The East Carolinian, April 20, 2006












4-19-06
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www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 69
THURSDAY
April 20, 2006
2006 Year in Review
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from January to April,
we examine the most
influential events
RACHEL KING
NEWS EDITOR
The year has flown by for
some, while for others it has
passed incredibly slowly.
Everyone has shared tears,
laughs and joys in the last four
months, including (from top left,
clockwise) the Polar Bear Plunge,
the death of Gay Wilentz, the
fire in Clement Hall, the contro-
versy surrounding the proposed
changes to Martin Luther King,
Jr. Street, the university's celebra-
tion of its 99th birthday and
the death of Coretta Scott King.
Although these are most defi-
nitely not the only issues ECU
has faced this year, they remind
everyone that life is fragile, finite
and beautiful. For those students
graduating, this could be a final
glance into the past and a chance
to fondly remember your roots.
The Polar Bear Plunge took place
in January, the start of a brand new
year, and an incredibly large crowd
of over 400 people found their way
into the icy waters of the Student
Recreation Center. This was the
10th straight year that students
"got a rush" in the frozen water.
In February, the university
mourned the passing of a beloved
English professor, Dr. Gay Wilentz.
After passing away on February
6, the memorial service held in her
honor allowed the campus com-1
munity to celebrate her life. The
memorial highlighted the many
accomplishments and contributions
Wilentz made at the university and
in her life.
The world also lost "The First
Lady of theCivil Rights Movement"
in February, Coretta Scott King.
A memorial service was held
in her honor that included a slide
show of pictures and voice clips
of some of her famous speeches.
In March, the community
watched in horror as a fire erupted
in Clement Hall, with one resi-
dent trapped on the ninth floor.
Luckily, the story had a happy
ending as she was rescued and
no one sustained serious injuries.
This event, while cata-
strophic for the school and res-
idents of Clement, attracted
national media attention.
The very same day as the fire,
ECU'S 99th birthday party was
in full swing on the mall, with
students wearing their Pirate
pride on their shirts and painted
faces.
Finally, this month, there
is the matter of the ongoing
debate of whether or not to
change Fifth Street to Martin
Luther King, Jr. Street all the way
through as half of it already is.
There have been several
public discussions on the topic
and will probably be many more
before a decision is reached.
That's the year in review.
Hopefully, the community will
not soon forget the events that
shaped our semester and our world.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
fiH?lKSrW?rwP Sp- t&atl'JiMl .
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Photos Lett to Right: Zach Sirkin, Zach Sirkin. Jessi Mo
Joyner sponsors
delicious stress buster
Why gas prices continue to rise
Gasoline is poised to rise
over the summer
Some need a study break
Students take advantage
of free ice cream
VANESSA CLARKE
STAFF WRITER
Students flooded Sonic Plaza
on Monday to treat themselves to
free ice cream.
Joyner Library sponsored
an outreach program designed
to give harried students a break
from the stress of the last week
before exams.
Student Outreach Librarian
Mark Sanders came up with the
delicious idea. He said it has been
extremely popular.
"We served more than 200
students in an hour and 15 min-
utes said Sanders.
This semester's ice cream
giveaway proved even more
popular than the one the library
6 hosted during the fall semester.
" Because of this, Sanders said they
2 plan on doing it every semester
and possibly during the summer
as well.
But the most important
aspects of this outreach program,
according to Sanders, were to give
students a break and to show
them a different side of Joyner
Library.
"The library is not just the
academic heart of campus Sand-
ers said, "but the cultural heart
as well
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
LEESCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
Over the last two years gasoline
prices have risen considerably.
The price of light sweet crude oil
has increased from $35 a barrel
to $71.35 a barrel. The price of oil
accounts for 43 percent of the cost of
gasoline along with taxes, refining
and marketing costs.
Unfortunately there is no end
in sight to the high oil prices with
some analysts predicting that oil
could be as high as $80 a barrel by
June. Bill O'Grady of A.G. Edwards
& Sons said, "In effect, the market
is saying this is going to be with us
for a while
Oil is produced mainly from
countries in the Organization of
Petroleum Producing Countries.
OPEC was formed in 1960 in Bagh-
dad, Iraq in order to coordinate pric-
ing and production policies for oil.
Member countries include Algeria,
Indonesia, Iran, Iraq, Kuwait, Libya,
Nigeria, Qatar, Saudi Arabia, the
United Arab Emirates and Venezu-
ela. OPEC meets every year since
1982 to decide on production quotas
and pricing. Generally OPEC tries
to produce oil at a point that will
maximize profit, meaning a point
to keep the world satisfied without
excess supply to lower the price.
Despite ever increasing prices, OPEC
has not raised its production quota
since June 15,2005.
In addition to OPEC deciding
not to increase production quota,
trouble in the Middle East has
made investors and suppliers wary
of supply problems. The recent sui-
cide bombing in Israel and the U.S.
condemnation of the Hamas along
with Iran's nuclear boasts are not
going to go away. The unrest in the
region will continue to keep prices
high. Tobin Gorey, of the Common-
wealth Bank of Australia in Sydney
said "The market has had a decent
run-up in the past few sessions so we
may see a bit of consolidation, but I
don't expect it to be a sustained dip
in prices. The worries of Iran won't
go away any time soon, and in that
sort of environment very few people
are willing to be short on oil
The psychology of any market
is one of fear and greed. When
prices go up then traders are get-
ting greedy, when prices go down
traders are getting fearful. With
the hike in prices most traders are
exhibiting a bit of greed as they
believe that the continuing crisis
with Iran and the output disrup-
tions of Nigeria will continue to
convince people to pay higher prices
for oil. The beneficiaries of these
high prices in the Middle East are
the elite and often times royalty.
Warren Buffett once said "When
people get greedy you should be
see GAS page A7
Senior interior design students make an
impact on the Rocky Mount community
Students propose changes
for area of the city
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
George Okudi to
perform in Greenville
African pop star set to
perform for a good cause
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
An African pop star is coming
to Greenville to perform a fund-
raising concert. The benefits go
toward building a hospital in
rural Uganda.
The concert will be held at
Victory Church on April 29 at 7
p.m. featuring pop icon George
Okudi. Ginger Dail, who is the
founder of Aid International, is
organizing the fund raiser, as well
as Dr. Sylvester Odeke.
Okudi is the winner of "Best
Male Artist in Africa" and "Best
East African" artist in 2003 at the
KORA Awards.
The KORA Awards celebrate
the success of African artists.
Okudi has also won many awards
in other categories. Last year, he
was an African Lifetime Achieve-
ment award nominee.
The hospital George Okudi
is benefiting will have 65 beds
and will provide for more than
500,000 residents in Uganda.
Tickets for the concert are
$ 10 for adults and children under
12 are admitted free. Tickets are
available at Tipsy Teapot, located
at 409-B Evens St and The Rock
Christian bookstore on Old Tar
Road.
Okudi is in the United States
under governmental permission
and will go back to Uganda in a
few weeks. He has developed a
fan base worldwide.
Dail will travel to a couple
see OKUDI page A6
Senior interior design stu-
dents have been working on
plans for renovations to the
downtown Rocky Mount area
known as Harambee Square this
semester as apart of the Capstone
Studio.
The Capstone Studio is one
of numerous studios in the inte-
rior design major that prepares
senior students to use the con-
cepts they learned in the class-
room and apply them to real
projects.
"We like for students' work
to be used so they can work with
real clients and see the possible
changes that may have to be
made said Hunt McKinnon,
studio professor for the Capstone
Studio.
The students brainstormed
ideas for ways to improve this
part of the Rocky Mount com-
munity. The major area of focus
in the city is Main Street, which is
divided by a train track that runs
from Florida to New York.
"This area of downtown used
to flourish until disinvestment
from the 1960s until the end of
the 1990s Hunt said.
Students propose an idea to renovate parts of the downtown Rocky Mount, N.C. area.
The students were split into include Harambee Place, Old
three groups of four to work"on Tunes, New Voices and RDI.
different aspects of the renova- The Harambee Place group
tions. consists of Sarah Hunt, Kathy
Horohoe, Jenny Speece and
Andrea Henderson.
The different groups came up
with different sections, which
These four students came up
with the idea of creating three
buildings that would include a
market, convenience shop, deli,
see DESIGN page A3
INSIDE I News: A3 I Classifieds: A91 Opinion: A4 I A&E: Bl I Sports: B6

