Ofc hrn mtl to gt hrtid.
WILLMFS M I TH
All you could ever want
of horror, drama, action
and comedy
KORRI-LEE SMITH
STAFF WRITF.R
With summer coming to an
abrupt end, many people will soon
have to find other enjoyable activi-
ties to embark on that don't require
the heat of the sun. If anyone is left
wondering what they can do tor
fun, I come with answers. This
fall, movie lovers everywhere are
sure to be satisfied.
Fortunately, filmmakers have
provided a wide variety of movies
from which we may select. This
season will provide audiences
with a great deal of horror, drama,
action and comedy. The Guardian,
School for Scoundrels, The Grudges,
Marie Antoinette and Stranger than
Fiction are just a few of the titles
viewers can keep an eye out for.
Coming out this Friday, The
Guardian plans to attract the
public with a few big names and a
substantial amount of action and
adventure. In the movie, Kevin
Costner plays a renowned Coast
Guard rescue swimmer who is
reassigned to teach at the Coast
Guard A School.
While at the school, Cost-
ner's character meets an arrogant
rookie played by Ashton Kutcher.
Together, the two men discover
the true meaning of courage and
sacrifice.
Also coming out Friday, School
for Scoundrels features a notorious
comedic cast. In the film, Jon
Heder (Napoleon Dynamite) enrolls
in a class to help build up his
confidence. His teacher, Billy Bob
Thornton, utilizes some eccentric
techniques to get his many points
across. When the two men dis-
cover they both have eyes for the
same girl, a battle of charm and
deception ensues.
For those of you who loved the
first installment of The Grudge,
the second should prove to be a
worthy sequel. This time around,
Sarah Michelle Gellar returns
for only a short appearance.
In her place, Amber Tamblyn
becomes the new target of the
terrifying supernatural curse
plaguing Tokyo. The film plans
to explore the dark secrets of the
grudge and possibly put an end to
the terror.
On Oct. 20, the historical
drama portraying the life of
Marie Antoinette will hit theatres.
Kirsten Dunst plays France's leg-
endary teenage queen who took
the monarchy by storm and played
by her own rules.
The life of Marie Antoinette,
perhaps one of the most misunder-
stood historical figures, is sure to
be an interesting tale of conspiracy
and scandal.
On Nov. 10, Will Ferrell
returns to the big screen in, you
guessed it, a comedy. In Stranger
than Fiction Ferrell plays Harold
Crick, an unsuspecting character
whose liff is mirrored in a book
of fiction. Finally aware of the
circumstances, Harold must find
a way to change the ending of the
book before his fate matches that
of fiction.
So as we say goodbye to
summer, let us all welcome the
new wave of motion pictures.
Though our outdoor fun is
snatched away before our very
eyes, perhaps we should all say
"thanks" to the land of Hollywood
for not allowing boredom to com-
pletely take its toll. If all is well
in the world; may the movies we
watch this year sustain us until
next summer.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Celebrity profile: Kate Winslet
Sean Penn as Willie Stark who overcomes all to be the Louisiana governor.
'All the King s Men
deserves movie royalty
Brilliant acting makes
movie a must-see
BEN HARRIS
STAFF WRITER
Thank God summer is over!
As summer winds down and the
fall movie season begins, studios
usually bring out What they con-
sider their Oscar heavyweights.
These movies feature the best
acting, the best plots and the best
direction. Just as nature enthusi-
asts notice leaves disappearing
from trees, moviegoers notice
the disappearance of big-budget
effects that thrive during the
summer months as studios take
advantage of children being out of
school and vacationing, and work
toward making the majority of
their annual money.
I don't know if I could take
one more weekend of computer-
animated animals and their wacky
shenanigans. To celebrate the
beginning of this most glorious
part of the year, brilliant direc-
torwriter Steve Zaillian, who
previously wrote screenplays
for Schindler's List and Hannibal,
brings us All the King's Men.
This film is based on the
Pulitzer Prize winning book of
the same title written by Robert
Penn Warren. This great piece
of literature was in itself loosely
based on the life of Louisiana
Governor and United States
Senator Huey "Kingfish" Long.
The movie centers on Willie
Stark, a terminally corrupt and
extremely charismatic individual
who overcomes all odds to be
governor of Louisiana. One thing
I definitely like about the movie is
that it is pretty straightforward.
It chronicles the rise and fall
of Stark from beginning to end
with very little of that flashback
nonsense that I loathe so much.
Stark, played by the absolutely
brilliant and fire-tongued Sean
Penn uses strong-arm tactics,
such as bribery and blackmail, to
achieve his political gains. Poor
old Louisiana. It seems as if the
good old boot-shaped state can't
catch a break when it comes to
political corruption.
Stark starts off as just a
pawn to the higher ups who
want him to split the white vote.
