The East Carolinian, August 21, 2006












EastCarolinian
VOLUMEJtrlSSUE
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Today in
ECU History
Students were studying
for a spelling test?
Originally, all students
who entered East
Carolina Teachers'
Training School were
given a spelling test on
the first Saturday of the
fall semester. Students
who correctly spelled
90 out of 100 familiar
words were excused from
further spelling work.
Those who did not pass
the test were required to
take spelling for one term,
or longer if necessary.
greenville
' riverrock
festival
Greenville hosts first-
ever RiverRock Festival,
as well as four benefit
concerts prior to
the eventPage B9
Will Skip Holtz' Pirates
start the 2006 season
off with a bang?
Check out the special
football preview page to
find out if our experts
expect a season
opening road win
over Navy. PageBI
STj 2 3 8 4 96 74 9 7 6 5 2 1 3 83 6 8 1 9 7 2 4 5
7 3 6 4 2 5 1 9 88 2 4 9 7 1 5 6 39 5 1 6 8 3 4 7 2
2 4 97 158 3 6
6 7 32 8 9 3 4 65 1 4 7 2 9
8 5 1
Test your skills at
SuDoKuPageB14
Mon Aug 21
Scattered T-Storms
85772
Tue Aug 22
Scattered T-Storms
83772
Wed Aug 23
Mostly Cloudy
87772
Thu Aug 24
Scattered T-Storms
90771
Fri Aug 25
Scattered T-Storms
89773
NEWSPage A3
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SPORTSPageBI
OPINIONPageA5
COMICSPageB14
CLASSIFIEDS Page B14

ECU to offer online teaching degree opportunities
Online learning provides
students with flexibility
in their learning schedule
CHRISTOPHER STEVENSON
STAFF WRITER
The College of Education will
soon be offering online teaching
degrees for students who have
finished their general education
requirements at any N.C. commu-
nity college.
The program is designed to
offer prospective teachers an
opportunity to get a degree within
their home communities.
Students will be able to get
online degrees in elementary edu-
cation, special education-general
curriculum and middle grades
education with math and science
concentrations.
This online degree program
will be through Wachovia Partner-
EXCLUSIVE
Students will now be a ble to earn degrees in elementary, special and middle grades education online.
ship East and classes will be taught
be ECU faculty.
Some experts feel there is a
need for more teachers.
"Data from the N.C. State
Department of Public Instruction
shows that 10,000 new teachers
are needed per year, and N.C. col-
legesuniversities graduate about
3,500 of which about 2,500 go into
teaching in N.C said Dr. Vivian
Martin Covington, director of
the office of teacher education at
ECU.
ECU is trying a new tactic
in response to the need for more
teachers, and online learning gives
students flexibility in their learn-
ing schedule. Students will be able
to access this program from any
where in the state.
"We will be helping to recruit
teachers from areas that may have
been traditionally underserved,
and people in those areas can fulfill
their desire to become teachers
with the access this program will
provide Covington said.
Covington said about 50 per-
cent of the students currently
enrolled in their programs is con-
centrated in the site-based model
of teacher assistants. ECU hopes to
get the same level of interest, if not
see TEACHING page A8
Mendenhall gets murals
The murals, which took six weeks to complete, span five walls, and add a burst of new color to Mendenhall's Destination 360.
Colorful addition to Destination
360 painted over the summer
STAFF REPORT
Former ECU student Daniel Krochmalny
was contracted by Campus Living to paint two
murals inside Mendenhall Student Center over the
summer.
The murals, which span several walls and depict
various architectural structures around campus
and Greenville, were added to Destination 860 in
Mendenhall to make the area more interesting.
"Students were complaining that the walls
were so white said Joyce Sealey, director of Dining
Services.
Krochmalny, 27, attended ECU for one semester
as an art major in 1998. He also briefly attended
Lenior Community College, but did not graduate. 1 le
considers himself mostly self-taught, but credits his
high school art teacher in Kinston, N.C for sparking
his interest in painting.
Krochmalny was recommended for the
The murals depict various architectural structures
id campus and Greenville.
see MURAL page Al
BACK TO
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EASTCAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER6
MONDAY AUGUST 21, 2006
Sexual assault
not a big
problem' at ECU
Prevention key in
keeping students safe
VANESSA CLARKE
STAFF WRITER
Though the rate of violent
crimes across the country is
steadily decreasing, college
women are at a disproportionately
higher risk for sexual assault and
rape than women in any other age
category, according to the U.S.
Department of Justice.
In a typical academic year
as many as 3 percent of college
women across the country report
surviving a rape. This, accord-
ing to the survey done by the
National Institute of Justice, does
not include summer semesters, a
time period that sees increased
incidences of rape.
The problem of campus rape
has been garnering quite a bit
of attention over the past few
months, due to the alleged inci-
dent at nearby Duke University.
The debate that raged and even
now continues to smolder over
nearly every aspect of the case
leads to a couple of questions. How
big a problem is sexual assault at
ECU? And what is being done to
protect students?
Statistics released by the ECU
Police Department show that for
the most recent year available,
2002, there were two on-campus
and two off-campus forcible sexual
assaults of students in a campus
population of 15,018.
These statistics show that
though sexual assault is a huge
concern at ECU, that it is not as
prevalent as some of the other
universities.
Sgt. Amy Williams Davis, the
crime prevention sergeant for the
ECU Police Department, agreed.
"It's really not a big problem she
said. "However, we do not want it
to become a big problem
Still, there are quite a few
campus resources when it comes
to educating students, faculty and
staff about sexual assault and also
for assisting victims of this kind
of assault.
One of these programs is the
Rape Aggression Defense course.
Davis introduced this program
to ECU during the fall 2005
semester.
"Basically, RAD is just a self-
defense class for women to defend
themselves from an attacker
she said.
The 12 hour class attempts to
provide the women who attend
the class with both information
and hands-on techniques that
may help save their lives during
the "various types of abductive
encounters perpetrated against
women Davis said.
Even though, statistically,
men are at less risk of a sexual
assault than women, Davis said
that ECU plans on introducing
the RAD program for men.
"It's just because men are vic-
tims of crime, usually from male
attackers she said.
The class will be separate
from the women's class and will
concentrate mostly on male on
male assault
Davis also advised students
to take advantage of the other
resources on campus.
"It's all about prevention as
well she said.
To prevent sexual assault at
home, the occupant should lock
the windows and doors, close the
blinds and arm the alarm system,
see ASSAULT page A8
Brody School of Medicine sponsors children's camps
Camps focus on having
fun, making friends,
maintaining health
CLAYTON BAUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Brody School
of Medicine held its annual
camps this summer for kids with
various ailments
and diseases.
Sponsored by
the Division of
Pediatric Hema-
tology and
Oncology at the
Brody School of
XiMHMj r" Medicine, the
camps focus spe
cifically on children who are
afflicted with chronic illnesses
camps tms sum
LtB
EAST
CAROLINA
such as cancer, hemophilia and
sickle cell disease.
According to information
on the ECU pediatrics Web site,
Camp Rainbow began in 1982
as a one-day event for kids with
hemophilia and cancer to come
together.
Since then, the event has
expanded dramatically into a
weeklong event with nearly 100
campers in attendance each year.
Camp Hope, which is much
like Camp Rainbow in princi-
ple, is held every year as well
for children that are suffering
from sickle cell disease. Sickle
cell disease is a disease in which
red blood cells cannot carry
oxygen very fast, which causes
those with it to tire more
easily and may involve physical
pain as well.
According to the ECU
pediatrics Web site, Camp Hope
began in 1991 with 49 campers
and is held at Camp Don-Lee on
the Neuse River.
The camps offer attendees a
wide variety of activities to partici-
pate in, including sailing, canoe-
ing, swimming (lessons adapted
for handicapped), arts and crafts,
music, campfires, nature and spe-
cialized support and educational
sessions.
"We've made really good
friends there and will keep in
touch for years to come, so it's a
really good place and program
they have set up there said Lucas
Waniewski, junior criminal justice
major.
Waniewski's brother Evan
suffers from hemophilia, which is
defined as any of several heredi-
;
tary blood-coagulation disorders
in which the blood fails to clot
normally because of a deficiency
or abnormality of one of the clot-
ting factors.
"He's met other kids that he
has things in common with and
thanks to the advancement in
technology today, he's been able to
keep in touch with them and make
new friends across the state said
Waniewski.
Evan, who is 16 and has
attended the camp since he was
eight, said, "It's a really cool place
and 1 really liked it
Both Camp Hope and Camp
Rainbow lay out its mission
goals on their respective Web
sites stating that the camps are
intended to instill self-confidence
and independence, along with
emotional and social develop-
ment and well being. The camps
also aim to teach kids to learn
and share support with others
who are living with a chronic
disorder.
Camp Don-Lee is located
on the Neuse River near Arap-
ahoe, N.C. According to the
Web site for the camp, donleecen-
ter.org, the camp has its services
firmly rooted in the Christian
faith, stressing fun and enjoyment
in a spiritual environment.
In charge of the programs
supporting both of these camps
is Jacquelyn P. Sauls, Rainbow
Services Director. For more infor-
mation on these camps, Sauls may
be reached at 252-744-4676 or by
e-mail at Saulsj@ecu.edu.
This writer can be reached at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
I





PAGE A2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006

Didn't tell him about the stacks and
stacks of used books that saved them money. Didn't
mention the fast-moving lines or the fact that there are
real people to talk to at U.B.E. So now his "mates" are
out celebrating with the book money they saved.
He's alone, without so much as a molting macaw.
Scallywags! Arrrrg!
WIN A VERA BRADLEY
COLLECTIBLE! During August 17-31,
register at U.B.E. to win a Vera Bradley "Miller" bag.
No purchase necessary. Two bags will be given away
in drawings to be held September 1.
EXTENDED BOOK RUSH HOURS
819 - Saturday
9 a.m. - 6 P.M.
820 - Sunday
1 p.m. - 6 P.M.
821 & 822 - Monday & Tuesday 9 a.m. - 9 p.m.
823 & 824 - Wednesday & Thursday 8 a.m. - 9 p.m.
825 - Friday
9 A.M. - 7 P.M.
826 - Saturday
9 a.m. - 6 P.M.
827 - Sunday
1 P.M. - 6 P.M.
828 - 831 - Monday - Thursday 9 a.m. - 8 p.m.
U.B.E. MORE USED BOOKS FOR LESS.
Uptown Greenville 516 South Cotanche Street www.ubeinc.com 758-2616
Briefs
T





,2006
i
1
News
Campus & Community
MONDAY AUGUST 21, 2006 PAGE A3
Today in ECU History
Students were studying for a spelling test? Originally, all students
who entered East Carolina Teachers' Training School were given a
spelling test on the first Saturday of the fall semester. Students
who correctly spelled 90 out of 100 familiar words were excused
Briefs
Fall Semester Begins
Classes for fall 2006 will
begin Wednesday, Aug. 23
for students.
ECULoessin Playhouse
Presents
Chicago
October 5-10, 2006
Based on the play Chicago
by Maurine Dallas Watkins.
When two murderesses
have been jailed, they
compete.for the atten-
tion of the press and their
lawyer. Add to this a cast of
characters and a dazzling
score; you have Chicago
and "All That Jazz with
music by John Kander and
lyrics by Fred Ebb.
Hedda Gabler
November 16-21, 2006
Employing methods
that virtually defined the
modern psychological
drama, this masterpiece
reveals the conflicts and
emotions that lie below
the surface of daily life.
Was it murder or suicide?
Originally by Henrik Ibsen,
the adaptation is presented
by Christopher Hampton.
Gray Gallery Alumni
Exhibition
The Wellington B. Gray
Gallery will host the 2006
Alumni Exhibition, "Bring-
ing it All Back Home The
exhibition is scheduled
for Sept. 6 and will run
through Oct. 7. This also
becomes an early kickoff
for the ECU centennial
celebration. There is a sym-
posium planned for Sept.
14 and 15, beginning with
a keynote speaker and an
opening reception for the
alumni exhibition.
Students phst and
present are invited,
as well as the public.
Questions and concerns
can be directed to Susan
Nicholls at nichollss@ecu.
edu or Gina Cox at
coxg@ecu.edu.
Mendenhall Art Exhibit
Beginning on Tuesday,
August 1 and ending on
Thursday, August 31, 2006
in Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery, ECU
students will share their
experiences from a
summer art education
program with an art exhibit
and public lecture. ECU'S
School of Art and Design
sponsored a program in the
summer of 2006 in
the Italian cities of Pistoia,
Florence and Rome for
20 students to study art
and art education. Stu-
dents from the School of
Art and Design, the School
of Communication and the
Department of English
participated in the pro-
gram. Participants will
share their experiences
through an art exhibition
at the Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery Aug.
1-31. There will be a
corresponding public
lecture at the Greenville
Museum of Art on Aug.31
from 6:30 p.m. -7:30 p.m.
Contact: Cynthia Bick-
ley-Green 328-1293 or
bickleygreencc@ecu.edu.
18fri 19sat 20sun 21mon 22tue 23wed 24thu
Art education exhibition
Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery
ECU students share
their experiences from
a summer art education
program in Italy.
Pitt County Citizens
Academy registration
Apply by Aug. 25
First-ever civic program
designed to educate
citizens about County
government. Will meet
on Tuesday evenings
for two to three hours
beginning Sept. 26
through Nov. 14. Cost is
$25, participants must
be at least 18 years old.
Contact Nancy Wilson
at (252) 902-3106 for
more information.
Carolina Skies
Astronomy Club public
stargaze
Bradford Creek
Soccer Field,
Old Pactolus Road
8 p.m. -11 p.m.
For more information
call (252) 258-4827
or visit http:csac.
weseestars.org
Campus Ministries
Interdenominational
Services
Mendenhall Student
Center, Room 244
11 a.m.
Work-Study Job Fair
Joyner Library
1 p.m3 p.m.
ECU Idol
Where: Hendrix Theater
When: 8 p.m.
Want your event
included on the commu-
nity calendar?
E-mail news@theeast-
carolinian.com with
"calendar" in the sub-
ject line.
Submissions must be
received by 5 p.m. on
Sunday to run the fol-
lowing week.
The East Carolinian
reserves the right to
edit submissions for
brevity and content.
Part-time Job Fair
Where: Mendenhall
Student Center, multi-
purpose room
When: 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
Pirate Palooza:
MTV's DJ Skribble,
Unity Step Perfor-
mance, Fifth Genera-
tion and the ECU Idol
Winner will provide
entertainment from
the center stage, while
activities like laser
tag, mini golf, bouncy
boxing, 'slide for tuition
and walking the plank
take place on the field.
Where: Dowdy Ficklen
Stadium
When: 7 p.m. - 11 p.m.
Classes Begin!
Healthy Pirates
Welcome Day
Wright Plaza
10 a.m2 p.m.
Sports Official
Interest Meeting
Student Recreation
Center, Room 238
5 p.m.
Welcome Back Cookout
Ledonia Wright Cultural
Center
4 p.m. -6 p.m.
Buddy:
An independent film
presented by the Mag-
nolia Arts Center, for
more information visit
magnoliaartscenter.com
Underground Cinema,
Jefferson Blount Harvey
Building, 330 S. Evans
St. 7 p.m.
Sports Official Interest
Meeting
Student Recreation
Center, Room 238
9 p.m.
WELCOME BACK TO SCHOOL
A Fresh
Face for Fall
INTRODUCING
New campus-relevant content
Teasers for an inside look
A redesigned, user-friendly layout
Sudoku puzzles for your enjoyment
Community Calendar news space
!fl EastCarolinian
m. ECU to uflrr iKiliiK- Inching (h-grvc npfKirtunitirn
Mendenhall gets murals
Hnxly S him! ni Medicine mormon hfldran'i craw
90771- . ' '
89773-
5tra
Pick us up every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday!
Briefs
Local 'Champions of Change
in Medicine' recognized
An ECU physician who's led
efforts to deliver health care to
underserved populations and a
program to help children manage
their asthma have received a state-
wide honor.
Dr. Thomas G. Irons, ECU
associate vice chancellor for
regional health services and a
professor of pediatrics at the Brody
School of Medicine at ECU, and
Pitt County Memorial Hospital's
pediatric asthma management
program have each been named
as a "North Carolina Champion of
Change in Medicine
"I'm of course honored, but
mostly thankful to have so many
great people to work with said
Irons. "I don't feel like I have done
this myself, but that I have been
privileged to help bring institu-
tions and the community together
around the health needs of our
neighbors. I believe deeply that
one must lead from the posture of
service and am especially grateful
to East Carolina University for
making it possible for me to serve
in this way
Irons, who heads the East-
ern Carolina Community Health
Consortium, has worked with
individuals and organizations,
including PCMH, to look for ways
to address the needs of people
in Pitt County who lack health
insurance, access to health care
i-r both. One result of those efforts
exists today as HealthAssist, a
project that started after Hurri-
cane Eloyd in 1999 made obvious
many shortcomings in health cart-
access in eastern North Carolina.
HealthAssist provides primary
care for uninsured residents of Pitt
County using volunteer and paid
providers. In addition, enrollees
receive care coordination, access to
affordable therapeutic drugs, links
to social services, mental health
care, computer skills courses,
GED classes and other training.
Another project Irons has
led is the 15,000-square-foot,
$2.8 million James D. Bernstein
Community Health Center under
construction north of Greenville.
There, full-time and volunteer
health care professionals will pro-
vide primary care, dental care and
pharmacy services for low-income
people in Pitt and surrounding
counties. Irons estimated the
center will see 20,000 patients
annually within five years. The
center will also host educational
programs involving ECU and Pitt
Community College.
PCMH's pediatric asthma
program began in the mid-1990s
as a way to help children learn how
to manage their asthma to reduce
school absences and emergency
department visits due to asthma
attacks. The program has been
funded by the hospital and The
Duke Endowment. Three case
managers work with children
through the program.
Since the program began, more
than 2200 children have been
seen, inpatient hospital admissions
of pediatric asthma patients have
fallen 71 percent, inpatient costs
for pediatric asthma patients have
dropped 56 percent and emergency
department visits by pediatric
asthma patients have fallen by 22
percent. Anecdotal evidence says
school absences have also been
reduced, said Lisa Johnson, who
oversees the program.
Irons was interviewed July 26
on the UNC-TV program "North
Carolina Now An interview with
Johnson or another representative
of the pediatric asthma program
will air on an upcoming edition
of the program.
The Champions of Change was
a statewide competition corre-
sponding to the upcoming national
PBS program, "Remaking Ameri-
can Medicine slated to air in Sep-
tember To parallel the profiles in
the national series, UNC-TV, the
state Area Health Education Cen-
ters, the North Carolina Institute
of'Medicine and the group Healthy
Carolinians launched a statewide
search for people making a differ-
ence in North Carolina health care.
The NCIOM selected the winners
from a slate of nominees.
More information about the
Champions of Change project is
available at unctv.orgncram.
Radio show returns to Pirate
Radio
The East Carolina Alumni
Association will begin the second
season of A Pirate's Life for Me!
Saturday, Aug. 5 on Pirate Radio
1250 and 930 AM. This half-hour
radio program features inter-
views with ECU alumni who are
making a difference in their pro-
fession or community. Upcoming
guests include former U.S. Senator
Robert Morgan '47, James May-
nard, Co-Founder and CEO of
Golden Corral restaurants, Julie
Berry '03 of CBS's "Survivor Vanu-
atu and Dan Neil '82, Pulitzer
Prize winning columnist of the
L.A. Times.
Tune in Saturday mornings
at 10 a.m. throughout the fall on
Pirate Radio 1250 and 930 AM
for these alumni interviews and
more. To view the upcoming guest
schedule and learn more about the
East Carolina Alumni Association
visit PirateAlumni.com or call
800-ECU-GRAD.
Secretary Lisbeth Evans
Will Speak at ECU Tourism
Conference in October
Lisbeth C. (Libba) Evans,
secretary of the North Carolina
Department of Cultural Resources
will be among the featured speak-
ers at ECU's "Making Tourism
Work for You II" Tourism Confer-
ence on October 26-27, 2006, at
the Hilton Greenville.
Ms. Evans was named to the
post by Governor Michael Easley
in January 2001. As secretary,
she has oversight responsibil-
ity for the N.C. Museum of Art,
N.C. Museum of History, State
Historic Sites, N.C. Symphony,
N.C. Arts Council, State Library
and Archives and Records, among
others. She led the state's highly
successful First Flight Centen-
nial Celebration in December
2003, an event that was publicized
around the world. She serves on
the boards of Golden L.E.A.F
Inc Second Harvest Food Bank
of Northwest North Carolina and
Wake Forest UniversityBaptist
Medical Center. She is also on
the Board of Trustees for Wake
Forest University and the Board
of Trustees for the North Carolina
School of the Arts.
Along with Ms. Evans,
the "Making Tourism Work for
You II" Tourism Conference will
present speakers who are nation-
ally known in the fields of tourism,
marketing, and branding. Break
out sessions will carry a strong
"marketing tourism" theme. The
two days will offer learning and
networking opportunities for
business owners, travel and tour-
ism professionals, art and cultural
organizations, local community
leaders and others interested in
economic growth and develop-
ment.
Your partnership is welcome
through sponsorship and par-
ticipation. To register, please
visit the conference's Web site
at ecotourism.ecu.edu. For fur-
ther information on the confer-
ence, please contact Maria Allen
at ecutourism@ecu.edu or call
Ms. Allen at 252-328-4969. For
information on tourism education
at ECU, contact David L. Edgell,
Sr, PhD, director of the Institute
for Tourism at East Carolina Uni-
versity at edgelld@ecu.edu or call
252-328962. j