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PAGEA2
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
4-20-06
Thursday
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4-20-06
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Page A3 news@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.6366
RACHEL KING News Editor CLAIRE MURPHY Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY April 20, 2006
Announcements
DANCE
The ECU Folk and Country Dancers
are sponsoring a salsa dance on
Friday, April 21 at the Willis Building,
First and Reade Streets downtown.
Instruction by Procopio and friends,
7:30, dance from 8:30 -11 p.m
DJ - Ramon. Students $3, FASG
members $5, public $8. A non-
alcoholicnon-smoking event The
ECU Folk and Country Dancers
are sponsoring a contra dance
on Friday, April 28, at the Willis
Building, First and Reade Streets
downtown. Beginners lesson at
7:30 p.m and contra dance, 8 -
10:30 p.m. Live, old-time and Celtic
music by a string band. Students
$3, FASG members $5, public $8.
For more information contact:
752-7350
Last chance for
Buccaneer Photos
2006 graduates
Wednesday, April 26 from 9 am.
until 5 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room One. Cap and gown may
be taken separately and packages
are available for purchase.
Contact 328-9236 to reserve a
time. Walk ins are also welcome.
'Guys and Dons'
Tuesday, June 27 through Saturday,
July 1 at 8 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday In
McGinnis Theater
Set in Damon Runyon's mythical
New York City, this oddball romantic
comedy introduces us to a cast of
vivid characters who have become
legends In the canon: Sarah Brown,
the upright "mission doll out to
reform evildoers; Sky Masterson,
the high-rolling gambler who woos
her on a bet and ends up falling in
love; Adelaide, the chronically ill
nightclub performer whose been
engaged to the same man for
14 years; and Nathan Detroit, her
devoted fiance, desperate to find a
spot for his infamous floating crap
game. Everything works out in the
end, thanks to the machinations
of Abe Burrows and Jo Swerling's
hilarious, fast-paced book and
Frank Loesser's bright, brassy,
immortal score, which takes us
from the heart of Times Square
Mj eates of Havana, Cuba, and
(froTne biwSrs of New Toil? City
Funny and romantic, Guys And
Dolls is ideal for all audiences.
Tickets are required and are $20-
$30
Contact 328-6829 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS for additional information.
The Fantasticks'
Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday,
July 15 at 8 p.m. Tuesday
through Saturday and 2 p.m.
Saturday In Mcginnis Theater.
Try to remember a time when this
romantic charmer wasnt enchanting
audiences. The Fantasticks is the
longest-running musical in the
world, and with good reason: at
the heart of its breathtaking poetry
and subtle theatrical sophistication
is a purity and simplicity that
transcends cultural barriers.
It's moving tale of young lovers
who become disillusioned,
only to discover a more mature,
meaningful love is punctuated
by a bountiful series of catchy,
memorable songs, many of
which have become standards.
Tickets are required and are $20-
$30
Contact 328-6829 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS for additional information.
Summer Drama Camp
Monday, July 24 - Saturday, July 29
from 1 - 4 p.m. at Studio Theatre,
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
This is a fun-filled program
emphasizing growth and
discovery through theatre arts.
Classes include: Beginning Acting
Technique for student aged 14-
18; Character Development for
students aged 11-13; Creative
Dramatics for students aged 7-10.
$100 per child
Contact Patch Clark at 328-1196
or e-mail her at clarkp@mail.ecu.
edu.
Wake County Public
Schools Job Fair
Wake County Public School System
Spring Teacher Job Fair Saturday
May 20, from 8:30 a.m. until 2:30
p.m. at Forestville Elementary
School and Knightdale High
School
School administrators will be on-
site to conduct interviews and to
offer contracts to select applicants.
All candidates must pre-register
and receive confirmation to attend
the job fair. Pre-register online from
May 1 -17, at wcpss.netsignupjob-
fair.
For more information contact.
hrrecruitment wcpss.net
(800) 346-3813 or (919) 854-1690
News Briefs
State:
Credtt Sulsse to add another 400
Jobs In N.C.
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)-Credit Suisse
Group plans to hire another 400
workers at its new global business
operations center in Research Triangle
Park, ultimately bringing the total work
force there up to 800 in the next two
years, the company said Tuesday.
The Swiss-based financial services
company employs 350 in the Research
Triangle and has already announced
plans to hire an additional 50 people.
The new jobs will have an estimated
annual average salary of $86,000 plus
benefits.
Credit Suisse announced in October
2004 it would invest $100 million in a
center that would house support and
information technology staff for its
investment banking division. A similar
global operations center is based in
Singapore.
Peterson lawyers: Friend's death,
bisexuallty unfair as evidence
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)-The prosecution
of writer Michael Peterson was filled
with inflammatory, irrelevant evidence
and judicial mistakes that prevented
him from getting a fair trial on charges
of murdering his wife, his lawyer
told a state Court of Appeals panel
Tuesday.
The novelist, newspaper columnist
and one-time mayoral candidate
was convicted 2 12 years ago of
first-degree murder in the death of
Nortel Networks executive Kathleen
Peterson.
Defense lawyer Thomas Maher argued
Tuesday before a three-judge appeals
panel that Superior Court Judge
Orlando Hudson repeatedly erred in
Peterson's trial by allowing evidence
that had no clear connection to the
case, and asked the panel to overturn
his client's conviction.
"We think the issues in this case,
none of them would be harmless
by themselves Maher said. "But
clearly, to the extent that there are
multiple errors, It is much tougher for
a court to say 'Well, that didn't cause
a problem
In particular, Maher cited testimony
regarding Michael Peterson's
bisexuality and evidence comparing
Kathleen Peterson's death to that in
1985 of Elizabeth Ratliff, a friend of
Peterson and his first wife, who like
Kathleen Peterson was found dead
at the foot of a staircase.
National:
U.S. businessman pleads guilty
to paying more than $2 million in
bribes for Iraq contracts
WASHINGTON (AP)-With millions of
dollars in Iraqi reconstruction contracts
to be had, Philip H. Bloom offered up
money, cars, premium airline seats,
jewelry, alcohol, even sexual favors
from women at his villa in Baghdad.
For a while, the kickback scheme
worked. Bloom, a U.S. businessman
who saw opportunity in Iraq, paid
more than $2 million in bribes to U.S.
officials who directed more than $8.6
million in contracts to companies he
controlled.
After the inspector general for
reconstruction projects began auditing
contracts, the system crumbled.
Bloom is facing up to 40 years in prison
and nearly $8 million in penalties after
pleading guilty to conspiracy, bribery
and money laundering, according
to court documents made public
Tuesday.
He is one of four people charged so
far in a scheme that included the theft
of $2 million in reconstruction money
and the illegal purchase of machine
guns and other weapons.
Defense secretary has no plans to
quit, sees no widespread dissent
among officers
WASHINGTON (API-Defense Secretary
Donald H. Rumsfeld said Tuesday he is
not thinking of quitting despite several
retired generals' calls for him to do
so. He discounted any suggestion
of widespread dissent within the
military's officer corps.
At a Pentagon news conference,
Rumsfeld sought to portray the recent
public airing of grievances against him
by some former Iraq war commanders
and other retired generals as an
inevitable consequence of his hard
push for fundamental changes in the
military establishment to fight the war
on terrorism.
"When you make a decision, you make
a choice, somebody is not going to like
it he said. "It's perfectly possible to
come into this department and preside
and not make choices, in which case
people are not unhappy, until about
five years later when they find you
haven't done anything and the country
isn't prepared
International:
robbery. Police and soldiers hunt them
down at railroads, bus stations and
fleabag hotels. Sometimes they are
deported; more often officers simply
take their money.
And though Mexico demands humane
treatment for its citizens who migrate to
the U.S regardless of their legal status,
Mexico provides few protections for
migrants on Its own soil. The issue
simply isn't on the country's political
agenda, perhaps because migrants
make up only 0.5 percent of the
population, compared with 12 percent
in the United States.
The level of brutality Central American
migrants face in Mexico was apparent
Monday, when police conducting a
raid for undocumented migrants near
a rail yard outside Mexico City shot to
death a local man, apparently because
his dark skin and work clothes made
officers think he was a migrant.
Virginia Sanchez, who lives near
the railroad tracks that carry Central
Americans north to the U.S. border,
said such shootings in Tultitlan are
common.
Like the United States, Mexico is
becoming reliant on immigrant labor.
Last year, then-director of Mexico's
immigration agency, Magdalena
Carral, said an increasing number
of Central Americans were staying
in Mexico, rather than just passing
through on their way to the U.S.
DID YOU KNOW?
Coalition soldiers kill 5 militants In
Afghanistan; Karzai wants more
action by Pakistan
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)-U.S. and
Afghan soldiers killed five militants
during a large-scale operation targeting
Taliban and al-Qaida fighters in a
volatile eastern region near Pakistan,
the U.S. military said Tuesday.
The renewed violence in Kunar
province came as Afghanistan urged
neighboring Pakistan to do more
to curb militancy on their shared
frontier, drawing an angry rebuke
from Islamabad, which has deployed
80,000 soldiers to the region.
Two U.S. soldiers, meanwhile, were
wounded when a roadside bomb
exploded near their vehicle in the
southern Zabul province's Argandab
district, military spokesman Lt. Mike
Cody said.
The soldiers were in stable condition. It
was unclear who was behind the blast,
but Taliban militants have claimed
responsibility for rising violence
throughout the region.
On Monday, coalition forces shot dead
five militants near Kunars provincial
capital of Asadabad, about 105 miles
northeast of Kabul, after a patrol
spotted a group of seven, a U.S. military
statement said.
It was unclear what happened to the
remaining two militants.
Mexico wants migrant rights in
U.S but is harsh to undocumented
Central Americans
TULTITLAN, Mexico (API-Considered
felons by the government, these
migrants fear detention, rape and
Design from page A1
coffee shop, lounge and apart-
ments.
Edgecombe Community Col-
lege is.behind the buildings and
the students came up with ideas,
such as a lounge and deli, to pro-
vide a common area for students
and other members of the com-
munity to join.
"Our proposal for these build-
ing takes inspiration from the
word 'Harambee which means
unity in Swahili said Hender-
son.
"Our design seeks to bring
unity back to trie, qjjfojiiji&&jr6r
Rocky Mount by creating spaces
that can be used by current resi-
dents and new visitors, as well as
students attending Edgecombe
Community College
Megan Pressley, Anne
Glendinning, Sarah Wilson and
Rebekah Bishop are the students
involved the second group called
Old Tunes, New Voices.
According to a member of the
group, the goal of this section of
the renovations is to include the
needs of college students, senior
citizens and to complement the
Imperial Centre.
IF YOU'RE CARING FOR
ANOTHER FAMILY
MEMBER, TRYING YOUR
HARDEST AND DOING
YOUR BEST ARE TWO
DIFFERENT THIN6S.
Apartment units, a juice bar
internet cafe and a music center
are all ideas that these students
came up with to cater to the
community.
The instruments in the music
center will be available for rent
or sold at affordable prices. The
group said that they were striv-
ing to bring music back into the
Rocky Mount area.
According to McKinnon, a lot
of Rocky Mount's history is about
nrujsjt such as Thelinus Monk.
ceilings.
The students also worked on
things such as the cost estimates,
programming, code review and
computer generated graphics
designs for the presentation.
Ian Kipp, downtown Rocky
Mount development coordina-
tor, came up with the idea of
the renovations to this area
and contacted McKinnon about
allowing his students take part in
the project.
Students in the Capstone
The last section of the ienova-v Studio did-similar work to an
nons is titled RD1. The students a ta inVKocky Mount lasfyeai
in this group focused on the Nash
County Side.
The students proposed a
coffee shop, toy store, sporting
goods store and day spa for this
area.
The students presented their
work at the Imperial Centre for
Arts and Sciences on April 17 at 6
p.m. to Rocky Mount community
leaders.
The presentations consist of
color-coded designs that specifi-
cally outlined all the aspects of
the renovations from the fur-
niture to type of windows and
that they called the Douglass
Block.
Senior level students who are
a part of the studio contribute
to finding ways to make the less
advanced parts of communities
revitalize their image.
For more information on the
Capstone Studio, visit their Web
site at ecu.edurdscapstone
capstone.htm, or contact Hunt
McKinnon at mckinnonw(smail.
ecu.edu.
This writer may be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Every day, 17 people die while waiting for a transplant. Over
93,000 people are currently in need of an organ transplant. April
is the month of Organ Donation Awareness and the Students
for Organ Donation Awareness will provide all daily facts. Look
for a fact about organ donation in each April edition of TEC.
Professional, Comprehensive
EYE EXAMS
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Independent Doctor of Optometry
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OPINIO
4-20-06
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
THURSDAY April 20, 2006
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Rachel King Claire Murphy
News Editor Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Kristin Murnane
Features Editor Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Edward McKIm
Production Manager
Rachael Lotter
Asst Photo Editor
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
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Our View
Pujols may end up
as one of best ever
Is there really any doubt that Albert Pujols is the
best player in Major League Baseball? Not only
now, but Fat Albert may go down as one of the
downright sickest players of all time.
He's the only major leaguer to ever average 35
home runs or more in each of his first five sea-
sons. Think about that.
How many great hitters can you name that you
would think had accomplished that feat? Ted Wil-
liams, Ty Cobb, Joe DiMaggio, Babe Ruth, Willie
Mays, Mickey Mantle, Lou Gherig the list goes on
and on. And yet Pujols is the only guy to do it.
With just 14 games played this season, Pujols has
10 home runs and 20 RBI, including a stretch of
six home runs in four games, In which he went
deep three times in a single game (including the
walk off blast to win it).
Chris Shelton, second year Detroit Tiger phenom,
has caught all the media attention with his torrid
home run pace, slamming nine in his first 13
games, the second quickest in MLB history. Yet
Pujols, who doesn't share the same mark as
Shelton does as the second quickest to reach
nine in 13 games, has 10 bombs in 14 games
(through 13 he had eight and then hit two in one
game against the woeful Phillies).
Pujols is one of those guys who comes along and,
as they say, "makes you forget about everyone
else Anybody can see this guy is really some-
thing special. At just 26 years old, he has collected
211 home runs. Let's say for argument's sake he
plays for another 12 years, averaging around 35
homers per year. That gives him 420 more deep
balls, totaling 631 home runs. With the pace he's
on this year, he will hit over 50 homers, the first
time so far in his young career if he does accom-
plish it. Plus, he's the type of special hitter that
Could have four straight years of over 50-home
run production.
If Bonds doesn't break the record, who are the
next candidates? Alex Rodriguez and Albert
Pujols. And the truth is A-Rod strikes out way
too much.
Watch out Hank Aaron, Albert Pujols may be
coming your way in about 10 or 11 years.
Pirate Rant
My Random Column
Letter of goodbye after another year
Dear TEC Readers,
As I sit here in the office with decorations around me, I want to thank all of you for an amazing
year here at TEC. We have enjoyed working with the organizations on campus and businesses around
Greenville. As we finalize our year, I wanted to write a goodbye to all of you as Editor-in-Chief.
Many changes have taken place within our office, the school's campus and even around Greenville.
We relocated to our new office downtown, which made for an interesting adventure in trying to cover
the events on campus in a timely manner. We had great support from campus organizations, which
made for successful coverage of the important events on campus and around Greenville. As ECU ages
one year closer to our centennial, we tried to cover campus events to the best of our ability.
As with everything in life, as soon as you're comfortable, it is time to change. Much of our adjusting
was to the new building and new staff. Now that we've settled in and gotten to know one another, it is
easy to see that the changes were positive ones. I was eager to do the best I could, and all in all, with a
few bumps in the road, we have had a successful year at TEC.
Only one more year until my graduation and with this chapter of my life closing, I want to thank
you all for your presence on campus and in our paper.
The Pirate Rants continue to be a wonderful source of entertainment for us at the office and you
as readers; I hope you all have enjoyed the plethora of perspectives received each week as much as we
have. The Letters to the Editor have contributed to our awareness of the various opinions of our readers
as well. Thank you notes and other acknowledgements for our stories and coverage have made the staff
feel appreciated, while notice of upcoming events helped us to stay informed throughout the year. For
all of these ways in which you, our readership, have been involved, we here at TEC are thankful.
Over the summer we will only have one publication each week, coming out every Wednesday start-
ing May 17 until July 26. We look forward to continuing to hear from you in Pirate Rants and Letters to
the Editor this summer. If you are enrolled in summer classes or this fall, we are always looking for new
additions to our team. Just come in and apply. We look forward to having you join us.
So with warm wishes for a relaxing summer, 1 wish all of you luck with your exams starting next
week. The breath of relief is just around the corner. Classes and exams are almost over, so just hang in
there for a few more days. Enjoy the beautiful weather and the events on campus. Take a break today
and join your fellow students at the Barefoot on the Mall celebration. It proves to be a good distraction
and a good way to end the semester. Cometby for some free goodies from our table.
As you read this I have completed my tenure as Editor and what I have left to say is, that it hasn't
always been a party, but it has been fun.
Thank you again!
Jennifer Hobbs
Editor-in-Chief 2005-2006
In My Opinion
(KRT) April is Fair Housing
Month, the perfect time to exam-
ine some of the more sobering
realities of housing in America.
As Hurricane Katrina dem-
onstrated, incidents of housing
discrimination still abound. The
homeownership divide between
blacks and whites is strikingly
wide. And housing has become
less and less affordable in most
major metropolitan areas.
The reported incidents of
housing discrimination increased
significantly - 8.6 percent - from
2003 to 2004, according to the
National Fair Housing Alliance.
The number of cases reported to
state, federal and nonprofit agen-
cies climbed from 25,148 in 2003
to 27,319 in 2004. But last year,
the number of incidents dropped
slightly, with 26,092 reported
complaints in 2005.
In late March, the National
Urban League's report, "The State of
Black America 2006 found that 50
percent of blacks own their homes
compared to 70 percent of whites.
A major reason for this dis-
parity is racial segregation, says
Lance Freeman, assistant profes-
sor of Urban Planning at Colum-
bia University. Many middle-class
and home-owning blacks live in
neighborhoods that are over-
whelmingly black, where pov-
erty rates are higher and where
amenities and services are lower
than for middle-class, home-
owning whites, Freeman says.
This, he says, reduces the
chances of blacks to build equity
with their properties, and it
impedes wealth creation.
Because many black home-
buyers are turned away when
trying to borrow from conven-
tional lenders, they are often
susceptible to predatory lenders.
These high rates make it difficult
for many blacks to meet their
mortgage payments.
Predatory lending is rampant
in minority communities. Blacks
and Hispanics are disproportion-
ately represented in the sub-prime
home-finance market, which
means they are paying several more
percentage points in interest than
what their white counterparts pay.
As a nation, we lose more
than an estimated $9 billion
per year because of predatory
loans, according to the Center for
Responsible Lending. State and
municipal legislatures all across
the country are passing laws and
ordinances to try to address this
serious housing issue.
Likewise, the issue of afford-
able housing is in need of immedi-
ate attention and reform. As gen-
trification continues to skyrocket
in many major metropolitan areas,
the costs of rental properties are
increasing and homeownership
is becoming more and more out
of reach for many Americans.
On average, it costs more
than three times the federal
minimum wage - or $15.78 per
hour - to pay for a two-bedroom
apartment in America, accord-
ing to the National Low Income
Housing Coalition.
And even in families that rent
and have two full-time mini-
mum-wage earners, 81 percent
of them live in counties where a
two-bedroom apartment at the
Fair Market Rent is unaffordable,
according to the housing coalition.
The dream of homeownership
is part of the American dream.
Let's not allow it to fall to ruins.
(KRT) Federal officials
in Washington are finalizing a
national bird flu response plan.
In Missouri and Illinois, public
health agencies are nervously
tracking an outbreak of mumps
that has grown to about 200 cases
in eight states so far this year,
about as many as are reported
nationally in an average year.
Bird flu and mumps are very
different viral diseases, but they dem-
onstrate one uncomfortable truth: In
this era of globalization, the break-
down of public health anywhere in
the world poses a threat to everyone
everywhere, no matter how wealthy
their nation or remote their location.
Bird flu began in South China.
It has spread across the globe,
through Central Asia and into
Europe. So far, the virus has shown
little ability to spread from person
to person, which is a very good
thing. But most experts believe It
will arrive in North America this
year whether we're ready or not.
Doctors at the U.S. Centers for
Disease Control and Prevention
believe the first mumps case was
carried to this country by some-
one traveling from overseas late
last year. Two infected airline trav-
elers are believed to have spread
it through the Midwest on a total
of nine flights, including two
passing through St. Louis. At least
one student at Southern Illinois
University has been infected.
It's likely that at least some
of the 75 people who have con-
tracted mumps in Missouri and
Illinois this year would not be
infected if they had received
the so-called MMR (measles,
mumps and rubella) vaccine.
But in recent years, lawmakers
in Missouri and several other
Midwestern states have expanded
options for parents who object to
vaccination on religious or philo-
sophical grounds. That policy
carries significant public health
risks. Many parents probably
don't understand the great stakes.
Since the 911 attacks, national
spending on public health has
soared. But much of that has
been for work aimed at combat-
ing bioterrorism. The greater
threat, unfortunately, seems to
be from diseases that are far more
mundane and easily overlooked.
The Bush administration's
avian flu plan relies too much
on stockpiling antiviral drugs
that will be of only limited use in
the event of an outbreak. Money
would be better spent sending
public health teams to countries
with little or no public health
infrastructure. That way the avian
flu threat could be contained and
fought before it ever reaches us.
At the same time, tight bud-
gets have curtailed state public
health spending.
We can't escape the conse-
quences of the worldwide col-
lapse of public health. Towering
mountains and wide oceans are
no protection from tiny germs.
It's a small world, after all, and
that's enough to make us sick.
Exams are almost here and now people are realizing they
have to study for the first time all semester. Now they
are using all of the group study rooms at Joyner. OK, you
have a right to them just as much as I do. But what about
the 5 million empty faculty study rooms that cannot be
used by students? I have never seen a faculty member
use one of them, so why not let the students?
To the person that wrote about people being jealous of
fraternity guys and sorority girls Get over yourself!
Did you ever think that not everyone wants to be like
you?
Ah yes, spring is in the air. The girls on campus are
dressing quite nicely love those skirts ladies, oh yes.
Soon, we'll have our finals. I can hardly wait and then
summer will be here. Oh yeah. That's right!
The semester is almost over and I can't wait to move
out of the dorms.
Please stop copying off of my paper in my science class!
Don't you know that the professor makes up two copies
of the exam, moron? I hope you fail.
Does anybody else ever walk by someone qr a group of
people and get stuck in that awkward situation where
you've made eye contact and you don't want to be rude
so your forced to talk. But at the same time you don't
want to because you know it's going to turn into one of
those awkward conversations where you have absolutely
nothing to talk about and both parties know they're
going to walk away feeling like complete losers?
If you are going to do a research paper on Vietnam,
please do your research. And don't use racial slurs and
generalize about soldier drug use without facts, espe-
cially when the professor is a Vietnam vet!
The ECU Ambassadors are the coolest people I know on
campus.
Just a little grammar lesson for all of you grammatically
challenged people out there; your and you're are two
completely different words. If you mean you are then
put the apostrophe in there and don't make yourself
look ignorant or lazy.
1 hate when people use God's name in vain. It stings my ears!
What ever happened to innocent until proven guilty? I
hope the trial in Durham tells the real story and all the
media and liberals are put to shame for trying to judge these
people before any criminal proceedings were undertaken.
1 don't want a job in my major either, I think I'm going
to move to the beach and use a metal detector to find
change to buy lottery tickets until I hit it big. If that
doesn't happen, at least I'll be at the beach.
I think my R. A. fell off the side of the earth. No wonder
we never ge't caught doing illegal things. I can't wait
until May 1 when I'm out of this luxurious jail cell
(a.k.a. dorm).
Will someone please fix the stupid ice cream machines; if
you don't I'm going to keep leaving multiple bowls filled
with the liquid that is supposed to be icecream on the table!
You can't tell me who I am, because I'm working on that
too. What's right for me )ust isn't for you.
Is It wrong that I want to push my history professor, who
is an old lady, down a flight of stairs?
Today is going to kill me.
Why can't I wear socks with flip-flops?
I am addicted to Myspace, but not Facebook.
Whoa there buddy! NSO does not lie. They do their best
to provide the most accurate information. If they do not
have the answer, they refer the customer to someone
who does. I apologize if you received some, so you say,
"incorrect" information.
My roommate makes up stories when she writes pirate
rants, but they sound like real stories. I mean, what is
the point?
Dear Roommate - 1 can't wait until you get your own
apartment just so I can come over and laugh at how
trashy it is because you don't know how to clean. P.S.
I'm glad I never have to live with you again.
i I want to thank the person in Jarvis who folded my
i laundry the other day instead of just taking it out of the
' dryer and throwing it on the floor. It was a busy stressful
day, but that made me so happy! Thank you to everyone
out there who takes the time to be courteous!
j It's not the friend zone, it's not a relationship, it's that
damned gray area.
I'm a student who works at The Galley, and I am sick of
people handing me broken, taped up or sometimes even
just half of their OneCard and expecting it to work. I
cant believe people can be too cheap to fork over the 15
dollars it costs to get a new card. Yet they'll let me spend
10 minutes trying to make their melted, hole-punched
.warped in-three-pieces, duct-taped OneCard they've
had for three years go through our machine.
! If you expect the guys on campus to act like men, then
I learn to act like ladies.
Dear Roommate - Please stop painting your finger nails
I seven days of the week. Every time I walk into our room
1 feel like lamina Korean nail salon. Please stop before
I suffer from brain damage.
Girls check your boyfriends. You'd be amazed at how
many bigay closet guys there at ECU. Check the history
on their computers!
Why join Facebook if you are going to block your fellow
students from viewing your profile? Well 1 suppose if
i your friend does it then you must do it as well.
We've known each other for about four years now, we
' came to school together, and for some reason you've
; seemed to turn your back on me once we got here. Even
though I'm with someone else, I'm not over you. This
summer won't be much fun without you.
Countdown to this summer is upon us
Thanks to the guy who told me to smile when I was
walking back from class it brightened my day!
To the guy who wants to know why girls want to sleep
next to the wall. It's because the guy should sleep closest
to the door, it's kind of like when you walk down the
street, the guy should be next to the road.
Editor's Notr: The Pirate Rant is an anonymous way for students and staff in the
ECU community b wke their opinions. Submissions can he submitted anonymously
online at wsvw.theeastiarolinian.com. or e-mailed to cditon&theeastcanillnian.
i com. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity.
:






-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A5
DEAD WEEK SURVEY
Become an AdRep at XftEjJU
Must:
Work well with others
Be detail oriented
3e able to multita:
Benefits:
Flexible houro
Gain a ton of work experience
Great resume builder
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec
Self Help "Building
adstheeastcarolinian.corr.
Take the survey today by visiting
www.ecu.edusga
Definition of Dead Week:
The period of approximately one week, known as "Dead Week will be designated
the last week of instruction for the Fall and Spring semesters. During this time, there
shall be no required major examinations given, with the exception of skills,
laboratory or clinical finals. Term papers or any other projects due during Dead Week
must be assigned in writing at the beginning of the semester with complete written
instructions given to students no later than the midpoint of the semester. Although
the purpose of Dead Week is to provide students maximum freedom to prepare for
final examinations and otherwise complete course wok requirements, it is also one of
the fifteen weeks designated for instruction. Therefore, all classes will meet as
regularly scheduled.
www.expressions.ecu.edu
Mftvnwi
VPPW
1
CfuL 35tlv cz-ct 36tlu

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I
RAGEA6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
4-20-06
Wellington B. Gray Gallery presents
designs to run through May 22
ON UNIVERSITY
SCHOOL OF LAW
Opening in Greensboro - August 2006
Now accepting applications for the charter class.
Web site:
law.elon.edu
for complete information and online application
Toll free: (888) ELON-LAW E-mail: law@elon.edu
The Gray Gallery is currently presenting work from eight artists graduating from the MFA program
in the School of Art and Design at ECU.
4-20-C
Okudl
from page A1
of places in Uganda in June to
check on ongoing projects that
are generating income. She is
also looking to build a chil-
dren's center for children who
have been orphaned by AIDS.
The facility would be a linked
school and orphanage called
HOPE Children's Center. The
center would initially be home
to 20 to 30 children and then
expand to hold more than 50.
Dr. Odeke recentlytreturned
from Uganda where he was on a
medical mission for a full month.
The hospital is a personal project for
Dr. Odeke, who is a native of Kadami,
where the hospital will be built.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas t Carolinian, com.
A ride the No. 66 bus in Chicago
could be a fare to remember
(KRT)A young property
lease coordinator wants to start a
conversation with a man seated
next to her on a Chicago Transit
Authority bus one morning.
"Nice day out Sara Hall, 25,
says, turning to the stranger. "It
might be one of the nicest days of
the year, don't you think?"
He peeks over his newspaper,
flashes a smile and so begins
another friendly conversation.
As the No. 66 Chicago bus
inches along this morning, it
is different things to different
people: a noisy reading room, a
place to catch a quick nap, a mass
transit jalopy that rattles between
home and work.
But for at least some students
and young professionals, it has
become a kind of rolling velvet
room, albeit with plastic and
crushed polyester decor.
It'sa place for people-watching,
friendly conversation and maybe,
just maybe, a place to find love.
In the 1980s and 1990s, when
lakefront high-rises were the pin-
nacle of fashion, and the buses that
rolled up Michigan Avenue toward
the drive were packed with young
singles, the No. 151 was tagged
by some as Chicago's "Love Bus
Now the population in those
lakefront neighborhoods has
aged, ridership on the No. 151
has declined, and the new hot
neighborhoods for young profes-
sionals lie to the west, in Ukrai-
nian Village, in West Town and
in Wicker Park.
Undoubtedly there are many
contenders for the title among the
city's crisscrossing grid of bus routes.
Indeed, some would argue
the El's Brown Line is every bit as
romantic, and others even make
a claim for Metra's Union Pacific
Northwest Line to Crystal Lake.
Yet the No. 66 Chicago Avenue
line seems as good a candidate as
any for the new Love Bus.
"I met my husband on this
bus" three years ago, said Angela
McKnight, 31, while riding along
on Chicago Avenue.
CREATING A NATIONAL MODEL OF ENGAGED
LEARNING IN LEGAL EDUCATION
Emphases on total student development, exceptional legal
knowledge and skills, leadership and civic involvement, and
international study
Learning experiences in the area's leading law firms, federal
and state courts, businesses, government agencies and
nonprofit organizations
Home of the North Carolina Business Court, which handles
business litigation in the school's courtroom and facilities
Partner with the American Judicature Society's Institute
of Forensic Science and Public Policy, a new national
organization located near the law school
Congratulations to the
newest members of
Omicron Delta Kappa
National Leadership Honor Society
Caitlin Aldridge Allen
Carlos Everett Arosemena III
Justin Gary Byrd
Virginia Gray Carraway
Georgia Childs
Roger Allen Conner, Jr
Judith Emery Coogan
Elizabeth Regina Costello
Marcus Ray Coward
Catrina Davis
Derek Wayland Denton
Thomas Edward Doyle
Johnnie Isaac Eastwood
David Linville Edwards
Michael Bruce Edwards
Christina Susan Eftekharzadeh
Lori Sholders Farmer
Bryson Richard Finney
Benjamin Cohen Gersh
Brittney Alese Grantham
Jaime Kerry Hall
Rebecca Nolan Harris
Nancy Jo Hodges
Latoya Quansha Horton
Marques Cole Jones
Paris Nicole Kee
Erica Plouffe Lazure
Jessica A Ledbetter
Aadil Mubeen Lodhi
Jonathan Steven Massachi
Shawnte' Carriea' McMillan
Kevin Ray Mills
Todd Nolan
Brittany Marie Norman
Charles Ryan Owens
April Lynne Paul
Miller Bowen Pearsall
Kathryn Patricia Pedersen
Jennifer Elizabeth Perrino
Mary Elizabeth Puckett
Courtney Diann Quinn
Elizabeth Nicole Schuler
Brandy Lorraine Shaw
Robert Andrew Statz
Cedrea Ashnique Stephens
Audra Marie Thomas
Regina Lynn Twine
Tamika E Walker
Angel Lou Warren
Alicia Nicole Williams
Steven Brent Young
fa

The ODK Initiation will be held on
Saturday, April 22, 2006 1:00 pm
Mendenhall Sudent Center
: I
I





4-20-06
006
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4-20-06
NC STATE UNIVERSITY
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A7
Going back to Raleigh this summer?
Take a course at NC State!
Registration is open!
First Session May 22 - June 27
Second Session July 5 -Aug. 10
Ten-Week Session May 22 - Aug. 10
With Summer Sessions at NC State, you have the flexibility of
attending day and evening classes. This summer, choose from
an array of over 900 undergraduate and graduate courses.
Web site: www.ncsu.edusummer
Toll free: (866) 294-9903
Local: (919)515-2265
PREMIER STUDENT HOUSING FOR
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY!
Welcome to River Pointe Village Apartments, the student community
that is all about students! Conveniently located adjacent to the East
Carolina University campus, our fully-furnished apartments feature all
the comforts a student needs to feel at home, whether you're studying
or not! Our all-inclusive rent means your electricity, water, cable, and
Internet access are all in one easy payment! We feature a state-of-the-art
study lab with Internet access, full-size washers and dryers, a fitness center,
a swimming pool, basketball and volleyball courts, tanning beds, and
much more! Plus, we're located on the ECU shuttle and weekend Pirate
Express shuttle routes! Call or visit us on-line for more information.
Fully furnished 2 3- and 4-bedroom floor plans Large balcony w locking storage
Broadband Internet and cable connections in every bedroom Built-in study areas
Full-size washer and dryer Ceiling fans Private bathrooms
All-inclusive rent includes electricity, water, cable, and Internet access
Vaulted living room & reception area Furnished model apartment Tanning beds
Multipurpose game and recreational room Fully-equipped fitness room
High-tech 247 Internet accessible study hall area Sparkling swimming pool
Courtyard patio area by the pool Basketball and volleyball courts
Located on the Pirate Express shuttle and ECU shuttle routes
Village Apartments
'Offer ends 53106
lli) NL Greenville Klvcl. I Greenville, NC
Fourth annual undergraduate
exhibition showcases creativity
Symposium gains
popularity with students
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The University Honors Pro-
gram, EC Scholars and Undergradu-
ate Research are hosting the fourth
annual symposium in Mendenhall.
The all-day event starts at 8
a.m. and is open to the public.
According to a recent press
release, Dr. Michael Bassman,
associate vice chancellor and
director of University Honors,
EC Scholars and Undergraduate
Research programs, said, "The
purpose of the symposium is to
display undergraduate student
research and projects completed
over the past year Every-
one is encouraged to attend
the event and take notice of
the exceptional research being
completed by ECU students
Last year the 15 undergraduates
were rewarded14,653 in stipends
for their work. They are hoping
for the ability to give out even
greater rewards around $25,000.
"Up until a few years ago,
students basically began their
research in graduate school.
Now research has started in
the undergraduate level and
includes creative projects. We
include all projects from uni-
versity programs such as art,
music and interior design. I am
looking forward to a fascinating
and educational experience this
year said Bassman.
Last year, Mendenhall was
packed with students, parents,
faculty and other supporters.
The number of people attend-
ing is expected to double at the
upcoming symposium.
Students are encouraged to
show their research and creativ-
ity, with the chance to compete
for great rewards.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
u3S from page A1
afraid and when people get afraid
you should get greedy That is
sound advice from the world's
second richest man. However
the question remains whether the
increased demand will continue
to overprice oil to the point that it
is? Certainly attempts at creating a
substitute are currently in the works
and when the countries of OPEC
have run dry of oil what will they
export? Sadly most OPEC coun-
tries are in the Middle East where
unemployment is high and there is
an extreme disparity of wealth. The
wealth is often not invested into the
infrastructures of these countries
or used to educate and develop the
workforce.
For anyone who has seen the
2005 movie Syriana and remembers
Matt Damon's speech to Alexan-
der Siddig about how the Middle
East should use their oil revenues,
Damon hit the nail on the head
and the countries of OPEC would
do well to heed his advice before
the world's greatest natural resource
is wasted.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Coke laugh your bu
Thugs Might at the
Comedy 2 One
Same comedy zone which
started at The Attic in
1986 the manual to the
Mesh Cafe and has now
made a permanent home
here at Tie Breakers
Sports Bar and Grill.
T pFF EVERY
iDY ZoNe!
Show starts at 8:15 PM w "Built
Comfort" playing after the show.
Call 439-0555 to reserve your
seats. Admisson is $7.00 for both
shows.
Come early and have dinner with
us and enjoy the 12 price pitchers.
www.tie-breakers.com for more info.
Tm River febte
www.riverpointevillage.com (866)317-2121
If S StU. Not too Late,
blit please doN't Wt.
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rife tqe is at Haiti
For 50U to Laiti
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OtHer peaces Ciafl tHat they're tHe Hot Spot,
a part; s Wnat schools about.
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tHN JU HUSt gVe US a SHOUt.
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1725 East First Street
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 752-4225
Managed by Aimco
www.TarRiverEstates.com
(U&.