Of course, Stark learns of this
and so begins his glorious cam-
paign to pull the rug out from
under the feet of his opponents
and win the governor's seat.
Many of Stark s speeches are
powerful, and are without a doubt
where Penn's talent really shines.
He really turns himself into Stark
and ceases to be Sean Penn at all.
For a moment I actually consid-
ered signing up to help Stark on
his campaign after the movie. I
then realized that Willie Stark
isn't real and I felt pretty embar-
rassed. It must have been the form-
aldehyde from all of the old people
sitting near me because honestly I
think I was the youngest person in
the theater by at least 700 years.
Stark's tactics of course earn
him many enemies and very few
friends in the Louisiana state
government. He out corrupts the
most corrupt people in the coun-
try. Nevertheless, he remains very
popular with the common voter.
As bad as he is about morals,
Stark is truly a people's politician.
He says what the people want to
hear and he says it very well. He
reminded me of a little guy in Ger-
many from about 60 years ago.
All the King's Men also focuses
on Jack Burden, played by nanny
see KINGS MEN page B3
The actress with talent
of titanic proportions
JENNY AYERS
STAFF WRITER
Were you aware that Kate
Winslet has been in over 15 movies
since her Titanic days, that she is
the first actress to be nominated for
four Oscars before the age of 30, or
that she was deemed "Blubber" as
a school girl? Neither was I, until
I realized that there is a lot more
to this 31-year-old British actress
than her riveting deliverance of
the line, "I'll never let go, Jack. I'll
never let go
Winslet's career was beginning
while most of us were still waiting
on puberty's first attacks. Her first
show biz gig was at the age of 11
in a cereal commercial that sparked
her interest in the business and
inspired her to take acting lessons.
She would later receive formal
training at a performing arts
high school where she appeared
in several plays and even snagged
a few roles in TV sitcoms. Her
first film was Heavenly Creatures
in 1994, which was by no means
a blockbuster but a nice first step
into the world of film. It was this
break that set Winslet's journey in
full motion.
Shortly after the film, Winslet
landed the part of Marianne Dash-
wood in Ang Lee's Sense and Sensi-
bility (1995). This film won Winslet
nominations for Best Supporting
Actress from both the British
Academy Awards and the Oscars.
In 1996, she appeared in Jude and
Kennth Branagh's Hamletwhich was
the first full-length film version of
the play and the second lengthi-
est major Hollywood production.
Kate Winslet, international movie star, in her new movie, All the Kings Men.
We all know what comes next:
James Cameron's Titanic in 1997.
Winslet's first dip into the "block-
buster" category in the form of
Rose DeWitt transformed her into
an international movie star. With
a nomination for Best Actress for
this film, she became the youngest
actress to ever receive two nomi-
nations from the Academy.
After the giant success of the
film, Winslet was offered amazing
roles in films such as Shakespeare
in Love and Anna and the King but,
desiring not to be typecast into a
specific character, Winslet turned
down the offers. Instead, she went
after independent, intriguing
productions that were barely blips
on the map compared to the vast
response to her previous film.
Over the next several years,
Winslet appeared in many lower
scale films such as Hideous Kinky
and Holy Smoke. However exciting
and suggestive these titles may
sound, their box office bank was
anything but.
Finally, one of Winslet s artis-
tic projects grew into a suc-
see WINSLET page B4
Valiant Thorr plays at Red Rooster
Valient Thorr played at the Red Rooster Sept. 27. The East Carolinian had an exclusive interview with the group
about the show, their lives and their music. To hear the podcasted interview, visit theeastcarolinian.com.






PAGE B
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
TV on the Radio's
'Cookie Mountain'
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 20Off.
Mark A. Ward
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Board Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
Traffic Offenses
Drug Offenses
DWI
State & Federal Courts
252.752.7529 Visit our website at www.mark-ward.com
Scissor Sisters to
release new album
Is Ta-Dah the next retro
masterpiece of our
time?
JOHN BOSCO
STAFF WRITER
There's always been a giant
debate amongst music lovers con-
cerning whether or not the 1980s
ruined music.
To be more specific, a lot of
people think that the 1980s new
wave sound that introduced syn-
thesizers and danceable grooves
in popular music were responsible
for theatrical, oddly-hairstyled
whiners to be artificially deep, and
worse - in the public eye.
While this might be a highly
debatable topic, it's true that new
wave introduced a lot of new ideas
to musicians.
On the Scissor Sisters' new
album, Tii-Dah, you can hear the
retro stylings that ring a common
bell with music from the 1980s -
from Boston to Flock of Seagulls
and even beyond.
While Ta-Dah isn't exactly
full out rock music, it also isn't
straight new wave, and it doesn't
really sound like a lot of today's
indie music.