PAGE A4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 81, 2006
Plunge
,ntoPmMJE
Plunge into Purple: Calendar of Events (First three Weeks of Welcome)
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
Introduction
WEEK
AUG.
13-19
WEEK 1.
AUG.
20-26
WEEK 2
AUG. 27-
SEPT. 2
Ham
Campus Ministries:
Christian
Interdenominational
Service (MSC 244)
2:45pm
Freshman
Convocation (Wright)
4pm-6pm
Explore ECU in 3D
(Bate)
6:30pm
Sorority Convocation
Recruitment (Wright)
9pm
Swash Improv (Wright)
9:30pm
VH1 Best Week Ever
(Wright)
12pm
Sorority Bid Day
(MSC Brickyard)
10:30am
Foreign Language
Placement Test
French (Bate 1031)
German (Bate 1032)
Spm
ECU Idol (Hendrix)
Sorority Recruitment
llam-lpm
Part-Time Job Fair
(MSC MPR)
7pm-11pm
Pirate Palooza
(Dowdy - Ficklen
Stadium)
Sorority
Recruitment
CLASSES BEGIN
10am-2pm
Healthy PIRATES
Welcome Day
(Wright Plaza)
5pm
Sports Official
Interest Meeting
(SRC 238)
THURSDAY
3:30pm-4pm
FX Family Meetings
6pm-6:30pm
FX Floor Meetings
9pm-12am
FX Pirate Mixer
(Intramural Fields)
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
9pm
Sports Official
Interest Meeting
(SRC 238)
FRIDAY
9am
Leadership
Symposium
12pm
Luncheon
(MSC Great Rooms)
9pm-12am
FX Takes The Rec
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
7pm-10pm
BandWeepies"
(MSC Brickyard)
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
Sorority
Recruitment
SATURDAY
5:30pm-7:30pm
MSC Cookout
8pm-11pm
"Set Sail"
(SRC)
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
Sorority
Recruitment
5pm
Flag Football Team
Registration Meeting
(MSC Social Room)
Spm
IM Sports Captain's
Certification
(MSC Social Room)
12pm-2pm
Transfer Student
Day (TSA)
4pm-5pm
Learn to Drive:
Note Taking
(Bate 2015)
4pm-6pm
Welcome Back
Cookout (LWCC)
9pm-2am
Mendenhall-
Activities
5:30pm
ECU Football
(Away)
ECU vs Navy
9pm-2am
Mendenhall
Activities
10am
NFL Pick 'Em
(SRC 207)
4pm
Freshman Commuter
Kick-off for CAR
(MSC Social Room)
6pm
National Pan-Hellenic
Meet the Greeks
(MSC Social Room) A
Weeks of Welcome (WOW)Eight weeks of non-stop, participate 'till you drop, so much fun you might pop, help your academics reach the top activities.
All events will require your 1 Card and will be free unless otherwise Indicated. All dates and titles subject to change.
For more information, contact 252-328-9928 or find us
online at www.ecu.educs-studentlifeplungeintopurple
I
Freshman Cinvocation
Tomorrow Starts Here.
Sund.iy, August 20th it am
2:45pm in Wright Auditorium

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9pm Wright Auditorium,
ECUs finest improv.
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the steoe uncut, uncentored end
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VH1, Best Week Ever
9:30pm Wright Auditorium
All the sarcasm, insanity, and fun you know from the TV
show wul be live and on stage at Wright Auditorium. For more
information please call the Student Union at 328-4715.





1, 2006
MONDAY AUGUST 21,2006 PAGE A5
imon
Not just for Pirate Rants
LETTER FROM
THE EDITOR
Welcome back!
Or just welcome, if you're a new
student and, well, glad you're still
around if you, like me, were stuck in
Greenville this summer
Quite a bit happened, so if you weren't
around, let me get you up to speed. I
officially became the new editor-in-
chief here at the East Carolinian, as
Jennifer Hobbs, your beloved editor-
in-chief from last year packed her
bags and went to California for most
of the summer. ECU appointed an
interim vice chancellor of Student
Life, an arrest was made in relation
to the Clement Hall fire, the campus
network shut down for a bit
never mind, I can't possibly recap
everything, go browse the Web site,
theeastcarolinian.com, to read about
what happened.
In addition to all the headlines, we
here at the East Carolinian have
some news of our own. As I'm sure
you've noticed, the paper underwent
a redesign this summer. We've added
some new features and retained some
old favorites to bring you a newspaper
customized for your life, full of the
information that you need to know as
part of the campus community.
You'll also notice that the acronym
TEC has been banished from
our pages (with the exception of
your Pirate Rants). Your campus
newspaper is the East Carolinian, not
"the TEC from here on out. For one,
"the TEC" is redundant, but more
importantly, it risks confusion with
N.C. State's campus newspaper, the
Technician. Would you want to be
confused with State? Exactly.
More great things are still to come,
so keep reading and we'll keep you
up to date! Also, keep checking our
Web site for campus news, as the
paper won't be printed again until
September.
Until then, have fun getting
readjusted - GO PIRATES!
Sincerely,
Sarah Bell
Editor in Chief
Wfcr(?E THE GENERATION OF THE FUTURE,
PETE'S SAKE! IT WOULDN'T HURT
YOU ID PONPEI? A SERIOUS ISSUE
ONCE IN A WHILE!
TAKE.RDREXAMPLEiTHE mo
CJONHTROVERSIAL QUESTION naOBLFMi
of WHEN LIFE ACTUALLY "vi.
PEONS! r f
?
I&U HAVE THE ANSWER? WELL, KEEP
US IN SUSPENSE NO LONGER, OW ,
EXALTEP DUDE OF ENLIGHTENMENT
LIFE AiS WE KNOW tT BEGINS AT
THE START OF FOOTBALL SEASON
Welcome to East
Carolina, and your
new Opinion page
ELIZABETH LAUTEN
OPINION EDITOR
I've been out of the East Carolinian's, loop for
the past few years, so when the situation presented
itself to be the new Opinion's Editor, I jumped on it
quickly. The East Carolinian has not had anyone in
this position for years, so get ready for some changes.
Of course, we'll be keeping the beloved Pirate Rants,
but the page is in for a face lift so keep reading in the
weeks ahead to see how things shape up.
Along with the new Opinions page comes the
new semester, and these first few weeks rank among
the most interesting of the entire school year. If
you're a freshman, there are some strong odds in
your favor of making one of the typical freshman
blunders, such as "walking into the wrong class
Of course you will have no idea of this error until
fifteen minutes into the lecture when the professor
is handing out a syllabus. The real test comes to you
then, when you have to make the choice whether or
not you sink back into your chair for the remain-
ing thirty-five minutes or if you have the guts to
stand-up and go and search for your actual class.
But don't worry, I did it too my freshman year and
it wasn't until the professor asked me about "conju-
gated denies" and "UV spectroscopy" did 1 realize I
was sitting in Organic Chemistry II making a fool
out of myself amongst seniors, and yet I lived. It's
memorable mistakes such as this, which help bring
humor to our lives, or at least other's.
It is also in these first few weeks where you will
say your name, hometown and major so often that
you actually feel like the diched "broken record
After a while you can't help but wonder if anyone
is listening or if they're just mindlessly asking you
the details of your life, as they've been asked so
many times themselves. But roll with it, and don't
be afraid to talk to anyone and make new friends.
The happiness of any college student can be rooted
to the friends that they keep, and in college, friends
can be found in the most unexpected places.
Don't be afraid when a professor tells you that
you're going to need three hours of studying outside
of the class for every hour spent in the class, you'll
quickly realize that's not triie (for most classes
anyway.) Of course after being here a few years I've
learned that it's the smart thing to do. Do yourself
a favor and at least spend some studying through-
out the semester, instead of trying to cram month's
worth of information into a few nights during exam
week. You'll thank me later.
No matter what year you are, do what makes you
happy. Get involved on campus, because while you
may not have to, being part of the bigger picture is
what makes your time at ECU worthwhile.
Don't be afraid to change your major just because
it's your junior year. As a Classical Studies major, my
fifth major for all of those keeping score at home,
it took me some time to realize what were my true
passions, and I couldn't imagine doing anything
else now.
So bring on the new semester! The friends who
will last for a lifetime, the nights you'll never forget
and the ones you'll never remember, the days of
obsessive away message checking, and the oppor-
tunity to build yourself a future in just a few short
years. Welcome to ECU.
Sarah
Editor in
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
I
Bell
Chief
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Sarah Cambell
Asst. Features Editor
Sarah Hackney
Head Copy Editor
Elizabeth Lauten
Opinion Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TECprints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the
summer. "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board
and is written by editorial board members. TECwelcomes
letters to the editor which are limited to 250 words (which
may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed
and include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information.
One copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
PIRATE RANTS
I wonder if someone's ever cracked their
knuckles so hard that they broke a finger.
I'm sure it's happened and the only thing
I can say to that person is "Wow. That
sucks
Sorority "recruitment" has begun.
Someone save us all, they're cloning again!
Hello, welcome to college for the first
time. Some of you just came here to
party. You probably won't be back in
the spring semester. Have mommykins
and daddykins get you an application
for McDonald's back home. You'll be
needing it.
TEC doesn't censor rants. You have
freedom of speech, which is the freedom
to say what you want and not to say what
you don't want. TEC has these rights too.
Furthermore, once you give TEC a rant,
it's not yours any more (TEC makes this
very clear on their submissions page.)
TEC is not taking away your freedom of
speech, it's just exercising its own.
I recently had the opportunity to climb
the new Alpine Tower located just off
of Blount field complex. All I can say is
WOW.
How do you get writer's block when
you're only trying to write Pirate Rants?!
Please make the feminists go away!
Women are for cooking, cleaning and
making babies and I am a woman. I
like catering to my boyfriend's wishes.
Why do freshman girls act like they've
been doing the college thing for a couple
years already? Especially at orientation
where everyone is a freshman.
I think our logo of Pee Dee makes him
look a little too French, what with the
mustache and the pouting lips.
I heard there's a new editor for the
paper. Maybe finally TEC will get its act
together. Just like Big Brother, I'll be
watching you.
I'm such a bum in the summer. All I do
is lay out at the pool all day, watch TV all
evening and drink all night. What a life!
I hate freshmen, I hated them when I
was one, and I still hate them go away!
Who says journalists have to see their
name in print to be happy? I'm happy
with just seeing my rant every week!
Why do we need belly buttons anyway? If
Kyle XY can get along fine without one,
well then so can I!
School's here in less than a month and
I still haven't been to the beach. Where
did my summer go?
Hey TEC Did any one of you bother to
actually step outside your social schema
and notice that an ECU alum (Howell
Binkley) won the Tony award for "Best
Lighting Design?" He's been nominated
many times before, and he finally earned
what many in theatre work for. That's a
story worth printing! More often than
not, I hear our own students complaining
about how we don't have anything to be
proud about. How about the fact that
we're considered to have one of the best
theatre programs on the east coast? We
have many success stories you just
have to open your eyes once in a while!
Why do girls in the library have to
dress so provocatively? Not that I am
complaining, but it distracts me from the
work that I should be doing.
I don't know why ECU cares if they're
portrayed as a party school or not. It'd be
awesome to have the best parties and the
best students. So really, they just need
to focus on showing the academic side
more, because I can throw down with the
best of them and still pull the 4.0.
The REC has an amazing effect on me
because I'm not sure whether my eyes or
my body get a better workout, with all the
gorgeous girls that are around and all.
I hate my friends. I think that's bad.
Dear Students, please work extra hard
this weekend at gaining ranks as a
party school once more. I really need
something to do.
"You want some lip chap?"
Why is it that ECU is one of the leading
STD colleges and we have to pay for
condoms, while other universities get
their condoms for free?
My dad looks like Brad Pitt. Is it bad
that I think my dad is hot?
Do yourself a favor and go see live
music!
I open the door for myself, but press the
handicap button for people coming in
behind me. Is that wrong?
Why did they let Saturday morning
cartoons die? It deeply saddens me to
know that my children will never know
the beauty of that art form.
Fresh, clean sheets are the best! I like
need a maid to wash them each night
and put them back on for me. Any
takers?
After I go downtown with my friends
some nights, I can't help but think to
myself the line Deanna Carter made
famous, did I shave my legs for this?
We are getting a dental school Suck it
up Chapel Hill. ECU is on the rise!
One more year of "Let's turn Fifth Street
into MLK One more year of freshman
girls who talk or whisper loudly all the
way through class (shut up already). One
more year of hung over zombies chatting
on cell phones while they slowly stroll
through Wright Plaza. One more year
of tow trucks, roommates and criminal
thugs who have a license to rob while the
authorities only pass out parking tickets.
Just one more year. Jeeeez man, just one
more freaking year.





PAGE Ae
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
FDA chief says medical ideology' led to Plan B decision
Rise of the 'morning-after' pill
The federal government approved sales ol the emergency oral
contraceptive Plan B in 1999, and it went on sale by prescription only.
Sales of Plan B.
in millions
2001 More than 70 health organizations
petition Food and Drug Administration
(FDA) to allow over-the-counter (OTC) sale
2003 Manufacturer asks FDA to approve
OTC sales; FDA advisory panel votes that
Plan B is safe, endorses OTC sales
2004 FDA delays decision in order to
review safety to teens; FDA official rejects
panel's advice, citing concern over teens'
hearth; manufacturer proposes OTC sales
only to women over age 15
Ang. 26, 2005 FDA delays decision
on OTC
July 31,2006 FDA considers OTC sales
to women 18 and older one day before U.S.
Senate hearing on new FDA commissioner
$2.3
"ill
'00-01 '02 "03 '04 '05
-2000 sales wen) $7,000
Source: Reproductive Health Technologies Project, IMS Health
Graphic Helen Lee McComat
MCT
(MCT) Acting Food and
Drug Administration commis-
sioner Andrew von Eschenbach
testified Tuesday that he decided
non-prescription sales of the
emergency contraceptive, Plan
B, should be limited to women
aged 18 and older even though
the agency determined in 2005
that the drug could safely be sold
over-the-counter to 17-year-olds.
Testifying at his nomination
hearing before the Senate Health,
Education, Labor and Pensions
Committee, von Eschenbach said
his decision was not based on
new medical or scientific data or
"political ideology but rather his
own "medical ideology" and his
own interpretation of the scien-
tific data.
After several years of delays,
the Food and Drug Administra-
tion unexpectedly announced
plans on Monday to make Plan
B available without prescription
to women ages 18 and older. Barr
Pharmaceuticals, the makers of
Plan B, was seeking approval for
non-prescription sales to women
lfi and older. Von Eschenbach
testified that the decision to bar
over-the-counter sales to women
younger than 18 "was based
primarily around our ability to
manage" the sales of the drug, but
he did not specify hdw. He also
said input from public-comment
letters helped determine the new
age limit for 18-year-olds, but
again did not explain how. The
FDA did not respond to questions
on these matters.
Von Eschenbach did say that
the age 18 cutoff provides "a
greater safeguard in protecting
and promoting the health" of
young women, adding that it was
similar to age restrictions on the
sale of alcohol and tobacco to
minors. After reviewing previous
studies about the safety of the
drug, von Eschenbach said "I'm of
the opinion that the data is insuf-
ficient to be able to ensure safe and
effective use of this drug by young
women" under age 18 without
medical supervision. In response
to speculation about outside politi-
cal meddling in t he Plan B case,
von Eschenbach said: "No one
told me what I could or couldn't
do. This was my assessment
But Sen. Patty Murray, D-Wash
provided an August 2005 letter
from former FDA commissioner
Lester Crawford that said agency
researchers found the drug safe
and effective for 17-year-olds.
The letter, to officials at a
subsidiary of Barr Pharmaceuti-
cals, said the FDA had "concluded
the available scientific data are
sufficient to support the safe use
of Plan B as an over-the-counter
product, but only for women who
are 17 years of age and older
Murray said von Eschenbach's
decision to disregard that finding
was another troubling example
of the FDA ignoring scientific
data in their regulatory decision-
making. She and fellow committee
member Sen. Hillary Clinton, D-
N.Y have vowed to block a com-
mittee vote on von Eschenbach's
nomination to head the FDA until
the agency makes a final decision
on over-the-counter sales of Plan
B. "This goes to the whole issue
of the crisis of confidence we have
in the FDA in making decisions,
not on behavior, but on science
Murray said.
Sen. Tom Harkin, D-Iowa,
said Plan B is already sold without
prescription in 45 countries to
women of all ages and that U.S.
women should not be treated dif-
ferently.
He said von Eschenbach's
actions and the entire Plan B
controversy were a "disregard for
science for ideological concerns
Deven McGraw, chief operating
officer for the national Partner-
ship for Women & Families,
said von Eschenbach's decision
was very curious. "It makes you
wonder if there's an agenda here
she said. Von Eschenbach said
upcoming talks with Barr would
determine when the agency's final
decision on Plan B is made.
The FDA will soon meet with
Barr to iron out issues concerning
the packaging, distribution and
enforcement of sales restrictions
on the drug. Non-prescription
sales will not be allowed in gas
stations ort convenience stores.
It will only be sold from behind
the counter in pharmacies. Cus-
tomers must show identification
and proof of their age. Barr must
provide the FDA with a plan to
assure that sales restrictions for
minors will be enforced.
Survey questioning can alter
subjects' behavior, study says
(MCT) Simply asking col-
lege students who are inclined to
take drugs about their illegal-drug
use in a survey may increase the
behavior, according to newly pub-
lished findings that are making
some researchers understand-
ably nervous. "We ask people
questions, and that does change
behavior study co-author Gavan
Fitzsimons, a marketing professor
at Duke University's Fuqua School
of Business in Durham, N.C said
Thursday.
The provocative effect, he
added, can be "much greater
than most of us would like to
believe It's not just drug use
that's affected by a researcher's
questions, Fitzsimons said.
People exercised more after
they were asked how much they
exercised. In a follow-up experi-
ment, students who were asked
about skipping classes and drink-
ing cut class more and drank
more. Since the study appeared
A special
ultraviolet camera
makes it possible
to see the
underlying skin
damage done by
the sun. And since
1 in 5 Americans
will develop skin
cancer in their
lifetime, what
better reason to
always use
sunscreen, wear
protective
clothing and use
common sense.
fAADl
1v
AMERICAN ACADEMY
OF DERMATOLOGY
888.462.DERM
www.aad.org
in the June issue of the academic
journal Social Influence, Fitzsi-
mons' research team has fielded
calls from health practitioners
concerned that asking patients
about depression and possible
thoughts of suicide might make
matters worse. Other research-
ers suspect that people polled in
political campaigns become more
politically active.
For their study, Fitzsimons
and co-researchers Patti Wil-
liams and Lauren Block, market-
ing professors at the University
of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia
and Baruch College in New York,
respectively, split a sample of 167
undergraduate students into two
groups.
Those in the first group were
asked how likely they were to use
drugs in the next two months.
Those in the second were asked
how likely they were to exercise in
the next two months. Two months
later, both were asked how often
they'd exercised and how often
they'd used drugs. Students in the
first group said they'd used drugs
an average of 2.8 times. Students
in the second group, who hadn't
been asked about drug use two
months before, said they'd used
drugs an average of 1.1 times.
When it came to exercise,
students who'd been asked earlier
about their exercise plans said
they'd exercised about one-third
more than students who hadn't
been asked. To assemble two
balanced groups, the researchers
initially asked the students about
prior drug use and their attitudes
toward it.
This enabled them to conclude
that the increased use was "only
true for people who were already
predisposed or in the at-risk
group for drug use Fitzsimons
said. "People who never used
drugs just had their negative
opinions cemented Survey ques-
tions still pose some risk, however,
said Williams, of the University of
Pennsylvania. "It's very difficult,
because policymakers still have to
ask these questions but don't want
to cause harm she said. "Anytime
you are asking about risky behav-
iors, there is a chance that merely
asking will activate a positive atti-
tude for those who already have
a positive inclination toward the
behavior Cliff Zukin, the imme-
diate past president of the Ameri-
can Association of Public Opinion
Research in Lenexa, Kan which
sets standards for the field, called
the study eye opening.
He wondered whether college-
student drug use might be easily
provoked, which would suggest that
the effect is milder than it seems.
"Surveys are not designed to
influence behavior added Zukin,
a polling expert at Rutgers Uni-
versity in New Brunswick, N.J.
"But when you talk to people
about a topic, you get them think-
ing about that topic.
ot an Eye for
n?
Call us!
The Office of Student Media is looking
for a part-time meb designer
Call 328-9239 to apply!
FREEp
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There's opportunity hire f.j
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From ECU Campus
543 S. Evans Street
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(252)551-1400
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electronically presented