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
4-20-06
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Cl
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Page A9 The East Carolinian, Self Help Building
Phone (252) 328-9238 Fax (252) 328-9143
THURSDAY April 20, 2006
FOR RENT
Now accepting applications for
summer and fall at Captains
Quarters, University Terrace,
Tower Village, The Trellis. Call
Hearthside Rentals 355-2112 or
355-5923. Visit our website at www.
hearthsidemanagement.com
Walk To Campus: 2 or 4 or 6 or
6 or 8 or 10 or 12 or 14 or 16
people can live together one block
from Campus. Central Heat Air.
Large bedrooms. Washer, Dryer,
dishwasher, high-speed internet,
basic cable, lawn care, water, and
sewer all included in rent. Available
August 1st Call Mike 439-0285.
2 BR Duplex Apt. Available June 1st
Convenient to ECU Central ACHeat
Pets OK w Deposit Call 714-9099
or 355-3248
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Brick Duplex,
Central Air Stancil Drive Walking
Distance to ECU -J540month
Pets OK wfee Call 353-2717 or
355-5439
DOCKSIDE DUPLEX - 3 bdrm, 2
bath, vaulted ceilings, washerdryer
included. 1 unit available 6106,1
unit available 71 06 or 81 06. Call
252-327-4433
Walk To Campus! 1 block from the
Library. 2 bedroom apartments with
hard wood floors and central heat
air. Washer, dryer, dishwasher, high-
speed internet, basic cable, water St
sewer all included. Available August
1st. Call Mike 439-0285.
One two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,
9, 12 month leases Water Cable
included ECU bus Wireless Internet
pets dishwasher disposals pool
laundry (252) 758-4015
Brand new 2 & 3 bedroom
townhouses for rent. 1.5 to 2.5
baths. Dudley's Grant off Firetower
Rd. All appliances. WasherDryer
hook-ups $695-795 per month. Call
341-0223 for more information.
Duplex 2 Bdrm 1 Bath $400-450 3
Bdrm 4 Bdrm 5 Bdrm Houses $750-
$1250 call 252-361-2138
Walk to Campus and Downtown.
2 Bedroom, WasherDryer hookup,
newly renovated, hardwood floors,
central heat and air. Very Clean and
Neat, in Holly Street off 1st Street.
$425 - Call 412-8973
Townhomes available now!
Over 1500 SQ ft. Enjoy your
own private floor! Rates
starting at only $340.00. Lease
today b get One Month Free!
Call University Suites 252-
551-3800
Duplex 2 BDRM 2 BATH Central Heat
AC ECU Bus Route Partial Furnished
218 Wyndham Circle 252-714-1057
252-756-2778 Available July 1st.
Walk to campus 3 BR 1.5 BA Recently
Renovated Meade St. Hardwood
Floors, ceiling Fans, WD, All Kitchen
Appliances Large FrontBackyard &
storage shed. $675monthAug. 1st
341-4608
DOCKSIDE DUPLEX - 3 bdrm, 2
bath, vaulted ceilings, washerdryer
included. 1 unit available 6106,1
unit available 71 06 or 8106. Call
252-327-4433
Beautiful house for rentsublease
over summer. Up to five bedrooms
available. House is huge and in
amazing shape. Located at 4th and
Eastern. Only $1000month. Call
Jen (252)883-9481
TWO AND THREE bedroom house
apt. Renovated hardwood floors,
all gas. Very clean. No dogs. ECU
area. $650 and $950. No dogs.
752-3816
Walk to ECU, Pre leasing For
May, June, July, August, All
size homes, view details at
collegeuniversityrentals.com
-or- call 321-4712
Sublease for June and July.
Willoughby Park Condo 2Bd2Bth.
Pool and Tennis Courts. Cable
WaterSewer incl. $625mth. For
more info call 252-327-2060
Wyndham Circle Duplex: 2
bedroom 2 bath, washerdryer
hookups, huge yard & deck
Desirable Student Location! $625
month. Available summer or fall.
For Rent: Very nice 4 br, 2.5 bath
house with 2 zone, central heatair;
off street parking; close proximity to
ECU campus. Completely renovated.
25 rent discount for prompt pay.
Call 752-1000, ask for Murrell.
House for Rent near campus on
Charles Blvd. 34 bedroom house,
front living area, central heatair
(completely closed in front fir. rear
porch), 2 full baths w washer &
dryer in main bath. Refrigerator,
range, rolling barcounter in
kitchen. Rear deck, large backyard.
Clean Tilley Properties 830-9502
$850month
FOR SALE
The Buccaneer is back! The ECU
yearbook has returned so make sure
to reserve your copy. Order online at
www.yearbookupdatesecu or call
1-888-298-3323 Hurry! Deadline
to order is 5pm 4-24-06
HELP WANTED"
Local law firm has a part-time
mail roomrunner position open.
Responsibilities include: general
office support, errands, file
maintenance, phrone and mail
room support. Must have own
transportation and be computer
literate. Please send resume and
available summer and fall hours
to: Legal Administrator, 1698 E.
Arlington Blvd Greenville, NC
27858 or fax to 252-353-1096. EOE.
Resumes without available hours
attached will not be considered.
Need Extra $$ Variety of positions
open @a new downtown restaurant.
Call Anne @ 252-757-1716 or 252-
327-6375
Mgrs. and Lifegrds at Pools and
Beaches in Greenville, Atlantic
Beach, and Wilson. Call Bob 714-
0576
Wanted: Student to assist kids
ages 14, 13, and 9 with homwork
. Must be math major with GPA
of 3.4 or better. Strong in sci
ence a plus. Must be non-smoker,
flexible hours, transportation,
available to work afternoons,
nights, and some weekends. Call
252-917-6787 or 252-752-1572 for
interview.
Active Handicapped Male Needs
Personal Attendant M-F, 7-10am
And Every Other Weekend. $10
Hr. Duties Include Bathing And
Dressing. Please Call 756-9141.
Lifeguards and swim instructors
needed for outdoor pool June 1-
August 20. Candidates must be
certified in Lifeguarding, AED, First
Aid and CPRPR. $7.50 per hour.
Apply at www.greenvillenc.gov or
call Jessica at 329-4043 for more
information.
Nanny Needed Greenville Family
is in Need of a Full time Nanny.
Good Pay with benefits. We will
provide a vehicle and Possible
Living Arrangement. You must
be energetic, responsible, and be
able to spend time summers at the
beach. This is a great opportunity
For the right person. Please call 714-
8824 to set up your Interview.
Live this summer at the Beach and
work with Telescope PicturesSunrays
Studio in Ocean City, MDVirginia
Beach. VA. Earn up to $10,000.
Housing is Available. For more
information visit our website and
Apply On-Line www.sunraysstudio.
com or call 1.724.322.1858. E.O.E
VA Beach based Comm GC in
business for 22 years is seeking
a construction estimator. Ideal
candidate should have the ability
to prepare and review bid packages,
perform material takeoffs and cost
comparisons. Sign on bonus and
relocation expenses paid for right
candidate. Forward resume to:
melissa@brownbuild.com or fax:
757-456-5395. EOE
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250day.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. Call (800) 965-6520.
ext. 202
Mobile waitstaff wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-150week. Perfect
for college student Some Lunch
Time (11a-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 551-3279 between 2-5 only.
Sorry Greenville residents and year
around dorm residents only. Leave
message if necessary.
other"
Retreatmyrtlebeach.com Spring
BreakGrad Week 1-800-645-3618
We Have What You're Looking For!
$100 Per Person & Up!
Get In State Tuition Rates! Join the
NC National Guard and qualify for In
StateTuition Rates Plus Receive State
& Federal Tuition Assistance (Pays
100 for most people) & Great
Pay along with many other financial
benefits. For more information
contact SFC Jimmy Smith (252)916-
9073 Email: jimmy.smith6@us.
army.mil
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Last chance for yearbook photos! All
Spring and Summer 2006 graduates
should come to Mendenhall Great
Room 1 on April 26th from 9am-
5pm. Call 328-9236 to schedule
a time.
Jtlortt Itve (tiert;
lie ioisi ; i
:re. '
Ground
Is looking for PACKAGE HANDLERS to load vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift hours 3 AM to
8 AM. 58.00hour.tuition assistance available after
.lOdays. Fuiure career opportunities in management
possible. Applications can be filled out at 2410 United
Dnve (near the aquatics center) Greenville.
HIRING NOW
I Looking for a great
summer Job? McLawhom
I Crop Services needs
reliable, honest energetic
I people work outdoors.
I monitoring crops from
I May through August Work
I near Klnston, Greenville,
New Bern. Let us train
I you. HURRY! HIRING NOW!
I Must be 19 or have one
I year ol college and need
I reliable vehicle. Full time
I hours. We train! Excellent
I pay mileage.
I Mail or tax resume to:
IMCSI
Ininm
; cm cm reran
Fax 252 637 2125
Laboratory Professionals:
Providing Answers. Guiding Cures.
Does finding solutions to problems intrigue you?
Do you wish to help save lives?
Do you desire guaranteed employment opportunities?
Do you like biology and chemistry and laboratory work?
If so, CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE is the career for you! Join
over one half million laboratory practitioners in the US who are
proud of their many roles in healthcare, research and industry.
ra
School of Allied Health Sciences
Dept. of Clinical Laboratory Science
www.ecu.educlsc
Celebrating National Medical Laboratory Week
April 23-29, 2006
It's PAY DAY.
You bought 'em. You read 'em. Now it's PAY DAY.
Sell your books to Dowdy Student Store and
you'll get top dollar for them.
Dowdy Student Store Wright Place Buyback Hours:
Monday, April 24th: 8am - 7pm
Tuesday, April 25th - Wednesday, April 26th: 8am - 5pm
Thursday, April 27th: 8am - 7pm
Friday, April 28th: 8am - 5pm
Saturday, April 29th: 11am - 3pm
Monday, May 1st - Thursday, May 4th: 8am - 7pm
Speight & Mendenhall Bus Stops, College Hill Hours:
Monday, April 24th - Friday, April 28th: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Monday, May 1st - Thursday, May 4th: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Others may SAY they buy back more used books and SAY they give you more
cash. But, ECU-Dowdy Student Stores has been recognized as one of the best
buyback programs IN THE ENTIRE NATION because we treat students fairly and
with respect. We also work with one of the largest book wholesalers in the
country, and buy back books not just for East Carolina, but for all
of the schools they represent.
We're YOUR campus bookstore, and we're
looking out for YOU.
Student Stores
Ronald E. Dowdy
Ranked 3rd by Follett Book Company, one of the leading collegiate textbook wholesalers in the US.
Free t-shirts available to students selling back their books, while supplies last.
Wright Building 252-328-6731 1-877-499-TEXT
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
i





PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
4-20-0
DID YOU KNOW
Each ton of recycled paper can save 17 trees, 380 gallons of oil, three cubic yards of landfill
space, 4,000 kilowatts of energy and 7,000 gallons of water!
Americans use more than 67 million tons of paper per year, or about 580 pounds per person.
Paper products make up the largest part (approximately 40 percent) of our trash.
Making recycled paper instead of newspaper uses 64 percent less energy and uses 58
percent less water. v
j
Every day American businesses generate enough paper to circle the earth 20 times!
Every day Americans recover more than 2 million pounds of paper! That's about 40
percent of the paper we use.
Paper products use up at least 35 percent of the world's annual commercial wood
harvest.
The highest point in Ohio is said to be "Mount Rumpke which is a "mountain" made up
of trash at a sanitary landfill! Rumpke is one of the nation's largest waste and
recycling companies.
One tree can filter up to. 60 pounds of pollutants from the air each year.

Every Sunday, Americans waste 90 percent of recyclable newspapers. This wastes
500,000 trees!
r
A new landfill generally costs more than an old one that has filled up. This is because it
typically costs more to comply with new environmental regulations, to buy the land, to
construct the landfill and to transport waste because new landfills generally are farther
away than older ones.
Only 1 percent of the world's water supply is usable; 97 percent is in the ocean and 2
percent is frozen.
Why Recycle - Five Good Reasons
Recycling conserves our valuable natural resources.
Recycling saves energy.
Recycling saves clean air and clean water.
Recycling saves landfill space.
Recycling can save money and create jobs.
COME OUT TO SUPPORT OUR RECYCLING INITIATIVE ON CAMPUS!
JOIN US IN COLLECTING RECYCLABLE ITEMS!
Sponsored by ECU Recycling Club & Student Government Association
www.buccaneer.ecu.edu
m
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films
uidpwp Id: ulufin
Wed 426 7:00PM & 9:30PM
Thurs 427 7:00PM & 9:30PM
Fri 421 7:00PM & 9:30PM
f Sat 422 7:00PM & 9:30PM
Sun 423 3:00PM & 9:30PM

Saturday April 22
, Midnight Spectacular Spectacular
Prop bags Provided
Audience Participation encouraged
Film Flair Event
iSliS
populaiffs '
Passfail: Pepper's Ghost, Locksley,
The Rewinds, The Capulets
MSC Brickyard 7PM
BTqMQfgAglgJP
spectrum )
Midnight Bingo
Destination 360 Midnight
w@sL appf 12Sb '
fbp$- app. 24ffo
Day of Relaxation
Hendrix Theatre Noon-4PM
A L v





4-20-06
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
PAGEA11
3535 EAST TENTH STREET
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$0 Security
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tM.OO Mow-In
40tdroom T
tmtOMd SMJOforturnltiw.
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Next 100 leases to sign get $200 off first months rent,
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private bedrooms & bathrooms
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$0.00 Move-In Fee $0.00 Security Deposit
All-inclusive 4 Bedroom 4 Bath $399.00 Pays It All for The Fall





PAGE A12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
4-20-06
EVERY SPINS
A WIN ON
THE AMAZING
UNIVERSITY BOOK
EXCHANGE
WHEEL'
BUYBACKT
SELL YOUR BOOKS TO US h)R A tHAN(b:
TO SPIN THE BIG VVHKFn. Asm
WOT
FABULOUS
PRIZES!
ACTUAL FABULOUSNESS MAY
VARY, BUT PRIZES DO INCLUDE:
f-iff- if y I,fC fCr
AMD MORE FROM TKV
CASH MOAJEY
FOR BOOKS!
THAT'S RIGHTf
FOR BOOKS!
AN1), L i i VS. t . i OAiL I
TO MENTION
" ' k . A
tS)
Pi la Pit
AND MANY OTHERS!
i'
WHEEL OF BUYBACK IN OPKR AT70JV ON APRIL. P.4 2.7. XB MAY 13

VESBTT DURING OUR CONVENIENT HOURS OF OPERATION! APRIL24-26: QAM GPM APRIL27-23:9AM -7PM APRIL20: QAM -0PM

THAT'S RIGHT, FOLKS! WE'RE
UJNlVJblHSITY BOOK

YOUR FULL SERVICE CX)LLEGE TEXTBOOK STORE IN UPTOWN GREENVILLE. sie south cot anche street GKEENVILLE, NC 278S8 PHONE 7880010CLOSED SUNDAY, APRIL 30 CMRMUaKCWMTMrUXDHAOTORMrrflOMnUU) MAY49AM-7PM ' jpmsr JXWT FORGET TO VISIT US AT OUR YET STILL MORE CONVENIENT REMOTE BUYBACK SITE AT THE ALPHA PUT HOUSES CBOTTOM OFCXxJKsm Jjr
QPEV9AJWSPM APRIL 24-28 MAY4 UBft OMEN LONGER AT EXAM TIME CAUSE WE LOVES YAT

