The East Carolinian, June 14, 2006












www.theeastcarolinian.com
tec
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 74
WEDNESDAY
June 14, 2006
Law proposed to improve campus safety SGA works
on second
goal for the
summer
Freshman could
be required to give
fingerprints
SARAH BELL
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
As summer orientation sessions
begin, many students have been
visiting ECU's campus to take vari-
ous course placement tests, register
for classes and be photographed for
their OneCard after completing the
admissions process. A recently pro-
posed bill, however, might create
one more hurdle for next year's
new students to jump before being
accepted to ECU.
State Sen. Neal Hunt has pro-
posed legislation that would require
criminal background checks for all
students admitted into the UNC
System.
Hunt's proposal was motivated
by the deaths of Jessica Faulkner,
18, and Christen Naujoks, 22, two
UNC Wilmington students whose
accused killers were students who
concealed their criminal histories
from the university.
If passed during this session of
the General Assembly, the new law
would take effect this fall.
Each background check would
cost around $20, to be paid for by
the applicant. If admissions staff
found a potential problem, the
student could be required to submit
fingerprints as well.
Supporters of the bill hope that
it will help keep students safer by
preventing predatory criminals
from being admitted to UNC
System schools.
Requiring background checks
on all new potential students might
be easier said than done, however.
Leslie Winner, UNC system vice
president and general counsel, said
performing criminal background
checks on all incoming UNC System
students would be difficult to
implement and "not the most likely
way to improve campus safety
Because juvenile records are
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Applications are received and processed in the Whichard building.
sealed, inquiries into an 18-year-old
college applicant's criminal history
could yield at most only two years
worth of information regarding
their behavior.
Also, requiring criminal back-
ground checks might overload the
State Bureau of Investigation with
an additional 80,000 fingerprint
checks from April to August each
year, according to Winner.
Sergeant Jermaine Cherry of
ECU Crime Prevention thinks back-
ground checks would be beneficial
to campus security, and could help
protect students and faculty.
see CHECKS page 3
Experts predict above average hurricane season
Tropical Storm Alberto made landfall yesterday in Florida, kicking off the 2006 hurricane season.
Storms to be numerous,
but not as bad as last
year
CHRISTOPHER STEVENSON
STAFF WRITER
Right now NHL fans in North
Carolina are hoping the Caro-
lina Hurricanes blow away the
competition in the Stanley Cup
Finals, but in the months ahead
a hurricane of a different nature
could be blowing away their
houses or flooding their streets.
Last week in the Features
section of The East Carolin-
ian, readers were informed on
how to prepare survival kits.
This week we'll examine the
possibility of a serious storm.
Since the hurricane season
officially began on June 1, the top
hurricane experts have said this
year could be an above average
hurricane season.
Max Mayfield, director of
the National Hurricane Center
in Miami, doesn't think this
see HURRICANE page 3
SGA begins to review
funding manual
KIMBERLY BELLAMY .
STAFF WRITER
The legislative branch of SGA
has started working on their
second goal for the summer: rede-
fining or providing more clarity to
the funding manual.
The funding manual includes
the rules and guidelines that SGA
follows when deciding how much
money to allot an organization.
It also includes task that organi-
zations have to complete upon
receiving funding.
The main objective for this
goal is find out why there were
some complications relating to
funding last year and how much
the funding manual played a role
in this.
After determining the reasons
for the problems with funding
allotments, the SGA will brain-
storm for possible improvements
to be made to the manual.
A few congressmen already
have some suggestions that may
improve the process of funding
student organizations.
Jon Massachi, congressman,
suggested more communication
between the SGA and student
organizations is needed.
Many organizations do not
check their e-mail as frequently
as they need to, which delays the
process for getting funding to
these organizations, according to
Massachi.
Improving communication
between the two groups would
increase the awareness of dates
that organizations must have
paperwork or tasks completed to
receive their funding.
Nadia Payne, congresswoman,
suggested enforcing stricter dead-
lines for organizations to submit
documents in to SGA.
see SGA page 3
INSIDE I News: 2 I Classifieds: 14 I Opinion: 5 I Features: 7 I Sports: 11





PAGE 2
WEPNES0AYJUNM4 2006
Announcements
2006 ECULoessIn
Summer Theatre
Individual ticket sales began June 1.
Please see ECUARTS.com to purchase
tickets orcall 1 -800-ECU-ARTS. Summer
season tickets are available now.
"Guys and Dolls"
June 27-July 1
A Musical Fable of Broadway and
based on a story and characters of
Damon Runyon, this funny and romantic
comedy-considered by many to be the
perfect musical comedy-soars with
the spirit of Broadway as it introduces
us to a cast of vivid characters who
have become legends in the canon.
Everything works out in the end, thanks
to the machinations of Abe Burrows
and Jo Swerling's hilarious, fast-paced
book and Frank Loesser's bright,
brassy, immortal score, which takes
us from the heart of Times Square to
the cafes of Havana, Cuba, and even
into the sewecs of New York City.
'The Fantasticks"
July 11-15
The original production opened on May
3,1960 at the Sullivan Street Playhouse
in New York's Greenwich Village
where it's still playing after 15,000
performances making The Fantasticks
is the longest-running musical in the
world! At the heart of its breathtaking
poetry and subtle sophistication is a
purity and simplicity that results in a
timeless fable of love that manages
to be nostalgic and universal at
the same time. With its minimal
costumes, small band and virtually
non-existent set, The Fantasticks
is an intimate show that engages
the audience's imagination and
showcases a strong ensemble cast.
footloose: the musical"
July 25-29
One of the most explosive movie
musicals in recent memory now bursts
onto the live stage. When Ren and
his mother move from Chicago to a
small farming town, Ren is prepared
for the inevitable adjustment period
at his new high school. What he isn't
prepared for are the rigorous local
laws, including a ban on dancing. The
ban is the brainchild of a preacher
determined to exercise the control
over the town youth that he cannot
command in his own home. To the
rockin' rhythm of its Oscar-nominated
top 40 score (the soundtrack album
reached number one on the Billboard
charts and has sold over 15 million
copies!) to which new, dynamic
songs have been added, Footloose fe
celebrates the wisdom of listening to
youno people, guiding them with a
warm heart and an open mind.
6-14
news@theeastcarolinian.com
RACHEL KING NEWS EDITOR
Al-Zarqawi's death could accelerate progress
One battle won in the
War on Terror
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
Abu Musab al-Zarqawi has
finally been subdued by U.S. forces.
A figure of intense notoriety and
who drew enough attention to
garner a $25 million dollar bounty,
equal to the bounty for Osama bin
Laden, was the leader and main
recruiter of foreign Islamic fighters
into Iraq. A vast majority of U.S.
military casualties are attributed
to Zarqawi's men. His death by
aerial bombing is seen as a huge
victory against terrorism in Iraq.
Germany's foreign intelligence
chief, Ernst Uhrlau, said Zarqawi's
death "cannot be overestimated
While Zarqawi's death was a
feat for the U.S. and Iraqi military
the question is: Will his death serve
as a rallying cry for the remain-
ing Iraqi militants in Iraq? The i
insurgents are described as being
"Very, very smart. They don't
want to die by Sergeant Chris-
topher Schwarz of the U.S. Army
10th Mountain Division fighting
the insurgency in Iraq. There is
no question that they are debat-
ing their options in the midst of
severely weakened leadership.
It has been suggested that one
of Zarqawi's deputies will step in
to fill his shoes. Perhaps this new
deputy will run a terrorist opera-
tion that more closely follows the
goals of the international Al-Queda
organization. The suicide bomb-
ings of Iraqi Shiites and attempts to
plunge Iraq into civil war have mar-
ginalized Zarqawi from bin Laden
An Iraqi soldier guards the scene of the airstrike against Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in Iraq
and from the support he used to
enjoy from among the rest of the
Iraqi insurgency. Zarqawi had
immense support when targeting
U.S. military locations and none
when attacking Iraqi Shiites.