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A7
TUESDAY
AUGUST 22
2006
part time job fair
Hire a Pirate Program connects
ECU Students with on and off
campus part-time jobs
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
MULTIPURPOSE ROOM
11am - 1pm
H H THE CAREER
carolina CENTER
UNIVERSITY
'Helping Pirates Achieve Success'





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
ASSAULT
continued from Al
if there is one, she said.
Outside the home, ECU offers
a few services to students to make
sure that they make it back to
where they are going safely.
From Sate Ride, a program that
will drive students anywhere on
campus, to Campus Security, and
from the blue light phones, which
will connect the caller to the ECU
police telecommunications center,
according to their Web site.
Also, the ECU Police Depart-
ment encourages students who are
nervous walking back to their cars
to give them a call, even if it is just
to watch them, to make sure they
get back to their vehicles safely.
"The increased police presence
makes people feel safer she said.
Still, even with all of these
precautions, sexual assault is
still a reality for every college
campus, and ECU is no exception.
There are also plenty of resources
on-campus and in surrounding
Greenville for students who have
been victims of sexual assault.
On-campus, there is the
Personal Counseling Services,
which lends emotional support to
the victim. Davis also strongly
urged all victims of rape to get a
check-up from the Student Health
Center, regardless of whether they
know their attacker, to check for
sexually transmitted diseases.
Another key person for the
victim to talk to is Sue Mohan,
a victim advocate. Mohan works
for all victims, not just those
affected'by sexual assault. She
works to help victims through the
lefral process. She is also able to
be there for the victim emotion-
ally, which Davis said was one of
the most important things for a
victim of sexual assault.
All of this plays into what Sgt.
Davis said was the most important
aspect of both the RAD program
and of enduring a sexual assault.
"The point is to increase the
will to survive she said.
This writer can be contacted at
newst heeastcarolinian.com.
TEACHING
continued from Al
more, with the online model.
"Teacher assistants are people
who are vested in their communi-
ties, who know the public schools
in the communities, and who wish
to work and remain in the commu-
nities where they currently work
and live Covington said.
With education students becom-
ing teacher assistants in their home
communities, it is ECU's hope that
some of these students will remain
in their communities and fdl posi-
tions to help alleviate the shortage
of teachers in their area.
ECU's enrollment goal is to
have 20 students per cohort for
special education and 24 students
per cohort for both the elemen-
tary and middle grades cohorts,
which is a total enrollment goal of
68 students per year for the three
online programs.
"We will begin in the spring
2007 with 20 in the special educa-
tion cohort, then add 24 for middle
grades in summer 2007 and 24
in elementary education in fall
2007 Covington said.
This cycle will be repeated on
a yearly basis as long as enrollment
in the programs remains steady.
Concerning the online program,
Covington said, "It is not for cur-
rent on campus students to transfer
into, nor does it serve licensure only
students, second degree students or
lateral entry teachers
Applications are due by Oct.
1 for spring 2007 special educa-
tion applicants; Jan. IS, 2007
for summer 2007 middle grades
education applicants and Feb. 15,
2007 for fall 2007 elementary
education applicants.
Interested applicants should
contact Paula F. Hopper, WPE
Virtual Consortium Coordinator
by e-mail at hopperp@ecu.edu
or by phone at 252-493-7659 for
further information.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
IS COMING
www.buccaneer.ecu.edu
AUDITIONS!
Do you love to sing and perform?
If so, consider auditioning for ECU's all-female a cappella group,
You'll have a chance to perform for alumni, students,
and the community as you sing a variety of music.
Auditions will be held September 5 and 6, 2006 from 3:00 - 5:00 pjn.
at the Taylor-Slaughter Alumni Center. Call the Alumni Association
at 328-6072 by September 4 to schedule an audition time.
AUDITION:
jl Bring completed application form (available at PirateAlumni.com)
jj Bring a copy of your class schedule
Jj Prepare two songs, each representing a wide voice range
CRITERIA:
J52.5GPA
Jj Knowledge of basic music theory a plus
J3 Previous group vocal experience is a plus
J3 Must be willing to commit time and talents
j3 Hardworking and good attitudes are required!
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Additu
for sti
We've Got Your Mail.
If you're living in the residence halls, be sure to tell your friends and
relatives your proper mailing address!
Student's Name
East Carolina University
Residence Hall Name and Box Number
Greenville, NC 278S8-43S3
Family members should be advised to insure valuable packages sent
through the US Mail and hold receipts until you tell them you've
received their package.
If notified that you have a package, pick it up promptly, and let the
sender know you received it. Saying "thanks" sometimes brings you
more goody boxes in the mail!
Questions? Call Mail Services
252-328-6091
We've Got Your Copier.
Looking for a copier or fax?
The Library Copy Center, Basement-300 Joyner
Library, is a full-service copying and faxing
center. Self-service card-reading copiers are
also located in the libraries, some computer
labs, and inside the Student Store. Add cash
to your ECU 1 Card or a CopiServ Card to use
these machines.
(252) 328-2326
Library Copy Center Rapid Copy Central Rapid Copy Brody
Copies Binding Color Copies Transparencies Fax
We've Got Your 1 Card.
How to get a 1 Card
If you are a new student, or a returning student but have lost your ECU 1 Card,
visit the 1 Card Office located in room 101 of Ragsdale Hall. You must bring a
photo identification, such as a driver's license, and current class schedule. There
is a fee of $10 for your first card, or $15 if it is a replacement card. The ECU 1
Card is the property of the university and may not be used by anyone except
the person to whom it is issued.
Linking Funds to your 1 Card
There are a variety of accounts that can be linked to your ECU 1 Card,
including a meal plan, bookstore account, cash-to-card copying funds, and
the Gold Key account that can be used for payment of fees, fines, and
services at various sites on campus.
Need more information?
(252) 328-2015 li) www.ecu.edu1card
101 Ragsdale Hall
H dunntr a ecu.edu
Extended Hours:
Fri Aug. 18:Mon Aug. 21:Thurs Aug. 24:Regular Hours
10 am - 5 pm9 am - 6 pm9 am - 6 pmMon. - Thurs 10 am - 5 pm
Sat Aug. 19;Tues Aug. 22:Fri Aug. 25:Friday: 10 am - 3 pm
10 am- 5 pm. 9 am - 6 pm10 am - 5 pm
Closed SundayWed Aug. 23: 9 am - 6 pm
We've Got Your Snacks.
Vending Machines are located throughout the campus, including all of
the residence halls. You'll find a variety of snacking selections, as well as Pepsi
products, the exclusive soft drinks sold at East Carolina University. Machines
are coin-operated. If you ever have a problem with a machine, call 737-1301.
1 Card CopiServ Concessions Central Stores & Receiving Fixed Assets Mail Services Materials Management
Medical Bookstore Medical Storeroom Rapid Copy Centers ' Student Stores University Printing & Graphics Vending
EAST
CAROLINA
uNivKKsrnr www.ecu.eduservices
We're here to serve you.
We're ECU Business Services.






1,2006
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A9
U
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Piratedrive
vw.ecu.edumcsplratedrlve megabytes of
Tn ECU student, you haveacces0
space on the ECU netwoju can
oaurdows PC connected to
the ECU network.
ACE Program and Support Centers
wvw.ecu.eduace programs require or
A number of ECU s aw hWI aess t0 a
recommend , ha
computer in orde computers, software
provides discount pricing o"c on campus.
and peripherals assistance to the
ItswSrronPACE laptop
OneStop
Jone8top.ecti. everything, you
other useful tools.
rTputing Essentials CD
other free ffiU " can piCk
I on computing roufK
1 5cBrlerdepartm
In ECU'S Dowdy Student Stores
IT Help Desk
www.ecu.edu98e6 technical
answering generaltechno'ogy
for students.
2S2 campus for
SStS more than 70 P re . day. Check
VISLS software and
riSprlnters and scanner.
Teens, young adults making
profession out of pastime
Peter Dietrich poses for photograph
(MCT)Like many teen-
age boys, Sam Suyeyasu spends
three to five hours a day blast-
ing virtual enemies into obliv-
ion with his Xbox. But at least
one thing makes Suyeyasu very
different: He's getting paid.
Under the moniker of "Samu-
rai Suyeyasu and his gaming
team, XiT Wound? travel around
the country and compete for cash
prizes. Throw in the $50 an hour
fans pay him for private lessons,
and he expects he'll clear $'25,000
this year from gaming.
Not bad for a 19-year-old
Califomian who just earned his
high-school equivalency diploma
last year. As video game promot-
ers push for gaming to become
the next big TV spectator sport-
and perhaps even an Olympic
event-more teens are hoping their
in his game room.
video game skills will carry them
to stardom and riches.
Some at the top, like Suyeyasu,
forgo school to establish them-
selves in gaming. "We're building
the next youth sport in the U.S
said Michael Sepso, chief execu-
tive of Major League Gaming,
a New York-based professional
league whose national competi-
tions attract some 1,200 pro
and amateur gamers and 5,000
spectators at a time. "We see our-
selves as the next NASCAR Pro
gamers earn from a few hundred
dollars to six-figure incomes,
depending on their skills.
Winners' pots and sponsor-
ship offers are proliferating,
fed by advertisers anxious to
reach the lucrative and largely
male teen-to-35-year-old market.
Gamers' parents, meanwhile, are
trying to shake off doubts about
their kids making a profession
out of what was once a pastime.
Kay Suyeyasu has mixed feel-
ings about how her son, whose
team is ranked No. 5 in the
nation in the multiplayer combat
game "Halo 2 spends his time.
While she's proud of his suc-
cess, "1 don't like the idea of going
around shooting people A pro
gamer's day may begin in midaft-
ernoon and run until nearly dawn,
which may put a squeeze on those
with classes and jobs. As in any-
thing demanding quick reactions
and hand-eye coordination, young
people hold the advantage.
At 21, Peter "Foulacy" Dietrich
of Palo Alto, Calif, is one of the
older players among Major League
see GAMING page A12
1
if
i
s
I
LI.
.
Don't Forget!
Reserved Textbook Pick-up
is August 19 & 20th!
See your application form for
pick-up location.
Y
STORE HOURS and
BOOK RUSH
PRIZE DRAWINGS
Friday, Aug. 18
7:30 am - 5 pm
Saturday, Aug. 19
9 am - 5 pm
Sunday, AuS- 20
1 pm - 5 pm
Drawing for
DVDVCR Combo
Monday, Aug. 21
7:30 am - 5 pm
Drawing for
lPodNano
Tuesday, Aug. 22
7:30 am - 6 pm
Drawing for
FREE TEXTBOOKS
Wednesday, Aug. 23
7:30 am - 8 pm
Drawing for
All-in-One Printer
Thursday, Aug. 24
7:30 am - 8 pm
Drawing for
Digital Camera
Friday. Aug. 25
7:30 am - 8 pm
Drawing for
Flat Panel TV
Saturday, Aug. 26
11 am-3 pm
Monday, Aug. 28
7:30 am-8 pm
Regular Hours
Monday - Thursday
7 30 am 7 pm
Friday
7 30 am -5 pm
Saturday
11 am - 3 pm
$5 OFF
your purchase of $75 or more!
$5
!i$5
New A USED Textbooks
Course Packs, Study Guides, References
Official ECU Apparel
Art, Computer ft School Supplies
General Reading ft Periodicals
Computer hardware software, and art department metals, special
orders, arid medical references are excluded from this offer Not Mild
in conjunction with any other coiaxm Pncr purchases excluded
COUPON REQUKEO One coupon per person, per visit. Coupon
valid AUGUST I -31,5006
Ronald E. Dowdy
.1
ill
ill
mm
Student Stores
Where your Dollars Support Scholars! : I ,1
i'j
TOLL FREE 1 -B77-W-TOCT I
www.studcntstorcs.ecu.edu : g.
Wrtsht Building- () 328-6731 Broty Building 1S-04 (SM) 744 3450 0
SAVE with our tremendous selection of USED books! And, take an Extra $5 bucks off!
We've Got Your Textbooks & more.
Back-to-Class Specials
Take 25 OFF all regular price
East Carolina apparel & gifts, August 18-25
Daily Prize Drawings, August 20 - 25
GIANT Poster Sale on the Plaza, August 20 - 25
We've Got Your Computer. Your Printer. Your iPod
We're Your Fast Connection to Computer Sales and Service! Call our computer department
with any questions about computing or tech products!
Lenovo (formerly IBM) and Apple academically discounted laptops &
peripherals
Printers, Cables, USB Storage Drives, Surge Protectors, Laptop Book
Bags, iPods
Academic discounts on popular software programs from Adobe,
Apple. AutoCad. Macromedia. Microsoft & others!
Service and technical support
Books & Supplies
Computers & Software
Apparel & Gifts
Dorm Accessories
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wright Building 388-6731 Brody 1S-04 744-3450
toll-free 1-877-499-TEXT wvAv.studentstores.ecu.edu
Prtze drawings held 8KK36 - aVSS06. Entries accepted beginning a1806 One entry per student per day. No purchase necessary Vou need not be present to win Winners must
be currently enroled at ECU and dsplay a vatd ECU 1 Card upon request. Textbook pnze Includes only required textbooks based on schedule at time of verification. I books have
already been purchased at Dowdy Student Store, a store credit wH. be awarded In the amount of the required books. Receipt necessary. books were purchased at another retailer,
student may opt to return books to mat retaHer and receive free books from Dowdy Student Store. Prizes may not be substituted and aU management decisions are Anal.
Owned and operated by
East Carolina
UNIVERSITY





PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
2006 ECU Student
Football Tickets
Beginning August 16, while supplies last, students may purchase
up to two away Navy tickets ($28 each) at the Athletic Ticket Office!
Join the Student Pirate Club TODAY!
Become part of the Team Behind the Teams
For just a $30 annual contribution you
receive the following:
- Student Pirate Club T-shirt
- Priority football tickets and advance pickup
-Option to purchase additional football season
tickets (max 2) at a discount ($100season ticket)
- Full membership in the Pirate Club at the Crew Level
for a fraction of the cost
- Accumulation of priority points in Pirate Club
- Special SPC cookouts, tailgates and much more!
For online instructions and to join, visit:
ECUPirateClub.comStudentPC.html
For more information contact Michael Ward
(P) 252-737-4540 (E) wardmi@ecu.edu
Membership in the Student
Pirate Club is non-refundable
MOND
:t
ISCOREBOARD
Pick-up for student football tickets will be the week before each home game.
Student tickets will be distributed at the following locations and times:
Minges Coliseum
Ticket Office
10:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Tuesday-Friday'
Central Ticket Office
(at Mendenhali)
9:00 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Tuesday - Thursday
Dowdy Student Store
(Main Campus)
9:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Tuesday - Thursday
Game Schedule & Price Information
Opponent Date
Pickup
Begins
First
Guest
Youth Adult
Memphis 916 912 $15 $15 $30
West Virginia 923 919 $20 $20 $40
Virginia 107 103 $20 $20 $40
Tulsa 1014 1010 $15 $15 $30
SMU 1021 1017 $15 $15 $30
Marshall 1111 117 $15 $15 $30
'On Fridays end game day, ell student guest tickets are the full price.
A limited number of student tickets are available for home games
and are provided on a first-come, first-serve basis.
NEW1 Student seating is general admission in sections 19-22.
NEW! Student Pirate Club seating is general admission in
sections 17 & 18.
A limited number of student guest tickets are available at the
discounted price and are provided on a first-come, first-serve
basis. Students may only purchase ONE discount guest ticket.
Additional guest tickets may be purchased at the full price. Guest
tickets will be located in the same area as the student's ticket.
On Fridays and game day, all student guest tickets are the full
price.
Students can pick up student tickets on game day, if available, at
the Minges Ticket Office.
Student Pirate Club members may begin picking up their season tickets at Pirate Palooza or at the
Minges Ticket Office from August 23 - 25. To join the Student Pirate Club, fill out the following information
and bring or send to: ECU Educational Foundation, 304 Ward Sports Med. BIdg Greenville, NC 27858
Name
SS ECU PhoneMale Female circle one ECU EmailDate of Birth

FR SO JR SR circle oneOther Email optional
Line 1ECULocal Address
Line 2
CityST Zip
Line 1Permanent Address
Line 2
CityST Zip

Below you may join the Student Pirate Club (SPC) AND order additional season tickets for football. As a
student and member of the SPC, you receive one free season ticket to all home football games, with
seats located in Section 17 or 18. You may order up to TWO (2) additional season tickets at $100 each,
located next to your seat, for friends or family!
Student Pirate Club Membership
Season Ticket - Section 17 or 18
?
Additional Season Ticket One
Only available if SPC Membership is purchased
?
Additional Season Ticket Two
Only available if SPC Membership is purchased
$30
FREE
$100
$100
TOTAL
$30
$0
Method of Payment
O Cash O Check Payable to ECU Athletic Fund
O Credit Card expiration I
CARD
SIGNATURE
v
,





2006
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE All
I
. t
Welcome to Pirate Country! The Place Where We Inhale Purple & Exhale Gold!
SGA WANTS YOU
TOSERVE!
ECU Student Government Association is actively recruiting positions
for all branches. Positions include
Executive Cabinet
The Cabinet is an extension of the SGA Executive Branch and works closely with the
Executive Officers advising them on matters relating to their respective positions. In
addition, the Cabinet is the chief facilitators of the administration's policies and agendas by
accomplishing the established platform.
Appointed Positions: Application Process - Deadline: August 31.2006.
Class Officers
As an extension of Cabinet, Class Officers represent their respective class by being the
primary spokespersons and assisting with Student Government initiatives and events.
Class projects will focus on specific principles and goals set forth by the Executive Officers
throughout the year.
Elected Positions: Filing occurs September 7th & 8th in SGA Suite, MSC-101 -
Deadline: September 8.2006.
OneStop Online Election will be held on September 20th.
Class Councils
Class Councils provide leadership and direction for the classes, promote unity, enhance the
student experience by focusing on traditional class events and serve as vehicles of
communication. Councils consist of representatives that assist with project planning,
coordinating and implementation.
Appointed Positions: Application Process - Deadline: September 29,2006.
Student Congress
The SGA Legislative Branch consists of an assembly of students called the Congress.
Student representatives serve as a voice for their residence hall government, funded
student organization, or as a representative-at-large. Congress strives to protect the rights
and privileges of all students.
Elected Positions: Filing occurs September 7th & 8th in SGA, MSC-101 -
Deadline: September 8,2006.
OneStop Online Election will be held on September 20th.
Applications are available in SGA Office - 101, Mendenhall
Student Center or can be found online at www.ecu.edusoa.
For more information, contact 328-4SGA or saaebecu.edu
SgX . Continuing to Tin fiance tfie Total'Student EXPE$(IE!N'CE!
We Look Forward to a Great Year Serving You!