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Arts & Entertainment
Page B1 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
THURSDAY April 20, 2006
Recipes:
Peanut Butter and Praline Ice
Cream Sandwiches
12 teaspoon plus 12 pound (2
sticks) unsalted butter, at room
temperature
12 teaspoon plus 1 12 cups
bleached all-purpose flour
1 14 cups sugar
4 large eggs
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
12 cup unsweetened cocoa
powder
1 teaspoon baking powder
Pinch salt
Recipe Vanilla-Praline Ice Cream
Recipe for Peanut Butter and
Chocolate Pralines
Preheat the oven to 350 degrees F.
Butter and flour a 9-by-5-by-3-inch
loaf pan with 12 teaspoon of the
butter and 12 teaspoon of the flour.
In a large mixing bowl, cream the
remaining 12 pound (two sticks)
butter and the sugar together with
an electric mixer until smooth. Add
the eggs one at a time, beating
after each addition. Beat in the
vanilla. Into a medium-size mixing
bowl, sift the remaining 1 12 cups
flour, the cocoa, baking powder and
salt together. Add 13 of the flour
mixture at a time to the buttersugar
mixture, beating after each addition.
Spoon the batter into the prepared
pan and bake until it springs back
when touched, about 50 minutes.
Remove from the oven and let
cool in the pan on a wire rack for
10 minutes, then remove It from
the pan and let cool completely
on the rack. After the ice cream is
Ami, remove it from the pan. Cut
the ice cream into 16 slices. Place
one slice of ice cream between
two slices of pound cake, forming
a sandwich. Repeat the process
until all of the cake is used. Wrap
each sandwich in plastic wrap and
freeze until ready to serve. To serve,
unwrap the sandwiches and serve
each with a praline on the side.
Vanllla-Prallne Ice Cream
2 cups milk
2 cups heavy cream
1 cup sugar
1 vanilla bean, split and scraped
6 large egg yolks
8 Peanut Butter and Chocolate
Pralines (recipe follows), crumbled
In a medium-size, nonreactive
saucepan over medium heat,
combine the milk, cream, sugar
and vanilla bean and pulp. Whisk to
dissolve as the mixture heats. Heat
the mixture to the scalding point
(when bubbles form around the
edges of the pan); do not let it boll.
Remove from the heat. Beat the egg
yolks in a large mixing bowl. Add the
hot cream mixture about 14 cup at
a time to the beaten yolks, whisking
well after each addition. Pour the
mixture back Into the saucepan and
cook, stirring over medium heat until
the mixture becomes thick enough
to lightly coat the back of a spoon,
two to three minutes, do not let it
boil. Remove from the heat and
strain through a fine-mesh strainer
into a glass bowl. Cover the top of
the mixture with plastic wrap (this will
keep a skin from forming) and let cool.
Place the mixture in the refrigerator
and chill completely. Pour the mixture
into an ice cream machine and follow
the manufacturer's instructions for the
churning time. Once the ice cream
Is almost ready, about five minutes
before the churning time is complete,
add the crumbled pralines through
the ingredients spout. Continue to
churn until the Ice cream freezes.
Line an 8 12 by 4 12 by 2 12-inch
loaf pan with plastic wrap. Scoop the
ice cream into the pan, smooth the
top, cover and freeze until firm, about
four hours. When ready to assemble
the ice cream sandwiches, lift the ice
cream out with the plastic wrap.
Peanut Butter and Chocolate
Pralines:
1 pound light brown sugar (about 3
firmly packed cups)
34 cup evaporated milk
18 teaspoon salt
1 tablespoon unsalted butter
3 tablespoons creamy peanut
butter
2 teaspoons unsweetened cocoa
powder
2 cups pecan pieces
Combine the brown sugar, milk, salt,
butter, peanut butter and cocoa in a
large saucepan over medium-high
heat. Stir to dissolve as the mixture
heats. Continue to cook, stirring, until
the mixture begins to bubble around
the edges of the pan and reaches 234
degrees to 240 degrees F on a candy
thermometer, or the soft ball stage
(that is, when a bit of the mixture
Is dropped Into cold water, it forms
a soft ball that flattens), about 12
minutes. Remove from the heat and
stir in the pecans. Drop the mixture
by the tablespoonful onto a waxed
or parchment paper on a baking
sheet and let cool completely. Lift the
pralines off the paper with a thin knife.
Pralines can be stored In an airtight
container at room temperature for up
to two weeks.
Serve together and enjoyl
Lest we forget United Flight 93
Despite the pain, the film
'United 93'should be seen
SCOTTY WILLIAMS
SENIOR WRITER
The movie United 93, a film
about the fourth hijacked plane
on Sept. 11 (the one where the
passengers overwhelmed the
hijackers), will be released in
the United States on April 28,
but it already has a fight on its
hands. When the movie's trailer
aired at a theater in Manhat-
tan, many viewers complained
and as a result, the trailer was
pulled from the rotation. A lot
of patrons screamed that the
movie was hitting theaters too
soon and that it was wrong. As
a result, there's already a large
controversy brewing that's not
just causing a stir in New York but
all over the United States - is it
right to show this movie?
A lot of people will say no, but
this reviewer says absolutely yes.
Yes, this movie will be shock-
ing. It will likely leave many in
this country's theaters crying
and it will generate strong reac-
tions. Memories of intense fear
and paranoia will be conjured up.
Everyone will remember where
they were as these events were
taking place and the fear they
felt as they saw those planes hit
the twin towers. Some may leave
the theater too upset to watch it;
I'm absolutely certain outrage
will sprout up in some people.
However, despite all objections,
I will tell everyone that can hear
This controversial film is meant to remember and honor the courageous passengers of United Flight 93 on Sept. 11, 2001.
me to see this movie.
As you read these words on
the page, it has been nearly five
years since those events in 2001.
Many of us remember it as if it
was yesterday because of the utter
panic, but it has been almost
five years. I tell you right now as
a historian and history teacher,
that's long enough for people to
forget. Many people say this was
the first and most devastating
attack on American soil, but I'll
tell you that means to me they've
already forgotten something. Yes,
Sept. 11 was tragic, horrifying
and devastating. However, there
was an attack before it.
On December 7, 1941, forces
from Japan attacked an Ameri-
can naval fleet at Pearl Harbor,
Hawaii, as soldiers were waking
up in the morning, killing 2,403
Americans and wounding 1,178
people. Japanese forces had been
planning it for months, practic-
see UNITED page B3
Hot CD releases of summer
New music to groove to
all summer long
MARK ROMANO
STAFF WRITER
The summer of 2006 is going
to be a music explosion. With
hundreds of great new acts
surfacing every month and reli-
able favorites still cranking out
albums, the summer is going
to set some interesting trends
in music.
Old favorites such as the Red
Hot Chili Peppers and Pearl Jam
are expected to make triumphant
returns after the malaise of
their previously released albums.
RHCP is coming out with a
double CD set on May 9 called
Stadium Arcadium that houses 28
tracks and is their longest LP to
date. Pearl Jam's self titled eighth
album is going to be supported by
an extensive summer tour along
with My Morning Jacket and
Sonic Youth, whose new album
Rather Ripped comes out June 13.
"There's a lot more up-tempo
stuff says Pearl Jam drummer
Matt Cameron in an interview
with Rolling Stone.
"It's a lot more rockin' than
our last one
A new album from Busta
Rhymes is also hitting the streets
this summer. On May 16 his
album, The Big Bang, will be
released and includes collabo-
rations with Tlmbaland, Scott
Storch, Dr. Dre and Stevie Wonder.
Dr. Dre also worked with
The Game to produce his second
Free book that saves you money
Buying CDs is worth the money rather than illegally downloading.
album, The Doctor's Advocate
(June 6) that will include guests
Nas, Snoop Dogg, Mary J. Blige,
Lauryn Hill and Damian Marley,
among others.
Portastatic's new one, Who
Loves The Sun (June 6), Cursive's
Happy Hollow (Aug. 22) and
Regina Spektor's Begin to Hope
(June 13) are keeping the indie
rock end of things in full swing
while Guster and Suf jan Stevens
will be releasing albums much to
the enjoyment of their die-hard,
acoustic guitar loving fans.
One of the best names for
a new album coming out this
summer is Peaches' third album
Impeach My Bush due out July 11.
She collaborated with members
of Eagles of Death Metal, Queens
of the Stone Age and Beck pro-
ducer Mickey Petralia to create
the album, which sounds like it
will be rather intense with track
titles such as "F or Kill "Rock
the Shocker" and "Tent In Your
Pants
There are tons of great albums
coming out this summer, a lot
of which are actually worth
purchasing instead of illegally
downloading. Do yourself a favor
and buy a real CD - the quality is
unsurpassable.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Edwin McCain's triumphant return to rock
Ricky Robinson, In conjunction with Money Brains, Inc. is giving
college students and adults free copies of their new publication
Money Brains Helper book and 30 days of free access to their
web-based money management program called "Money Brains
The objective of their actions is to bolster financial literacy in
the American public. Robinson, president of the company and
author of the book, said "The idea is to give people a tool to
help them better understand a smorgasbord of financial topics
The book and Web site cover a wide variety of topics ranging
frorrl what your credit score determines to how to lease a car.
For a free copy of the book, visit moneybrains.net and click
on products by the end of April. For access to the money
management program, click on the tutorial while on the Web site.
EDWIN McCAIN
LOST IN AMERICA
Lost in America goes beyond the
acoustic guitar
UZ FULTON
STAFF WRITER
After one too many episodes of "I Love the 80s"
on VHl, Edwin McCain has released his latest album,
Lost in America. The album hit stores April 11, and
it coincides with a U.S. tour that wraps up in July.
This is McCain's seventh studio album and the
10-track collection is charged with electric under-
tones that are normally absent from his recordings.
McCain is best known for his romantic ballads,
"I'll Be" and "The Promise of You Lost in America
diverges from this path and contains more bite
and sauciness. The opening track, "Gramercy Park
Hotel is a sarcastic observation of the entertain-
ment business that manages to jingle in your head
long after it is over. The song combines a catchy
chorus with an equally likeable double guitar solo.
The fourth song on Lost in America, entitled
"Truly Believe has the best chance for the popular-
ity that McCain's past songs have enjoyed. It is an
upbeat song full of a boy's pleads to his girl about
believing in their love and it will bring a smile to
any romantic while driving with the windows down.
The title track to Lost in America is a dark assess-
ment of the new American dream. It promises
"the cars, the girls, the money, the drugs to get
you out of your rut" and implies the heavy reli-
ance of material things on a person's happiness.
Another notable song is "Welcome to Strug-
gleville" and is a song any hardworking musi-
cian can identify with. It forthrightly describes
life on the road emphasizing the long tours
and the heartache when missing your family.
Lost in America closes with "Babylon a song
about love gone wrong. It is backed by an unex-
pected heavy metal style that ends the album with
a resounding bang.
This album gives the band a lot more freedom to
make their own mark while in past recordings, only
provided background noise for McCain's perform-
ing. He is accompanied by Craig Shields on Wurlitzer,
piano, B3, saxophones and accordion, Pete Riley on
acoustic and electric guitars and background vocals,
Lee Hendricks on bass guitar and Dave Harrison
on drums, percussion and background vocals.
Overall, McCain's latest effort explores more
of its instrumental side while keeping the lyrical
singersongwriter style that fits him so well. New
and veteran fans alike of this good-time Southern
musician will enjoy listening to Lost in America.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
The Flaming Lips' new album
Finally something
different
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
It has come to my atten-
tion that many of the albums
I review receive pretty harsh
reviews. To this I answer, maybe
if the state of music was that
of actual music, I wouldn't
be so harsh on so many acts.
Seriously people, I'm only
asking that artists actually do
what they are supposed to do
- create art, not drop a deuce on
some expensive audio record-
ers and sell it to the general
public at $15 a pop. The old
saying applies, if it looks like
poo, sounds like poo and smells
like poo chances are that
it is what, music? I think not.
This rant brings me to the
actual review of this album
from The Flaming Lips. I will let
you in on a secret; this album
gets an A for the innovative
sound and complex combina-
tions of various styles of music
throughout the entire album.
This album uses samples of
ambulance sirens to form the
basis of an entire song. Their
message is surprisingly deep and
imaginative. The entire realm of
1970s' genres and their accom-
see UPS page B3





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
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4-20-06
4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
PAGE B3
we sweef.
www.jomrewards.com
re
c
United from page B1
ing a skillful campaign of decep-
tion and preparing for the ulti-
mate attack. On that morning,
they carried it out to the utmost
effectiveness. One bomb fell on
the U.S.S. Arizona and the result-
ing explosion stopped every clock
on the ship. Now, more than 50
years later, bodies still lie inside
that ship that hadn't seen the sun
since that morning.
Now I'm not saying that the
two should be compared in terms
of greater devastation or terror,
but it did happen and it was a
devastating blow. Sadly, however,
many people have no knowledge
of it. For most of this nation it
has become a forgotten memory.
However, when the movie Pearl
Harbor was released in May 2001,
it brought back the memory of the
event, even if the movie did take
some liberties with the story line.
This will not be the first
time a movie has been a pain-
ful experience for people. Many
will remember 2004 when a
film called The Passion of the
Christ was on the big screen and
brought scores of people to tears.
This reviewer has to admit, I
cried watching the movie and I
cried for a while afterward. One
also has to wonder what kind
of experience it was to sit down
with a Holocaust survivor or the
family of a Holocaust survivor
and watch Schindler's List. It is my
sincere hope that many people
never have to feel what those
people must have felt.
However, these movies were
made for a reason, and for the
same reason United 93 has been
made. These movies tell stories
not just of terrifying pain and suf-
fering, but also of hope, bravery,
courage and triumph. According
to the story of the resurrection,
Jesus got up and walked just days
after being crucified. Despite
the horrors of the Holocaust
and the best efforts of some
inhuman monsters, people did
survive and lived to tell the story.
Director Paul Greengrass did
not want to make this movie to
make money or to shock and hurt
people. If you watch the trail-
ers, you'll see that. The movie's
main focus will be the courage of
those brave souls on board that
flight. Those people overcame
paralyzing fear and saved the
lives of hundreds while simulta-
neously laying down their own.
The story of that courage is some-
thing every person should see.
I'll tell you another reason you
absolutely, positively have to see it
the weekend it comes out; Univer-
sal Pictures is donating 10 percent
of the first three days' gross sales
to a memorial fund. So, for all
that money you shell out to see a
movie, this will go to the memory
and not directly, completely into
someone's pockets.
As a movie reviewer of some
expertise (although there are lots of
people who know more), I'm glad
that this movie will not be starring
a Tom Hanks, Tom Cruise, Drew
Barrymore or any other block-
buster movie star. It will be put on
by a cast of unknowns so that the
story, not the actors, will be center
stage. That's the way it should be.
At this point, you're probably
wondering what the families of
the passengers thought. Many of
them give it their complete bless-
ing. David Beamer, the father
of passenger Todd Beamer, said
in an interview at a television
station in Jacksonville, Fla (the
full interview can be found at
news4jax.com) that he felt every
American adult should view it.
Beamer went on to say the movie
is, "a great example of Americans
doing the right thing at the
right time answering a call to
duty that they never understood
was going to be theirs that day
This movie will be contro-
versial. It will hurt, it will sting,
and yes, people will be upset.
Movies are supposed to stir your
feelings, however. If this movie
didn't inspire those old feelings,
it would mean the event doesn't
mean that much to you anymore
and that would be a true tragedy.
When and if you file into a
theater to view this movie, watch
it for what Greengrass wants
people to see. Not the pain of the
terrorist attacks, but the courage
and strength of a group of pas-
sengers who sat down as 40 but
stood up as one and gave their
lives completely and without res-
ervation. Their story must be told
no matter how much it may hurt
because I promise you, it would
be more hurtful if David Beamer
spoke to a class of high school
students five years from now, and
no one could tell him anything
about September 11, 2001.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Campus Dining
LfpS from page B1
panying sounds are combined
into single songs which flow
together very nicely to form the
album At War With the Mystics.
Songs like "The Yeah Yeah
Yeah Song "It Overtakes Me"
and "The W.A.N.D" are distorted
clap-along songs that feature,
amongst other instruments, a
piano part embedded within
the music. Others such as "The
Sound of Failure" and "Going
On" are slightly reminiscent of
acts such as Carly Simon.
I must admit that the lyrics of
this band are a little on the odd and
unusual side, but that is what lends
some complexity to the music. It
is not the same old garbage that
is rehashed in every single pop
album. Every song changes its
tempo somewhere within the song.
Every song plays out differ-
ently and as you get comfort-
able with the current pace of
songs they change melody and
tempo just as quickly. I really
dig the use of synthesizers in
the introductions and body
of their songs. I haven't ever
heard a band to incorporate
so many different sounds and
styles of wide ranging music ever.
My favorite song on the
album is "Vein of Stars It opens
to a soft 1920s' jazz chromatic
ticking, which then bleeds col-
orfully into a guitar and piano
front against psychedelic elec-
tric guitar. The music is further
accompanied by lyrics that seem
to effortlessly flow from the bel-
lows of the singer's voice.
I, for one, am a huge fan of
this album for its originality and
diversity of sounds. I would rec-
ommend this album to anyone
who likes to hear something dif-
ferent from time to time.
Honestly, I wouldn't even
know how to classify this type
of music. Perhaps "original" shall
due for now. The guys may be one
of the better kept secrets in the
music industry. Albeit, they had
a hit in the mid 1990s with "She
Don't Use Jelly
As always, keep your mind
for music open and be good to
each other.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
ft
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'V' . 1
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a pu I e t s
s
Monday April 24th 2006
7 PM AASC Brickyard





PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
4-20-06
4-20-06
SUBJECTS FOR RESEARCH
PROJECT EXAMINING THE EFFECTS
OF AGING ON INSULIN AND SUGAR
METABOLISM NEEDED
The Human Performance Laboratory at East Carolina
University is looking for research subjects who wish to
be involved in studies examining the role of the aging
process in relation to insulin action and muscle.
We are looking for subjects ranging from 18 to 90
years of age. Subjects will be compensated for their
participation. Tests will include body composition
assessment, exercise stress testing, and blood and
muscle analyses.
Certain medications or health conditions may
disqualify you from participation.
For further information contact the Human
Performance Laboratory, East Carolina University at
328-4681 and leave your name and number. We will
return your call as soon as possible. This research is
under the direction of Joseph Houmard, Ph.D.
J
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MUST BE A FULL-TIME REGISTERED STUDENT WITH A 2.25 GPA
Positions open include:
DJS
PROGRAM DIRECTOR
SPORTS DIRECTOR
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NEWSCASTERS
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TO PICK UP AN APPLICATION, PLEASE STOP BY. WE ARE LOCATED IN THE
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4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
PAGE B5
Congratulations to the
Ek
e
Pirate
Nabeel Arastu
Virginia Carraway Debranetta Gethers
NOT
PICTURED
Matthew Herrmann
Aadil Lodhi
Brian Mitchell
April Paul
Sarah Riggs
January Russell
Ik m
Sean Russell
Stephen Shaheen
ElitePirate HonorableMentions:
Roger Conner, Jr.Mark Demerjian
Benjamini WycheNJoy Dismukes
Elite Pirate Nominees:
Brandy AlexanderDebranetta GethersCharles Owens
Nabeel ArastuMatthew HerrmannApril Paul
Carlos AroscmenaJessica KellyCourtney Quinn
Anna-Lisa BaileyNicholas KochenourSarah Riggs
Keri BrockettFaisal LadakJanuary Russell
Virginia CarrawayAlison LassiterSean Russell
Kendall ConleyJessica LedbetterElizabeth Schulcr
Roger ConnerAadil LodhiStephen Shaheen
Callie CribbJonathan MassachiElizabeth Sheetz
Mark DemcrjianBrian MitchellTeodora Stoica
Joy DismukesCrystal MooreBenjamin Wyche
Thomas DoyleRobin Moore