The negative implications of
Zarqawi's rogue operations hurt
Al-Queda in the Islamic world so
perhaps his death was more of an
expulsion from Al-Queda than
it was an execution by the U.S.
military. It is possible that bin
Laden used the U.S. to eliminate
a political embarrassment using
the Al-Queda name and conse-
quently revoked Zarqawi's fran-
chise rights.
A terrorism analyst at the Gulf
Research Center in Dubai said
"Al-Qaeda headquarters will now
have more influence on the Iraqi
branch. At least, I think they'll
be in a far better position than
before In fact Ayman al-Zawahiri
bin Laden's number two man in
Al-Queda wrote a long letter to
Zarqawi telling him of his precipi-
tous place among Muslim opinion
makers. Zarqawi may have had
an even lower job approval rating
with Muslims than Bush. Strangely
enough an Al-Queda take over of
Iraq's insurgency may be stabiliz-
ing as Al-Queda has no wish for the
anarchy which would result from
an Iraqi civil war.
While Zarqawi's death will
affect recruiting there are other
insurgent groups independent of
Al-Queda who may be a more seri-
ous threat to the peace and stability
of Iraq. After news of Zarqawi's
death hit the news prices of crude
oil dropped $1 per barrel and the
Iraqi government capitalized on
the momentum by announcing the
selection of two cabinet members.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Amendment banning gay
marriage fails in Senate
A news conference was held Wednesday, June 7 after the Senate
voted to block a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriages.
, (KRT) While backers of a gay
marriage ban have triumphed at the
ballot box in state after state, they
failed Wednesday for the second
time in two years to pass a federal
constitutional amendment defin-
ing marriage as between a man
and woman, making little headway
since the Senate's last vote on the
issue in 2004.
"We're not going to stop until
marriage between a man and
woman is respected Kansas Repub-
lican Sam Brownback said.
Only 49 senators voted to move
ahead with the amendment on a
test vote Wednesday, far short of
the 60 needed to keep the measure
alive and the 67 needed to amend
the Constitution. A similar vote
in 2004 produced 48 votes for the
amendment.
Supporters of banning same-sex
marriage had hoped to get more
than 50 votes this time, especially
after the GOP picked up four Senate
seats in the 2004 election. But the
marriage amendment lost the sup-
port Wednesday of two Republi-
cans, Judd Gregg of New Hampshire
and Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania,
who backed it in 2004.
The House is expected to take
up the matter next. A majority of
see AMENDMENT page 4





6-14-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE 3
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL 2006!
3 Bedroom
3 Full Bath
WaterSewer Included Close to Campus
On ECU Bus Route Sorry, No pets allowed
$875
Reserve Yours Today!
561-RENT(7368)
uhGCKS from page 1
"Some type of background
check on prospective students
would be useful Cherry said,
pointing out that many employers
perform background checks on
potential employees.
"I see no difference in acceptance
of a student to campus he added.
Rob Lange, associate director
of admissions, says mandatory
criminal background checks on
incoming students would help
ECU to better comply with the
UNC System campus safety initia-
tive, but could slow the admissions
process.
"The additional burden on
the manpower hours required to
process around 20,000 applica-
tions each year would lengthen the
turnaround time for applicants to
be notified of their acceptance
Lange said.
Currently, ECU admissions does
background checks on prospective
students whose applications raise
red flags.
If a student indicates prior
convictions or pending charges
on his or her application, the
university requires documentation
of the offense for review, which then
undergoes a structured process of
evaluation by various departments.
If the applicant is considered a
potential threat to the campus com-
munity, they are denied acceptance.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
SGA from page 1
0
Payne also mentioned the
efforts to establish a campus tele-
vision station to help students
become more aware of SGA poli-
cies, deadlines and events.
SGA also worked on provid-
ing representation at the summer
orientation sessions.
The final issue that the legis-
lative branch discussed was the
proposed Al parking lot expan-
sion behind the Baptist Student
Union. Massachi provided his
fellow congressmen with a visual
of the parking lot.
The branch will continue
to work on the funding manual
and other issues at the upcoming
meetings on Mondays at 5.15 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center,
room 14.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Hurricane
from page 1
hurricane season will be as
active as last year, though.
"It would be an unbeliev-
able record to have another
season like that; that's just not
very realistic Mayfield said in
an article on livescience.com.
There was a record of 27 tropi-
cal storms last year, with seven
becoming powerful hurricanes.
Four of those hurricanes made
landfall in the United States last
year, including hurricane Katrina,
which turned out to be the most
expensive and detrimental natu-
ral disaster in U.S. history.
North Carolina is no stranger
to hurricanes. North Carolina
has been hit time after time by
hurricanes in past ten years, and
Mayfield expects this trend to
continue the next 10 to 20 years
due to global warming. The North
Carolina coastline has always
been particularly vulnerable to
hurricanes because of how it sticks
out into the Atlantic Ocean.
There are 16 tropical storms
forecasted this year, and eight
to 10 of these tropical storms
are expected to become hur-
ricanes. Six of the hurri-
canes forecasted are expected
to be a Category 3 or higher.
According to the USA Today,
there is an 82 percent chance that
a hurricane will strike the United
States' coastline this hurricane
season and a 69 percent chance
that a hurricane will strike spe-
cifically within the East Coast and
Florida peninsula area.
Many hurricane experts
and government officials are
expressing the need for individu-
als to be prepared for potential
hurricanes this season, especially
those who live in the areas that
have been hit by numerous past
hurricanes.
Hurricane warnings are issued
when sustained winds of 74 miles
per hour andor dangerously high
water or waves are expected in
specific areas within 24 hours
or less, while a hurricane watch
is issued when a hurricane or
it's resulting weather conditions
threaten coastal and inland com-
munities. Local, state and federal
government warnings for evacu-
ations should be heeded with
expediency.
Alberto is the first tropical
storm this hurricane season.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.






PAGE 2
WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 2006
news@theeastcarolinian.com
RACHEL KING NEWS EDITOR
Announcements
2006 ECULoessIn
Summer Theatre
Individual ticket sales began June 1.
Please see ECUARTS.com to purchase
tickets or call 1 -800-ECU-ARTS. Summer
season tickets are available now.
"Guys and Dolls"
June 27-July 1
A Musical Fable of Broadway and
based on a story and characters of
Damon Runyon, this funny and romantic
comedy-considered by many to be the
perfect musical comedy-soars with
the spirit of Broadway as it introduces
us to a cast of vivid characters who
have become legends in the canon.
Everything works out in the end, thanks
to the machinations of Abe Burrows
and Jo Swelling's hilarious, fast-paced
book and Frank Loesser's bright,
brassy, immortal score, which takes
us from the heart of Times Square to
the cafes of Havana, Cuba, and even
into the sewecs of New York City.
"The Fantasticks"
July 11-15
The original production opened on May
3,1960 at the Sullivan Street Playhouse
in New York's Greenwich Village
where it's still playing after 15,000
performances making The Fantasticks
is the longest-running musical in the
world! At the heart of its breathtaking
poetry and subtle sophistication is a
purity and simplicity that results in a
timeless fable of love that manages
to be nostalgic and universal at
the same time. With its minimal
costumes, small band and virtually
non-existent set, The Fantasticks
is an intimate show that engages
the audience's imagination and
showcases a strong ensemble cast.
footloose: the musical"
Jury 25-29
One of the most explosive movie
musicals in recent memory now bursts
onto the live stage. When Ren and
his mother move from Chicago to a
small farming town, Ren is prepared
for the inevitable adjustment period
at his new high school. What he isn't
prepared for are the rigorous local
laws, including a ban on dancing. The
ban is the brainchild of a preacher
determined to exercise the control
over the town youth that he cannot
command in his own home. To the
rockin' rhythm of its Oscar-nominated
top 40 score (the soundtrack album
reached number one on the Billboard
charts and has sold over 15 million
copies!) to which new, dynamic
songs have been added, Footloose
celebrates the wisdom of listening to
young people, guiding them with a
warm heart and an open mind.