PAGE A12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 11, 2006
MONDAY
GAMING
continued from A9
Gaming1! ISO pros "Basically, 1
saw in opportunity to make a lot of
money in the next few years said
Dietrich, who had a 5.7 grade-point
average in college but quit last
winter to game full time. I thought
I'd rule tins video game thing until
I can no longer be one of the top
players Talmadge Wright, an
associate professor of sociology at
Ixiyola University in Chicago, notes
that while Major League Gaining
is set to begin airing its tourna-
ments on cable TV in November,
it isn't likely to push the pastime
into mainstream consciousness.
But he gives credit to fledg-
ling leagues like MLG and the
rival Cyberathlete Professional
League. "They're trying to con-
vert whit people thought of as
an idle activity into a profes-
sional sport said Wright, who
has studied gamers who play the
police-terrorist shooting game
"Counter-Strike
At the marathon three-day
tournaments, which are usually
held at hotels, caffeine is the
beverage of choice. Energy drink
brands such as Ked Bull advertise
heavily there, along w ith automo-
tive, cell phone and video game
retailers.
"Compared with the average
21-year-old who's holding down
a job at Kmart or in construction,
they're not going out at night
carousing in bars or drinking
beer. They're living a pretty clean
life said Paul Dietrich, Peter's
father. That's one upside the elder
Dietrich, a molecular biologist,
sees in gaming.
Dietrich had thought his son
might attend University of Cali-
fornia, Santa Cruz after graduat-
ing high school three years ago.
Like some players' parents, he
ticked off other benefits-travel-
ing, making money, meeting nice
people-that gaming has offered
his son. Still, "professional gamer"
isn't an answer that comes easily
to parents who explain what
their college-age children are
doing. Some big names in gaming
caution against quitting school
or work. "It's certainly not big
enough where it could support
more than a handful of players as
a full-timejob said Dennis Fong,
who in 1996 quit University of
California, Berkeley, to play pro-
fessionally and founded a gaming
company with his brother.
Yet Kong's success lures
young gamers. He reaped hun-
dreds of thousands of dollars in
winnings and endorsements. He
sold one company, an instant mes-
senger and social networking site
for gamers, in April to MTV Net-
works for $102 million. When he
quit school, his parents were unen-
thusiastic. "After I brought home
a Kerrari they were like, well, OK,
maybe there's something in this
gaming said Kong, 29.
Winning does have a way of
changing parents' minds. The
first $4,000 check helped Johna-
than "Fatality" Wendel, a mul-
tiple champion in games such as
"Quake "Doom" and "Alien vs.
Predator convince his dad in
2000 it was OK to quit college.
Today, Fatality's six-figure
income is more than his father, a
retired attendance coordinator at
General Motors in Kansas City,
Mo ever made. The gamer is
putting his name on peripherals,
sound cards and clothing. "I'm
trying to make Fatality become
the lifestyle brand of gaming
said Wendel, 25, who pays just
$250 a month to live in the base-
ment of a friend's home.
"He's got plenty of time to
go to college said his father,
James Wendel. Gamers' parents
recognize that fame and success
may be fleeting. "It's not going to
last forever said Kevin Suyeyasu,
the father of "Samurai But the
players tend not to look too far
into the future, beyond winning
the next tournament. About his
son, Paul Dietrich said, "I want
something for him to be always
passionate about and he enjoys
doing. If this leads to a career in
business, that's great. It may lead
to someplace different. "In the
meantime, he's getting a lot of
great experiences
ID theft insurance:
Waste or worthwhile?
(MCT)-You've heard the
horror stories about identity theft
victims spending many frustrat-
ing, costly hours trying to reclaim
their financial lives. For insurers,
those nightmares are a marketing
opportunity. Increasingly, compa-
nies are offering insurance that
reimburses victims for the costs
of cleaning up after an identity
thief. Coverage, usually part of
homeowner or renter policies,
includes $15,000 to $25,000 tor
expenses ranging from attorney
tees and lost wages to postage,
phone charges and notarizing
documents.
Actual financial losses, such as
money siphoned from an account,
are typically not covered but also
are unlikely. Big names, such as
Allstate and Nationwide, joined
the roster within the past year
or so.
Allstate tapped Dennis Hay-
sbert, star of CBS military drama
"The Unit as its pitchman for
the policies. Annual charges are
$25 to $5 among six insurers
contacted, including some of the
largest. Chubb has a $500 deduct-
ible compared with $250 or zero
from others.
In 47 states, Chubb includes
coverage at no charge. Most insur-
ers also offer what are called resto-
ration services that help with what
can be an overwhelming to-do list
of calls, reports and bureaucratic
hassling. So, is the coverage worth
it? The North Carolina and South
Carolina Departments of Insur-
ance say they haven't received any
complaints about identity-theft
policies.
"This is a policy with such low
premiums said Chrissy Pearson,
spokeswoman for the N.C. Depart-
ment of Insurance. "It's not like
we're talking about a lot of money
here She notes that consumers
should be clear about what they're
9
camp"
t
ft " $ fritZ V te '
vWEjjiJI'1
tfi
?'
A.
For more information
on med plS & foot;
to siqn up
Cd ecu-fooh
or uisi't
lAtMtuetMedudining
Kr?r2"
see THEFT page A15
ECU Campus Dining Meal Plan Memberships
Get A Plan!
www.ecu.edudining
Add $100 Pirate Bucks to any meal plan -get $110 to spend!
Add $200 Pirate Bucks to any meal plan - get $220 to spend!
v
O
CJ

3
. '
.
Location 316 ElOth S
Suites C & D
(Across from El Ranchito)
Hours: 8AM-6PM
Telephone: 439-2665
Reserve your textbooks for
fall, e-mail us your schedule at
piratetextbooks@yahoo.com





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A13
.1
Welc
ome
Back
Industrial Distribution and Logistics Students
Weh
ave misse
d you!
Come see us on the 4th floor of the
Science and Technology Complex
Non-declared students:
GET A JOB WHEN YOU GRADUATE
If you are looking for a challenging but rewarding career, and want to
have a job when you graduate, come see us on the 4th floor of the Science
and Technology Building! We can help and would love to talk with you!
Contact:
Dr. Leslie Pagliari
Suite 402, Science and Technology Complex
328-9663 pagliaril@ecu.edu






PAGE A14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST gl, 2006
Chicago Style Pizza
Subs
Stromboli
Pasta
Salads
Appetizers
Desserts
And More!
- o , o
3STREET
PIZZERIA
GREENVILLE, N C
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best pizza
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Open 7 Days
a Week
We Deliver!
Now Serving Late Night
Breakfast Tues-Sat 1AM - 4AM
Specials
' a A
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12 Appetizers
$4 60 oz. Pitcher
We Have NFL
Sunday Ticket!
11 TV's
Mon Mon. Night
Football
$1.50 23 oz Miller
Light Draft
$1 Domestic Bottles
$8 All You Can Eat
Wings
Now Accepting
University Meal Deal!
Wed $1 Domestics
$1.50 House Hi-Balls
MONDA
Apar
Fully
(Le,o
Prtv
AIIU
iio
FulH
Incli
Exto
IncHv
Aval
Flexl
752-BOU (2654) Corner of 5th & Cotanche
campusi





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGEA15
cam
THEFT
continued from A9
Apartment Featu
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Private Bedrooms & PrtvaBth
All Utilities Included
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Swimming Pool
Beach
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On ECU
www.CAMP
campuspointeecu @ blpinc.com
TE.com
purchasing. Consumer advocates
are divided.
Typically, you buy insurance
to protect from major financial
hits such as illness, death, a car
wreck or house fire. Identity theft
is rampant, but for many victims,
there is little or no cost. But you
could be among those who must
spend a fortune proving yourself
innocent of crimes and cleaning
up your credit.
"The out-of-pocket expenses
can vary, and how extensive the
problem can become varies said
Jay Foley, executive director of the
Identity Theft Resource Center,
a San Diego nonprofit organiza-
tion. "If you want the additional
security of that insurance, go
for it
Don't go for a deductible
of more than $250, he advised.
"Don't waste your money said
Paul Richard, executive direc-
tor of the Institute of Consumer
Financial Education, a nonprofit
group in San Diego. Richard just
doesn't see the policies' payoff. He
urges consumers to focus instead
on tasks such as having a list of
all your credit cards and other
financial accounts and contact
information so that if you are a
victim, you can quickly make the
right calls.
More than two-thirds of vic-
tims have no out-of-pocket costs,
based on a January report by
Javelin Strategy & Research for
the Council of Better Business
Bureaus. For those who incurred
costs, the average was $422,
according to the report by the
California financial-services
research firm. Foley's center found
a much higher average cost of
$ 1,300 per person, based on inter-
views with victims, Foley said.
That's without lost wages,
he said. "If we added lost wages,
that number would go right
through the darn roof Foley
said. Reimbursement for time off
and attorney fees could make the
coverage very valuable in some
cases, he said. Lost wages top
the list of claims, said Joe Lester,
identity theft product manager
for Travelers.
The insurer, a pioneer in iden-
tity-theft policies, began consid-
ering a policy after an employee
was victimized in the late 1990s
and introduced its plan in 1999.
Travelers covers about
5 million people, including
those on group policies that
companies can offer employ-
ees or customers, Lester said.
Nationwide, another of the
top home insurers, rolled out its
identity-theft coverage last spring
and added a standalone policy this
year. Next up, the Ohio insurer
plans to add credit-monitoring
at no extra charge to all iden-
tity-theft policies. As with any
contract, read carefully.
Liberty Mutual and Travel-
ers, for example, require pre-
approval for attorney fees. That's
to ensure that people understand
exactly what they're covered
for, Lester said. "It has to be
specifically items related to iden-
tity theft Make sure you're
not buying something you can
get free, such as credit reports,
cautioned Sheila Adkins, spokes-
woman for the Council of Better
Business Bureaus in Arlington,
Va. "We've received a lot of inqui-
ries recently about companies
offering identity theft insurance
policies she said.
The Charlotte-area Better
Business Bureau also is fielding
calls about whether policies are of
value. Chairman Tom Bartholomy
said that generally, they are not.
Consumers don't need to pay for
what they can do themselves, such
as canceling credit cards, he said.
Victims also could suffer costs
that can't be quantifiedand aren't
covered. "What's the price tag for
not being able to apply for credit
when your credit is in limbo?"
he said.
But for time-starved con-
sumers, help could be an espe-
cially welcome bonus. Restoration
services, provided in-house or
through outside firms, can include
helping you get an appointment
to replace a driver's license or
Social Security card, contacting
creditors and credit-reporting
agencies, issuing fraud alerts
and filing police reports. "It's not
a company telling you, "Here's
what you need to go do said
Deb Harmon, Nationwide product
manager for the line. "You turn
it over
George Doubrava, who runs
a Nationwide agency, sold his
first policy to himself and said
nearly all his customers added
the coverage after he mailed them
brochures.
Diane Lorick, an Allstate
agent, said some customers don't
buy the insurance because they
don't think they'll be victims.
But personal experience gives
her a compelling sales pitch: Her
wallet was stolen in a restaurant.
She lost her credit card, her and
her son's Social Security cards
and her driver's license. "That was
my greatest fear, and it happened
to me she said.
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving www.HumaneSeai.org
Washington, D.C. 202-686-2210, ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
GRAB THESE
DEALS
BEFORE SOMEONE ELSE DOES!
OUR STORE'S PACKED WITH THE SANE
NAHE BRANDS FROM THE HALL,
BUT AT THESE LOW PRICES, THEY'RE GOING FAST.
252-758-6766
2230 NE Greenville Boulevard
GREENVILLE
WILSON
WWW.RUCCEDWEARHauSE.COM





PAGE A14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
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1,2006
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGEA15
THEFT
continued from A9
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purchasing. Consumer advocates
are divided.
Typically, you buy insurance
to protect from major financial
hits such as illness, death, a car
wreck or house fire. Identity theft
is rampant, but for many victims,
there is little or no cost. But you
could be among those who must
spend a fortune proving yourself
innocent of crimes and cleaning
up your credit.
"The out-of-pocket expenses
can vary, and how extensive the
problem can become varies said
Jay Foley, executive director of the
Identity Theft Resource Center,
a San Diego nonprofit organiza-
tion. "If you want the additional
security of that insurance, go
for it
Don't go for a deductible
of more than $250, he advised.
"Don't waste your money said
Paul Richard, executive direc-
tor of the Institute of Consumer
Financial Education, a nonprofit
group in San Diego. Richard just
doesn't see the policies' payoff. He
urges consumers to focus instead
on tasks such as having a list of
all your credit cards and other
financial accounts and contact
information so that if you are a
victim, you can quickly make the
right calls.
More than two-thirds of vic-
tims have no out-of-pocket costs,
based on a January report by
Javelin Strategy & Research for
the Council of Better Business
Bureaus. For those who incurred
costs, the average was $422,
according to the report by the
California financial-services
research firm. Foley's center found
a much higher average cost of
$1,300 per person, based on inter-
views with victims, Foley said.
That's without lost wages,
he said. "If we added lost wages,
that number would go right
through the darn roof Foley
said. Reimbursement for time off
and attorney fees could make the
coverage very valuable in some
cases, he said. Lost wages top
the list of claims, said Joe Lester,
identity theft product manager
for Travelers.
The insurer, a pioneer in iden-
tity-theft policies, began consid-
ering a policy after an employee
was victimized in the late 1990s
and introduced its plan in 1999.
Travelers covers about
5 million people, including
those on group policies that
companies can offer employ-
ees or customers, Lester said.
Nationwide, another of the
top home insurers, rolled out its
identity-theft coverage last spring
and added a standalone policy this
year. Next up, the Ohio insurer
plans to add credit-monitoring
at no extra charge to all iden-
tity-theft policies. As with any
contract, read carefully.
Liberty Mutual and Travel-
ers, for example, require pre-
approval for attorney fees. That's
to ensure that people understand
exactly what they're covered
for, Lester said. "It has to be
specifically items related to iden-
tity theft Make sure you're
not buying something you can
get free, such as credit reports,
cautioned Sheila Adkins, spokes-
woman for the Council of Better
Business Bureaus in Arlington,
Va. "We've received a lot of inqui-
ries recently about cdftipanies
offering identity theft insurance
policies she said.
The Charlotte-area Better
Business Bureau also is fielding
calls about whether policies are of
value. Chairman Tom Bartholomy
said that generally, they are not.
Consumers don't need to pay for
what they can do themselves, such
as canceling credit cards, he said.
Victims also could suffer costs
that can't be quantifiedand aren't
covered. "What's the price tag for
not being able to apply for credit
when your credit is in limbo?"
he said.
But for time-starved con-
sumers, help could be an espe-
cially welcome bonus. Restoration
services, provided in-house or
through outside firms, can include
helping you get an appointment
to replace a driver's license or
Social Security card, contacting
creditors and credit-reporting
agencies, issuing fraud alerts
and filing police reports. "It's not
a company telling you, 'Here's
what you need to go do said
Deb Harmon, Nationwide product
manager for the line. "You turn
it over
George Doubrava, who runs
a Nationwide agency, sold his
first policy to himself and said
nearly all his customers added
the coverage after he mailed them
brochures.
Diane Lorick, an Allstate
agent, said some customers don't
buy the insurance because they
don't think they'll be victims.
But personal experience gives
her a compelling sales pitch: Her
wallet was stolen in a restaurant.
She lost her credit card, her and
her son's Social Security cards
and her driver's license. "That was
my greatest fear, and it happened
to me she said.
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
NOAH WVLE, Star of NBC's hit show ER
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving www.HumaneSeal.org
Washington, D.C. 202-686-2210, ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
GRAB THESE
DEALS
BEFORE SOMEONE ELSE DOES!
OUR STORE'S PACKED WITH THE SANE
NAME BRANDS FROM THE HALL,
BUT AT THESE LOW PRICES, THEY'RE EOlNE FAST.
252-738-6766
2230 NE Greenville Boulevard
GREENVILLE
WiLSON
WWWRUGGEDWEARHOUSEIOr!