4-2
Page B6 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY April 20, 2006
Retirements cut ties between past, future
All good things must end. Time dictates it. The career clock has summoned two of ECU's most impressionable and faithful employees.
One, a burly man with a low voice and a big heart, has inspired and tutored more than an estimated 4,000 physical education majors
during his 39 years in education. The second, a soothing voice in a land of looming deadlines, has become synonymous with her job's
department. Both Dr. Jimmie Grimsley, associate professor in the exercise and sports science department and Pam Forrest, secretary for
media relations and the Pirate Sports Networks are days away from their respective retirements. Though each has served the university
in different capacities, they have remained every bit as genuine as the day they arrived. Both epitomize the old Southern culture that is
dwindling in today's fast paced society. "People are different today said director of electronic media and 17-year play-by-play voice Jeff
Charles. "Pam is old school and Jimmie Grimsley is old school. And those kinds of people, from that generation, are the kind that came
to Greenville and made their home here. When those people leave, it just never feels like it's the same In a day where computers are
replacing the old fashioned handshake, both Dr. Grimsley and Forrest are about people. To them, relationships trump money and good
deeds come naturally. That's why with their retirements, ECU is losing two of a dying breed and more importantly, vital links to its past.
Added former ECU baseball coach Dr. Gary Overton, "They will not be forgotten for quite some time
Dr. Jimmie Grimsley
Countless students have stepped into Dr.
Grimsley's exercise and sport science office seeking
academic advice. What they received, more often
than not, was a manual on life.
"He understands students and their needs said
close friend and colleague Carol-Ann Tucker, who
is director of advising for the College of Health
and Human Performance. "He understands the
human side of it
Saying that students' personalities haven't
altered much over the course of his career, he's
developed a philosophy rich on relationships.
"My teaching style has evolved recalled Dr.
Grimsley. "I consider how you teach, how you con-
duct yourself in class and the impression you make
on kids much more important than the content
that you deliver
The youngest of eight children, Dr. Grimsley
grew up on a farm in rural Wilson, N.C. When leg-
endary coach Clarence Stasavich offered a grant-in-
aid to play football in 1962, a younger Dr. Grimsley
gladly obliged. A self-termed "brief football career
ensued, but more importantly, the scholarship
helped to ensure a college education.
After finishing a four-year undergraduate
see GRIMSLEY page B8
Pam Forrest
Forrest has dealt with local celebrities and
media types throughout her 28-year career. And
her pleasant demeanor still hasn't changed.
Through five office moves, nine different bosses
and a wave of technology, Forrest has kept her
cheerful ways.
"Pam has been the rock of this department
for all these years Charles said about his trusty
office assistant. "She's seen a lot of people come
and go
And that's usually when her job picks up.
Whether it's a coach being fired, a player arrested or
some wild scandal, she assists the sports information
directors in keeping diligent files and making copies.
"The one thing that's so great about Pam is that
she never gets rattled Charles said. "Things get
hectic around here sometimes and you have all of
these press conferences called with coaches being
released and all of the other normal day-to-day
environment within an athletic department
But her experience has helped her to keep roll-
ing with the punches. She learned the lesson early
on when her office was relocated from Minges
Coliseum to the actual football press box.
"We didn't have air conditioning up there
see FORREST page B8
MLB remembers Jackie Robinson,
pioneer of racial equality
Krog, ECU claim
C-USA Women's
Golf Championship
Robinson
Problems persist regarding
team ownership and
administration
(SID) - East Carolina claimed
its first Conference USA Women's
Golf Championship on Tuesday
carding a three-round total of
887 to win by 10 strokes at the
Par 72, 6,216-yard Ironwood
Golf Course. Freshman Lene
Krog became the Pirates' first
individual C-USA champion as
she carded a 54-hole of 216 to win
by one stroke over SMU's Jennifer
Ackerson.
The victory gives the Pirates
an automatic bid to the NCAA
Regionals at a site to be later
determined which is scheduled
to begin May 4.
Krug was also named the
C-USA Freshman of the Year
and named first-team all ion
ference as voted upon by the
league's nine head coaches.
Heidi Helliesen was voted third
team all-conference and finished
ninth at the championship with
a seven-over par 223.
"I knew we had the potential
to win today said first-year
Pirate head coach Kim Lewellen.
"I'm so proud of the way we
competed this afternoon. We
were able to make some tough
shots down the stretch and put
ourselves in position to win
The Pirates held a four-stroke
lead over Tulsa entering the final
round and improved Its lead by
six strokes.
ECU finished 23-over par,
887, followed by SMU (897),
Tulsa and UCF (902), UTEP (907),
Memphis (919), Southern Miss
(948), Marshall and UAB (958).
Finishing with a third round-
low total of 70, two-under par,
Krog completed the 54-hole
tournament with a par score of
216 (74-72-70). Krog birdie five
holes during the final round and
recorded the second-most birdies
in the field, 11. Only Ackerson
made more birdie putts and
finished with a tournament-best
13 birdies.
"Lene is an incredible golfer
state Lewellen. "I knew she was
capable of having a great round
today. She was able to make some
long putts and hit her driver
really well to keep pace with an
outstanding player Ackerson
All five of ECU's players fin-
ished in the top 20, including
four among the top 16.
After shooting one-under
par Monday, sophomore Emelie
Lind completed the tournament
with a nine-over par, 225, in
11th place.
Senior Jamie Quinn finished
the tournament tied for 16th
with a 14-over par, 230. Junior
Jessica Hauser carded a one-over
par 73 Tuesday, improving by
nine strokes from her previous
round to finish tied for 20th
with a 54-hole total of 231, 15-
over par.
As a team, ECU totaled 11
birdies in the final round and
finished with a tournament-best
36 birdies. ECU also pared the
most holes of any team, finishing
with 172.
JOSH FERNANDEZ
STAFF WRITER
Words like integrity, courage
and persistence are scattered
about Major League Baseball's
Web site dedicated to its annual
April 15 commemoration of
its greatest leader, role model
and civil rights initiator, Jackie
Robinson, one of the most
versatile and consistent athletes
to ever play the game of baseball.
In 1946, Brooklyn Dodg-
ers team president and general
manager Branch Rickey signed
Robinson to the organization,
which, at the time, was a very
controversial move. One year
later, Robinson moved up from
the minor leagues to become the
first black Major League Baseball
player of the modern era. In 1962,
his first year of eligibility, he was
inducted in to the Baseball Hall
of Fame; Robinson's number 42 is
the only number retired by every
MLB team.
Robinson's on-the-field skills
and accomplishments are well
known to those who follow base-
ball. He successfully stole home
19 times, a figure that put him
at number one on an otherwise
miniscule list. Robinson's career
.311 BA (.409 OBP), 1,518 hits
(in only 10 seasons), and over 20
stolen bases, on average, per year,
put him at the top of the list of
history's best offensive players.
During his professional
career, he played every position
except center field, pitcher and
catcher. His career .983 fielding
percentage puts him above many
all-time great fielders like Jim
Edmonds, Cal Ripken Jr Ozzie
Smith and Joe DiMaggio.
Robinson not only contrib-
uted to Brooklyn pennants in
both 1947 and 1949, but his
uncanny determination and
hustle kept the Dodgers in
pennant races in 1950 and 1951
when they might otherwise
have been eliminated much
sooner.
In 1955, although injured for
roughly one-third of the season,
while still enduring fervent
racism from fans, opponents and
his own teammates, Robinson
helped lead the Dodgers to their
first and only World Series cham-
pionship in Brooklyn, thrillingly
defeating the New York Yankees
in seven games.
And after an illustrious 12-
year career that included six
all-star appearances, two seasons
in the Negro League (1944-45),
as well as honors such as 1947
Rookie of the Year and 1949 NL
MVP (additionally, his .342 BA
that year made him NL batting
champion), he retired after the
1956 season at age 37. As previ-
ously stated, he was inducted
in to the Hall of Fame in 1962,
becoming the first black person
to receive such an honor.
After baseball, Jackie Rob-
inson continued his legacy of
integrity, courage and persistence
until his death in 1972. During
the 1960s, after being denied an
opportunity to manage or coach
for an MLB team, Robinson was
quite a busy man. He became
a vice president for Chock Full
O' Nuts Corp. and was a board
member of the NAACP until
1967. He campaigned for presi-
dential candidate Hubert Hum-
phrey in 1960 and 1968.
Ten days before his death,
in his final public appearance
before game two of the 1972
see ROBINSON page B12
NFL Draft 2006: Leinart, Young or Cutler?
Top three QBs in draft
could go in top 10
RON CLEMENTS
SPORTS WRITER
Reggie Bush will likely end
the five-year streak of quarter-
backs being the number one
overall pick in the NFL Draft this
year, but there are three quarter-
backs who could follow Bush very
closely. Southern California's
Matt Leinart, Vanderbilt's Jay
Cutler and Vince Young of Texas
are all probable top 10 picks in
next week's draft.
Leinart took home the Heis-
man Trophy and a second straight
national championship in 2004.
His numbers in 2005 were better
than his Heisman year, leading
the Trojans again to the National
Championship game. Like 2003
Heisman winner Carson Palmer,
the number one overall pick in
the 2004 draft by Cincinnati,
Leinart is a born leader.
He made the decision to
return for his senior year, and
it paid off. He would have been
a top five pick in 2005, but the
extra year of college has gotten
Leinart to where he could start
right away in the NFL. Leinart is
bigger than most people think,
at 6 feet 5 inches, 223 pounds.
His accuracy and knowledge of
the game is unmatched by any
other prospect. The only knock
on Leinart is his arm strength.
That being said, being reunited
with his old offensive coordina-
tor, Norm Chow, in Tennessee
seems like a likely spot for Leinart
to land.
While Leinart guided his
team to the National Champion-
ship game in 2005, the player he
lost to in that game was Texas
junior Vince Young. Leinart may
be ready to step in and produce
for an NFL team now, but both
Young and Cutler have seem-
ingly higher ceilings of potential.
Young was amazing in the Rose
Bowl and in 2005. He completed
75 percent of his passes in the
Rose Bowl, going 30-40, and
finished the game with over
200 yards rushing on only 19
attempts and 275 yards passing.
While he did not throw for a
touchdown in the game, he did
run in the game-winning score in
Texas' 41-38 win. That Rose Bowl
game capped a season in which
Young led the nation in passing
efficiency.
Young is such a superb ath-
lete. He has great size at 6 feet
4 inches, 220 pounds for an
NFL QB and Michael Vick-like
athleticism. His delivery is a
bit sidearm, but that was not
an issue at his NFL Pro Day in
Austin last month. He may have
the best arm strength of any of
the quarterbacks and has every
intangible a coach would want.
While his Wonderlic score was
horrible, most NFL teams know
that he is not dumb and a solid
first-round lock he remains. The
Jets may try to jump up and
grab either Leinart or Young, but
grabbing an offensive tackle like
Virginia's D'Brickashaw Ferguson
to protect Chad Pennington is
more plausible.
Oakland signed Aaron Brooks
away from New Orleans this off-
season, but the often ineffective
and inconsistent Brooks may
not last long while Al Davis still
runs the organization. Young has
shined in the California sun each
of the last two seasons in the Rose
Bowl and Al Davis loves high-
profile players. Young to Oakland
makes sense at the seventh pick.
That leaves Cutler. Cutler
impressed everybody at the
combine with his.workouts,
especially on the bench press.
He put up 225 pounds 25 times
- outdoing USC running back
LenDale White by 10 reps. Cutler,
6 feet 3 inches, 226 pounds,
did not have the win-loss suc-
cess at Vandy that Leinart and
Young had in college, but Van-
derbilt isn't exactly Texas or USC.
His numbers were still good,
and he was an all-SEC selection
on a losing team. He tossed 21
touchdowns to just nine picks
while throwing for more than
see NFL page B9
I

A
i






pril 20, 2006
ure
es.
rs
d's
or
ty
is
iff
ne
re
d
St.
id making copies,
about Pam is that
laid. "Things get
id you have all of
th coaches being
rmal day-to-day
department
I her to keep roll-
1 the lesson early
ed from Minges
ress box.
ming up there
WEST page B8
son,
;ague (1944-45),
irs such as 1947
;ar and 1949 NL
illy, his .342 BA
him NL batting
retired after the
ge 37. As previ-
e was inducted
f Fame in 1962,
rst black person
in honor.
ill, Jackie Rob-
d his legacy of
i and persistence
in 1972. During
being denied an
nanage or coach
l, Robinson was
an. He became
for Chock Full
nd was a board
! NAACP until
igned for presi-
:e Hubert Hum-
id 1968.
fore his death,
lic appearance
jo of the 1972
SON page B12
er?
ed Aaron Brooks
Orleans this off-
iften ineffective
it Brooks may
ile Al Davis still
ition. Young has
ifornia sun each
sons in the Rose
vis loves high-
iung to Oakland
le seventh pick.
Cutler. Cutler
ybody at the
his. workouts,
e bench press,
aunds 25 times
running back
' 10 reps. Cutler,
, 226 pounds,
i win-loss suc-
at Leinart and
liege, but Van-
y Texas or USC.
were still good,
1-SEC selection
i. He tossed 21
ust nine picks
for more than
NFL page B9
4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B7
,bs NOT NOUOH ABT ' a c,00l
NO WONDER PEOPLE THINK
CARAVAGGIO
IS A GUY ON THE SOPRANOS.
ART. ASK FOR MORE.
Hurricanes limp into playoffs
with four losses in five games
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(AP) The best season in
franchise history ended with
a thud for the Carolina Hurri-
canes: four losses in their final
five games, including one to
Buffalo in the finale that cost
them the top playoff seed in the
Eastern Conference.
Not exactly the best way to
prepare for the postseason.
"It's tough to lose any time,
but come tomorrow, nobody is
going to be talking about this
game Carolina captain Rod
Brind'Amour said. "We made the
playoffs and that's what we came
here to do in September. Now, it
is a new season
It begins Saturday night in
the first round against seventh-
seeded Montreal, which lost four
of six down the stretch following
an eight-game winning streak.
The Canadiens haven't been
very good against the Hurricanes
this season, either, losing all four
games by a. combined margin
of 25-9.
Of course, considering the
way the season ended, no one
in the Carolina locker room felt
particularly cocky.
"All that doesn't matter
now center Kevyn Adams
said. "They're going to try to
take something we want. Now
it comes down to us being
focused and really ready to go
The struggles for the Hurri-
canes came mostly in their own
zone they simply gave up too
many goals. Discovering exactly
why that happened is the chal-
lenge for coach Peter Laviolette
and his staff.
Yes, starting goaltender
Martin Gerber suddenly lost a
bit of his reliability between the
pipes, allowing 28 goals in his
final seven starts and at least
three goals in each of them.
Many were of the "soft" variety,
and one of those came in the loss
to the Sabres on Tuesday night.
An unscreened shot by Brian
Campbell slipped between Ger-
ber's right arm and his chest
to give Buffalo a 2-0 lead. But
Carolina missed a couple of
opportunities to clear the puck
before Campbell got possession,
so all the blame doesn't fall on
the player in net.
"For me, we just weren't
skating Laviolette said. "To
play our game, it's up-tempo,
there's a lot of effort that goes
into it, and we were on our heels
pretty much the entire night
Despite the disappointing
conclusion, Laviolette has plenty
to be happy about. The Hurri-
canes finished with 52 victories
and 112 points, both the best
totals in a history that dates back
to their inception as the Hartford
Whalers in 1979.
They also had the best home
record in the Eastern Confer-
ence at 31-8-2 and reached
the playoffs for the first time
since an improbable run to the
Stanley Cup finals in 2002.
"You don't want to choke
your last game of the year, but we
can't dwell on it defenseman
Mike Commodore said. "Obvi-
ously, it would have been nice
to win the East, but now it is a
clean slate. Second is pretty nice.
Let's get the playoffs started
And if Carolina comes out
strong against Montreal, few will
remember the rough patch at the
end of the season.
"Sometimes in this game, you
have to have a short memory
Adams said. "You have to leave
it at the rink and leave it alone.
We're excited to be in the play-
offs and to be playing at home in
the playoffs
mAnjmYuNPAY.oAMjPM'i Two Duke lacrosse players arrested
i