Interestingly enough, the best
comparison I can think of would
have to be Paul McCartney's
post-Beatles work and the album
features a track entitled "Paul
McCartney
Maybe one of the best tracks
on this album, "Paul McCartney"
features a smooth sounding, slap-
bass line that sets a funky tone and
then comes in with a cool horn
section and a very, very disco feel.
Throughout the album, lead
vocalist Jake Shears successfully
manages to create interesting (to
say the least) arrangements that
fit well with the band's disco, glam
rock and pop influences.
On the track "Intermission
music legend Elton John ;s noted
as a contributing musician.
My favorite song has to be
the opener, "I Don't Feel Like
Dancin It has a clean guitar and
layered piano intro build-up to a
great, hooky chorus of, "I don't
feel like dancin dancin This
track is sure to stick with you all
day long.
Other notable songs on this
album include "I Can't Decide"
and the album's last song, "Every-
body Wants The Same Thing
which does a good job of closing
up the rest of the album.
Overall, the Scissor Sisters'
new album, Ta-Dah, sounds fresh
and new, but it's not something
that I especially consider better
than average or something that
stands out among the rest of this
year's releases.
For more information about the
Scissor Sisters, log onto their Web
site scissorsisters.com to sample
tracks and read a brief biography
Grade: B-C
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
LOST-
DELaptoJ&n Black
Bookbag - 7.50.00 Reward for
Return antfe
Call 252 - 37!
Brooklyn art-rock trio
avoids sophomore slump
LLOYD NEWMAN
STAFF WRITER
As they say, you have your
whole life to write your first
record and only two years to write
the second. Perhaps this is why
we, as a culture of music listeners,
have come to expect great band's
releases to be weaker the second
time around, eschewing the very
last shred of logic.
However, it might be because
the doubters are proven right
repeatedly with bands such as the
Strokes, Interpol and most recently
the Yeah Yeah Yeahs. These artists
have all delivered fantastic debuts,
only to follow up with records
that were undoubtedly inferior.
So, imagine the heat on the
Brooklyn-based trio TV on
the Radio. Their 2004 debut,
Desperate Youth, Blood Thirsty
Babes, earned them the coveted
Shortlist Music Prize, a spot
atop countless year-end best-of
lists and praise from the holiest
of holies, namely David Bowie.
The band responded this
month with Return to Cookie Moun-
tain and now a week into its release,
it's clear that this record not only
meets the high expectations set
by their debut but it exceeds them
in nearly every way imaginable.
The album gets off to a great
start with "I Was a Lover a track
that takes the kind of toyish beat
you'd expect to hear pounded
into the tables in a high school
cafeteria and juxtaposes it with
skittering, synthesized strings
and a looped horn squawk. The
song is a great example of the
"neo-shoegaze" the band has
ONE MONTH
Walk-In Customers Welcome
become known to define, creat-
ing a cacophony of noise by track
endings not using live distorted
guitars but instead with samples
and loops. It's a fascinating sound
and one that is distinctly TV on
the Radio during a musical era not
known for its distinctness.
Cookie Mountain hits its peak
a short time later with "Wolf
Like Me a track that will surely
contend for single of the year. At
its core, it's a love song that slyly
makes a metaphor of a werewolf's
primal instincts. "Charge me your
day rate I'll turn you out in kind
When the moon is round and full
Gonna teach you tricks that'll
blow your mind sings front man
Tunde Adebimpe. It's an almost
lustful song, it's lyrics played
against an up-tempo beat and
fuzz-bass line that lends the track
a sense of urgency and importance.
The band rarely falters here.
"Hours" keeps things moving
with a rolling, reverberated drum
beat and mysterious vocal cues
that reflect on the inflation of
self-worth and commerciality,
while songs like "Province" and
"Dirtywhirl" explore a more play-
ful side that comes as a welcome
break from the intensity of some
of the record's heavier tracks.
Simply put, TV on the Radio
has avoided the sophomore slump
in a big way, and in the process has
maybe created the best record of
2006. It's refreshing to finally see
a band do it like everyone thinks
it should, using their growth and
maturity as artists in the years
since their debut to craft some-
thing truly superior.
CradezA ,
This writer can be contacted at
pulseGtheeastcarolinian.com.
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
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KINGS MEN continued from Bl
Jude Law, as Jack Burden who is a newspaper reporter as well as campaigner,
guru Jude Law. Burden is a
newspaper writer who basically
becomes Stark's partner. Burden
is in charge of the Boss's smear
campaigns as well as other
endeavors such as blackmailing
senators and other respected
citizens. Burden manages to
bring two of his friends into his
tangled web of corruption. Anne
Stanton, played by the underrated
Kate Winslet, and Adam Stanton,
played by Mark Ruffalo.
Stark, always on the lookout
for bed partners, starts a relation-
ship with Anne. This ultimately
proves to be his undoing as it
causes rifts between him and
Jack, as well as between him and
Anne's troubled brother Adam.
The acting in'the film was noth-
ing short of incredible.