Al-Zarqawi's death could accelerate progress
One battle won in the
War on Terror
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
Abu Musab al-Zarqawi has
finally been subdued by U.S. forces.
A figure of intense notoriety and
who drew enough attention to
garner a $25 million dollar bounty,
equal to the bounty for Osama bin
Laden, was the leader and main
recruiter of foreign Islamic fighters
into Iraq. A vast majority of U.S.
military casualties are attributed
to Zarqawi's men. His death by
aerial bombing is seen as a huge
victory against terrorism in Iraq.
Germany's foreign intelligence
chief, Ernst Uhrlau, said Zarqawi's
death "cannot be overestimated
While Zarqawi's death was a
feat for the U.S. and Iraqi military
the question is: Will his death serve
as a rallying cry for the remain-
ing Iraqi militants in Iraq? The
insurgents are described as being
"Very, very smart. They don't
want to die by Sergeant Chris-
topher Schwarz of the U.S. Army
10th Mountain Division fighting
the insurgency in Iraq. There is
no question that they are debat-
ing their options in the midst of
severely weakened leadership.
It has been suggested that one
of Zarqawi's deputies will step in
to fill his shoes. Perhaps this new
deputy will run a terrorist opera-
tion that more closely follows the
goals of the international Al-Queda
organization. The suicide bomb-
ings of Iraqi Shiites and attempts to
plunge Iraq into civil war have mar-
ginalized Zarqawi from bin Laden
An Iraqi soldier guards the scene of the airstrike against Abu Musab al-Zarqawi in Iraq
and from the support he used to
enjoy from among the rest of the
Iraqi insurgency. Zarqawi had
immense support when targeting
U.S. military locations and none
when attacking Iraqi Shiites.
The negative implications of
Zarqawi's rogue operations hurt
Al-Queda in the Islamic world so
perhaps his death was more of an
expulsion from Al-Queda than
it was an execution by the U.S.
military. It is possible that bin
Laden used the U.S. to eliminate
a political embarrassment using
the Al-Queda name and conse-
quently revoked Zarqawi's fran-
chise rights.
A terrorism analyst at the Gulf
Research Center in Dubai said
"Al-Qaeda headquarters will now
have more influence on the Iraqi
branch. At least, I think they'll
be in a far better position than
before In fact Ayman al-Zawahiri
bin Laden's number two man in
Al-Queda wrote a long letter to
Zarqawi telling him of his precipi-
tous place among Muslim opinion
makers. Zarqawi may have had
an even lower job approval rating
with Muslims than Bush. Strangely
enough an Al-Queda take over of
Iraq's insurgency may be stabiliz-
ing as AUQueda has no wish for the
anarchy which would result from
an Iraqi civil war.
While Zarqawi's death will
affect recruiting there are other
insurgent groups independent of
Al-Queda who may be a more seri-
ous threat to the peace and stability
of Iraq. After news of Zarqawi's
death hit the news prices of crude
oil dropped $1 per barrel and the
Iraqi government capitalized on
the momentum by announcing the
selection of two cabinet members.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Amendment banning gay
marriage fails in Senate
A news conference was held Wednesday, June 7 after the Senate
voted to block a constitutional amendment to ban gay marriages.
, (KRT) While backers of a gay
marriage ban have triumphed at the
ballot box in state after state, they
failed Wednesday for the second
time in two years to pass a federal
constitutional amendment defin-
ing marriage as between a man
and woman, making little headway
since the Senate's last vote on the
issue in 2004.
"We're not going to stop until
marriage between a man and
woman is respected Kansas Repub-
lican Sam Brownback said.
Only 49 senators voted to move
ahead with the amendment on a
test vote Wednesday, far short of
the 60 needed to keep the measure
alive and the 67 needed to amend
the Constitution. A similar vote
in 2004 produced 48 votes for the
amendment.
Supporters of banning same-sex
marriage had hoped to get more
than 50 votes this time, especially
after the GOP picked up four Senate
seats in the 2004 election. But1 the
marriage amendment lost the sup-
port Wednesday of two Republi-
cans, Judd Gregg of New Hampshire
and Arlen Specter of Pennsylvania,
who backed it in 2004.
The House is expected to take
up the matter next. A majority of
see AMENDMENT page4
6-V






6-14-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE 3
NOW LEASING
FOR FALL 2006!
L
3 Bedroom
3 Full Bath
WaterSewer Included Close to Campus
On ECU Bus Route Sony, No pets allowed
$875
Reserve Yours Today!
561-RENT(7368)
Checks
from page 1
"Some type of background
check on prospective students
would be useful Cherry said,
pointing out that many employers
perform background checks on
potential employees.
"I see no difference in acceptance
of a student to campus he added.
Rob Lange, associate director
of admissions, says mandatory
criminal background checks on
incoming students would help
ECU to better comply with the
UNC System campus safety initia-
tive, but could slow the admissions
process.
"The additional burden on
the manpower hours required to
process around 20,000 applica-
tions each year would lengthen the
turnaround time for applicants to
be notified of their acceptance
Lange said.
Currently, ECU admissions does
background checks on prospective
students whose applications raise
red flags.
If a student indicates prior
convictions or pending charges
on his or her application, the
university requires documentation
of the offense for review, which then
undergoes a structured process of
evaluation by various departments.
If the applicant is considered a
potential threat to the campus com-
munity, they are denied acceptance.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
SGA from page 1
Payne also mentioned the
efforts to establish a campus tele-
vision station to help students
become more aware of SGA poli-
cies, deadlines and events.
SGA also worked on provid-
ing representation at the summer
orientation sessions.
The final issue that the legis-
lative branch discussed was the
proposed Al parking lot expan-
sion behind the Baptist Student
Union. Massachi provided his
fellow congressmen with a visual
of the parking lot.
The branch will continue
to work on the funding manual
and other issues at the upcoming
meetings on Mondays at 5:15 p.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center,
room 14.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Hurricane from page,
hurricane season will be as
active as last year, though.
"It would be an unbeliev-
able record to have another
season like that; that's just not
very realistic Mayfield said in
an article on livescience.com.
There was a record of 27 tropi-
cal storms last year, with seven
becoming powerful hurricanes.
Four of those hurricanes made
landfall in the United States last
year, including hurricane Katrina,
which turned out to be the most
expensive and detrimental natu-
ral disaster in U.S. history.
North Carolina is no stranger
to hurricanes. North Carolina
has been hit time after time by
hurricanes in past ten years, and
Mayfield expects this trend to
continue the next 10 to 20 years
due to global warming. The North
Carolina coastline has always
been particularly vulnerable to
hurricanes because of how it sticks
out into the Atlantic Ocean.
There are 16 tropical storms
forecasted this year, and eight
to 10 of these tropical storms
are expected to become hur-
ricanes. Six of the hurri-
canes forecasted are expected
to be a Category 3 or higher.
According to the USA Today,
there is an 82 percent chance that
a hurricane will strike the United
States' coastline this hurricane
season and a 69 percent chance
that a hurricane will strike spe-
cifically within the East Coast and
Florida peninsula area.
Many hurricane experts
and government offftials are
expressing the need for individu-
als to be prepared for potential
hurricanes this season, especially
those who live in the areas that
have been hit by numerous past
hurricanes.
Hurricane warnings are issued
when sustained winds of 74 miles
per hour andor dangerously high
water or waves are expected in
specific areas within 24 hours
or less, while a hurricane watch
is issued when a hurricane or
it's resulting weather conditions
threaten coastal and inland com-
munities. Local, state and federal
government warnings for evacu-
ations should be heeded with
expediency.
Alberto is the first tropical
storm this hurricane season.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE 4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
6-14-06
Amendment from page 2
lawmakers in the House backs the
amendment but in numbers well
short of the required two-thirds.
Wisconsin's eight House mem-
bers are divided along party lines
on the issue, as they were when
the House voted in 2004. All four
Republicans support it. All four
Democrats oppose it.