PAGE A16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
MURAL
continued from Al
job by his father, who is a main-
tenance mechanic at ECU After
an interview ami review his of
ideas !r the murals, Krochmalny
was hired According to Sesjey,
no attempt was made to contact
a current ECU student, alumni
or faculty member, anil no other
Candidates were interviewed
Aaron Lucier, uaociate direc-
tor of Campus Living, said the
decision to add the murals was
made after the spring semester,
and that they were done on "a very
tight timeline
"We did not have enough time
tu search out a student artist or
have a design competition Lucier
wrote in an e-mail.
Carl Billingsley, interim
director of the School of Art and
Design, expressed his opinion
that contacting the School of Art
and Design might have facilitated
finding a current KCU student to
paint the murals.
"Most of the art students
are always looking for work, and
most of the time art students are
delighted to find work in their
field of study contacting the art
school would have been a success-
ful strategy Billingsley said.
I.uke Daughtry, junior art
major, said he was disappointed
by Campus Living's decision to
contract a non-KCU student to
paint the murals.
Get caught
reading, m
hv

"Painting the murals!
would've been a great opportunity
for an art student. It was a great
opportunity that was lost he said.
Krochmalny was origi-
nally contracted for five to six
murals, but was unable to com-
plete them all. He estimated
the two murals required two
weeks of planning and six
weeks of on-site work to finish;
however, his paintings will
eventually be destroyed when
Mendenhall undergoes its next
renovation in the next two to
three years.
This writer can be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian.com
ARE YOU
www.buccaneer.ecu.edu
Puzzled About Health Majors?
Find the Piece that Fits!
3rd Annual Health Majors Resource Fair
NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TW.D
TQUH FAMHf
www.8hareycxir1Ne.org
1-800-355-SHARE
Wednesday, September 20, 2006
10:30am-1:30pm
The Wright Place Plaza
(raindate: Wednesday, September 27th)
Special prize drawings will be held for the students who attend
For more information:
Contact the Academic Enrichment Center at (252) 328-2645
To apply, please attend an
upcoming event or stop by
Administrative Services located on
the second floor Joyner Library.
For employment questions, or to
request more information, please
call 252.328.6514.
tomorrow itartt here.
i-wrr.n
Joyner Library offers more than 160 student employment
positions that help you gain valuable working experience, make
friends, learn new things, and not to mention, get paid!
Our Work-Study Job Fair will be held in the Joyner Library lobby
on Sunday, August 20, 2006 starting at 1:00 p.m. All current
and incoming students are encouraged to apply. We also invite
applicants to attend the On-Campus Job Fair held in Mendenhall
Student Center on August 22, 2006 from 11:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
We offer competitive pay and flexible hours including late-nights
and weekends.
Vmt u online at www,llb,cu .tdu to learn mort,
!
I .
I 4





21,2006
du
as?
air
)6
NAVY SCHEDULE
ECU SCHEDULE
SEPT. i SEPT. 9VS. ECU VS. UMASS5:80 PM 1:80 PM
SEPT. 16AT STANFORD10:00 PM
SEPT. sVS. TULSA1:80 PM
SEPT. 80AT CONNECTICUTTBA

OCT. 7AT AIR FORCE8:00 PM
OCT. 14 OCT. 88VS. RUTGERS VS. NOTRE DAME1:80 PM 12:00 PM
NOV. 4AT DUKETBA

NOV. 11?AT EASTERN MICHIGAN 1:00 PM
NOV. 18 DEC. 8VS. TEMPLE VS. ARMY18:30 PM 2:80 PM
SEPT. 8AT NAVY5:30 PM
SEPT. 9ATUAB7:00 PM
SEPT. 16VS. MEMPHIS7:00 PM
SEPT. 23VS. WEST VIRGINIATBA
OCT. 7VS. VIRGINIA6:00 PM
OCT. 14VS. TULSA8:00 PM
OCT. 21VS. SMU3:00 PM
OCT. 28AT SOUTHERN MISS8:00 PM
NOV. 4ATUCF4:00 PM
NOV. 11VS. MARSHALL1:00 PM
NOV. 18AT RICESiOO PM
NOV. 25AT N.C. STATE1:00 PM
KEYS TO THE GAME
1. Keep ECU'S offense off the field
Navy wins by controlling the clock. The
Midshipmen have been to three consecutive
bowl games with ball control offense. The
Middies led the nation in rushing in 2005, with
nearly 319 yards per game, while the Pirates
were the sixth worst in defending the run.
Navy must control the ball, using gimmicks
and misdirection to keep the Pirates guessing.
2. Contain ECU'S passing game
By concentrating preseason all-conference
selection Aundrae Allison and ECU'S
other weapons in the passing game, the
Midshipmen can force ECU to do something
they struggled to. do a season ago - run
between the tackles. If Navy can force the
Pirates into third and long consistently,
along with other passing situations, the
Middies may slow down Allison and company.
3. Will Depth Hurt?
Practice injuries have plagued the Middies so far
this fall. Coach Paul Johnson has been forced to
move some freshmen around to fill holes. Going
against a bigger ECU team, Navy will need the
inexperienced players to fill in immediately.
ECU Head Coach Skip Holtz hopes to march a more talented, bowl-bound team onto the field in his second season.
Holtz wants Pirates
to come out smoking
JOHNSON
"We got a lot of respect
for Coach Holtz and his staff
and we know it's going
to be a hard-fought game
ECU takes on Navy for
season-opener
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
The 2006 ECU football team will open with
a daunting task, traveling for the first-time ever
to play Navy, Sept. 2 on Labor Day Weekend.
The Midshipmen are one of seven bowl champi-
ons and eight bowl teams from last season that
highlight the 2006 schedule.
"We need to come out of the chute smok-
ing said ECU Head Coach Skip Holtz said.
"We need to come out strong, fast and polished
offensively
Navy went 8-4 in 2005 and led the nation in
rushing, averaging nearly 319 yards per contest.
The Middies downed Colorado State, 51-30, in
the Poinsettia Bowl. The Midshipmen bring back
a veteran squad, returning 18 starters, including
eight on offense.
"They do an impressive job at running the
ball Holt, said. "With the option, their triple
option, their read, their misdirection and their
play-action passing off of it absolutely annihilates
people. We got a great challenge starting from
the chute
Navy is forced to replace departed quarter-
back Lamar Owens, who led the team in rushing
with 880 yards. Owens' successor is two-year
senior backup Brian Hampton. Hampton played
in all 12 games on special teams, nine of which
he took snaps under center.
Fullbacks Matt Hall and Adam Ballard
will combine to give Navy a vertical rushing
attack.
Junior slot back Reggie Campbell tallied
514 yards and seven touchdown on the ground
while hauling in 12 passes for 314 yards and two
touchdowns. The leading wide receiver, Jason
Tomlinson will look to add on his 25 catch, 445
yard total in 2005. On the offensive line, Navy
returns four of five starts, replacing only the
right guard.
The Middies were able to reach a bowl for
the third straight year despite returning only
six starters from their 10-2 campaign in 2004.
Navy Head Coach Paul Johnson received the
Bobby Dodd National Coach of the Year in that
same year, capping the first 10-win season since
1905 with a 34-19 win over New Mexico in the
Emerald Bowl.
"We finished up the 2005 season pretty
well considering what we lost the year before
said Navy Head Coach Haul Johnson. "We've
got a lot of guys who have played before and
they've been around the system so they know
what's going on
Both teams finished 2005 with momentum;
the Pirates won their final two games of the
season, clawing to 5-6 while Navy won its last
three. Holtz knows this is just game one and, win
or lose; it does not define the season.
"You have to be careful about putting too
much into that first game Holtz said. "Obvi-
ously it's important, but how we react to the Navy
game will mean more than winning or losing
it. Obviously if we lose, we can't go undefeated.
A We know that. I think the players want to see a
benefit from the hard work they've put in
Holtz' primary concern is in the trenches, a
glaring weakness last season. Establishing the
run while preventing the run has been the staff's
main focus during the offseason. ECU finished
112th defending the run, while 71st in rushing
offense. The first step was to add muscle, which
fell upon strength and conditioning Coach Mike
Golden, who controlled the offseason workout
regiments. The starting five offensive linemen
now average 312 pounds while defensive ends
Scotty Robinson and C.J. Wilson have seen gains
of 40 pounds respectively.
"They're going to be way bigger than us
Paul Johnson, a two-time NCAA Championship
Division champion at Georgia Southern said.
"They have tremendous athletes and 1 have a
lot of respect for Coach Holtz and his coaching
staff and their players
The Pirates return two starters on the offen-
sive line in senior offensive tackle Eric Graham
and junior offensive guard Matt Butler. Both
Holtz and offensive line coach Steve Shankweiler
are counting on his hogs to provide leadership to
less experienced starters in Tom Wingenbach,
Josh Coffman and Terence Campbell.
"We've been pushing each other Graham, a
two-year starter said. "We've been accepting the
challenge to get better every day. We also know
the offense starts with us. If we don't protect
the quarterback, you can't throw to Aundrae
Allison. If we don't block, the running backs
are useless
Graham, Sutton and company have the
responsibility of clearing holes for the running
game. Chris Johnson and Dominique Lindsay
look to be a one-two punch in the ECU backfield.
Chris Johnson is healthy after missing spring
practice with a neck injury while Lindsay has
sparkled in the offseason. Brandon Fractious, a
senior who had a career-high 107 yards against
UCF, adds a speedy third option.
Protecting quarterback James Pinkney will
also be a priority so the senior has ample time
to throw to ECU's talented group of receivers.
Pinkney, under the same system in consecutive
years for the first time, is fresh off the second-
best passing performance in ECU history. The
senior's 2,773 passing yards and 193 rushing
yards ranked him 20th nationally for total offense.
Allison, a preseason all-conference selection,
broke the ECU single-season receiving mark
(1,024 yards) in his first season as a Pirate. To
complement, Allison's game-breaking abilities,
Philip Henry and Bobby Good, both whom had
a game 100-plus receiving yards return. Juwon
Crowell, Kevin Roach and newcomer Jamar
Bryant all provide depth and alternate options
for Pinkney.
The Navy head coach, who ECU showed
interest prior to hiring Holtz, is well aware of the
ability of ECU's skill position players.
"They're very athletic Paul Johnson said.
"The quarterback is returning and he's a very
good athlete, they've got a good receiving corps,
two good running backs. They've got a chance
to be really good team. We know it's going to
be a hard-fought game
This writer can be contacted at
spcrts@theeastcarolinian.com.
KEYS TO THE GAME
1. Slow down Navy's run game
This was Skip Holtz' chief concern in the
offseason. The Pirates ranked dead last in
C-USA and 112th in the nation in 2005 at
stopping the run while Navy led the nation
in rushing with'its multiple formation option
attack. Navy coach Paul Johnson acknowledged
ECU'S size advantage; it's just a matter time
to see if size and strength will beat scheme.
2. Run the ball better
The Pirates were inconsistent at running the
ball with an average of 137.5 yards per game.
Once again, size is the key. ECU'S offensive
line averages 312 pounds and should be
able to control the line of scrimmage against
a smaller Navy defensive front. But, will the
Pirates' young offensive line gel fast enough?.
3. Prevent turnovers
ECU lost close games last year by committing
too many turnovers. The Pirates must
take better control of the ball or Navy will
wear down the defense with its dominant
run attack and controlling the time of
possession. Winning the turnover battle is
a must and it starts with securing the ball.
HOLTZ
"We need to come out of the
chute smoking. We need to come
out strong, fast and polished
offensively. When you look at
it from top to bottom, I'm really
excited about this season





Sports
wiTwT Air of confidence
MONDAY AUGUST 21, 2006 PAGE B2
ECU's Inside Source
ECU have
in 2006?
9 or more 5.9
6 - 8 52.9
3 - 5 23.5
0 - 2 17.6
Total votes 17
BY THE NUMBERS
416
Number of volleyball assists
Heidi Krug needs to become
the school's all-time leader
55.5k
the women's soccer roster
43.8yards
Distance between Navy and
second-place rushing offense
(Texas) in 2005
1
ECU defeflitvt? starters
injured for season opener at
Navy
8
Returning receivers with
more yards nationally than
Aundrae Allison in 2005
33JL7
the 10K NCAA Southeast
Regional
10
Freshmen listed on the
football two-deep depth chart
They said it
"If you have a semi-truck
and a Volkswagen in a head-
on collision, I know who is
going to win. Some of them, it
was like throwing a beer can
at a semi. It wasn't much of a
battle
Skip Holm, SCt' Football Coach
on the lack of site on the offensive and
defensive line in 3005
"The linebackers we have here
are way more talented than we
had last year. Before Coach
Holtz came, you might have
a group of white guys sitting
with their group or black guys
over here. Now, you get to
know everybodywhen it's
like that, you bleed sweat and
care about them. You're not
going to let them down
Kasey Ron, senior cornerback
"The guys I'm with now on
the offensive line, we weren't
the best of friends. We were
teammates, but we weren't as
close as we are now
Eric Graham, senior offensive
tackle
"Everybody is underestimat-
ing us. Once they see us play
all of our games, they're going
to understand the Pirates are
for real this year
Jam.ar Flournoy, senior safety
With 10 pounds of added muscle, Chris Johnson hopes to provide plenty of fireworks in his junior season.
Pirates upbeat and ready
for 2006 season
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
Confident and excited are the
two words that best describe the
mindset of the ECU football team
as it prepares for the 8006 season
opener against Navy. Fresh off a 5-6
season, exceeding expectations, the
Pirates built momentum in the off-
season with two wins. Head Coach
Skip I loltz wants to keep that energy
going this year by starting fast.
"We need to come out of the
chute smoking Holtz said. "We
need to come out strong, fast and
polished offensively. When you look
at it from top to bottom, I'm really
excited about this season. I'm excited
about the talent and attitude of this
team and about the leadership that
has emerged. These guys are hungry
for success, which was evident by all
the hard work they put in over the
summer
The players' enthusiasm and
confidence poke through with each
progressing practice. A team that
had three wins in two seasons under
former Head Coach John Thompson,
is still building a sense of unity.
However, Holtz has replaced the
bickering and individual tendencies
with a sense of newfound camara-
derie.
"Under Thompson, we were
just going out and playing said
Ross, a senior cornerback. "Every-
body had their own personal goals,
but this year, we have real team goals
- winning Conference USA, win-
ning a bowl and finishing season in
see FOOTBALL page B5
OPINION
Athletic program looking
for bigger and better
Fall sports need to win for future
conference goals
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS EDITOR
The new school year brings a chance at a new
beginning. The freshmen get to start over, finally
separating from their parents while adjusting to a
new backdrop. The professors hand syllabi to a new
crop, ready to make more of an impression than
before. And athletically, the new school season offers
an opportunity to pile onto previous success while
striving for new goals.
ECU won one conference title in 2005. One. New
women's golf coach Kim Lewellen guided the Lady
Pirates to an improbable tournament title, held at
nearby Ironwood Country Club. Yet major revenue
sports and other previous strongholds experienced
disappointing seasons in 2005, pushing ECU further
down the vault of big-time athletics.
At a critical juncture, ECU needs to reinforce
its troops in hopes of appealing to suitors in future
conference realignments. In order to appear sexy to a
conference such as the Big East, ECU needs to hoist
championship trophies. Approaching must-win situ-
ations, 2006-2007 could determine whether ECU's
long-term athletic direction sets sail or not.
It starts with football. As has been the case
since it adopted the sport in 1932, football drives
the athletic department. To this day, it remains the
financial lifeblood of the program. With Athletic
Director Terry Holland at the helm, bets are high
that ECU will have a bowl season. For the sake of the
other sports, ECU has to continue its revival from
John Thompson's disastrous two seasons.
Second-year Head Coach Skip Holtz will be
charged to perform some minor miracles to survive
a grueling schedule, which includes eight bowl teams
from 2005. Holtz also will rely on his a senior crop
at quarterback, wide receiver and in the secondary to
make sure that questions at offensive and defensive line,
along with the linebacking corps are answered.
A successful football season breeds into recruit-
ing, which in turn, assures long-term success. Wins
translate to fatter budgets, helped by corporate
donations and capital campaigns, which can pork roll
revenue to Olympic sports. However, if the losses
continue to pile, ECU could lose its foothold gained
by consecutive victories over Marshall and UAB to
conclude 2005.
Another small success story was the volleyball
squad, who finished with their best record (20-11)
since 1982. Second-year Head Coach Chris Rushing
led the Lady Pirates to a fifth place conference seed
and a first-round Conference USA Tournament win
in 2005. However, with the key loss of all-conference
selection Pam Ferris, the league's coaches projected
the Lady Pirates to finish seventh.
The team will tout seven freshmen, who must
gel with five returning starters. The season-open-
ing East Carolina Invitational, which is headlined
by Virginia Tech and William & Mary, will provide
a barometer for the season.
With no men's soccer team fielded in 2006, the
focus turns to the women. Head Coach Ron Don-
nenwirth is in his eighth season and will rely to his
five seniors to better 2005's second-round C-USA
Tournament appearance. Fourteen freshmen will
litter the lineup and the season will likely hinge on
the maturity process of the younger players.
The men's cross country team won the Southeast
Regional, held at the Lake Kristi Course in 2005.
However, the momentum was abruptly halted with a
sobering last place finish at the NCAA Championship
meet. The women's cross country squad, however, still
has steep hills to climb after posting an eighth place
conference finish and a 26th place regional finish.
The men's tennis team, which enjoyed wild
success in the late 1950s, will look to Head Coach
Shawn Heinchon on a full-time basis. The former
see OPINION page B5
Women's Volleyball wants to build on record-setting season
Heidi Krug wants to
spike seventh place
preseason ranking
ROBERT MATTHKW PARKS
SPORTS WRITER
ECU women's volleyball Head
Coach Chris Rushing had a spec-
tacular first season Rushing, who
replaced Collen Munson after she
left for" Western Michigan, led
the Lady Pirates to its best record
since 1982. Finishing 20-11, the
Lady Pirates tallied a surprising
fifth place standing in the confer-
ence before falling to UTEP in the
second round of the Conference
USA Tournament
Rushing will try to build upon
the groundwork that was laid in his
first campaign. Rushing character-
ized the 2005 season as being a
pleasant surprise. The former Ohio
Valley Conference Coach-of-the-
Year at the University of Tennessee
at Martin, surmised that 2005's
results displayed the roster's raw
talent and what was possible once
that talent was harnessed.
The Brigham Young graduate
will be forced to do without vital
players, losing senior all-confer-
ence selections Pam Ferris and
Erica Wilson, along with three
others. With the graduation bug
biting, seven of the team's 14 play-
ers are now freshmen, and it is
obvious that this year's team will
rely upon youth
Senior Heidi Krug and sopho-
more Trish Monroe will captain
the team. Krug played in all 113
games at her setter slot. Monroe,
a Michigan native, enjoyed a team-
high in digs Her 443 digs were
third all-time lor a single season by
a Lady Pirate Krug averaged 4.14
digs-per-game, landing her sixth in
C-l'SA. Also returning is middle
blocker Mignon Dubenion, who
finished fifth in the conference in
hitting percentage (32.5 percent).
Despite a late season push,
the C-USA coaches projected the
Lady Pirates to place seventh in
the 12-team league. The team may
not be forecasted in the top half
of the conference, but that does
not faze Rushing, who has higher
expectations.
"Last year we were preseason
ranked number eleven and we took
fifth Rushing said. "We placed
six slots higher than we were pre-
season ranked. Being preseason
ranked number seven, we go six
slots higher and we're conference
champions. For us, being ranked
preseason No. 1 or preseason No.
7, it really doesn't matter
Krug, a senior leader, is the
league's returning assists leader.
Krug's 13.36 assists-per-game
mark accounted for nearly 93 per-
cent of the Lady Pirates' total. Like Q
Rushing, Krug was disappointed "
see PIRATE pae B7
Senior Heidi Krug hopes to best her 1,510 assists in
2005 while tutoring the younger players.
Sophomore Trish Monroe will be pivotal in trying to
improve on the Lady Pirates' 20-win season.