As glorified in the preview,
the movie boasts many Academy
Award nominees as well as win-
ners. Like 1 stated earlier, and
like you should've read because
no one starts an article in the
middle except Gene Simmons, but
that's another story entirely, Sean
Penn's acting is perhaps the most
brilliant and illuminating perfor-
mance that I've seen all year.
He brings his character to
the screen with such ferocity and
dedication and you actually cheer
for Stark even though you know
how evil he is.
Jack Burden is brought to life
by a better than average perfor-
mance from Jude Law. I still don't
like Law because I'm convinced
he is still a horrible actor and I'm
sure he smells like Gak.
Kate Winslet, while I consid-
ered her character under used,
does the best she can with what
she has. It is because of her and
Martin Scorcese that I have lost
any confidence in the Academy
Awards. She should've won at
least once.
Mark Ruffalo, whom 1 haven't
really had any exposure to, pres-
ents himself very well as a trou-
bled man fighting his inner strug-
gle between right and wrong.
Patricia Clarkson, James Gan-
dolfini and the always excellent
Anthony Hopkins make up the
other important players in the
story. Clarkson comes off great as
the head of Stark's growing club
of mistresses. By growing club, I
mean Stark makes Wilt Chamber-
lain look like Mr. Rogers.
Gandolfini plays Lt. Gov.
Tiny Duffy, although he can't
manage to shake off his mob char-
acter from the Sopranos from his
character, he still gives an average
performance and provides some
humor. Hopkins is great as Jack's
father figure Judge Irwin. Now
there's a man who actually earned
his Oscar instead of buying it.
and Kate Winslet as Anne Stanton.
Lately this movie has been get-
ting a lot of flack from my fellow
movie reviewers.
I'm here to tell you that what
they say is a full load of platypus
dung. Honestly, what does Luke
Y. Thompson of E! Online know?
About as much as Paris Hilton
knows about nuclear fusion.
Seriously the guy works for E!
Online think about it. All the
King's Men proves itself as a very
worthy movie. It is perhaps one
of the most accurate adaptations
of literature that I've ever seen.
The acting, the scenery and the
direction should make this film a
formidable Oscar and box office
contender.
The story of the movie pro-
vides a very clear and admirable
message to never sell out yourself
or your friends and no matter
how honorable, manpower always
corrupts.
I only had one problem with
the film and that is that in certain
points it becomes slightly tedious
and a tad too preachy. I expect
this film to make $15 million
opening weekend with maybe $60
million total gross.
Overall Grade: A-
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
itSr:
er
org
4 i
Minority Student
Leadership Conference
Saturday, September 30, 2006
8:30am
Mendenhall Great Rooms 1, 2, & 3
with Keynote Speaker
Jeff Johnson
(BET's Cousin Jeff)
Conference Schedule:
Registration
Session 1, 2 & 3
Lunch
Keynote Speaker
Roundtable Discussion
$5 Registration Fee
For more information in regards to the Minority Student Leadership Conference visit the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center or visit us on the web at:
www.ecu.edulwcc





PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
WINSLET
continued from Bl
cess. Her role alongside Jim
Carrey in 2004s Eternal Sunshine
of the Spotless Mind rewarded her
with a fourth Oscar nomination
and an unexpectedly warm recep-
tion from the critics. A string of
films followed, including Find-
ing Neverland costarring Johnny
Depp.
This year is one of Win-
slet's most fruitful with her
appearing in four movie pro-
ductions, Little Children, All the
King's Men, Flushed Away, and
The Holiday are Winslet's latest
projects. After witnessing a very
entertaining and interesting
trailer for The Holiday, I expect
this one will go down as one of
Winslet's more successful movie
outcomes.
In this romantic comedy, two
women with guy problems swap
homes in each other's countries for
a "holiday where they each meet
a local guy and fall in love. With
Winslet, Cameron Diaz, Jude Law
and Jack Black on the cast, there
are bound to be enough laughs
(and eye candy) for everyone to
appreciate.
While she may be easiest
recalled for her role in one of
the most romantic movies of our
time, it's easy to see that Titanic
was not the pinnacle of Kate
Winslet's success. With many
film titles in her repertoire and
many more on the way, this is one
captain who certainly did not sink
with her ship. But as soon as they
cast her in a sequel to the flick,
we'll know that her acting days
are done.
This writer can be contacted at
pulset heeastcarolinian.com.