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Duke University lacrosse player Collin Finnerty, right, sits with his
father Kevin Finnerty and attorney Michael Cornacchia, left, as he
awaits his hearing at the Durham County Judicial Building.
(KRT) Two lacrosse players
from New York's suburbs were
arrested on Tuesday in the Duke
University gang-rape case, bring-
ing home an explosive scandal of
sex, race and college athletics.
The suspects hail from presti-
gious Catholic prep schools and
well-to-do bedroom communi-
ties where million-dollar homes
sit on manicured cul-de-sacs.
A black woman who attends
a nearby college charged that she
was hired to perform a $400 strip
show, and ended up being raped
by three athletes in a bathroom
for 30 minutes.
After a month-long probe,
charges were lodged on Tuesday
against Reade Seligmann, 20,
of Essex Fells, N.J and Collin
Finnerty, 19, of Garden City,
Long Island, N.Y.
Neatly dressed, the students
were taken in handcuffs to a
booking on first-degree rape and
kidnapping charges but freed
after posting $400,000 bail each.
Prosecutors said they
expected to charge a third
unnamed lacrosse player but
couldn't nail down a positive
identification.
Defense lawyers predicted
their clients would be cleared.
"This is probably the worst
miscarriage of justice I've seen
in 34 years of practice said
Julian Mack, an attorney for
Seligmann.
Finnerty's lawyer, Bill
Cotter, cautioned that the
grand jury's indictment
was not a finding of guilt.
"Ihey hear one side of the
story. They almost always indict.
The next jury will hear the entire
story, which includes our evi-
dence he said.
They plan to argue the defen-
dants weren't even at the March
13 party when the accuser claims
she was violated by three white
athletes.
Sources said one defendant
was captured on video at a cash
machine and the other has
receipts from a restaurant during
the relevant time period, several
news outlets reported.
Evidence in the case has been
murky from the start.
On the one hand, authorities
have the word of the 27-year-old
woman, a single mother who
joined the Navy for opportunity
and turned to stripping to sup-
port two kids after her marriage
floundered.
She attends a predominantly
black university in her work-
ing-class hometown, where the
average income is less than the
$40,000 in tuition and fees that
Duke students shell out a year.
There is a hospital report that
says her injuries were "consis-
tent" with rape.
On the other hand, there are
defense photos that show her
smiling as she left the house, and
the report of a cop who found her
"passed out drunk" at a grocery
store later.
DNA samples were taken from
all of the white lacrosse players
and none of their genetic mate-
rial was found on the dancer,
lawyers have said.
Instead, it appears Seligmann
and Finnerty were arrested after
being identified from photo-
graphs.
Durham cops and detectives
spent 90 minutes searching the
players' rooms at Eden Dormi-
tory and emerged carrying bags
and boxes filled with evidence.
Signs taped to windows and
draped from dorm rooms pro-
claimed support for the pair.
"I'm 100 percent sure they're
both innocent said Alissa Link,
19, a sophomore. "It seems abso-
lutely crazy. This is scary that
this could happen to guys who
are really innocent
Even before Tuesday's devel-
opments, the case had profound
repercussions.
The Blue Devils' season was
canceled and the coach resigned.
One player was suspended after
he sent a vile e-mail an hour after
the alleged rape threatening to
skin strippers.
The student, Ryan McFadyen,
who attended the same all-boys
academy in New Jersey, the Del-
barton School, as Seligmann,
has not been hit with criminal
charges.
Both the accuser and one
of her alleged tormentors have
criminal records.
She spent three weekends in
jail after stealing a car during a
drunken escapade in 2002 and
leading police on a wild chase.
Finnerty, meanwhile, was
see DUKE page 12
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PAGE B8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-20-06
GrimSley from page S6
degree, Dr. Grimsley completed
his graduate work in 1967. During
the same year, he joined the
ECU faculty and was named
head coach for men's soccer and
tennis. Despite spending 1972
at the University of Georgia to
complete his doctoral work, Dr.
Grimsley has spent the last 39
years in education.
'Students have always been
his number one priority said Bill
Cain, assistant to the dean of the
College of Health and Human
Performance and former athletic
director.
However, when a student
failed to get in gear, Dr. Grimsley
sometimes had to deliver some
tough love.
"He is old school said Jane
Moore, department of exercise
and sport science secretary. "He's
not a friend to the students, he's
an authority figure. He is type
of faculty member that students
come to when they have prob-
lems. If they need a swift kick,
he'd do that
Pirate Sports Radio Network
color commentator Si Seymour
credits Dr. Grimsley with moti-
vating him to complete his gradu-
ate degree. Asking how he could
repay his professor for his guid-
ance, Dr. Grimsley replied unself-
ishly to "assist other students
Seymour parlayed his degree
into becoming a head coach for
17 years at Craven Community
College.
"I never forgot that Seymour
said. "In a world where we're all
looking for the bottom line, Dr.
Grimsley only cared about help-
ing students
Always a student advocate,
Dr. Grimsley doesn't preach on
the holier-than-thou pedestal,
but more .of a 'let's discuss the
truth' approach.
Standing outside of a coach-
ing theory class, a few years back
Tucker overheard Dr. Grimsley
address yet another batch of
students.
"I can teach you the way it's
supposed to be, but we'll close
see GRIMSLEY page 89
FOrreSt from page B6
Forrest reminisced. "That first
summer was tough. It was so cold
in the winter that my typewriter
froze
Yes, ancient typewriters.
Forrest was responsible all the
press releases while still filtering
interview requests. Her immedi-
ate help consisted of two media
relations personnel, a temporary
and two student workers. But
again, she kept her charm.
"She's always, sometimes to
a fault, courteous and has great
patience with people Charles
said. "She's been a terrific
employee of this athletic depart-
ment for the last 28 years
Charged with keeping all
of the media relations files in
a neat manner and answering
phones, she's seen a revolving
door of bosses. With differing
opinions on how to approach
sports information and media
relations, she has survived all
nine superiors.
"That's the great thing about
Pam is that you won't hear her
publicly or outwardly criticize
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anybody Charles said. "When
you work in an office like this
you have all sorts of egos, she's
been really good at deflecting all
of that and just doing her job
Even when that means yet
another sports information
director is hired.
"For someone new, she's
been a wealth of information
said current sports information
director Tom McClellan. "For
me, her knowing the ins and
outs, every crook and crevice of
ECU athletics has been invalu-
able
As her X's on a small calendar
located in her corner office con-
tinue to mount, Forrest comes
ever closer to her beloved farm-
land near Grimesland. But so is
an aura of sadness throughout the
Ward Sports Medicine building.
"Pam Forrest has been a
fixture in media relations Dr.
Overton said. "She'll definitely
be missed
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
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4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B9
ONE MONTH
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GrimSley from page 88
this door and talk about the way
it really is Tucker recalled while
overhearing the 38-year teaching
staple.
"I've found that teaching,
coaching and parenting are all
the same Dr. Grimsley stated.
"As long as you're firm, fair
and consistent, most of the time
they'll live up to your expecta-
tions said the father of three.
His expertise in officiating,
derived from his doctoral thesis,
has led to a successful career in
operating the scoreboard for
both football and men's basket-
ball games. According to the Dr.
Grimsley, he's missed two foot-
ball games and only a handful
of basketball games since 1970,
when he assumed the job.
"I've always considered
myself one of the officials of
the game Dr. Grimsley said. "I
try to concentrate to get it 100
percent correct. I'm trying to
make the game officials' jobs
easier
Whether it's scoreboard oper-
ating or spending time officiat-
ing, Dr. Grimsley has immersed
himself within the community.
Former best friend and colleague
George Williams formed a tour-
nament, which he promptly
named the Jimmie H. Grimsley
Hot Stove Tournament in 1989 to
promote local baseball. The tour-
nament, held annually continues
NFL
from page B6
to draw some of the region's best
teams.
What satisfies Dr. Grimsley
the most is being able to teach
second-generation students.
And what has impressed his co-
workers is that he can remember
details from the parent's lives.
Dr. Grimsley claims that he
can remember 75 percent of
his students' names (even 35
years later), which has made a
spider-web network throughout
eastern N.C.
But now, retirement is at his
doorstep. What he calls a bit-
tersweet experience, in the third
year of the Phased Retirement
process, Dr. Grimsley carries the
burden of being the last connec-
tion between ECU'S physical edu-
cation history and its future.
"With each name that has
been phased out, the department
has seemed to lose something
from the past Dr. Overton said,
a former Dr. Grimsley student,
who is currently the Assistant
Athletics Director for Internal
Affairs. "With him being the
link to the past, that final link
probably is gone
For a few short days, the lime-
light is on Dr. Grimsley. With all
of the good deeds and years of
service, it's about time.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Report news students need to know. cc
Accepting applications lor STAFF WRITERS
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3,000 yards and completing 60
percent of his passes. Backing up
Kurt Warner in Arizona would be
a perfect spot for Cutler to hone
his skills under Warner and Head
Coach Dennis Green's tutelage.
Another SEC quarterback who
is getting some attention as a day
one prospect is Alabama's Brodie
Croyle. Croyle led the Crimson
Tide to a 10-2 season in 2005.
His numbers in college got better
every year. The concern around
Croyle is whether or not he can
stay healthy for an entire season.
If Clemson's Charlie White-
hurst could get into a system
where he could watch and learn
for a couple of seasons to work on
his decision making, he could be
'a starter in the league. He has all
the physical tools necessary, it's
working through reads and pro-
gressions that he must work on.
Oregon's Kellen Clemens
suffered a broken ankle in Octo-
ber, but has had good workouts
and is being compared to Drew
Brees. Other quarterbacks to keep
an eye on are Bowling Green's
Omar Jacobs, Georgia's DJ
Shockley, Texas A&M's Reggie
McNeal and Tarvaris Jackson
out of Alabama State. McNeal,
like Penn State's Michael Rob-
inson and Virginia Tech's
Marcus Vick could be moved to
wide receiver at the next level
- like Jacksonville did with
Matt Jones after drafting the
Arkansas quarterback last year.
Jacobs put up incredible
numbers at Bowling Green. He
threw for over 400 yards and
five touchdowns in a 56-42 loss
at Wisconsin in September on
his way to tossing 26 TDs, 2,600
yards and only seven intercep-
tions. That was a season after
throwing for over 4,000 yards
with 41 touchdowns and only
four INTs. Jacobs is the fourth-
best quarterback in this draft and
one that is being overlooked as
the draft looms closer. He may
not be the fourth quarterback
selected, but the fourth best he
is. A team selecting him in the
late second or third round would
have stolen a quality player with
a great upside.
Jackson, from little Alabama
State is a name that has been
climbing draft boards rapidly.
He could be a late-third round
pick, but most likely will land
somewhere in the fourth round.
He had the best season of his
college career as a senior, com-
pleting 61 percent of his passes
for 2,900 yards, 29 touchdowns
with just five interceptions for
the 6-5 Hornets.
Marcus Vick's off-the-field
troubles will probably relegate
him to the, undrafted free agent
market. Showing promise at the
beginning of the year with an
incredible showing versus N.C.
State, his run-ins with the law
and on-the-field antics - such as
kicking Louisville's Elvis Dumer-
ville have cost him millions.
This is the sixth and final
draft preview in this series. My
mock draft will be published
online at theeastcarolinian.
com next week. The NFL Draft
is April 29-30 in New York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
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PAGE B10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-20-06
CONGRATULATIONS
The following members of East Carolina University's National Panhellehic Council received a grade point average of 3.5
or higher for the Fall 2005 semester.
Jamie Allen (ZTA)
Emily Bell (ZTA)
Ashley Bennet (AZ)
Sarah Bishop (KA)
Carmin Black (AAII)
Jenna Bradley (ZTA)
Laura Breedlove (AAri)
Lindsay
Breissinger (AO)
Lucy Brenner (KA)
Jessica Brenton (ZTA)
Laura Brewer (KA)
Whitney
Buchanan (AO)
Sarah-Katherine
Buckman (III))
Crystal Cary (ZTA)
Ashley Chapin (AZ)
Kimberly
Church (AHA)
Meg Collins (KA)
Mallory Conway (ISS)
Jo Cooke (AZ)
Sarah Cox (AZ)
Jennifer Crusie (ASA)
Kristin Danielle
Currin (SSI)
Lauren Curtis (ASA)
Amanda Davies (AAn)
Lauren Debock (AZ)
Emily Dnistran (SSS)
Leslie Downum (Xfi)
Lauren Dredger (III)
Kristin Droese (KA)
Shepherd Duncan (III)
Blair Forbis (KA)
Beth Frazier (ASA)
Linda Gerrish (III)
Julie Goldfarb (AZ)
Stephanie Grice (AATT)
Jamie Haire (AZ)
Lyndsey Hankins (III)
Megan Hannon (ASA)
Rebecca Harbin (ASA)
Amy Hardcastle (Xfi)
Lindsey Hargest (AZ)
Jamie Harrell (Xfi)
Katie Heim (KA)
Lucy Hicks (AZ)
Allison Hodges (AAn)
Shannon Holcomb (III)
Kenzie Hood (AZ)
Ren Hucker (ASA)
Erica Hussey (AO)
Sarah Jacobelli (AZ)
Abby Jones (Xfi)
Kimberly
Killebrew (III)
Joanna King (KA)
Stacy Kopcha (AATI)
Tiffany Kreps (AO)
Emily Kurkjian (Xfi)
Michelle Kwak (ZTA)
Tara Lancaster (III)
Laura Lever (ZTA)
Crystal Lewis (AATI)
Jenna Lindsay (AATT)
Katelyn Litalien (Xfi)
Jennifer Lynch (AAIT)
Kate Manders (Xfi)
Rachel Matthews (AO)
Dena Mazie (AO)
Caitlin McGuire (Xfi)
Brittany McLamb (AZ)
Melissa Morgan (III)
Lindsay
Morigerato (AO)
Kristin Morris (AO)
Anne Mulligan (Xfi)
Tiffa Murray (AATT)
Shuana Naylor (KA)
Lauren Noll (AO)
Julie Norfleet (Xfi)
Lisa Osterberg (KA)
Kerry Owen (AZ)
Lauren Owenby (AZ)
Amber Palmer (ASA)
Katie Parker (AZ)
Kelly Partlo (KA)
Ashley Peele (ASA)
Krista Perrotti (AZ)
Melissa Phelps (ZTA)
Kacie Povinale (Xfi)
Natalie Putnam (KA)
Rachel Quinn (KA)
Leigh Rauchbach (AZ)
Karen Register (Xfi)
Sarah Roberts (Xfi)
Tricia Ross (KA)
Ashley Roundy (XQ)
Brianne Ryan (III)
Rebecca
Santangelo (ASA)
Jaclyn
Schexnayder (AO)
Erin Scott (AATT)
Stefanie Scott (ZTA)
Corey Sharpe (ASA)
Kristen Shaw (AATI)
Jennifer Sineath (Xfi)
Theresa Smith (AO)
Becky Soja (Xfi)
Paige Solomone (III)
Beth Souders (Xfi)
Starr Stephenson (KA)
Katie Stollbrink (ASA)
Toni Theraeult (AAIT)
Kourtney
Thompson (AATT)
Lindsey Tingle (AAn)
Tylden Turner (AO)
Alex
Vanden Hueval (AO)
Stephanie Walls (AAn)
Katharine Mary
Ward (AATI)
Jenna Weber (Xfi)
Brooke Whitfield (AAn)
Anna Woodruff (KA)
ECU Greeks take great pride in scholastic excellence.
. University Suites
"Night Out" at Dr. Un
April 21. 2006






('4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B11
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PAGE B12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-20-06
ROblnSOn from page B6 DllkO from page B7
World Series, Robinson used
this opportunity to express his
wish for a black manager to be
hired by an MLB team; Frank
Robinson (no relation), in 1974,
became the first to fill such a
position, becoming manager of
the Cleveland Indians. However,
since then, only 13 of the 30
MLB teams have had a black or
Hispanic manager.
This brings me to the main
point of my article, which is the
sheer injustice committed by
MLB to the legacy and wishes of
Jackie Robinson.
The Dodgers, the organiza-
tion that gave Robinson his
chance and later moved to Los
Angeles, en)oy a pseudo-New
York legacy in the New York
Mets, the team that 'replaced'
them in 1961 after the Dodgers'
1958 move to California. New
York enjoys two MLB teams,
the Mets and Yankees; both are
highly competitive with payrolls
exceeding $100 million and $198
million respectively. They are
two of the most popular clubs in
the entire league and all of sports.
However, New York, the state
Robinson helped bring a World
Series title to, did not see a black
manager lead either of its teams
until 2005 when the Mets hired
Willie Randolph. After being
passed over by team after team
for over a decade in favor of white
candidates, Randolph's hiring '
finally brought Robinson's dream
to partial fruition - 23 years after
his wish for the hiring of black
managers in MLB.
However, the real problem is
not the lack of blacks managing
teams or the fact that there are
only two black MLB umpires (a
figure that hasn't changed since
Robinson's death). Actually, it's
the fact that there is only one
black MLB general manager (Ken
Williams of the World Champion
Chicago White Sox) and no black
owners.
This is an extremely unset-
tling problem that must be
addressed. Right now, there are
only 75 black players in MLB,
constituting only 10 percent
of the 744 players on opening
day rosters (whites make up 64
percent of MLB rosters). I believe
this can be attributed to the lack
of black ownership and manage-
ment, as well as the alienation of
predominately black communi-
ties from baseball.
For the sake of compari-
son, during the 1970s, blacks
accounted for about 30 percent of
all players. That number shrinks
even lower when looking at black
participation in college baseball,
which is around 6 percent. In
other words, baseball is in a
state of racial decline in regards
to blacks.
But the telltale sign that
blacks are becoming an endan-
gered party in MLB can be found
in the Sports Business Journal, a
publication who's self-proclaimed
readership is "Business Executives
Across the Sports Industry The
SBJ's April 2006 article entitled
"The 20 Most Influential People
in Baseball" is comprised of all
white individuals. The fact that
the 20 most influential people in
baseball were all white when Rob-
inson entered MLB in 1947 and
now, 59 years later, the 20 most
influential people in baseball are
still all white is a clear indicator
that minorities lack power and
influence within the infrastruc-
ture and hierarchy of MLB.
The bottom line is baseball
has missed the present gen-
eration of black high-school ath-
letes. Amid the lack of blacks in
positions of power within MLB,
league officials are taking steps
to attract younger kids back to
the game by annually donating
$250,000 (note that $316,000
is the major league minimum
salary) to Little League to expand
its urban programs. Also RBI,
"Reviving Baseball in Inner
Cities" programs are thriving in
Atlanta and Houston.
I hope that the kids who are
recruited to play In these pro-
grams will discover that they are
part of a long legacy of athletes
who paved the way for sports
integration. There was far too
much sacrifice endured by people
like Jackie Robinson and those
who preceded and followed him
to allow the black ballplayer to
vanish from MLB and our neigh-
borhood sandlots, schools and
universities.
This writer can be contacted at
sportsfPtheeastcarolinian. com.
arrested last November in Wash-
ington after he and two buddies
from Chaminade High School
on Long Island allegedly pelted
a stranger, Jeffrey Bloxgom, with
anti-gay slurs and punches.
He agreed to a deal that
means a charge of assault will be
dropped if he completes 25 hours
of community service.
The allegations also have
exposed racial and class tensions
in Durham.
In a 911 call reportedly made
by the other stripper attending
the party, the woman claimed
the Duke students had yelled a
racial slur at her.
And a neighbor, Jason Bissey,
said he heard one of the athletes
shout at the departing dancers,
"Hey, bitch! Thank your grandpa
for my nice cotton shirt
But not everyone has taken
sides along racial lines.
The father of Devon Sher-
wood, the only black player on
the team, told the New York
Daily News he's happy his son
wasn't charged but is worried for
the others.
"They had no business being
implicated Chuck Sherwood
said from his home in Freeport,
L.I. "I want to believe that they
are innocent
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PAGE C2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
4-20-06
ongratulations