"This is a wedge issue that
divides Americans and enlivens
the conservative electoral base
House Democrat Tammy Baldwin
of Madison said in an interview
Wednesday, contending as have
other Democrats that GOP leaders
are trying to use the issue to energize
conservative voters demoralized
over other issues.
Baldwin, the first open les-
bian elected to Congress, supports
same-sex marriage, but she said
she accepted the right of states to
legislate in their own way on the
issue. She said a federal constitu-
tional amendment would pre-empt
the states.
"The states have always had the
authority to define and regulate mar-
riage Baldwin said. "I might note
it's a conservative tradition in this
country to support states rights
This week, supporters of the gay
marriage ban argued that a federal
amendment was needed to protect
state laws from court decisions
"redefining" marriage.
President Bush, who backed the
amendment, said in a statement
that he was disappointed with
Wednesday's vote.
"Our nation's founders set a
high bar for amending our Constitu-
tion and history has shown us that
it can take several tries before an
amendment builds the two-thirds
support it needs in both houses of
Congress Bush said.
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14-06
PAGE 5
WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 2006
1
I
a
OPINION
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
SARAH BELL EDITOR IN CHIEF
In My Opinion
Other issues trump gay marriage
Congress should
concentrate on more
important matters
DUSTIN PITTMAN
OPINION COLUMNIST
Now calm down my Conserva-
tive friends, I haven't gone soft on
you, in no way do I support the
idea of gay marriage, I just believe it
should stay away from the Constitu-
tion. I think it's more important for
Congress to spend their time solidi-
fying the nation's position on other
issues rather than trying to score
points with ultra-Conservatives
like myself, no matter how much
they need any points they can get.
The United States Constitution
is a sacred document, changed only
27 times in its more than 200-year
history, and it shouldn't change a
again for a ban on gay marriage.
Any mention of gay marriage in the
Constitution would do only serve
to weaken the document which is
the paramount law of this great
nation. Our Congress has many
other options it can exercise to
address this problem.
Conservative thinkers who
disagree with me on this issue say
that a constitutional amendment
banning gay marriage is the only
way that we can keep it out of the
hands of our court system, but I
say there's another way: limit the
jurisdiction of the court. This is
a power of Congress which has
seldom, if ever, been used, but it is
a power nonetheless. If we limit the
Court's ability to hear cases related
to these issues, they will not have
the opportunity to write law, plain
and simple.
Activist judges have forever
changed the laws of our nation by
legislating from the bench and a
constitutional amendment banning
gay marriage will only serve to fix
this one problem. I, for one, think it
is more important for us to exercise
the power of the plenty against our
activist judges and prevent them
from doing as they wish with the
laws of our nation. The Ninth Circuit
Court of Appeals is widely known,
and sometimes praised, as being the
most activist of our nation's court
system. Our Congress created it, and
they should dissolve it. By restruc-
turing the Court system, Congress
could remove from office, the legal
way, the entire Ninth Circuit and
replace them with judges appointed
by President George W. Bush, who
despite his many flaws as a Conser-
vative, has done a wonderful job in
appointing strong traditionalists to
the bench. By removing the Ninth
Circuit and courts like it, Congress
could reshape the system so that we
will not have to worry about activist
judges changing laws, because tradi-
tionalists would hold the benches.
But instead of doing what
would be difficult and, for some,
politically blackening, those we
elected to office decided that they
would try and pull the wool over
our eyes by attempting to ban gay
marriage using the Constitution
so we might praise them as great
Conservatives and vote for them
in the fall. I'm not fooled. Congress
could have done more, but they
were scared that it would upset
a few. It still remains true that a
majority of Americans believe gay
marriage is wrong, and regardless
of your position on the issue, you
must recognize one thing: America
is a majority rule society regardless
of whether or not what the major-
ity of Americans believe is moral
or immoral; it is the belief of the
majority. We have a responsibility
to protect the minority on any
issue, but we can't let that minority
guide policy.
A majority of Americans voted
for a Republican president and
voted more Republicans into the
Congress than they did Demo-
crats, because they believe that it
was the Republican Party which
could better guide the future of
America, and nothing could be
truer. The Republican Party can
bring success to America, but they
have to remember the principles for
which they stand. We didn't elect
Republicans to office so they could
increase the size of government
and increase interest rates every few
months. We elected Republicans
to strengthen America by allow-
ing it to grow in the free market.
As this was a source of major
debate over the past week I've had
a lot of time to think about how I
really feel about gay marriage, and
I've realized I really don't care.
At a time when our nation is
at war, attempting to provide the
citizens of Iraq and Afghanistan
with the very freedoms we forget
we have, I don't care about gay mar-
riage. At a time when the average
college student is racking up more
than $18,000 in debt while interest
rates continue to increase, I don't
care. At a time when the price of
oil has shot over $73 a barrel and
the price of gas is inching closer to
$3 a gallon every day, I don't care.
And at a time when our nation
is finally awakening from the oil
rich slumber we've had for way
too long, and our citizens are beg-
ging the government to help us rid
ourselves of a dependence on oil,
I don't care about gay marriage.
Our Congress should get to work
on the issues that matter, and I'm
talking to the Republicans and the
Democrats. Some politicians, on
both sides of the isle, have become
way too cozy in the job that they
have and it's due time we give them
a shock. If they're going to waste
time talking about an issue of no
real importance to America, vote
them out of office.
Pirate Rants
I wear my pink 519 wristband to
class the day after like a badge of
honor. Don't hate.
Why is it that when you are home
for the summer, your parents want
to take family trips everywhere.
Including Home Depot and the gro-
cery store can't I just stay home
and not be dragged along?
Oh please, the only message that
swearing gets across is that you are
in desperate need of a thesaurus.
Is anyone else ready for Lil Jon to
just go away?
I'm an 18-year-old with an earring
and people basically expect that
by being jerks they'll entice me to
talk back to them. When I'm just
as courteous and civil as always,
even empathizing with them ("I
understand why you feel that way,
Sir") they'll quickly get embarrassed
as they realize they're being out-
matured by an 18-year-old with an
earring.
Does anyone else miss the sounds of
the clock tower and the trains to tell
the time all over Greenville when
we are gone for the summer?
Retail sucks. That should be reason
enough for anyone to want to go
to college.
You think the drivers in Greenville
can't drive try California.
6-6-06 came and went and the
world didn't stop spinning. What
hoax are we going to look forward
to next?
Rain, rain, go away come again
some other day 'Cause I am sick
and tired of these thunderstorms!
Why is it that after three years,
when you finally find out that she
is interested, and you pursue it, she
just jerks you around and never calls
you back? Doesn't the phone have
numbers on it for a reason?
If this random kid asks me one more
time if he can get on the computer
I am going to slug him!
I really really hate when I am
hungry and I hit a restaurant and
the food sucks! I'm left still freakin'
hungry (my blood sugar dropping)
and out 20 bucks again it just
sucks!
When the girl you are dating drinks
more than you, it is quite pos-
sible that she is a man. I probably
shouldn't date himher anymore.
It may be a problem when Friday
night is your night off from drinking.
OK why is it the City of Greenville
is so concerned about grass height
but not the dumpy houses that I
wish were hidden by tall grass so I
wouldn't have to look at them! Per-
haps the Greenville PD should be
spotting criminals instead of weeds
over 12 inches high!
I believe in miracles. Where did you
come from? You sexy thing, you.
Why is it that I see an ECU police car
parked in the Chancellor's driveway
each and every night?! Don't the
ECU cops have something better to
do than to provide the Chancellor
with a private security guard? Seri-
ously though, ECU Police, why not
patrol the whole campus area like
you're supposed to do?
I hate when my employers refuse to
give me work to do at work!
If you have more than 500 pictures
on Facebook.com, you should think
about seeking professional help.
Why do some of the people I enjoy
most have to run away to California?
Life is a circus, don't be a clown.
Our Staff
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Sarah Bell
Editorjn Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Eric Gilmore
Sports Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Zach Sirkin
Photo Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during
the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board and is written by editorial board members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which are limited to 250
words (which may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed and include a telephone number. Let-
ters may be sent via e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East Carolinian, Self Help Building, Greenville, NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.