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THURSDAY SEPTEMBER 28, 2006 PAGE B5
ECU's Inside Source
92 j Allison has eves on the prize
cored by ECU's M
Points scored by ECU's
football opponents through
four games in Skip Holtz's
second season as ECU head
coach
170
Points scored by ECU's
football opponents through
four games in John
Thompson's second season
as ECU head coach
.250
ECU s winning percentage
after four games (1-3), who
are joined by UAB, UCF
and Marshall in Confer-
ence USA's East Division
1
2
Consecutive games that
senior cornerback Kasey
Ross has recorded an
interception
33
Time it took Ross to record
two career interceptions
throughout his career prior
to his current two-game
streak
5
Fumbles recovered by ECU
in 2005, which was the
lowest total since the school
starting keeping records
in 1966
6
Fumbles recovered through
four games in 2006, three
of which are by sophomore
linebacker Van Eskridge
7
TH
National ranking in sacks
allowed per game (.75),
ECU has only given up
three sacks in four games
Road games won by the
volleyball team who has lost
to Virginia (3-1), Charlotte
(3-1) and Tulane (S-O) away
from home
14
Assists per game averaged
by the volleyball team
compared to theiropponents'
13.8 per game average
12.8
Assists per game average
by senior setter Heidi Krug,
which ranks second in C-
USA
0
Amount of meets that the
cross country team has
hosted at Lake Kristi so
far, which will change on
Saturday when ECU runs
in the McAlister's Deli
) Invite
Bye week in ECU football's
12-game schedule which
was mandated by the NCAA
two years ago
Aundrae Allison stares down West Virginia's Quinton Andrews after shaking him during the first half. Allison scored on the 47-yard touchdown catch before jumping in the endzone.
Allison on quest to
achieve team and
personal goals
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
A season ago, Aundrae Allison
set as one of his goals, to break
school records for receiving yards,
receptions and touchdowns. Mission
accomplished. Allison shattered the
ECU mark for receiving yards with
1,024, becoming the first receiver in
school history to top 1,000 yards.
His five 100-yard games was also a
school record and his 83 receptions
were second only to Terrance Cop-
per's 2003 total of 87. This season,
Allison has set more goals, and
Head Coach Skip Holtz is hoping
the talented senior achieves them.
"Aundrae certainly has goals
said Holtz. "I think he's come back
more determined and more focused
Allison's goals were evident at
ECU's August media day when he
wore a pair of shoes with the objec-
tives inscribed with a Sharpie.
"I wrote all the seniors on there
because the seniors are the leaders
of the team and two rings because
that's important a conference
championship ring and a bowl ring
said Allison. "Personally, I wrote
the Biletnikoff Award, but that
works hand in hand with winning
Allison was the leading
receiver for the Pirates during
their season-opening 28-23 loss
at Navy, catching six balls for 86
yards. Two weeks ago in the win
over Memphis, Allison hauled in
nine passes for 124 yards and a
touchdown. Last week the 6-foot-
1 senior caught four balls for 54
yards and ECU's lone touchdown
as he played with "Supa Star"
shaved into his hair. So far this
season Allison has totaled 19
receptions for 264 yards and a
pair of scores. Personal achieve-
ments are secondary to Allison,
however, as he said he'd "take a
win over a 200-yard day any time
"1 did decent, but overall, the
job wasn't done Allison said
following the defeat at Navy.
"We came up five points short
Allison was sort of an unknown
coming into 2005, but made his
name known quickly when he
caught 10 balls for 163 yards in the
season-opening win against Duke.
Everyone knows about him now.
He was a preseason all-conference
and ail-American selection, and he
knows he will be double-teamed,
but that should open the field up for
ECU's other talented receivers.
Bobby Good and Phillip Henry
emerged as playmakers last year and
the addition of freshman phenom
Jamar Bryant gives quarterback
James Pinkney all the confidence
he needs to put points on the board.
"It's just a blessing for me to
have guys like that Pinkney said.
It didn't take the Pirates long
to go Allison's way this year.
Pinkney's first pass play against
Navy was an incomplete wide
receiver screen to Allison. The
second time Pinkney went Allison's
way; it was a 10-yard pickup for
a first down. Allison's 26-yard
reception in the second quarter
ignited the ECU offense and led
to a short Chris Johnson run and
a 14-7 ECU lead.
His 47-yard strike last week
against the Mountaineers tied the
game at 7-7 in the second quarter.
Allison knows that defenses will
key on him more this year, but isn't
worried because of the depth the
Pirates have at wideout.
"It gives James more confidence
back there Allison said. "Hecanjust
sit back and pick the defense apart
Pinkney is completing nearly
60 percent of his passes for 1,046
yards with five touchdowns and
lour interceptions.
Good knows the talent the
Pirates have at wideout.
"If Aundrae can't get open, we've
got other guys who can step up and
get open make plays Good said.
Those other guys have stepped
up. In ECU's first two games
Pinkney connected with nine
different receivers in each game,
with Allison not being one of
those recipients in the loss at
UAB. The signal caller hit eight
different receivers against West
Virginia and six versus Memphis.