ALLISON MARIE PEZZULLO
Allison,
Congratulations and Best
Wishes for a Wonderful
Future!
Love,
Mom, Dad, Leslie &uliann
ALEXANDRA BIRBACH
Alex,
We are all so proud of you.
Congratulations!
Love,
The Birbach Family
ERIC B. MURPHY
Congratulations
Superhero!
We're so proud!
Love,
Nancy and Dad
LAUREN HOUGH
Congratulations Lauren!
You did it!
We are so proud!
Love,
Mom and Bill
MICHAEL JOHN ROSE
"To repeat what others have
said, requires education, to
challenge it, requires brains
M. P. Poole
Michael, you've got brains!
We are Proud of You!
Love,
Mom and Dad
The ECU Student Media says
CONGRATULATIONS
to all Spring 2006 graduates.
duates
FILIPPA MACKENZIE DUKE
Congratulations Filippa!
We are so proud! May
God Continue to Bless
and Guide you!
Lots of Love,
Daddy, Mommy, Lngrid,
and Athena
LOGAN BRETT JARMAN
Congratulations Logan!
We all are very proud of
you
Love,
Mama, Daddy, Cody, Austin
andAshton
COLIN BLAINE WILSON
Congratulations Colin!
We're so proud of you.
May God bless you and
guide you as you follow
your dreams.
Love,
Mom and Dad
BRAD GRIBBLE
A great job by a great guy
Congratulations,
Mom and Dad
LINDA GERRISH
Congratulations Linda on
your Graduation!
We are so proud of you
Love,
Mom and Dad
ERIC ANDREW DICKEN
Eric,
Congratulations! I'm so proud
of you! We've been so blessed
and I'm so excited about our
future together!
love you,
Stephanie






4-20-06
4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
PAGE C3
Wishing the best
of luck to you
CANDACE CHERYL MOORE
We knew our brown-eyed
baby girl would succeed!
We are so proud of you and
love you so much. Congrat-
ulati
ons!
Love,
Daddy and Mama
MEGANHATHAWAY
1 .2' You've made me a proud man Megan Faye. May
God bless our future together. "Life is a journey,
tkVlet us travel it well"
VLove, Sam
ANJALI SIRONA HEMPHILL
Congratulations Anjali! We
are so proud of you! New
challenges ahead one step
at a time.
Love,
'ATS
Mom, Dad, Arjun, Aeneas,
and Mango
ski

TIFFINEE DANIELLE SMITH
Congratulations Tiffinee!
Words can't express - I'm
so proud of you hoping
you continue to grow and
always succeed in life.
You did it!
Love,
Mom
GABRIEL STEVON DUBIS
We are so proud of you!
May God continue to bless
you.
Gabriel, you are a blessing
to us.
Love,
Mom, Dad, and Wolfgang
ASHLEY BRITT
r V 4fl L Congratulations Ashley. I'm so proud of you! Your Daddy's looking down from heaven - sharing the same pride! L love you Baby! Mom


The ECU Student Media says
CONGRATULATIONS
to all Spring 2006 graduates.
JUSTIN E. BARROW
Congratulations Justin! We
are all proud of you.
Love you,
Mom and Dad, Vanessa and
Natanya, Nyanne too.
JANIE ASKEW PAREDES
Congratulations Janie!
Words cannot express how
proud we are of you for
your hard work and
perseverance.
We love you
Dad, Mom, and Mario
VICTORIA ALLISON MARLEY
We are so proud of you
Tori! Good Luck in the
next chapter of your life!
All our love,
Mom, Dad and Taylor
KAREN HODGE
Congratulations Karen!
We're so proud of you!
We love you,
Mom and Dad
SARA ANNE DELUCA
Congratulations Sara
You did it! You made it
through! You took your first
step toward success and
we're so proud of you!
Love,
Dad, Mom, and Angela







l-oitd tihtf to fxLriclcm. htsctrt-fulL coipriMj.u.cMtion3 to Oir ff-f'fft&irtff Jtwoj
tvi3H,&3 ctKt cjooct i curt? on itoiw rtil tricltcxtsor3.
cM.t JOlcMCtf to titstf, WM(U4 licit t'notfi li
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on Hcmi'?
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flcM.1'4? frcftKXfct mtfum
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723 Lm 7u-J St.
(2S2) 7S2-422S
CM. - r nr' . ttt . M
tL
2006-2007 Young Graduate Program Application
Building the Future Today
The Young Graduate program provides recent graduates the opportunity to stay connected with ECU Athlet-
ics' at an affordable cost while at the same time providing scholarship support to the many deserving stu-
dent-athletes competing here at ECU. This three year plan provides Young Graduates Pirate Club benefits
which include:
t Discounted season tickets for football and basketball
Pirate Club membership cards
Tax deduction
Bumper stickerswindow decals
Monthly Pirates Chest (exclusive Pirate Club news publication)
Pre-game access to Harvey Hall for home men's basketball games
In addition, as an added benefit beginning in 2006, those who join the Young Graduate program will receive
priority to order 4 general admission discounted football season tickets in the end-zone of Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. Below is the discounted ticket breakdown for Young Graduate members only for the 2006 foot-
ball season:
Young Graduate Membership
$25.00
Season ticket $50 00
Season ticket 2$50.00
Season ticket 3$100.00
Season ticket 4$100.00
Non Young Graduate Member
Season ticket $200.00
(Upper deck seating only for non-members)
Name
Address
City
Phone (H)
E-Mail
ECU Alumnus Year
Salutation Name
Spouse's Name
Gift Information
Total Pledge for 2006 $
Charge To: MC VISA AMEX DISCOVER CC
Exp. Date Amount Charged
Signature Years in Young Grad Program
Checks may be made payable and sent to:
ECU Educational Foundation
Ward Sports Medicine Building, Ste. 304
East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858
Or Call 252.737.4540, Fax to 252.737.4664
Interested in contacting Young Graduates to join Pirate Club in your area, please contact Michael Ward at
252-737-4540 or wardmi@ecu.edu. Visit our Young Graduate website at www.ecupirateclub.com for more
information





4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
14 i.1
Graduation is upon usThursdaMay4t
A- Reliaious Studies Brewster D 313 at 9 n m
Take the time to figure
out where you need to
be and when
CAROLYN SCANDURA
FEATURES EDITOR
Officially, ECU's commence-
ment date is Saturday, May 6
but there are many other things
that you need to know about
the graduation process before
that day gets here. Have you
registered on OneStop for the
University Ceremony? Do you
know when and where your
departmental ceremony will
be held? What are you going to
wear? All of these questions are
important and thankfully TEC
can offer some insight.
Registering for graduation on
OneStop is how students can be
sure that you will have a definite
spot at the University Gradua-
tion Ceremony. To complete this
process, log on to OneStop and
go to the Tools tab. Under the
Graduation & Commencement
tab, click on Commencement
Reservation. On this page, you
will be told which ceremony
your department will be partici-
pating in and at what time you
need to be there. If you would
like to participate in the Uni-
versity Ceremony, submit your
registration at this time. If you
are only going to participate in
your departmental ceremony,
contact the head of your depart-
ment for further instructions
about whether or not registration
is required. The schedule here
will tell you when and where
your department will be holding
their individual ceremony and
when your University Ceremony
will be held.
As far as attire, you obviously
need to be wearing a cap and
gown like everyone else.
Your keepsake cap, gown
and tassel are available for
pickup from the Student Store
in Wright Plaza during normal
business hours. Female students
are required to wear dark dressed
and black shoes with academic
robes. Male students are required
to wear dark trousers, white
shirts and black dress shoes with
their academic robes.
For more information about
the graduation process or infor-
mation to give your family
and friends, visit ecu.educom-
mencement.
This writer can be contacted at
leaturei@theeastcarolinian.com
The Charmed Peacock
an Enchanting Experience
Mother's Day and Graduation are Just Around the Corner.
Make sure you have the perfect gift for Mom or your favorite Graduate.
We have a gift for that person who has everything!
Free Gift Wrap with any Purchase!
408 S. Evans St Uptown Greenville (252) 83O-2625
SELL THE BOOKS
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THE REST.
Once finals are over, books are the last things you want to cart home. But your stereo,
CDs, clothes, computer, TV, microwave, kayak? Leave them to The UPS Store. We'll
carefully pack them and ship them home. Whether home's across the state, across the
nation, or across the ocean. There - who said you didn't learn anything this semester?
The UPS Store
Formerly Mail Boxes Etc.
(next to McAlister's)
740 SE Greenville Blvd.
2523216021
Jody Chaffee, Owner
Offering new low rates
direct from UPS
0AKM0NT SQURR6 APARTMENTS
2 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath Townhomes
1212 Red Banks Rd. Greenville, NC
252-756-4151
F6flTURS:
On-site Management
& Maintenance
On-site Laundry Facilities
Resident & Visitor Parking
Adjacentto ECU Bus Stop
Playground Area
Basketball Volleyball Courts
Outdoor Swimming Pool
Modern Electric Appliances:
Range,
Refrigerator,
Dishwasher &
Garbage Disposal
Central Heating & Air
Free Water, Sewer &
Basic Cable
Cemented Patios
Religious Studies, Brewster D 313 at 2 p.m.
Friday, May 5th
Human Ecology: Minges Coliseum at 8 am.
Brody School of Medicine: Wright Auditorium
at 9 am.
English: Hendrix Theatre at 9 a.m.
Chemistry: Science and Technology C307 at
10:30 am.
Business: Minges Coliseum at 12 p.m.
Nursing: Wright Auditorium at 12:30 p.m.
Economics: Hendrix Theatre at 12:30 p.m.
Theatre & Dance: McGinnis at 1 p.m.
Foreign Language & Literature: Bate 1032 at
2 p.m.
History: Mendenhall 244 at 2 p.m.
Philosophy: Brewster D 313 at 2 p.m.
Physics: Howell Auditorium at 3 p.m.
Political Science: Willis Building at 3 p.m.
Allied Health: Wright Auditorium at 4 p.m.
Biology: Hendrix Theatre at 4 p.m.
Anthropology: Flanagan 265 at 4 p.m.
Health and Human Performance: Minges
Coliseum at 4 p.m.
International Studies: International House at
5 p.m.
Music: Great Rooms at 7 p.m.
Communication: Wright Auditorium at 7 p.m.
PAGE C5
Art: Hendrix Theatre at 7 p.m.
Education: Minges Coliseum at 7 p.m.
Sociology: Willis Building at 8 p.m.
Saturday, May 6th
Psychology: Wright Auditorium at 10 am.
Industrial Technology & Computer Science:
Wright Auditorium at 2 p.m.
Morning University
Ceremony at 16 a.m.
Brody School of Medicine
School of Allied Health Sciences
School of Nursing
College of Education
College of Human Ecology
College of Health & Human Performance
College of Technology & Computer Science
Afternoon University
Ceremony at 2 p.m.
Thomas Harriot College of Arts & Sciences
College of Fine Arts & Communication
College of Business






RAGEC6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
4-20-06
On-campus conveniences Apartment amenities
4
w
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Located in the heart of
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perfect blend of location,
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With a cutting-edge
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Forget the early morning
commute. Sleep late and
walk or bike to class.
Come visit the new Campus Towers today!
(252) 752-2865 info@campustowers.com
635 Cotanche Street Greenville, NC 27858





4-20-06
4-20-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
PAGE C7
Convenien
0 Meals and Pirate Bucks are
0 Save 7 sales
0 Save up to $3.30 a meal when yol
0 Receive FREE guest meals to use
0 Get rewarded for eating on car
Flexibility.
ampus Dining locations.
ases.
& of our dining halls.
est End Dining Halls.
m Rewards.
jam With Jam Rewards, a free membership prdHHat rewards you just
for eating on campus, purchasing a Dining mbership and dining,
eating or snacking at any one of our locations earns you points toward
great stuff like song downloads, gift certificates, travel gear, electronics,
and more. Hey, you gotta eat. Why not get rewarded for doing it?
Interstate Meal Plan Memberships
(Available to commuter students, faculty, and staff)
With an Interstate Meal Plan Membership, you'll receive a set number of meals per
semester and Pirate Bucks. Meals are good throughout the semester when
they are purchased, and more than one meal can be used at a time.
1-95 95 meals per semester 6 FREE guest meals $50 Pirate Bucks
1-64 64 meals per semester 4 FREE guest meals $115 Pirate Buck
I-40 40 meals per semester 2 FREE guest meals $150 Pirate Bucks
Resident Meal Plan Memberships
(Available to all students, faculty and staff)
With a Resident Meal Plan Membership, you'll receive a set number of
meals per week and Pirate Bucks.
19 Pirate Plus 19 meals per week 6 FREE guest meals $300 Pirate Bucks
14 Pirate Plus 14 meals per week 4 FREE guest meals $350 Pirate Bucks
9 Pirate Plus 9 meals per week 2 FREE guest meals $400 Pirate Bucks
Pirate 19 19 meals per week 6 FREE guest meals $150 Pirate Bucks
Pirate 14 14 meals per week 4 FREE guest meals $175 Pirate Bucks
Pirate 9 9 meals per week 2 FREE guest meals $200 Pirate Bucks
I
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CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Campus Dinin






PAGE C8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN GRADUATION EDITION
4-20-06
w
s.
: i
Because big brother's on the "Van Wilder" plan,
He's burned through his college fund and most of yours.
Extend your savings and cover up to 100 of your education
costs with a Campus Door student loan, featuring online
approval in less than a minute.
Write that down.
www.campusdoor.com
CAMPUSDOOR'
YOUR TUITION SOURCE
Like this poster? Download your own printable PDF version at campusdoor.composters





4-20-06
4-20-06
THE EAST CAROUNIAN GRADUATION EDITION
PAGE C9
4th Annual ECU Undergraduate
Research and Creative Activities
Symposium
For additional information and program schodule
mmiv.ecu.odulionors
Friday April 21, 2006
Mendenhall Student Center
9:00 am to 4:30 pm
Projects will be featured from many disciplines and include:
Research projects
Class projects
Service learning programsprojects
Creative works
Artistic expression
Have Lunch on us and take in a Lunch Box Session on great
topics like these and many mbre:
Careers in Medicine & Allied Health
Pursuing Opportunities for International Experiences
Explorations, The State of NC Undergraduate Research Journal
Applying to Graduate School
Take a little time now.
for fall
semester'
Save TIME and MONEY later
with TEXTBOOK RESERVATIONS
Save yourself some time and money by signing up for the Dowdy Student Store's
TEXTBOOK RESERVATION PROGRAM. You'll get the first shot at buying
USED books, AND we'll save you time by pulling your books and
boxing them for pick-up!
Find out more about reserving your textbooks for fall semester,
by visiting Dowdy Student Store in the Wright Building
or our website: www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Textbook reservation applications for fall are due August 1.
Pick one up before you leave for summer break!
Ocoited' wd'operatedcm EatfCawflm uwwsfo,
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Vrf Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Wrisht Buildins 252-328-6731 1-877-499-TEXT
www.studentstores.ecu.edu






PAGE C10
THE EAST CAROUNIAN GRADUATION EDITION
4-20-06
The ECU Student Media savs CONGRATIIIATIONS to all Spring 2006 graduates.
WESLEY COMMONS NORTH
Located on Brownlea Drive at the
INTERSECTION OF TlIIRD SlREET
Call Keystone Property Management at
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or rentall@keystonepropertyrngt.com.
On 1 Month Free Rent
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Two Bid rooms $410.00
Wai.erS
K included in rent
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Apartment Features
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iNcluded
iNdlduAt 1 O & 1 2 MONlh (EASES AVAlUblE
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Game Room w!tI biltlARds, aIr liockry .
fopsbAU
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BuslNfUSCOMpUTER MEtfiA CENTER
FItness Center
SuImmInq Pool & Hot Tub
BEAck VolleybAll
MInutes From Campus
On ECU Bu Route
Come Ckeck 1l Out
Dring in this flyer to waive the $100 Reservation Fee
and pay only $S for the Application Fee!
Campus Pointe at ECU
45 Af7ptlrf0i4 fetf
University Suites
light Out" at Dr. Un
April 21,2006
Free Bus Shuttle starting at 9:30pm from
University Suites to Dr. links
NOW LEASING 3 Bed 3 Bath Townhomes
Come Celebrate Summer Time With Usl!
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$3 2382 Bit Liiht Draft
$3 Dr. lots Martinis
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BJ


Title
The East Carolinian, April 20, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 20, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1902
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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