PAGE 6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
6-14-06
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PAGE 7
WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 2006
FEATURES
features@theeastcarolinian.com
CAROLYN SCANDURA FEATURES EDITOR
Disney-Pixar successful with 'Cars'
"Lightning McQueen" played by Owen Wilson, The King" played by Richard Petty and "Chick Hicks" played by Michael Keaton race above.
Nothing less than
entertainment from this
summer release
CAROLYN SCANDURA
FEATURES EDITOR
Summer is meant to be a time
of rest and relaxation but most ECU
students find themselves plagued
by school and work this Summer.
Taking some time out of your hectic
schedule this summer is a must,
even if it is only to take a trip to the
local theater to see the new Disney-
Pixar film, Cars.
I have always been a sucker for
Pixar films. I can watch Toy Story
over and over and still be enter-
tained by some of the incredible
hidden animation or those quirky
little lines that you didn't notice
the first 37 times you watched it.
The same can be said for A Bug's
Life, Toy Story 2, Monsters. Inc. and
The Incredibles. All of these movies
have supplied entertainment to
children, both big and small, since
their releases. I never would have
thought that Pixar could top Finding
Nemo, which is my favorite movie
in the world until now.
Any movie that can keep me
entertained and laughing my head
off after working two 12-hour shifts,
has got to be a great one. Without
giving away why this film was so
heart warming, let's run through
what actually happened.
After the 30 minutes of pre-
views, it was time for the custom-
Tow Mater" with the voice of Larry the Cable Guy and "Lightning McQueen" enjoying their time together.
ary, no talking, Pixar short film
before the feature. Before Cars,
the film was called One Man Band,
which was a great beginning to a
great movie. The animation was
crisp and clear and the story was
probably the best yet.
Cars begins in a NASCAR race
of some sort, where the three
main contenders are "Lighting
McQueen" the young hot-shot
rookie who is played by Owen
Wilson, "The King" who is played
by none other than The King
himself, Richard Petty and "Chick
Hicks" who is played by Michael
Keaton. The three cars are racing for
the Piston Cup and amazingly all
tie for first place. A tiebreaker race
is set in California and the cars are
all anxious to get there first.
Lightning McQueen, who is
embarrassed by his sponsor, Rust-
Eze, wants to become the new racer
for Dynoco after The King retires.
Dynoco has helicopters, beautiful
big rigs and a pit crew anyone would
die for. Lightning is willing to do
anything to be at the top. Here is
where the problems start.
Lightning and his personal big
rig, Mack, voiced by John Ratzen-
berger, who has been in just about
every other Pixar movie ever made,
head for California in an attempt to
be the first team to the race. Long
story short, Lightning gets lost in
a town called Radiator Springs in
the famous Carburetor County
along Route 66. While in town,
Lightening meets a great group of
locals after completely destroying
their town and being sentenced to
fix it. Some of these locals include
Tow Mater played by Larry the
Cable Guy, Sally the Porsche played
by Bonnie Hunt and Doc Hudson
played by Paul Newman.
At this point, it would be unfair
to say anything more about the
story, the characters or the events
in the movie because I would much
rather everyone go out and see for
themselves. This is quite possibly
one of the best, most entertaining
movies I have seen since Finding
Nemo, which is a lot coming from
the girl who had the Finding Nemo
DVD Collectors Edition at midnight
the day it was released.
The animation in the film
made you feel like you were there
with all of the cars and the music
was stimulating and appropriate
for each scene. This laugh out loud
film had quite a bit of adult humor
that the typical six-year-old wuld
see CARS page 8
Celebrity
Drofile:
Hulk Hogan
He just keeps coming
back for more
MEREDITH STEWART
SENIOR WRITER
Terrence "Terry" Gene Bollea,
otherwise known as Hulk Hogan,
has been proclaimed to be the big-
gest attraction wrestling has ever
seen. Growing up, Hogan played
bass guitar in several Florida-based
rock bands, including Ruckus and
Infinity's End.
He played in local bars, where
wrestlers would go to hang out,
and caught the attention of former
top drawing wrestler Jack Brisco
and his brother Gerald who con-
vinced Hogan to give wrestling a
shot. He trained for almost two
years and finally had his first
wrestling match in Tallahassee,
Fla on August 19, 1977.
In 1979 Hogan made his debut
in the World Wrestling Federa-
tion, and was given the name
"The Incredible Hulk Hogan He
wrestled three matches and won
them all. One month later, he
made his debut in Madison Square
Garden and in only 11 min-
utes and 12 seconds, he defeated
Ted DiBiase.
He continued to wow his fans
and began drawing crowds of all
ages. In 1981, Sylvester Stallone
personally asked him to be in
Rocky III. It was against the rules
of the World Wide Wrestling Fed-
eration, but Hogan took the offer
anyway and was fired.
He began to wrestle with the
American Wrestling Association
and later went on to wrestle on
the Japan Pro Wrestling teams. He
became so famous in Japan that
he even recorded an album there.
Fans could not seem to get
enough of Hulk Hogan and by
1983 he made a dramatic return
to the WWF. As his fans, referred
to as "Hulkamaniacs carried
him through the hard times (a
steroid scandal) and cheered
him through the great ones,
Hogan went on to win 15 world
heavyweight championships.
The 1980s and early 1990s
were his prime days as "Hulk
Hogan He was the highest draw-
ing, most popular wrestler in the
history of the business. He was the
see HOGAN page 9
hwiiimn in, iiiiiiiwm
11





PAGE 8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
6-14-06
udrS from page 7
not understand but that will keep
any adult laughing through the
whole movie. With a cast list like
this and the story's moral: Slowing
down to enjoy life and appreciate
your family, no matter what form
they come in, this movie cannot
help but please.
Cars was actually the first
movie directed by John Lasseter
(who directed both Toy Story and
A Bug's Life) since Toy Story 2. The
fact that he was a part of this movie
should make any Pixar lover stop
reading right now and get to the
theater. Cars raced to first place at
the box office this weekend with a
$62.8 million debut, maintaining
Disney-Pixar's undefeated record
with a seventh straight hit.
I recommend that if you have
any free time at all and an extra
$7.50 sitting around that you go out
and see what all the hype is about.
Enjoy some of your summer and
start by seeing this movie, you will
not be disappointed.
Grade: A
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
ECU graduate in the Middle East
Heather Crisco and four child residents of a Palestine refugee camp.
"Voices need to be heard
and not only the voice of
Israel"
CHRISTOPHER STEVENSON
STAFF WRITER
The Middle East is a place of
history and conflict filled with
a richness of religion that has
impacted nearly the entire planet.
Heather Crisco, who graduated
from ECU in 2004 with a double
BA in anthropology and religious
studies, is currently a MA student at
the American University in Cairo,
Egypt in the sociology-anthropol-
ogy department.
(Irisco went on a student abroad
trip with ECU to the Middle East
area. Crisco was so impacted by her
student abroad trip to the Middle
East that she decided to stay. Crisco
spent a great deal of time on her
trip in the Palestinian and Israeli
areas.
Americans are not completely
alien to the Middle East environ-
ment. Americans hear mainly nega-
tive things about the Middle East
through filtered news stations like
CNN. Americans hear about other
Americans being taken hostage by
extremists and terrorist. Americans
hear about the suicide bomb attacks
on a weekly basis. It is not a warm,
fuzzy feeling that comes to mind.
Crisco wrote by e-mail about
this very situation but shared a
stark contrast to what the media
mainly filters to Americans con-
cerning the Middle East.
"Before coming to Egypt, I was
faced with many concerns (espe-
cially from family and friends)
about being the target of hatred and
violence because I am an American
and a female. I've found that this
is a huge stereotype among many
Americans that is just that a ste-
reotype. I've not once during any of
my travels throughout the Middle
East, experienced negativity, hos-
tility or threats of danger because
of my nationality. If anything, I
have been welcomed to the point
that it almost becomes irritating
wrote Crisco.