"I think the receivers have
really showed up and played well
Holtz said. "With the way so many
guys are playing so well, James (
feels very comfortable taking what '
a defense gives you. It's not 'Look
for Aundrae nor when you are
calling plays are you saying put
Aundrae in the slot and run him
up the field to get Aundrae the ball.
You are now saying this is where
Aundrae is, but there are definitely
guys now on this receiving corps
that can make some things happen
Phillip Henry is second on the
team in receptions for the Pirates
with 15 for 226 yards.
"Jamar Bryant and Davon
Drew are two guys that add to an
already very strong corps. Jamar
Bryant has had a good camp. I
think Jamar Bryant is very physical
and probably has some of the best
hands out of all the receivers. He's
a great athlete. He's gonna have a
great career here
Bryant, a freshman from Rich-
mond County, has eight recep-
tions for 82 yards. Drew, who was
recruited as a quarterback after
leading New Bern to consecutive
state title appearances, was moved
to tight end for his junior year and
has hauled in eight balls for 93
Allison concentrates as he hauls in a 40-yard catch against Memphis.
yards and his first career touch-
down at UAB.
The unselfish Allison wel-
comes the influx of talent, know-
ing he's not the only playmaker
the Pirates have on offense. This
doesn't bother him one bit.
"I know for a fact that those
guys will be there for the team
and pick up the slack if I get double
or tripled Allison said. "I'm just
looking forward to seeing those
guys make plays and showcase
what they can do
Briefly touted as a Heisman
candidate in 2005, Allison is on the
watch list for the Fred Biletnikoff
Award, given to the nation's best
receiver. The senior communica-
tion major said he does not pay
attention to personal accolades.
"I don't really keep track of
those, but most of those guys are
exceptional athletes and to even be
mentioned with those guys is an
honor Allison said. "My personal
goals are not really something I'm
focusing on. I'm just trying to be
there for the team and hopefully
they'll take care of themselves. The
more wins we get, the better it will
be for me to achieve my personal
goals. We're not gonna give up.
We still got conference games and
those critical games against Vir-
ginia and N.C. State. Wejust gotta
buckle down and get better
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
The East Carolinian staff
football predictions
Gilmore
6-4
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
see PREDICTIONS fage B7
OPINION
Bye game comes
at a perfect time
Open date will help
players recuperate,
nurse injuries
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS KD1TOR
Walking off the practice field,
Mike Hanley is often confused
with an assistant football coach. He
wears the newly adopted Nike gear,
roams the sidelines on Saturdays
and has constant interest from play-
ers seeking attention and guidance.
However, Hanley s job descrip-
tion is much different that the
coordinators setting up cots in film
rooms while arguing X's and O's.
As the head athletic trainer, Hanley
diagnoses. He fixes. He heals.
Throughout this week and into
the next, Hanley's staff is charged
with triaging players, recuperating
their injuries and putting them back
into purple ECU jerseys.
Orlando Farrow. Wendell
ChaVis. For ECU Head Coach Skip
Holtz, the laundry list of wounded
players never seems to end. Bran-
don Setzer. Shauntae Hunt. All
starters on the defensive side of the
ball, all four wore bandages and
braces while watching from the
sidelines against West Virginia.
They can only hope for a prognosis
of probable or even questionable as
turned ankles, torn knee cartilage
and a torn Achilles stand in the way
of their contribution. For seniors
Farrow and Hunt, the mirage
of playing professional football
becomes muddled with each game
on the sideline.
It's the name of the game in
college athletics.
"The chance of having your
starting 11, you're really not going
to have it that often said ECU
defensive coordinator Greg Hudson
at a recent practice. "Its battlefield
promotions
On the other line of scrimmage,
see OPINION page B6





PAGE Be
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
THURS
Wake Forest adjusting
to role as favorite
PREI
After Ben Mauk went down in the first game, Riley Skinner has led Wake Forest to three consecutive wins.
(AP) Aaron Curry is trying
to convince his Wake Forest team-
mates that the unbeaten Demon
Deacons are actually winless.
"We find a new point to prove
every game the Deacons line-
backer said Tuesday. "It may be
ridiculous, but we come up with
something so we don't go, 'Hey,
we're 4-0 and everybody's going
to lay down for us I tell them
we're 0-4, just go be 1-4. Any-
thing crazy just to get everybody
focused, chop everybody back
down so we don't get too high
Picked in the preseason to
finish last in the ACC's Atlantic
division, Wake Forest is instead
off to a 4-0 start for only the
fourth time in school history and
first since the 1987 team won its
first five games and finished 7-4.
The Deacons are looking for their
first five-game winning streak
since 1992 this weekend, when
they are sure to be a heavy favorite
against Division I-AA Liberty.
Coach Jim Grobe said the task
of keeping the Deacons grounded
would be much tougher if his play-
ers weren't among the most experi-
enced and mature in the conference.
"The tendency is always to feel
like you've arrived Grobe said.