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE BS

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PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
MOI
Women's soccer hopes for instant chemistry
Talented recruiting
class, 16 freshmen will
have to grow up quickly
TOMMY GRAHAM
SPORTS WRITER
Grit and determination.
Vocabulary usually associated
with football, the words can also
be associated with ECU women's
soccer Head Coach Rob Donnen-
wirth and his team. Coming off
last season's 8-1'2-1 record, the
Lady Pirates hope to improve on a
promising end to the 2005 season
that concluded with a second
round loss in the Conference USA
tournament.
With top returning players
Kachel Hils, Patty Pierce, Kat
Norris, Anastasia Nikas, Tara
Shaw and Amber Campbell, the
Pirates won't be devoid of expe-
rience. Hils, Pierce and Norris
have been nominated captains and
should provide a smoother transi-
tion for the rest of the team.
However, the storyline
remains on the 16 incoming
freshmen filling the 29-woman
roster. Recruiting younger players
instilled with a winning pedigree
was a must for Donnenwirth.
Newcomers like Sarah Kirkley,
w hose club league and high school
team won the Premier League and
4-A high school state champion-
ships respectively will roam the
midfield. Jennifer Kurrowicki
joins ECU as a former first-team
All-West Jersey Selection from
llunterdon Central Regional High
School. Kami York-Feirn earned
second team all-state honors in
Colorado as a senior.
Establishing team chemistry
is a concern for the coaching staff.
With the freshmen staying in the
dorms together, the staff hopes
they bnnjj a sense of unity and
togetherness to his young play-
ers The biggest challenge will be
not only getting these new faces
acclimated to the rigors of college,
but also with the upperclassmen
on the team.
"Team chemistry isn't some-
thing that happens by accident
Donnenwirth said.
An injury to goalkeeper then-
senior Lindsi Troxler early in
the season gave then-freshman
Amber Campbell the opportu-
nity to play every game in goal.
Campbell posted 114 saves, four
shutouts and a 1.69 goals-against
average.
"Goalkeepers need special
one-on-one nurturing Donnen-
wirth said.
Junior defender Patty Pierce should help the Lady Pirates improve on an
eleventh-place conference ranking for goals-allowed.
Re-enter Troxler, who has
joined the team as a graduate
assistant and will again help
to tutor Campbell. While still
praising Campbell's talent, Don-
nenwirth signed two goalkeepers
to push some competition. Fresh-
men Jen Kurowicki and Kady
Hubscman should compete for the
backup slot.
The schedule will not be a
pushover with six games against
the top 15 in the region. The
Lady Pirates host in-state foes
Charlotte and UNC Wilmington
along with conference rivals Mar-
shall, UCF and Southern Miss at
Bunting Field.
"Our goal is always to win the
Conference championship Don-
nenwirth said, despite ECU's pro-
gram having never accomplished
the feat since it began competition
in 1994.
To realize this goal, the Lady
Pirates will rely on its strong
see SOCCER page B6
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T 21, 2006
ms!
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B5
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FOOTBALL
continued from B2
the Top 25. Coach Holtz has set
the bar very high. Coach knows
we have the talent to play with
any team in the USA. He knows
what we have and he's not going
to accept mediocrity
Now defensive players are
congratulating offensive players
during practice. Players have
crossed racial boundaries and
socialize together. Evidenced by
the progressions in the weight
room, led by strength and condi-
tioning coach Mike Golden, the
team wants to get better.
"We've added a lot of girth
which I hope will help us do
something we had a hard time
doing last year - preventing
a yard on defense or getting a
yard on offense on a third-and-
one play Holtz said. "To see the
strength gains they've made is
incredible
Golden's infectious personal-
ity translated to huge gains in
voluntary off-season workouts.
Golden's staff, along with a select
group of seniors, stayed on the
younger players to emulate their
coaches' work ethic. Because a
bowl was so close in 2005, play-
ers understood that 'selling out'
during the winter and summer
months constituted the amount
of improvement.
"The morale is real high said
senior wide receiver Bobby Good,
who emerged late in the season as a
scoring threat, hauling in two of his
three touchdown receptions in the
season-closing win against UAB.
"We're confident and ready to go
Much of swagger has to do
with the attitude of the coaching
staff, which trickles down to the
seniors. For the first time since
the Steve Logan era, the majority
of the coaching staff was retained
for consecutive seasons. The one
addition was Don Yankowsky, a
former ECU assistant from 2001-
2002, replacing Greg McMahon,
who left to take a similar job
with the New Orleans Saints, at
the tight ends and special teams
position. Other than that, the staff
remains in tact.
"That's something that we
haven't had here in awhile - to be
able to run the same offense, same
defense, same special teams said
senior fullback Pat Dosh. "It's
definitely an advantage
Holtz sees the obvious ben-
efits for establishing a sense of
continuity into his second season.
Instead of installing a system,
Holtz is spending time refining it.
Gone are the instructions on basic
instincts and fundamentals.
"The playersj know what
they're doing Holtz said. "Last
year, we were coaching assign-
ments. This year, from day one,
I would call a play and they'd go
out and run it
Eric Graham, a senior offen-
sive tackle and probable captain,
receives his daily instructionfrom
Steve Shankweiler, who is the
offensive coordinator and offensive
line coach. Graham, one of two
returning starters on the offensive
line, knows that having an offen-
sive coordinator for consecutive
years will draw dividends.
"We've been in the system for
a year so we know the terminol-
ogy and communicate well with
each other when we get to the
line the 325-pound preseason
all-conference selection said.
Good, a third receiving threat
for quarterback James Pinkney
agrees with the returning left
tackle.
"We feel like we're a lot more
experienced this year with the
same offense and same defense
Good said. "Last year we pretty
much put everything in, so there's
really not a lot of new stuff which is
good because when we go through
these meetings, pretty much every-
one knows what's going on
The significant schedule
upgrade sees Virginia and West
Virginia taking non-conference
games normally reserved for
Duke and Wake Forest. The
Pirates will face eight bowl teams
from a year ago, but the players
and coaches are embracing the
challenge with confidence.
"We have some challenges
with our schedule and our inex-
perience, but at the same time, I
am really pleased with the talent
and attitude of this football team
and how hard they are working
Holtz said. "We have a lot of talent
on that field - a lot more talent
than we've had here
Upgrades in the talent pool are
most glaring at linebacker, where
three junior college recruits and
a core of younger players replace
four departed letter winners.
Defensive line remains a question
mark, but an improved Marcus
Hands and Brandon Setzer to
compliment newcomers Scotty
Robinson and C.J. Wilson have
drawn rave reviews. Another
newcomer, who could have a big
splash, is Jamar Bryant, a former
University of Georgia signee.
"It's just a blessing for me
to have guys like Bryant
Pinkney, who tossed for over
2,700 yards and 14 touchdowns
in 2005, said. "Everybody has the
confidence in each other to win
Not everyone agrees with the
Pirates' optimism. In the C-USA
Preseason coaches poll, ECU was
picked to finish in last place in
the six-team East Division. The
Pirates have taken notice of the
prediction, but isn't letting the
prognostication alter their mind-
set or deter them from achieving
their season's goals.
"Whether or not they pick us
to finish first or last, preseason
polls don't mean squat said line-
backers coach "Rock" Roggeman
bluntly. "It's great motivation
When the Pirates open the
season Sept. 2 at Navy, expect
a rambunctious and optimistic
group with a determination to
prove the preseason picks wrong
and with strict instruction to
'come out of the chute smoking
"We've got a nice little air of
confidence Robinson, a redshirt
freshman defensive end, said. "We
feel we can compete with anybody
in the nation right now
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
OPINION
continued from B2
Wake Forest assistant took over
coaching duties in July and will
try to rejuvenate some energy
into a perennial bottom dweller.
The lone senior Nick Rose will
likely play the top spot while
Henrique Viana will be relied on
heavily as well.
Each year, the National Asso-
ciation of College Directors of
Athletics compiles a score based
on championships in all sports.
What used to be referred to as the
Sears Directors' Cup, the rank-
ing is a prestigious measurement
for which to measure an athletic
program, including all partici-
pating sports. For Division I
in 2005-2006, ECU failed to
finish in the top 100. And frankly,
that is sad.
Luckily, the 2005-2006 sports
years has come and gone. Now, it's
a new day, a new season and a new
year. Hopefully for Pirate sup-
porters who strive for grandeur,
it's also a new beginning.
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian.com.
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
MOI
SOCCER
continued from B4
backfield. Anchored by juniors
Norris and Pierce, the Lady
I'irates should give opposing
teams some headaches trying to
find the net.
However, DoiUMtTO irth admits
that one of the weak points is the
ability to score goals. The Lady
I'irates finished in the lower tier of
most offensive categories, includ-
ing ninth in shots and goals-per-
game. Having senior Carmen
Calpo returning will provide a
creator at both forward and mid-
field. Having Hill, a senior, and
sophomore Madison Keller in
the midfield should provide some
defensive presence while leaving
open the position of an attacking
midfielder to be answered during
the preseason.
After the unexpected termina-
tion of the men's soccer program
in December 2005, the spotlight
is now on the Lady I'irates as the
school's premier soccer team.
"ECU Athletic Director:
Terry Holland has obviously been a
great leader everywhere he's gone
Donnenwirth said. "However, he
feels that it was very unfortunate
what happened to the men's pro-
gram last year both tor friends and
players affected by ithoping that tight losses turn to
Still Donnenwirth sees 2006 close wins. Until thathappens, he
as an opportunity tc be the voice remains determined.
of socceifor Greenville. With
the spotlight solelyon his pro-This writer can be contacted at
gram, the eighth-year coach issportst heeastcarolinian.com.
2006 Women's Soccer Schedule
Aug. 25FridayOld DominionNorfolk, Va.8:30 pm
Aug. 28MondayCampbellBuies Creek, N.C8:00 pm
Sept. 1FridayWestern CarolinaCullowhee, N.C.7:00 pm
Sept. 3SundayCharlotteGreenville, NC1:00 pm
Sept. 8FridayAmericanRaleigh, N.C.2:00 pm
Sept. 10SundayGeorgia St.Raleigh, N.C.12:00 pm
Sept. 15FridayUNC-WilmingtonGreenville, N.C.4:00 pm
Sept. 17SundayPennGreenville, N.C.1:00 pm
Sept. 22FridayFurmanGreenville, N.C.7:00 pm
Sept24SundayFrancis MarionFlorence, S.C.1:00 pm
Sept. 29FridayMemphisMemphis, Tenn.8:00 pm
Oct. 1SundayUABBirmingham, Ala.1:00 pm
Oct. 6FridayMarshallGreenville, N.C.4:00 pm
Oct. 13FridayUCFGreenville, N.C.4:00 pm
Oct. 15SundaySouthern MissGreenville, N.C.1:00 pm
Oct. 20FridayTulsaTulsa, Okla.8:00 pm
Oct. 22SundaySMUDallas, Texas2:00 pm
Oct. 27FridayUTEPGreenville, N.C.3:00 pm
Oct. 29SundayColorado CollegeGreenville, N.C.12:00 pm
Nov. 1-5WedSun.C-USA TournamentDallas, TexasTBA
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ALL UTILITIES INCLUDED!
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1ST 21, 2006
ry
:ials
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B7
M
f
VOLLEYBALL continued from B2
2006 East Carolina Volleyball Schedule
FridayAug. 25'William & MaryGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
SaturdayAug. 26FurmanGreenville, N.C.1.00 p.m.
SaturdayAug. 26Virginia TechGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
FridaySept. 1AWright StateCharlottesville, Va. 5:00 p.m.
SaturdaySept. 2GeorgetownCharlottesville, Va. 11:00 a.m
SaturdaySept. 2VirginiaCharlottesville, Va7:00 p.m.
Wednesday Sept. 6UNC WilmingtonGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
FridaySept. 8! North FloridaCharlotte, N.C.4:30 p.m.
SaturdaySept. 9! CharlotteCharlotte, N.C.12:30 p.m
SaturdaySept. 9IPennCharlotte, N.C.5:00 p.m.
TuesdaySept. 12CampbellGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
ThursdaySept. 14MarshallGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
FridaySept. 15Wisconsin-Green BayGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
SaturdaySept. 16Grambling StateGreenville, N.C.12:00 p.m
TuesdaySept. 19N.C. A&TGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
FridaySept. 22TulaneNew Orleans, La.7:00 p.m.
SundaySept. 24UTEPGreenville, N.C.1:00 p.m.
FridaySept. 29SMUDallas, Texas7:00 p.m.
SundayOct.lTulsaTulsa, Okla.1:00 p.m.
FridayOct. 6UABGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
SundayOct. 8MemphisGreenville, N.C.12:00 p.m
FridayOct. 13Southern MissHattiesburg, Miss.700 p.m.
SundayOct. 15UCFOrlando, Fla.1:00 p.m.
FridayOct. 20RiceGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
SundayOct. 22HoustonGreenville, N.C.12:00 p.m.
FridayOct. 27Southern MissGreenville, N.C.7:00 p.m.
SundayOct. 29UCFGreenville, N.C.1:00 p.m.
FridayNov. 3"UABBirmingham, Ala.7:00 p.m.
SundayNov. 5MemphisMemphis, Tenn.1:00 p.m.
SaturdayNov. 11MarshallHuntington, W. Va.7:00 p.m.
ThursSunNov.l6-19C-USA TournamentHouston, TexasTBA
East Carolina Invitational (Greenville, N.C); A-University of Virginia Tournament
(Charlottesville, Va.); I- UNC Charlotte Invitational (Charlotte. N.C); East Carolina Classic
by the seventh place ranking, but
happy with the progress it shows
in the program.
"We've always been placed in
the last couple spots Krug said.
"Its good to see that we're placed
somewhere in the middle this year
but it's still disappointing that
we're not placed higher because
teams don't realize how good
we're going to be
With five players departing,
Rushing knows that mixing the
youth with the two seniors will
be the key to success. Half of the
team will don an ECU jersey for
the first time. So far, Rushing likes
what he sees in the freshman class,
which includes 6-foot-2-inch out-
side hitter Melissa Zentner.
"The practices pretty much
wowed us Rushing said confi-
dently. "We know for sure that
we're going to be good
The Pirates will be holding two
tournaments here in Greenville
this season, the East Carolina Invi-
tational, which features William &
Mary and Virginia Tech. The Lady
Pirates will also travel to tourna-
ments held at the University of Vir-
ginia and Charlotte before hosting
the East Carolina Classic. The Lady
Pirates open conference play against
defending champion and preseason
favorite Marshall, hosting the Thun-
dering Herd on Sept. 14.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
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Pulse
MONDAY AUGUST 21, 2006 PAGE B9
Horoscopes:
Campus & Community
ARIES
Physical confidence, social
insight and romantic interest
steadily increase over the
next eight days. Some Aries
natives may this week begin
a controversial relationship or
adopt a new health regime.
TAURUS
Over the next six days, friends
and lovers may provide unique
insights into their private thoughts
or dreams. Pay special attention
to extended travel plans or
creative employment schemes.
Although unrealistic, fresh
concepts will eventually become
workable: offer enthusiasm.
GEMINI
Financial partnerships may this
week require extra planning.
In the coming weeks, many
Geminis will receive delayed
payments or secure secondary
income sources.
CANCER
Before mid-week, a close friend
may offer misinformation or
issue an unreliable invitation.
Romantic triangles, private
resentments and ongoing social
disputes may now create minor
group tensions.
LEO
Authority figures will carefully
examine workplace skill and
performance this week. Business
reputation and career history
are now vital to successful
advancement.
VIRGO
Long-term romance is a top
priority over the next few days.
Before mid-week, expect lovers
and potential partners to ask for
greater involvement in private
decisions or family events. Don't
disappoint: public discussion
and group acceptance will now
move key relationships forward.
LIBRA
Creative business suggestions
may be publicly challenged over
the next nine days. At present,
colleagues and officials may feel
more comfortable with flawed
methods than with constructive
ideas.
SCORPIO
Over the next six days, team
projects may subtly establish new
workplace roles. After Monday,
study the actions or comments
of older colleagues for valuable
clues. Some Scorpios may be
asked to privately mediate a
dispute between co-workers.
SAGITTARIUS
Quiet workplace flirtations
are this week flattering but
unproductive. Although love
affairs are now highly favored
and may arrive from unlikely
sources: pay attention to the
needs of business partners or
long-term clients.
CAPRICORN
Early this week, a close friend
may request delicate romantic
or family advice. Long-term
promises, complex personality
traits or emotional regret may
be at issue.
AQUARIUS
Special applications, loans or
corporate permissions will this
week demand almost constant
attention. After Tuesday, small
details are easily mistaken
and may later create annoying
delays.
PISCES
For many Pisceans social anxiety
is now easing. Over the next
few days, expect friends or
potential lovers to ask probing
questions or discuss private
family information.
Fun Facts:
Women blink nearly twice as
much as men.
Donkeys kill more people
annually than plane crashes.
A spider's silk is proportionately
stronger than steel.
Women who read romance
novels have sex twice as often
as those who don't.
Ninety-nine percent of pumpkins
sold in the United States are for
the sole purpose of decoration.
More than 50 percent of
Americans fall asleep on their
sides.
King Kong was Adolf Hitler's
favorite movie.
Surviving ECU:
Your early years
Campus maps can sometimes be confusing, when in doubt, ask another student if they know how to get there.
What every freshman
should know about life
in the collegiate bubble
LIZ FULTON
SENIOR WRITER
To quote the incomparable
Adam Sandier, it's "back to school,
back to school to prove to dad
I'm not a fool For many of you
freshmen, it is your first foray
into college life. Some other
might have had too much fun last
year (or three) to gain the credit
hours to pass go and enter into
the more serious phase of your
college career.
Greenville is a true diamond
in the rough. There are many
eccentricities that accompany
attending ECU, and making it to
Christmas break is a feat that not
all accomplish. You might want
to think of this new chapter of life
as a "choose your own adventure"
novel. Is it better to jump into the
snake pit and tackle the degree
in three program? Or, would you
rather strive for recognition at
every establishment surrounding
Fifth Street?
Moderation is the key at any
establishment of higher learning,
but finding a niche and having
the time of your life are the clutch
aspirations to any college student.
Take a few life lessons from some-
one who has been around Reade
Circle a time or two and hopefully
some of the general awkwardness
ofbeing in a new environment will
fade quickly.
Remember that it is perfectly
acceptable to have roots and
wings. There is nothing wrong
with spending a few hours every
now and again gabbing it up with
you friends from back home about
the new challenges and situations
you are faced with everyday.
On a side note, this is eastern
North Carolina, the birthplace
of Pepsi, so please refrain from
complaining too much about the
shortage of Coke products on
campus.
College friends are going to
be very different from high school
friends. This is a place where
no one knows what a geek you
might have been back home and
some of the things that kept you
from making friends could be the
characteristics others like about
you the most.
Do not think that the people
who live in your dorm are the
only people you have to stick with.
There are hundreds of organiza-
tions on campus and joining one
may bring you closer to a higher
level of comfort amongst a vast
population of students.
A great place to meet people,
the almighty Student Recre-
ation Center. It is true what
they say, the Freshman 15' does
exist, so becoming close friends
with the treadmill, or your exer-
cise machine of choice, will help
combat those nasty tires of fat
that seem to attach to our bodies
come October. Just keep in mind
that the first months of a semester
are crowded more than usual and
midday is the best time to skip the
see SURVIVE page B12
Free fun for all
Greenville's RiverRock Festival
SARAH CAMPBELL
SENIOR WRITER
Greenville offers its residents and visitors alike
the opportunity to experience a first rate education
at ECU, outstanding medical care at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, a plethora of dining locales
and a night life like no other in the downtown area.
However, Greenville doesn't offer much in the way
of live musical performances.
Don't fret just yet - because live music is making
a comeback in the form of the first Greenville River-
Rock Festival. The festival is a free, day-long event
featuring eight local bands from a variety of genres
which include rock, reggae, blue grass, folk rock,
jazz and hip hop.
The festival will run from 11 a.m. to 9 p.m. on
Saturday, Sept. 9 at the Greenville Town Commons.
Local vendors will be on hand selling a wide range of
food including hot dogs, sandwiches, drinks and much
more. ECU's own, the Swash Improv Group will also
be selling a dozen glazed Krispy Kreme doughnuts
for $5.
Local businesses will house booths to promote
their services throughout the day. Other local bands
that are not performing in the event are encouraged
to show their support by setting up a group display
at the festival. In order to do so, bands are required
to fill out a form which is available at riverrockfest.
com.
All proceeds from the day of the festival, includ-
ing merchandise sales and sponsorship will go to
benefit the Magnolia Arts Center, Greenville's only
comprehensive arts organization.
Although the event is free to the public, there are
still many costs involved in organizing it. In order
to tame some of the costs The Axis of Stevil, a local
Creative Consultation firm and the organizer of the
festival, has put together four benefit concerts.
Each of the four concerts have a $5 cover charge
for admission.and host a 5050 raffle drawing in
which you can buy a $1 ticket and be entered to win
half of the money raised from the drawing.
The first of the four benefits was hosted down-
town at the Red Rooster on July 22. The turnout
was great with more than 150 people present. Eyes
of Wrath, The WinterMission and Cast Against
Character gave truly unforgettable performances.
The Phoenix Nightclub hosted the second event
on Aug. 9 with Viva la Venus, Breaking the Girl and
Strychnine Soul performing to a full house.
Finally, on Aug. 19 the RA Fountain will play
host to FRAIL and Mark Wilson with doors opening
at 12 p.m. and F'RAIL taking the stage at 1 p.m. This
concert was designed to be more family-oriented
since the first two drew mostly college crowds.
The last benefit concert is still searching for a
venue, but there is no doubt that Romeo is Bleeding,
The Legion of Supervillians and Princess and the
Criminals will be performing. The date of the concert
is Aug. 24 with doors opening at 9 p.m. and the show
beginning at 10 p.m.
For more information about the Greenville River-
Rock Festival or upcoming benefit concerts, please
visit their Web site at riverrockfest.com.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
It's a Pirate s
life for me
Being at ECU really is
something to brag about
LIZ FULTON
SENIOR WRITER
It is an exciting time here
at ECU as the school plunges
forward into its centennial year.
While making your first journey
this semester across Wright Plaza
and through the singing columns
of Joyner Library, know that you
are following a legacy of talented
students and amazing stories that
have enriched this university and
eastern North Carolina. Next time
someone puts ECU down, remind
them of all of the wonderful things
we have accomplished.
Beginning in 1907, East Car-
olina's Teacher's Training School
was set up to help teach and train
mainly young women. There was
a shortage of teachers in eastern
North Carolina, and the school was
the region's only hope for improv-
ing the situation.
Originally a two-year school,
ECTTS became East Carolina
Teachers College in 1921 and
from there evolved into a four-year
institution. By 1948, the school
was nearing a college status by
offering a B.A. in liberal arts and
a B.S. in education.
ECTC became East Carolina
College in 1951 and achieved
university status in 1967. Since
that time, rCCU has continued to
come to the aid of its neighboring
communities by opening a school
of medicine in 1977. Now known
as the Brody School of Medicine,
the school continues to expand
and serve the state. This year, the
school tied with Duke University
and others for sixth place as a
medical school that emphasizes
primary medical care according to
U.S. News & World Report Maga-
Joyner Library
Laupus Health Sciences Library
What to expect from campus libraries
see PIRATE pass BIO
,fi
Enhancing academic
performance is their
ultimate goal
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDI TOR
Ok, so I admit that in high school I
barely set foot into my school's library,
but once I graduated and decided to
seek higher education here at ECU, I
realized the vast number of resources
that libraries can provide. J.Y. Joyner
Library and Laupus Health Sciences
Library not only provide students
with endless research materials, but
the skills to conduct their research
as well.
Joyner Library is the third larg-
est library in North Carolina as well
as the largest library east of Raleigh.
Encompassing nearly 1.4 million
bound volumes, 2.4 million pieces
of microform, 530,000 government
documents, 27,000 journal subscrip-
tions and over 175 subscription data-
bases, Joyner provides students with
extensive resources.
Joyner also houses the North
Carolina Collection and Special
Collections. The North Carolina
Collection consists of historical
information from throughout the
state. The Special Collections
house oral histories, university
achieves, rare book collection, map
collection and much more.
Stepping through the doors of
Joyner the first thing you notice
is a sweet aroma drifting toward
the door from Java City and the
array of computers beckoning for
use. The reference desk which hugs
the right hand wall offers students
some friendly faces to aid in their
research.
"We want students to know
that we are here to help them, we
love to teach them information
literacy which includes how to
find, locate, evaluate and use the
libraries resources said reference
librarian Mark Sanders.
Joyner looks to provide stu-
dents with assistance through
their various programs. Students
can set up a one-on-one research
consultation, stop by the reference
desk for help or send in questions
via e-mail, AskRef@ecu.edu, or
instant message through AIM,
JoynerRef. The Interlibrary Loan
also allows students to check out
1
books from university libraries
around the nation and have them
sent here in a matter of weeks.
The Laupus Library, which
primarily serves students in ECU's
health and human services depart-
ment is located in the east wing of
the new School of Allied Health and
School of Nursing Building. Laupus
offers students thousands of health-
related journals, monographs and
periodicals to aid in their research
as well as a computer lab equipped
with a variety of software, technol-
ogy and services.
In addition to Joyner and Iaupus,
ECU also offers students with an
extensive Music Library, which is
located in the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center. The library holds over 80,000
pieces including an audio recording
collection, scores, books, journals and
microforms to aid in the educational
mission of the School of Music.
The libraries here at ECU
not only offer students a place to
do their research, it offers them
an opportunity to enhance their
academic performance. Each of the
libraries provides students with the
comfort, support and resources to
further their education.
After two years of long nights
of studying, endless cups of coffee,
group projects and research
papers Joyner Library has become
my home away from home where I
feel perfectly cozy while snuggled
into a wing chair reading and
taking notes.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Joyner Library Hours:
Sunday11:00 AM-2:00 AM
Monday7:30 AM - 2:00 AM
Tuesday7:30 AM-2:00 AM
Wednesday7:30 AM-2:00 AM
Thursday7:30 AM-2:00 AM
Friday7:30 AM-8:00 AM
Saturday10:00 AM-7:00 AM
Laupus Library Hours:
Sunday12:00 PM - 10:00 PM
Monday7:30 AM - 12.00 AM
Tuesday7:30 AM-12:00 AM
Wednesday7:30 AM- 12:00 AM
Thursday7:30 AM-12:00 AM
Friday7:30 AM-5:00 PM
Saturday9:00 AM-5:00 PM