Crisco conversed to both
Israeli and Palestine soldiers and
to a variety of people in each
region. During her trip, Crisco did
spend a great deal of time with
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i-14-06
6-14-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
PAGE 9
HOydn from page 7
spokesperson for the "Legends of
Wrestling" video game, appeared
on the cover of Pro Wrestling Illus-
trated magazine 81 times and was
on the cover of Sports Illustrated in
1985, which, next to the swimsuit
issues, was the year's best seller.
Needless to say, he's accomplished
many things during his lifetime,
but has yet to put a period at the
tnd of his life's goals and ambitions.
During his long career he
appeared and starred in several
movies and television shows. In
1991 he played in Suburban Com-
mando, starred in the 1993 comedy
Mr. Nanny and appeared on the
hit show "Walker Texas Ranger"
in 2001. Today Terry has his own
reality show on VH1 called "Hogan
Knows Best Hogan and his wife
of 22 years, Linda, openly share
their life on national television
as they struggle to raise their two
teenagers.
Brooke, 16, wants to date guys,
become a singer and have a semi-
normal life but her brother Nick, 15,
is currently struggling to become a
professional wrestler just like his
dad, but of course his mother has
to throw in her input. This reality
show lets people see what Holly-
wood Hulk Hogan is getting into
since his wrestling days are over.
Be sure to check out the show
now playing new episodes on VH1
and get the latest scoop on the
classic wrestling champion who
captured many and continues to
exceed the expectations of any pro
wrestler. For more information
about the show, visit vhl.com to
read about upcoming Hulk events
and episode topics.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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MidEdSt from page 8
Palestinians. Crisco emphasized
that the Palestinian people are
in favor of promoting peace and
democracy. Crisco wrote that
though the political group Hamas,
who is thought of as a terrorist
organization by much of the world,
officially has not committed any
acts of violence since being elected
and are actually calling for the
violence to stop.
Crisco has been influenced
greatly by her trip abroad.
"Because of my PalestineIsrael
trip specifically, I have definitely
changed. I have changed in that,
after meeting with government
officials, university officials and
peace-keepers from both sides; it
has become clear to me that some-
thing has to be done. Voices need
to be heard and not only the voice
of Israel Crisco wrote.
It's no secret that the United
States' government favors Israel
over Palestine. Our government
gives Israel millions of dollars and
military equipment on a continual
basis, which is one reason why
Israel has the third most powerful
air force in the world. Even Ameri-
can residents, for the most part,
seem to favor Israel over Palestine.
The United States has a huge Chris-
tian population, and the Christian
belief is that the people of Israel are
God's chosen people. The question
to ask is does this religious connec-
tion with Israel blind Americans
from seeing the conflict situation
between Israel and Palestine clearly
and in a non-biased manner?
Crisco does think that there is
a huge misconception some Ameri-
cans tend to share about the Israeli
and Palestinian conflict.
"Americans are unfortunately
only exposed to a censored media
which does not always portray
the conflict in a fair manner, thus
many Americans tend to think that
the Palestinians are nothing but a
group of militant, fundamentalist
Muslims who are attacking Israel
non-stop. This is absolutely not
true, and if anything, it is Israel
doing most of the attacking
Crisco wrote.
After finishing school, Crisco
hopes to eventually have a job that
at least keeps her coming back to
the Middle East. Many students like
Crisco go on student abroad trips
every year for the feeling of adven-
ture and for the educational aspects
that contribute to an unforgettable
experience.
Calvin Mercer, who is the
co-director of the religious study
program at ECU, is the one who got
Crisco interested in taking the trip
abroad to the Middle East.
"I know students often sign
up for study abroad because of the
sights and adventure, but most
students find out that the physical
travel is really about expanding the
internal journey of the mind and
heart wrote Mercer.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Tuesday - $2.25 Imports
Wednesday - $1.25 Mug Bud Lt $4.50 Pitchers
Thursday - $2.50 House Hi-Balls $3 Wine
Friday - $2.50 Import of the Day
Saturday - $3 Lits ft $2.50 Import of the Day
Sunday - $2.75 Pints Guinness, Bass,
Stella Artois, Black and Tan
mi
I
I





PAGE 10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
6-14-06
silly, practical, funny,
useful, thought-provoking
absolutely ridiculous
ways to beat the heat
SUZANNE PEREZ TOBIAS
KNIGHT RIPPER NEWSPAPERS
It's the kind of forecast
that elicits gasps. Groans.
Triple digits and bright
yellow suns march in a
line across your television
screen. The weather guy
chuckles, then swears it's
not his fault.
Whatever.
It's hot and miserable.
Time to think of some ways
to keep cool.
Here are 50 ideas, from
useful to wacky, to beat that
smmer heat. Look out for
more useful tips to come
throughout the summer.
1. Run in the sprinkler.
2. Freeze your sheets.
Just before bedtime, make
your bed, jump in and
ahhhhh.
3. See a movie.
4. Go ice skating.
5. Head to a swimming
pool.
6. Wash the car.
7. Turn off the stove. Opt
for salads or gazpacho.
8. Freeze a damp wash-
cloth or bandanna and wear
it around your neck.
9. Carry a parasol or light-
colored umbrella so you'll
have shade wherever you
go-
10. Have a water balloon
fight and be sure to win.
11. Take a walk through
the mall with the great AC.
12. Use your hot tub as a
cool pool. Turn off the heat
in the summer and take a
cool dip.
13. brink lots of water.
14. Spray water on your
body. Stand in front of fan
blowing at the highest set-
ting. Repeat.
15. Think cool. Mind over
matter does help.
16. Go barefoot.
17. Fill a kiddie pool or
your bathtub with water.
Throw in a bunch of ice
cubes. Try to pick them up
with your feet.
'5
18. Move slowly.
19. Close blinds or cur-
tains on windows that let in
midday sun.
20. Sounds cruel, but keep
your sweaty little kid(s) at
arm's length.
21. Play Christmas
music.
22. Bob for apples.
23. Splash in a public
fountain (at your own risk,
of course).
24. Eat spicy food. It
makes you sweat and cools
you down.
25. Stick your head in the
freezer case at a local grocery
or convenience store.
26. Take a drive a
looonnng drive to some-
where you've always meant to
go. The aiLconditioning will
make it worth your while.
27. Make homemade ice
cream in all of your favorite
flavors.
28. Put a frozen cabbage
leaf under your cap (unless
you play professional baseball
in South Korea, where this
has been banned).
29. Drink coffee. Your
body will respond by cool-
ing itself.
30. Make Kool-Aid Pop-
sicles.
31. Play catch with water
balloons.
32. Dress in breathable,
cotton fabrics.
33. Crank up the Beach
Boys.
34. Chase down the ice
cream man for that well-
deserved ice cream.
35. Dip your hat or socks
in water before heading out-
doors. The water will evapo-
rate in no time but will leave
you feeling cooler.
36. Embrace an indoor
hobby, like scrapbooking or
quilting.
37. "Test" the city's nudity
laws at your own risk.
38. Find the coolest
beauty salon in town. Make
an appointment. Ask for the
works. Be very picky.
39. Hang out in the base-
ment.
40. Visit a hypnotist for a
session, and request to be on
a trek in Alaska.
41. Watch a guilty-plea-
sure TV show. In fact, watch
many.
42. Sleep on the roof.
43. Make lemonade.
44. Carve a watermelon.
45. Watch a documentary
about polar bears or pen-
guins.
46. Soak in your tub
cool water, please with a
melon facial and cool aro-
matic suds or salts.
47. Browse a bookstore.
48. Freeze grapes and eat
'em.
49. Pull your hair up.
50. One word: Frappuc-
cino.





PAGE 11
WEDNESDAY JUNE 14,2006
SPORTS
sports@theeastcarolinian.com
ERIC GILMORE SPORTS EDITOR
ECU, ISP Sports
announce new flagship
radio stations for FM, AM
ERIC GILMORE
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU fans will be adjusting
their dials to a new radio frequency
come football season. ECU and
ISP Sports announced a five-year
agreement with Classic Rock 106.5
(WSFL-FM) which will enable the
100,000-watt station to become the
football FM flagship for the Pirate
ISP Radio Network.