"We've got a lot of work to do to
be a good football team. Com-
placency is something you battle
when you have early success.
That's an issue, no question
That's why Curry is playing
mind games with his teammates.
"When you're the underdog,
it gives you a reason to prove
everybody wrong Curry said.
"But when they favor you, it's kind
of weird. So as a team we just try
to avoid all that stuff. We play like
we're the underdog every game
No matter what happens
against Liberty, it's likely Curry
won't have to pretend when No.
18 Clemson visits Winston-Salem
the following weekend, a matchup
in which the only unbeaten team
left in the ACC's Atlantic Division
will return to its familiar role as
an underdog.
Running back De'Angelo
Bryant said an inexperienced team
might not handle the increased
attention as well as Wake Forest's
experienced roster. No ACC team
returned more starters from last
season than the Deacons' 18.
"What comes with winning is
publicity Bryant said. "We have a
lot of veteran guys who know how
to accept that role now. I really
think this team is more focused
and more goal-oriented (than any
other) since I've been here
And more successful.
"Everybody's remained
humble, because we don't want
to be too high on ourselves or too
high on each other Curry said.
"You just want to stay at the same
pace. Right now, I think we're at
a pretty good pace. Things just
keep getting better and better by
the week
OPINION
continued from B5
the list continues Paul Walsh
Drew Sutton. Three quarters of
the scholarship running backs
are injured. Norman Whitley had
shoulder surgery Dominique Lind-
say is patiently waiting on a torn
MCL to heal, still unsure whether
hell still contribute or be able to
apply for a medical redshirt.
Chris Johnson has to rest his
turf toe that prevented him from
playing more than a quarter against
W VI). With two yards rushing in
the first half against WVU, injuries
severed any ability to establish a
solid rushing attack and put the
offense in a vulnerable one-dimen-
sional state.
"You look at the injuries we
have on this team right now said
Holt?, following a recent practice.
"We've got a number of them I'm
not trying to make excuses because
people have to step up and injuries
are part of the game, but when
you start looking at the defensive
front and the running back situ-
ation, we'u- had some injuries
Following the 27-10 physical
loss to WVU, the team is more
nicked up than ever.
"Everybody has a ding right
now Hudson said. "I'm sore from
guys jumping on my back and knock-
ing me around We're all sore right
now and you're going to le sore until
December. That's part of the game
The soreness might subside
with the open date, which gives
players two days away from football
to rest, both mentally and physi-
cally. Players wnO live within driv-
ing distance have the opportunity
to see their families for a weekend
for the first time since fall camp
started in early August
It will allow the coaches a fifth
game film on the evolving Virginia
team. AI.Groh has used three
quarterback thus far and seems to
have found one in Kevin McCabe,
but the game film against Duke
will confirm or deny Groh's faith
in his young signal caller. It also
provides the ECU coaching staff
more evidence of Virginia's nuances
and habits in different formations.
Scouting has become such a dis-
tinct science that each repetition
becomes ammunition for the oppos-
ing teams. Knowing personnel will
help ECU become familiar with
an opponent they haven't played
since the Pirates embarrassed the
Wahoos 61-10 in 1975.
Holtz summarized having an
open date four games into the 12
week schedule.
"I'm excited about the open date
where we can get some of these
bumps and bruises healthy and kind
of get healthy again going in the
second part of the season
That is, if Hanley can work
his magic.
This writer can be contacted at
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ft!
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B7
PREDICTIONS
Biddix
I 5-5
Graham
3-7
Jackson
5-5
continued from B5
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
Johnson
6-4
Sirkin
3-7
Clements
5-5
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
SOUTH CAROLINA"
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
see PARKS page B8
Build
froi
Bridges
ast to your Future!
Are youlcolleEIT&ud&nt in Greenville? Then you need to check this out!
We're hav& our 85ttranniveiary celebration and you're invited! Saturday night, Octo-
ber 1st at 7:3Qp.mwewill kick the weekend off with a worship service that you will
not forget. SCTfe Elyferw featured speaker for the evening. He is culturally relevant
and dynamically gifted, and he will challenge you. We'll follow up the Saturday night
event with a Sunday service beginning at 10:30 a.m. on September 31st. The house is
going to be full so jriime a tittle early. Finally, lunch will be served on the grounds im-
mediately following the morning service. If you are looking for good food, forget eating
out. This is the place you want to be. Sounds interesting, doesn't it?
Come out and join us for the celebration where we are building a
bridge from our past to your future! For directions call 252-765-3315
qjBP
Free Food after flie Service
Steve Ely
(Guest Speaker)
National Youth Pastor
for IFHC Churches
Youth Pastor
Ben Speermen
Go to greenvillefirst. org for more info
first Pentecostal
holiness church
GREENVILLE, NORTH CAROLINA






t
PAGE B8
Brunswick County teen's
passions: faith and football
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PARKS r
continued from B7
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 28, 2006
Open 7 days a week for
Lunch and Dinner
(AP) Less than 2 hours
after tucking away his cleats and
West Brunswick High School
football uniform, Brandon Rankin
goes to church.