PAGE BlO
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
MONDAY, AUGUST 81, 2006
MO!
HISTORY
continued from B9
tint. On May 3, 2000, the Brody
School of Medicine became the
first school in North America to
perform robotic heart valve sur-
gery. It is also constructing a new
facility that will make ECU one
of the premier heart treatment
centers in the world.
Furthermore, in response
to the shortage of dentists in
the area, ECU is now look-
ing to begin a dental school.
Five counties in eastern
North Carolina lack dentists and
the new school will provide rural
training for its students to better
serve the area.
ECU also has a nursing school
that was instituted in 1960. The
school produces more new nurses
a year than any other school in
North Carolina and continues to
be one of the best nursing schools
in the state with incredible gradu-
ate opportunities.
In keeping with its tradition
of teaching students to be effec-
tive educators, ECU has one of
the best teaching schools in the
country and was one of only four
nationwide recognized by the
U.S. Department of Education
for developing "cutting edge pro-
grams that will provide powerful
examples for others
The different majors and
courses of study offered at ECU
range from business to music to
fine arts. The university is cur-
rently helping the U.S. Army to
develop devices and strategies
that will abate the effects from a
biological attack.
On a local note, ECU is
working with the North Caro-
lina Department of Cultural
Resources to process remnants
from a shipwreck that is believed
to be the Queen Anne's Revenge,
Blackbeard's ship.
Many alumni have enjoyed
great success in their careers.
President of Duke Power Ruth
Shaw and president of BB&T
Kelly King are both ECU gradu-
ates as is Vince McMahon, the
founder of World Wrestling
Entertainment. Dan Neil, a 2004
Pulitzer Prize winner for the Los
Angeles Times and Mark Kemp,
the VP of music development for
MTV, also are former pirates.
The School of Theatre and
Dance was the training ground for
Sandra Bullock Speed, The Lake
House) and also writer-director
Kevin Williamson (Scream, "Daw-
son's Creek"J. Although Emily
Procter studied journalism and
dance because the school of theater
"was full she went on to become
a star of "CSI-Miami" and "West
Live Music Beer & Wine Garden Free Samples from Uptown Restaurants
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Our cupola, central campus, represents a physical piece of ECU history.
Wing Also during her time at
ECU, Procter was the 1989 runner-
up for Homecoming Queen.
With 100 years already under
its belt, ECU is the third largest,
and fastest-growing university
in North Carolina and is set to
expand from the east and take
over the world. With 23,000
undergraduates enrolled and more
than 4200 distance education stu-
dents, the school contributes $2
billion dollars to the state econ-
omy every year which just goes
to show that the time is steadily
approaching as ECU becomes a
force to be reckoned with.
This writer can be contacted at
pulsetheeastcarolinian.com.
Jimmy Buftttt cow band
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D 1 Hand or Stick vacuum
D 1 Cylinder Hamper
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LINENS-n-THINGS





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGEBll
t
Much anticipated release of 'World Trade Center'
What this film has to say
about a very sensitive
time in U.S. history
ZACH STEPHENSON
STAFF WRITER
Oliver Stone has never been
one to compromise vision for
commercial appeal. At his peak,
he humanized societal faults with
a caliber of truth that could only
be revealed on the silver screen.
Such striking acknowledgments
captured the essence of our vul-
nerabilities in cinematic staples
like Wall Street and Talk Radio.
These films not only examined the
spectrum of human emotion, but
issued contempt for those engulfed
by their own instabilities.
When I heard Stone was
directing a film based on the after-
math of Sept. 11, I was intrigued
at the thought he would follow
the precedent of his former films
with a concoction of omnipresent
motives and tribulations. Instead,
he slipped audiences the first
sacrificial blunder of his career.
Alexander failed as a film,
but proved Stone still had some
backbone in his aging frame. The
same cannot be said of World
Trade Center, which only exhibits
emotion by resurfacing the still-
too-present calamity of Sept. 11.
Flipping through the lives of two
Port Authority police officers
tragically pinned under the col-
lapse of the first tower, the movie
attempts to evoke a sentimental
response. Efforts to dramatize this
disposition are circulated through
mundane flashbacks and glimpses
into the dashed hopes of frantic
relatives. But these scenes only
offer a peripheral vista of expected
response, painfully avoiding a
much-needed dive into the crev-
ices that once defined Stone's
work.
Horld Trade Center is the first
Stone film to characterize pro-
tagonists lacking faults. More dis-
orderly, nothing is affirmed about
Sgt. John McLoughlin (Nicolas
Cage) and Will Jimeno (Michael
Pena) besides the evident position
of being stuck between layers of
concrete. Their dialogue rarely
deviates beyond the trivialities
of their children's names and a
mutual admiration for "Slarsky'
and Hutch Toss in a pompous,
revenge-seething marine, Dave;
Karnes (Michael Shannon), to
mythologically aid their rescue
and it's a wrap.
A translucent stab to cash
in on sentimental value, it only
seems natural that the film was
scheduled beside the teeny-dance-
bop of Step Up much like United;
93 was released along-side Stick
It. Audiences will seemingly ditch
their kids at the matinee to for
the following workweek's water
cooler topic.
It's ironic that Maggie Gyl-
lenhaal was almost cut loose from
her role of Will Jimeno's wife
for publicly quoting "America is;
responsible in some way" for the
Sept. 11 attacks. Conspiracy theo-
ries were formerly one of Stone's
preferred topics. But World Trade
Center smells more Mel Gibson
than Stone from the get-go. Its
mannerisms feel appropriately
entitled for a hyped profile on the'
Trinity Broadcast Network.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
Nicholas Cage, who plays John McLoughlin and Michael Pena, who plays Will Jimeno in 'World Trade Center Nicholas Cage, one of two Port Authority Police Officers that was trapped under the ruins of the first tower
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PAGEBia
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
SURVIVE
continued from B9
onslaught of gym buffs.
When it cornea to navigating
your whip around Greenville, it
is best to steer clear of Greenville
Boulevaril You'll come to love t he
under-appreciated Kvans Street,
which can pretty much get you
everywhere you need to go w ith-
OUt all of that pesky traffic.
Ax for parking on campus,
the best bet is to light a candle
and say a prayer if you do not
have a parking pass There are
times you can park in the lot
by the library for hours with-
out a single ticket gracing your
windshield and other times,
a quick run into Mendenhall
will leave you cursing the
parking enforcement people for
the heinous fine that only gets
worse if you ignore it Parking at
KCU can be a challenge; you will
need to use all your cunning to
avoid getting a ticket.
There are a few time-honored
traditions that can make the most
studious leave the library for a
little extracurricular fun. While
we steadfastly pray every year
for a winning football season,
the tailgating aspect is much
more revered. There is nothing
more fun than getting out to the
tailgate fields at 9 a.m. for a 6
p.m. game. Lounging outside with
your beverage of choice in hand
makes you thank your lucky stars
that you currently reside in 'Pirate
Nation There is no greater place
to make new friends and enjoy a
common love of all things ECU.
As October nears, two exceed-
ingly important days will need to
be marked on yourcalendar. One is
of course Halloween. Even Wike-
pedia.com cites the well-known
debauchery associated with ECU
and the last day of October. Dress
up as ridiculously as possible and
enjoy the madness.
With fingers crossed, I hope
that you will all be able to also
experience Pi Kappa Phi's Reggae
on the Lake as well. For next to
nothing, you can enjoy the mellow
grooves of some great reggae
bands and the madcap fun that
always seems to ensue at these
shindigs. I can only pray that the
powers that be will keep it going
for at least one more year.
Create your own path and
remember that your first year is
always the easiest. Take the time to
experience all that Greenville and
eastern North Carolina have to
offer because there are some truly
amazing places that only exist here.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
ftliiUJQ
mm
103 f astbrook Drive, Greenville, NC 27858
1 2S2-3S3-6463
Newman Catholic
Student Center
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Welcomes you to East Carolina!
Mass
(every Sunday evening at 7PM &
Wednesday at 5:30 followed by dinner)
Annual Pig Pickin'
September 13 at 5:30 PM
953 E. Tenth Street (2 doors down from Brewster)
252.757.1991
www.clubhouse.ecu.edunewman
Report news students need to know, tec
Accepting applications for STAFF WRITERS
Learn investigative reporting skills
Must have at least a 2,0 GPA
WEVE MOVED Apply at our NEW office located uptown at the Self Help Building - 100F E. 3rd St
353 6463(MIND)
G3TT
& BUCK.
3 for
'99
Regular '40
Sizes M-XXL
f Steinbeck'
MEN'S SHOP
Arlington Village
604 E. Arlington Blvd
Greenville
355-5926
m
V
Mexican Restaurant
MONDAYS 12 PRICE PITCHERS OF CERVEZA
TUESDAYS $1.99 HI-BALLS! $6.25 46 OZ. LIME MARGARITAS!
WEDNESDAY $1.75 MEXICAN IMPORTS!
THURSDAYS $2.95 lime Margaritas!
$3.25 FRUIT MARGARITAS!
FIESTA ON THE PATIO!
Downtown Greenville 757-1666
CALL 756-5527 FOR DELIVERY
WE HAVE WIRELESS INTERNET!
BESIDE PITT COMMUNITY COLLEGE 439-0003
We Can't Advertise Name Brands
But Come In And Check Out The Bargins
Your Favorite "Catalog"
Clothing For Ladies and Men.
40 - 50 OFF
EVERY DAY
Catalog
onnection
210E.5,hSt.
758-8612
UJB.E.
M8N-SAT18-6
SUN 1-5
- ' .' . V- VVl!





T21,2006
MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006
THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
PAGE Bis
Dapper
. Dam's.
Over 22 Years'Experience
uil.i.U)t11iiijLi Ji-wvlrv
HI V Sll.l TRADE
Ilir 1 ii i or Whole iMilrs
752-17JC
'1 Dickinson Avr. ci mivil
University
Haircutters
Hen's Cut and Style Shop
752-0559
S. Evans St.
Across from
Pirate Stuff
Serving ecu and Uib
community since 1982
$8 Men's Cut "2
with student ID 0ffl-
I
I
Si bctnimieitirlntM
piJMimiiwjCNrti
IOOFE. 3rd St.
Mark A. Ward
Attorney at Law
Board Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
Traffic Offenses
Drug Offenses
DWI
State & Federal Courts
252.752.7529 Visit our website at www.mark-ward.com
EXPRESS30RS
ROMANCING YOUR ADDICTIONS
TOBACCO ACCESSORIES ADULT NOVELTIES
EXOTIC CIGARETTES T-SHIRTS
DANCEWEARLINGERIE
Rolling Papers Glass Pipes Loose Tobacco
Stickers Blow-up Friends & Farm Animals Incense
Body Piercing & Jewelry Detox Solutions Candles
Hair Dye Adult Videos Black Lights Whipcream
Gag Gifts and a Bunch of Other Cool Stuff
Welcome Back Students!
Show Your Student ID And Get
13 OFF EVERYDAY!
205 E. 5th Street
GREENVILLE, NC
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
www.partylikehell.com
Looking for great opportunities?
Seeking a more-than-decent income?
Sounds like a health care career might be right for you.
But how do you choose?
First ask yourself what appeals to you.
What are you good at? What do you like to do?
The ALLIED HEALTH CAREER EXPLORER can help you
narrow down your search. Go to www.ecu.eduah and
click on the CD. You'll get the scoop on dozens of careers
in health care. Find out what you'd do, where you'd work,
and what kind of education and training from ECU you'll
need to get there.
Now's the time to get started on your future!
LrH
School of Allied Health Sciences
Library, Allied Health and Nursing Bldg.
252.744.6010
www.ecu.eduah
Campus Dining: More to eat than meets the eye
Something for even the
most picky students
CAROLYN SCANDURA
FEATURES EDITOR
For freshman, you may be
feeling like you are not going to
have enough dining options this
year and for upperclassmen, you
probably think that nothing has
changed over the summer. You
are both wrong thankfully.
The easiest way to tackle this
information is to start at the begin-
ning. One resource that is available
to everyone is to use the internet to
find out about your meal options at
ECU. When you visit the Campus
DiningWebsiteatecu.edudining
you should be pleasantly surprised
with the wide array of information
that is available. Wondering what
the dining hall is serving today?
Don't wonder, find out before you
get there. On the left side of the
site you can select which dining
location you would like to visit
and find out what will be waiting
for you hot and fresh like always.
Counting calories or carbs? Click
on each menu item and you can see
the nutritional content and plan
your nfeal before you even leave
your room.
West End dining hall makes meals easy; find out what's cooking online at the Campus Dining Web site.
If the internet is too last year for
you, try podcasting with Campus
Dining. You can click on the link at
the top of their site and download
all of the information they have to
offer. You can listen to information
about dining menus, meal plans,
nutrition tips, FAQs and informa-
tion about JAM Rewards.
JAM Rewards? Yep, get ready
to be rewarded for eating This
national program, which students
with new meal plans are auto-
matically enrolled in, tallies up
points each time you use a campus
dining location If you eat two
meals a day for two weeks, you
will have tallied up enough point
for three free song downloads.
For more information about the
program, visit jamrewards.com
where you can enroll in the pro-
gram, donate points to Second
Harvest, the U.S. Food Bank or
see some of the rewards you can
use points for.
New to Campus Dining this
year will be a Blimpie Subs and
see DINING page Bl 5
Recreational Services at ECU
Bye-Bye, freshman 15
SARAH CAMPBELL
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
When I first came to ECU
two years ago I vowed to my
family and friends that I would
not fall victim to the freshman
15. At first my goal was being
accomplished, I was heading the
Student Recreational Center on a
daily basis and eating as healthy
as possible.
However, a month or so into
freshman year I got bogged down
with schoolwork and suddenly I
didn't have time to do anything
but study. Needless to say I did
gain the freshman 15, maybe even
20, but now that I've gotten into a
pretty regular schedule of study-
ing and working I finally have
time to put myself first.
Since I haven't even set foot
into the SRC in over a year I
decided that the first thing on my
agenda needed to be finding out
exactly what they have to offer
now. As far as the facility itself
the 150,000 square foot SRC
houses an indoor track, indoor
and outdoor pools, 27 foot climb-
ing wall, weighs, cardio equip-
ment, a six court sports forum
and a fitness assessment lab.
I also learned that Campus
Wellness, which is located on the
second floor of the SRC, has made s
a transition to become Campus ?
Recreation and Wellness in order -g
to offer students health educa- "3
tion and promotion services on a
wide variety of topics including g
eating disorders, body image,
sexual assault prevention and
much more.
"The mission of Campus Rec-
reation and Wellness is to offer
studentsfacultystaffalumni
positive recreation and wellness
opportunities as well as providing
relevant leadership experiences
through our many programs
and employment said Kath-
ryn Hunt, associate director of
WellnessEducation Promotion.
Since I was pretty athletic in
high school so I was excited to
learn about the club and intramu-
Students stay in shape playing basketball on one of the six indoor courts.
ral sports that are ottered through
the SRC. They otter students a
great way to get to know new
people while staying in shape.
They also offer adventure trips
for the daring students dying to
try something new.
Now that I know about the
variety of equipment and services
that the SRC offers I'm excited
to get back into shape, meet new
people and improve my body
image. I expect that this fall I
will not only lose my freshman
15, but also become a healthier,
happier and stronger person.
The SRC hours of operation
are Monday-Thursday 6 a.m
11:30 p.m Friday 6 a.m. - 10
p.m Saturday 9 a.m. - 10 p.m.
and Sunday 9 a.m. - 11:30 p.m.
Admission is free to students
when they present their OneCard.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
You drank.
You danced.
You had
m-
Free Pregnancy Tests
Carolina Pregnancy Center
Greenville (252) 757-0003
www.carolinapregnancycenter.org
Washington location: (252) 946-8040
24 Hour Hotline: 1-800-395-HELP
Back-To-School. .
(J$ack-Q)o()ance(
We have a complete
size and style
inventory for all your
dancewear needs
At CarreLTD
Celebrating 31 years as
Greenville's Premier Dance Simp
756-6670
644 E. Arlington Blvd.
lies. M-F10-6, Sat 10-4
tEafce
You must be 21 to possess or consume alcohol.
Park only in designated areas (not on the grass), on the right side of
streets, in driveways or parking lots.
No more than 3 unrelated people can live together In a house.
Greenville has a leash law that requires keeping dogs under control
when walking and from running free. Pets must also have current
vaccinations.
Throwing any litter or household trash on any street, sidewalk, or
private property will result in a minimum $50 fine
Greenville has a noise ordinance to keep noise within reason. Viola-
tors are subject to increasing fines to $500. Special events permits
are available through the police department.
Grass and weeds must be kept below 12 inches.
It is illegal to discharge a firearm in the City.