ISP Sports, a marketing firm
based out of Winston-Salem,
recently inked a deal with ECU
to operate the marketing arm of
the athletic department, which
includes multi-media broadcast
rights. Thus, ISP Sports and athletic
director Terry Holland wanted to
find a station with the largest pos-
sible coverage area.
WSFL's will emerge as the lone
flagship FM signal, which reaches
Wake
County to
the west and nearly
the entire North Carolina
coastline to the south and east,
will allow Pirate fans to receive a
new extended level of coverage.
However, the drama falls on the
AM dial. Talk 1070 (WNCT-AM)
will serve as the AM flagship for
the network and provide exclusive
coverage of ECU men's basketball
and baseball. After a long period
of anticipation, Talk 1070 recently
amped their wattage up to 50,000
during the day, but powers down to
10,000-watts at night. According
to their Web site, they also operate
on an HD signal.
Talk 1070 is managed by Hinton
Media Group and more specifically
Henry Hinton. Hinton, a large
Pirate Club contributor, previously
owned New East Communications,
which included the former flagship
station 98.3 (WCZI-FM). Talk 1070
and Classic Rock 106.5 are both
owned by Beasley Broadcasting
Group, a large media conglomer-
ate.
"Having always had a strong
presence in the eastern Carolina
market, we are delighted that Clas-
sic Rock 106.5 and Talk 1070 will
be the home to Pirates' football
George G. Beasley, Chairman and
CEO said in a press release.
"Under the leadership of Terry
Holland and his team, ECU is
poised for a great future and we
want to be a part of it
Confused? In essence, Pirate
Radio 1250 (WGHB-AM) and 930
(WDLX-AM) (think T-shirts) was
carved out of the deal and will no
longer be permitted to cover any
network games, programming or
coaches' shows. Pirate Radio, who
has carried games for the past three
years, sports two 5,000-watt sta-
tions that span from Wilson to the
Outer Banks.
"Although ISP Sports and ECU
made the deci-
sion to end our
partnership, it does
not mean we will pack up
our bags or turn dur backs on
ECU stated an open letter reaction
co-authored by Troy Dreyfus and
Jonathan Ellerbe, both managing
partners of the Pirate Media Group,
which owns Pirate Radio.
"Are we disappointed? Yes. Are
we devastated? No
Because of a deep divide between
ECU's fans regarding the AM split
between Talk 1070 and Pirate Radio's
two stations, Holland felt the need
to issue an open letter released
on the ECU athletic Web site.
"I do not pretend to understand
all the "history" involved with the
various radio entities who have
carried Pirate athletic events Hol-
land said in his opening paragraph.
"Neither am I burdened with ties
to any of these entities that would
make me respond emotionally
instead of attempting to do what
see RADIO page 13
111
TERRY OLLAND





PAGE 12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
6-14-06
I
Hockey fans
bred not born
Mark Recchi and Eric Staal hope to clinch the Stanley Cup in Raleigh.
'Canes one win from Cup
RON CLEMENTS
SENIOR WRITER
Tonight the Carolina Hur-
ricanes go for their first Stanley
Cup Trophy in franchise history.
It took me awhile to become part
of the "Caniac Nation but my
enthusiasm had to develop from
something.
Growing up in Wisconsin, I was
a one-team fan depending on the
sport. The Milwaukee Brewers for
baseball, the Milwaukee Bucks for
basketball and, of course, the Green
Bay Packers for football. There is no
NHL team in Wisconsin, so I had
no real loyalties. I pulled for the
Minnesota North Stars during their
Stanley Cup Finals run in 1991, but
not passionately.
Two years later 1 was living in
Southern California and pulled for
the Wayne Gretzky-led Los Angeles
Kings to win the Cup, only to see
them fall in five games to the Mon-
treal Canadiens and the evil Patrick
Roy. It was then that I took a real
interest in hockey, at the age of 19.
The Kings became my team.
When 1996 rolled around, I
found myself cheering for Pat-
rick Roy and his new team, the
Colorado Avalanche. It was the first
season in Colorado for the former
Quebec Nordiques and they swept
Florida to bring Lord Stanley's Cup
to Denver. I just happened to be in
Denver for the decisive triple-over-
time Game 4 and I can still picture
Uwe Krupp's shot from the blue line
getting by John Vanbiesbrouck for
the game's only goal. It was one of
the best games I have ever watched,
with a combined 125 shots on goal,
and the Avalanche became my
team number two.
I went to my first NHL game in
1997 in L.A. It was Gretzky's first
game back in Los Angeles, as he was
a member of the New York Rangers.
The Rangers won the game, which
disappointed most of the fans inside
the GreatVestern Forum that night,
but it was a memorable experience
see CANES page 13
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6-14-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE 13
RddlO from page 11
is right for ECU while trying to be
fair to everyone involved
Holland went on to cite reasons
behind the five-year agreement. He
included that "the Pirate radio net-
work had of recent years has had,
at best, pitiful night-time coverage
of Pitt County Jeff Charles, the
play-by-play voice for football and
basketball, used to be the director of
electronic media before ISP Sports
came on board in January.
Holland wrote that ECU has had
a one-year game broadcast agree-
ment with 1250 for the past three
years and 1070 the last two years
with everyone's understanding that
at some point ECU needed a large
FM flagship station for its network.
According to Holland, N.C.
State stepped in and took the oppor-
tunity instead. When ECU got word
that the Wolfpack had taken the
opportunity, the unnamed 25,000-
watt FM was in serious negotiations
with 1250-AM for an agreement
that would have eliminated 1070-
AM frdm all Pirate broadcasts.
"ECU has been loyal to both
partners and has demonstrated
a willingness to do everything
reasonable (except to com-
promise ECU'S future) to keep
both included for game broad-
casts Holland included.
Holland also added that the
athletic department would assist
both radio stations with their daily
programming. However, fans have
now questioned the Holland's lack
of loyalty to Pirate Radio, who
bailed them out during troubled
times three short years ago.
"As we have said many times
on our airwaves, 'It's tough to be a
Pirate Dreyfus and Ellerbe's letter
read. "But as true Pirates who bleed
purple and gold, we vow to finish
what we started and will not let
adversity slow us down or divert us
from accomplishing our goals
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Report news students need to know, tec
Accepting applications forSJAFF WRITERS p"
Learn Investigative reporting skills J?
Must have at least a 2.0 GRA
WE'VE MOVEDI! Apply at our NEW office located uptown at the Self Help BuMdJng - 100F E. 3rd St.
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Hockey paving way on Tobacco Road
Rod Brind'Amour's hat choice highlights deeply rooted college loyalities.
(AP) Among the raucous
crowd of Carolina Hurricanes fans,
some wild cheers turned to boos
whenever North Carolina basket-
ball coach Roy Williams showed
up on the scoreboard. Ditto for
new North Carolina State coach
Sidney Lowe.
In North Carolina, such hard-
wood loyalties are passed down in
families like heirlooms.
But with the Hurricanes one
win away from bringing the first
major professional team champion-
ship to North Carolina, the rabid
'Caniacs that fill the RBC Center,
and the ticketless fans who party
outside as the game goes on, have
embraced hockey as they might a
NASCAR champion or ACC MVP.
Argue they might and do about
everything else, fans here are proving
a Tar Heel can love a game played on
the ice. So can a Demon Decon, a Blue
Devil, those running with a Wolfpack
or sailing with the Pirates.
"Everybody for the longest
time would argue that North Caro-
lina was all about basketball
said East Carolina football coach
Skip Holtz, who took time off
from preparing the Pirates for next
season to attended Game 2 of the
finals against the Edmonton Oilers
in Raleigh.
"I think this is a great sports
state he said. "They follow it,
they're rabid, they're animated.