His pastor, Emily Howard,
thinks of him as a junior deacon.
"He does whatever you need
for him to do she said.
On Saturdays, Brandon mows
the church lawns, then rehearses
the music for Sunday services.
Church is his only serious
interest besides football.
He plays the keyboard, organ
and sometimes the drums, and
occasionally sings during services
at Emmanuel Sounds of Praise
Pentecostal Fellowship Minis-
tries. The senior has been doing
it since age 12 or 13 around
the same time he first went out
for football. "It just came to me
naturally, just like football he
said of his musical abilities.
"Brandon has a gift said his
mother, Rosa Hill. "He never took
music lessons because I couldn't
afford it
Football limits his practice
time at home, yet he is a team
player off the field as well.
"We had an organ in church
and nobody to play it he said.
"I told him to get on the
keyboard Howard said. "The
Lord told me to put him on the
organ
Undaunted, Brandon obliged
and learned to play by ear.
"I just pick it up from listen-
ing to different people who play
he said. "I just play by what I
hear
He also picked up pointers
from Angela Thompson, who
plays the organ when Brandon
doesn't. "I just watch how she
plays he said.
Brandon's grandmother,
Addie Rankin, wishes he could
do more in the church, but foot-
ball season cuts into his religious
activities. Brandon is part of the
church's worship team, consisting
of a keyboard player, drummer
and two singers. Like a defensive
unit on the gridiron, his wor-
ship team practices on Saturday
afternoons.
"He does a little bit of every-
thing his grandmother said. "If
you want to do something, the
Lord will find a way for you to
do it. He keeps the church grass
cut and things like that. We miss
him when ball season .comes in
because we don't see him as much
on Tuesdays and Fridays Rankin
had no idea Brandon possessed
musical talents.
"God just anointed his hands
to play the organ she said.
On the gridiron, often the
only sound opponents hear are
footsteps.
Brandon, a defensive end,
delivered what he called his best
hit last season when he drove
South Brunswick quarterback
Austin Stiller into the turf just
as he released a pass during the
Trojans' 88-9 victory.
"He jumped in the air, and I
just hit him Brandon said. "That's
the hardest hit I can remember
The force of the contact led to ,
an interception.
A combination of power and
speed make Brandon a disruptive
defender. At 6-foot-S, 23 pounds,
he runs 40 yards in 4.fi6 seconds
and bench-presses .115 pounds.
N.C. State and Appalachian
State are among the college
programs to contact him. He's
being recruited as a pass rusher,
although he has played linebacker.
"I think he could be the best
player in our league said West
Brunswick coach Jimmy Fletcher,
a former East Tennessee State
assistant. "I've told a lot of college
scouts that
Growing up, Brandon wasn't
interested in football, preferring
toy trucks and basketball. He only
went out for the sport in his final
"She's a very
successful
-black woman
Togathar we can tamp
our prajudica. It only takaa
ona voica to make a
difference. Find yours at
www.freedomcentar.org
FREEDOM CENTER
year of middle school after seeing
how much fun his brother, Lamar
Hill, had while playing linebacker
for the Trojans.
"The first time I went out on
the field during practice, I imme-
diately liked the hitting Brandon
said. "I got an adrenaline rush.
The sport just came naturally
to me
West Brunswick is attempt-
ing to get Brandon to try out for
basketball, but he's not interested
in other sports.
When asked what he would
do if he wasn't playing football,
he replied he didn't know
"Football has just carried me a
long ways he said. "I don't know
where I'd be without football
Both his mother and pastor
suspect Brandon would be OK.
"When I pull up on Sundays,
Brandon is already at the church
Howard said. "He greets me and
takes my bags into the church. He
is always there, every Sunday
Parks
6-4
Auburn
Rutgers
Tennessee
Georgia Tech
Ohio State
Southern Methodist
Rice
Oregon
Purdue
Alabama
SOUTH CAROLINA
SOUTH FLORIDA
MEMPHIS
VIRGINIA TECH
IOWA
TULANE
ARMY
ARIZONA STATE
NOTRE DAME
FLORIDA
DALE'S
INDIAN
CUISINE
o
Lunch Buffet
11:30-2:30PM
Dinner
5:00 - 10:00PM
Sat & Sun Brunch
12:00-2:30PM
We cater all
occasions,
big or small
10 Student
Discount with ID
419 Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 252-551-3253
Fax: 252-551-3252
Cell: 919-601-1562
DalesIndianCuisine.com Email: psingh@tandoorinrtp.net
WWW.THEEASTCAR0LINIAN.COM


Title
The East Carolinian, September 28, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1924
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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