f
Classifieds
Want it, get it! Only in our Classifieds.
FOR RENT
WILDWOOD VILLAS- 1450square
foot, two bedrooms, 3 12 baths,
recreation room, furnished kitchen
remodeled, on ECU bus route,
$675, no pets. 717-9872
FULLY-FURNISHED 2BR, 2BA.
WD, microwave, dishwasher,
security system, cable, water,
walk-in closet, gated community,
pools, tennis court, and incl. All
Furnishings, even silverware! $695
mm0112@mail.ecu.edu
Off 5th St. Blocks to ECU 2
Bdr, All appliances, we mow; call 321-
4712 or collegeuniversityrentals.
com.
LARGE 2BR, 2 12 BA townhouse,
full basement, WD hook-up, great
storage, enclosed patio, ECU bus
route, not pets.752-7738
HOUSE FOR rent. 302 Lewis St.
3 BR LR DR AC, WD hookups.
Garage, 5 min. walk from ECU
campus in quiet neighborhood.
No pets. $900mo lease. Call for
application: 336-816-3637
Now accepting applications for
summer and fall at Captains
Quarters, University Terrace,
Tower Village, The Trellis.
Call Hearthside Rentals
355-2112 or 355-5923.
Visit our website at www.
hearthsidemanagement.com
One, two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat
air 6, 9, 12 month leases
Water Cable included ECU bus
Wireless Internet pets dishwasher
disposals pool laundry (252) 758-
4015
Walk to campus 3 BR 1.5 BA
Recently Renovated Meade St.
Hardwood Floors, ceiling Fans in
all rooms, WasherDryer, All Kitchen
Appliances, Large Front, fenced
back yard. Attic & storage shed.
Pets ok. $650month Aug. 1st
341-4608
For Rent Twin Oaks Laura Ln. 2 Br,
1 12 baths, furnished townhouse.
All appliances washerdryer
included central air and heat.
Pool. A must see. Great location.
On ECU bus route. $650 month,
plus deposit. First month free with
contract. (757) 654-6204 or
(757) 654-9162 leave message if
no answer.
Near Gold's Gym and Campus-
great location- 2 BR-Upton Ct.
- new appliances. $590 per month-
call 917-1258. Washer and dryer
included- available immediately.
WALK TO campus! Close to
campus. 4 to 5 bedroom house
with hardwood floors and central
heatair. Washer, dryer, basic
cable, high-speed internet, alarm
system all included. Call Mike
439-0285.
WALK TO class! 1 block from
campus. 2 bedroom apartment
with hardwood floors and central
heatair. Washer, dryer, dishwasher,
high-speed internet, basic cable,
water & sewer all included. Call
Mike 439-0285.
Blocks to ECU,2or3bdr,2 12 bath,
all appliances; we mow; call 321-
4712 or collegeuniversityrentals.
ROOMMATE
WANTED
Need Roommate to share BR
apartment 1 block from campus.
WDDW, cable, DSL, and parking
included. $325mo. NPNS email:
velake@hotmail.com
FOR SALE
MUST SELL- Ralph Lauren tapestry
fabric living room sofa, club chair,
ottoman; solid oak round ballclaw
coffee table. Very good condition!
$575.00group OBO. (252)355-
7497, after 6:30 p.m.
For Sale- Sony 56 inch HD
ready projection TV with PIP and
TruSurround by SRS with Sony
surround sound system. Only 3
years old. Asking $1,000. Call
327-6565 after 6 pm.
HELP WANTED
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Manager needed approximately
two hoursday. Duties include
data entry and management,
receiving money, and preparing
computer generated reports,
general clerical duties. Apply
in person only at The East
Carolinian, Self Help Building,
Suite 100F, (East 3rd St.) Bring
Resume.
OFFICE ASSISTANT needed;
flexible hours (approx. 10 hrs.
week), great work environment. Must
be articulate, be able to interact
professionally with customers and
staff. Apply in person only at The
East Carolinian, Self Help Building,
Suite 100F, (East 3rd St.) Bring
Resume.
LOOKING FOR 20 guys and gals for
a local merchant phone promotion.
Morning, afternoon and evening
hours available. Near campus
location at 1530 South Evans
Street 104-A2 (across from Pirate
Stuff). Apply ASAP 10am thru
5pm.
AREA HIGH school seeking girl's
field hockey coach for fall 2006
M-Th 3-4:30. If interested, please
call Lydia Rotondo at (252) 714-
8180.
GREENVILLE RECREATION &
Parks Department is recruiting
Soccer Referees, Flag Football
Officials and Volunteer Coaches for
our Youth Soccer & Flag Football
programs. Pay for Referees and
Officials range from $10-$17 per
game. For additional information
about training clinics and
directions, please contact the
Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday-Friday 10am-7pm.
PART-TIME POSITION. Broadband
Internet Provider looking for part-
time employee to be part of our
Customer Response Team. Job
duties consist of answering multi-
line phone system, communicating
product to customer, entering
customer data into data base,
making marketing phone calls and
preparing marketing materials.
Applicant must have good
communication skills, computer
skills & be able to work mornings.
Approximately 15 to 20 hours
per week. Send resume' to
candidate@wavelengthmail.com
or fax to (252) 321-8186.
Night front desk clerk 10pm-5am
Mon, Wed, Fri. Serious enquiries
only. Call 754-8047 Also Sun,
Tues, Thurs, Sun 10 pm to 5 am.
WAVELENGTH, A Broadband
ISP is in need of a part-time
receptionist to work 12:00 p.m.
to 5:30 p.m Monday thru Friday.
Job duties consist of answering
multi-line phone system
plus administrative support to
busy office. Send resume' to
candidate@wavelengthmail.com
or fax to (252) 321-8186.
A SMALL Miracle is seeking
dedicated dependable employee(s)
to work with individuals with
disabilities. Various hours are
available. HS diploma, clean
background, and a one year
commitment is required. Experience
working with children or adufts with
special needs is important. Great
pay. Please call 252-439-0431.
www.asmallmiracleinc.com
RELIABLE, SAFETY-conscious
driver wanted to pick up students
in Greenville at 7:20a.m. and drive
them to school in Kinston. Monday
through Friday. $125week. Must
have reliable car and no previous
moving violations. Call Linda at
341-5460.
Customer-Service ; Part-time.
Monday -Saturday assisting
prospective tenants, answering
telephones and filing. Apply at
Wainright Property Management
3481 -A South Evans Street
Greenville.
MOTHER'S HELPER needed for
busy mom. $6hr. M-TH, 12-3pm
(12 hoursweek), but can work
with your schedule. References,
experience, reliable transportation,
non-smoker. Please call 329-
0101.
AREA HIGH school needs field
hockey and boys' lacrosse officials
for 2006-2007 school year. Great
way for past players to earn $. Call
Lydia Rotondo at 252-714-8180 if
MONDAY AUGUST 21,2006 PAGE B14
THE EAST CAROLINIAN, SELF HELP BUILDING
PHONE (252) 328-9238 FAX (252) 328-9143
interested.
WAVELENGTH, A Broadband ISP,
is in need of part-time Information
Technicians to provide support
on our Customer Service Team.
Job duties consist of installations,
troubleshooting, and maintenance
hardware and software components.
Communication skills and upbeat
personality are a must. Send resume
to candidate@wavelengthmail.com
or fax to (252)321-8186.
WZMB is in need of a student office
assistant to work morning hours M-
F. If interested please come to the
basement of Mendenhall Student
Center to get applications. You must
be good in math and have at least
a 2.25 gpa. You must be a full
time registered student. Deadline
is Friday August 25th.
FRONT DESK- Ladies Workout
Express in Greenville is seeking
an individual to work 3-5 Mon-
Thur. Must be energetic and be
able to work one-on-one with
members. Drop by or call Vicki at
353-3488.
AREA HIGH school seeking boys'
lacrosse coach for new program
beginning spring 2007. If interested
please call Lydia Rotondo at (252)
714-8180.
ARAMARK at East Carolina
University is now hiring motivated,
energetic individuals to fill positions
in our Catering Department.
Applications are available in the
Human Resources Office (located
off the back dock of Todd Dining
Hall) from 12:30 until 4:30 ,
Monday-Friday. EOE.
PT job available working with
individuals with developmental
disabilities. Competitive pay.
Great experience for students
interested in Human Services or
Health related careers. Males
encouraged to apply. Please
call 355-4033 for more info.
Application can be picked up at
101-CE Victoria Ct or fax resumes
to 3554266.
AEROBICS INSTRUCTORS
needed -Ladies Workout
Express in Greenville is seeking
outgoing, highly motivated group
fitness instructors for evening
classes. Fun atmosphere & top
pay! Drop by or call Vicki at 353-
3488.
other"
Spring Break with STS to Jamaica,
Mexico, Bahamas, and Florida.
Are you connected? Sell trips.
Earn cash, travel free! Call for
group discounts. Inforeservations
800-648-4849. www. ststravel.
com
NEED MONEY for your school
club, fraternity or sorority? Distribute
our gitt certificate package and
make great profitshurry, the
packages are limited! Each one
contains $1,500 in 2 for 1 meals,
$100 in absolutely free tanning
sessions and much more! Call
367-7059.
House hunting is
hard.
Being homeless is
harder.
Remember the Rule of Three:
Greenville City Code
says no more than
three unrelated people
can live together in a
house. townhouse.
apartment or condo.
For more info contact Student
Neighborhood Relations at 328.2847
' ARE Y00
MOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOtfl
YOUR FAMILY,
www.shareyourlif8.org
1-800-355-SHARE
Bl CoMenonQginlTlMutDontflon
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Guacamole
ingredient
8 Was conniving
15 Working editor
16 Midler movie
17 Medicinal
concoctions
18 Craftsman
19 Contribute
20 Goodness,
gracious!
22 Debt voucher
23 Astronaut's
"thumbs up"
24 Tablelands
26 Scrambled
broadcasts
29 Underwater
scanner
30 Audit pro
33 Toward shelter
34 Tafari (Haile
Selassie)
35 Algae-fungi
symbiosis
37 Besmirched
39 Bird's digestive
organ
40 Ripped to
shreds
41 Neighbor of Ger.
42 Gaelic tongue
43 Personal ID
44 Somewhat
foolish
46 Tops
47 Family
subdivision
48 Blank reply
49 Empowered
52 Had to have
54 Heavy weight
57 Very sharp turn
59 Place for a ring
61 Periodic table
entry
62 Rigby of song
63 E-mail item
64 Thwarted
DOWN
Vicinity
South African
grassland
First-century
versifier
109. to 3D
Isaac of sci-fi
'234567191011TT-1314
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33-35
37 4b'
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2006 Tribune Msdla Services, Inc.
All rights reserved.
81906
6 Shortstop Jeter
7 Approximately
8 Flower part
9 Pupa
10 , up (excited)
11 Blore and Bloom
12 Slam-dance
13 Actor Morales
14 Fender mishap
21 Health ins.
choices
23 Dined at home
25 Calif neighbor
26 Times gone by
27 Choir section
28 Long (for)
29 Blue
30 Bracelet dangler
31 Inherently
32 Llama land
34 Fastening anew
36 Prague person
38 Stocking shade
39 Fellow
41 Basilica area
45 Mambo king Tito
46 Hepburn of
Hollywood
Solutions
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47 Microbes
48 Handed out
hands
49 Uhpardon me
50 Barn bundle
51 Falsehoods
53 Deejay Rick of
"Disco Duck"
fame
54 Singer Braxton
55 Hautboy
56 Campus misfit
58 Shade of green
60 Hasty retreat
sudoku
Puzzles by Pappocom
8173
678
92316
4756
7912
6349
49216
6 754
859
V.EASY
1
To sponsor
this ad space
call the
advertising
department at
328-9245 for
more details.
6 9 V z i e 9 8 l9 e i V 8 9 Z 6 L8 Z t 6 9 fr 9 e
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PAUL
VOU KNOW WHAT THE WORST J
PART Of HAVIN6 A JOB VOU J
DON'T UNDERSTAND IS?.
WELL NO, I DON'T KNOV, SINCE
NEVER ACTUAUV BEEN HIRED FOR A
JOB I WAS TOTALLV UNQUALIFIED FOR
BUT I'M 6OIN6 TO 6UESS THAT
IT'S PROBABLV SOMETHING IN
THE RAN6E OF NOT BEIN6 ABLE
TO 00 THl
IY BILLY O'KEEFE www.mrbilly.com
SSSJuffSSSS; m- 6UESS AT? THIS IS THE ,
SECOND-WORST CONVERSATION I HAVE tVt HAD
Two Dudes
IT'SALOTHICER
WITHOUT ALL THE SNOW
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COATS.

THIS SPRING
HASPEENAAJCf-
SUZFTISE.
by Aaron Warner
ITH0U6HTHALF
THESE 6IRLS WERE
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A College Olrl Ngflisd Joe
IF WE CALL THE P1Z7A PUCE TO
COMPLAIN ABOUT HOW LONG WE'VE
PEES WAITING FOR THE PR-IVEPY
GUY, THEN IWkYPE THEY WONT
WAKE USW FOR IT.
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by Aaron Warner
THEY'P
STriHIT
FORSMfiey

WW&E THEY ARE
NOWW THAT'S
WHAT'S TAKING
S0L0U6.

:i;Y:
aNV Kii . .





MONDAY, AUGUST 21, 2006 THE EAST CAROLINIAN PULSE
Club sports: A great way to meet people, stay in shape
PAGE B15
DINING
continued from B13
rs for evening
losphere & top
ill Vicki at 353-
STS to Jamaica,
3, and Florida,
ed? Sell trips.
free! Call for
nforeservations
www. ststravel.
Members of the ECU Equestrian Club Sports Team wait with the horses at a team practice before an IHSA horse show they competed in last season.
All sorts of
opportunities to get
involved
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
It is a common worry of both
parents and students that there is
nothing to keep students occupied
during their college years but
schoolwork and social activities.
Well, never fear, ECU has one of
the largest club sports programs in
the country, which offers opportu-
nities for students all year.
Club sports are not only a
great way to get some exercise,
but also a great way to meet new
people and get out to be a part of
all ECU has to offer. I personally
wish I would have had someone
tell me about the various club
sports and their corresponding
tryouts when I was a freshman.
The Club Sports Department
at ECU has a wide range of sport-
ing opportunities just like the
diverse student population. These
club sports aren't only limited to
just men or just women, these are
sports for everyone to play.
Sports such as basketball,
frisbee, lacrosse, rugby, soccer
and tennis are all opportunities
that both are available to men's
and women's teams. Some of the
other teams and activities include
equestrian, fencing, field hockey,
volleyball, surfing, waterskiing,
skiingsnowboarding, diving,
swimming and golf.
Just last year the ECU men's
ice hockey team was established.
These mn are quite the talk of
ECU as they had unprecedented
success as ECU's first ice hockey
team. These gentlemen made it
all the way to the championship
game last year before falling to
the Richmond Spiders.
Then; are club activities for
people who dont consider typical
contact sports to suit their fancy.
Things such as various forms of
martial arts are offered as club
sports at ECU. Budo Taijutsu,
Isshinryu, Tae Kwon Do and Tai
Chi are all offered as club sports
here at ECU.
The ;asiest way to find out
about how to get involved in the
activities listed above would be to
contact the organizers of each club.
To accomplish this go to the ECU
Web site and search, at the top, for
"Club Sports Find the "Recreation
Center" tab describing what sports
you are interested in and there you
can find contact information for the
team captain or coach.
Some of the clubs actually
have their own Web sites to where
you can get even more info about
when practices are, when tryouts
are or even the knowledge on how
to become a member of many of
these organizations.
There are a wide range of
opportunities available for students
at ECU and now is the time to get
some information and hopefully get
involved. Have a great summer and
welcome to ECU.
This writer can be contacted at
pulseOtheeastcarolinian.com.
Salads on the Health Sciences
Campus. There will be a full
service breakfast menu for these
students and the convenience of
a new program called Webfood.
This will allow customers to place
their order up to a day in advance
over the Internet and have their
food prepared and waiting for
them when they arrive at their
specified time. To access this
system, customers can visit ecu.
edudining and click on the link
for Webfood.
At one point or another, every-
one has a class in the Bate, or Gen-
eral College Building on Central
Campus. When you only have a
10-minute break in between classes,
there is not much time to grab that
much needed coffee or snack. Campus
Dining took that into consideration
and is offering a C3 Express kiosk to
the left of the elevators. This mini-
store will offer snacks, salads and
Starbucks brewed coffee.
Because Campus Dining is
always listening to what students
want, they have added a new
Subway on the hill, in The Galley
on the first floor of the Jones
Residence Hall.
Back over on West Campus,
in the area of Destination 360
in Mendenhall Student Center,
Campus Dining is adding a Pirate
Grill, which will offer an upscale
grill menu and Bleeker Street Cafe
where students can enjoy fresh
baked breads, pastries and fresh
sandwich fillings made to order.
On the far end of campus, next
to Chick-fil-A at the Croatan,
there will be a new Pirate Grill
Express, which will offer a scaled
down version of the Pirate Grill
menu to provide a quick meal.
If you did not purchase a
meal plan, you can always use
your credit or debit card at any
Campus Dining location. Visit
ecu.edudining for updates and
more information.
This writer can be contacted at
pulse@theeastcarolinian.com.
COWMAN'S
JL. Est 1956
We can help
We offer GRE and GMAT prep courses
GRE course schedule:
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Starting September 12, Ending October 10
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
cost195 before September 5 .
GMAT course schedule:
Tuesdays and Thursdays
Starting October 3, Ending November 2
6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
cost $195 before September 26
If you have any questions please contact Professional Programs al 252-328-6377 or
e-mail us at LYNCHL@ecu.edu
aron Warner






PAGE B16
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 21, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 21, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1913
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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