They're great sports fans, and
they're going to follow a winner
Fans on Tobacco Road have had
plenty of practice. Duke, North
Carolina and North Carolina State
have combined to win nine NCAA
basketball championships and
create fiercely loyal fan bases, as
have fellow ACC member Wake
Forest and chip-on-the-shoulder
East Carolina.
Fans live in the same neighbor-
hoods, eat at the same restaurants
and send their kids to the same
schools. They sometimes even share
the same residence, making "A
House Divided" bumper stickers a
staple in two different shades of blue.
Udf16S from page 12
for me and my affinity for the
sport grew exponentially. Just a few
months later, I relocated to Jackson-
ville, North Carolina and I was again
living in a state without hockey.
Thankfully that lasted just a
few months. In an awkward and
sudden move, the Hartford Whal-
ers left their home in Connecticut
and moved to Greensboro. I hated
this move initially and cursed the
new Carolina Hurricanes. They had
just become another northern team
to migrate south, following the
Winnipeg Jets (Phoenix Coyotes)
and Minnesota North Stars (Dallas
Stars) to name just a couple. I felt
bad for the fans in Hartford and the
move was poorly executed, remind-
ing me of the Baltimore Colts' mid-
night move to Indianapolis.
The new Hurricanes had no
real home, playing in the small
Greensboro Coliseum to minimal
and hockey-ignorant fans in its
first season. Then a funny thing
happened. In Carolina's second
season, they made the playoffs and
the fans showed up. The Hurricanes
created "Hockey U" to educate their
new southern fan base on the rules
and terminology of the game. What
they should have done prior to the
move, they did during the playoff
run and it worked.
The Hurricanes sold out the Col-
iseum while winning, but lost to the
Boston Bruins in the first round of
the playoffs. I was fortunate enough
to attend two of those playoff games
and, I'll admit, I was pulling for
Boston, due in large part to their
goalie - former L.A. King, Byron
Dafoe. What I saw in the Coliseum,
with these Carolina fans embracing
the game that I grew to love, made
me respect the team and its fan base.
The next season the 'Canes
found a new home in Raleigh and I
went to another game, against the
Rangers. I grew fonder of the Hur-
ricanes with each season and really
jumped on their bandwagon in 2002
when Carolina reached the Stanley
Cup Finals. Even former Whaler
fans wanted the 'Canes to win, if
for no other reason than the fact
that they were playing the league's
most-hated team, the Detroit Red
Wings. I have always despised
the Red Wings (Blackhawks, too)
- blame it on the NFL's NFC North.
Carolina lost those Stanley Cup
Finals, but just four years later, the
Hurricanes find themselves just
one game away from hoisting Lord
Stanley's Cup. Like Ron Francis four
years ago, it is the veteran leadership
of Rod Brind'Amour that has led the
'Canes to Lord Stanley's doorstep.
Brind'Amour and Head Coach
Peter Laviolette have kept the
Hurricanes calm, patient and
focused. The unflappable Hurri-
canes rebounded from their Game
3 loss in Edmonton to win Game 4
Monday night despite being out-hit
by the Oilers, 32-19 and hounded
by the raucous Rexall Place crowd.
While second-year point
machine Eric Staal has become a star
and threaded a perfect pass to Mark
Recchi for the game-winning goal
Monday night, the Conn Smythe
front-runner for Carolina is rookie
netminder Cam Ward. Ward has
made brilliant save after brilliant
save while posting three shutouts
in his first Stanley Cup playoffs.
My NHL passion grew from
watching a Wayne Gretzky-led
team lose in the Stanley Cup Finals.
Tonight that passion will grow
stronger as I watch the team that
Gretzky built lose in the Stanley Cup
Finals to my Carolina Hurricanes.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE 14
WEDNESDAY JUNE 14, 2006
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maintenance Central heat air 6,
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included ECU bus Wireless Internet
pets dishwasher disposals pool
laundry (252) 758-4015
WALK TO campus: 1 block from
campus. 2 bedroom apartments
with hardwood floors and central
heatair. Washer, dryer, dishwasher,
high-speed internet, basic cable,
water and sewer included. Available
Aug. 1st. Call Mike 439-0285.
WALK TO campus and downtown. 2
bedroom duplex. Newly renovated,
hardwood floors, central heat &
air. $425 month. Available now!
Located 111-B Holly St. Call 412-
8973
ONE BLOCK from ECU - two
bedroom duplex $550; 1450 square
foot, two bedrooms, 3 12 baths,
recreation room furnished kitchen
remodeled, on ECU Bus Route,
$675, no pets 717-9872
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washer dryer included, all kitchen
appliances. $630month. Call 252-
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THREE BEDROOM, remodeled
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Very nice. $930 752-3816
3 bedroom, duplex near ECU
$546month. First month student
CLASSIFIED
6-14-oe
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discount. 752-6276.
Walk to campus 3 BR 1.5 BA
Recently Renovated Meade St.
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Kitchen Appliances, Large Front,
fenced back yard. Attic & storage
shed. Pets ok. $650month Aug.
1st 341-4608
BEECH STREET Villas- 3br2ba
available - ECU bus route, parking,
central heatair, washerdryer
hookups - $690. (866) 637-3458
or e-mail office@beechstprop.com
RENT THIS one just for the great
Parking Spot! Walk everywhere;
campus, groceries, downtown.
Fenced yard awaits your dog. More
energy efficient than most. Brick
home on Fifth for you to share with
up to 5 of your closest friends. Wiley
Realty and Property Management
347-6504.
BLOCKS TO ECU; 3 bdrm, 2.5b,
central heatAC; washerdryer;
dlshwasher, stove, refrigerator,
celling fans, blinds, fenced
yard we mow grass, call
321-4712 or view at www.
collegeuniversityrentals.com
5-MIN WALK to Wright Auditorium,
3BR, 2BA, central heat and air.
Hardwood floors, 1-car garage,
nice yard, deck, nice neighborhood.
$975 month plus deposit 864-457-
6104
WOW, NO parking hassles, no
parking fees, walk to class, to
the rec. center, to downtown - 2
bedroom1.5 bath duplex at 507
East 11th Street, central heatair,
kitchen appliances and full size
washerdryer. Small pets OK, only
Report news students need to know, foe
Accepting applications for SRFF WMERS 3
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Must have at least a 2.0 Gf 2
VVEVEMaVEDflApatouNEVVoWwIcgaleduptovlheSelfrBuInQ 100fE.3rdSt
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ROOMMATE WANTED
WANTED: MALE grad-student to
share 2BR apartment 1 block from
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dryer, dishwasher, central air,
cable, high-speed internet, and
off-street parking included. $325
mo. No pets; non-smoking. E-mail
SCW0421@mail.ecu.edu
HELP WANTED
LIBRARY PAGE. Mondays and
Wednesdays 5:45p.m. to 9p.m. and
daytime every other Saturday and
Sunday. Shelve books, assist library
patrons as needed. Apply in person
only at Children's Library, Sheppard
Memorial Library, 530 Evans Street,
Greenville. No Phone Calls.
Do you need a good job?The
ECU Telefund is hiring students to
contact alumni and parents for the
ECU Annual Fund. $6.25 per hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on ")OBS
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
OTHER
CALVARY HORSE Stables 10 minutes
East of Greenville on Hwy 33.
Full boarding, riding arena, trails,
pastures. Call 758-2779.
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252.752.7529 Visit our website at www.mark-ward.com
Get cash for your books.
Dowdy Student Stores BOOK BUY BACK:
June 20-22 II
Now's the time to sell back your USED books. Even if your
book isn't needed at East Carolina again, we may buy it
anyway! We're now buying books for State and Carolina
too! What does that mean for you? More CASH!
tsar
Student Stores
Ronald E. Dowdy
Buyback hours: 8 am - 5 pm
at the Wright Building
Wrisht Buildins 252-328-6731 1-877-499-TEXT www.studentstorcs.ecu.edu






6-14-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE 15






PAGE 16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
6-14-06
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 14, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 14, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1907
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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