The East Carolinian, April 19, 2006













4-18-06
www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 69
WEDNESDAY
April 19, 2006
:
Simulation defense training
for students, faculty and staff
Last RAD. class of the
four-part series
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
The final session for ECU'S
self defense class, Rape Aggres-
sion Defense Systems, took place
Wednesday, April 12 from 7
- 10 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Rooms.
The attending students learned
simulation training in which the
students practiced defense tactics
with their instructors who were
dressed in protective suits.
R.A.D. was a four class series
that lasted for approximately
three hours each meeting time
for a total of 12 hours.
Among instructors who par-
ticipated in teaching R.A.D.
students were Amy Davis, Curtis
Hayes, Janel Drake, Tandy Dunn,
Stephanie Carnevale, Tedd Biggs,
Scott Pollard, Justin Guthrie and
Michelle Lieberman.
The classes strive to increase
student knowledge of risk aware-
ness, risk reduction, risk recogni-
tion and risk avoidance.
Davis said that they felt that
these classes were very appro-
priate with April being sexual
assault month.
R.A.D. classes are broken into
categories, which consist of a
R.A.D. for women and a R.A.D.
for men, that are both offered at
the university.
"R.A.D. for women is designed
for women as an educational pro-
gram for them to grow emotion-
ally and physically against their
attacker said Davis.
Among completion of the
class, each student receives a
certificate that says that they
have successfully completed the
12-hour course.
Students also receive a partic-
ipant manual that allows them to
participate in any R.A.D. program
being offered anywhere for free.
The R.A.D. program started in
1989 and it just recently became
available to students, faculty and
staff at ECU.
The classes are only available
to this group of people at the
university but according to Davis,
it's a possibility that the classes
might expand the eligibility for
possible participants.
"Hopefully in the future, it
may open up to the outside, but
right now we're keeping it in
house Davis said.
The classes are offered com-
pletely free to students, staff and
faculty and they can register online.
The classes usually consist
of no more than 25 students per
class. To secure a spot in the class
students should register early.
Anyone interested in taking
one of these classes is encouraged
to visit the Web site at ecu.educs-
adminpoliceRAD.cfm for more
upcoming classes.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Survey, forum to address issues in Pitt County
Pitt County
Voices
Top Issues in Pitt County:
Crime
Gangs
Violent Crime
Family Violence, Abuse of
Children and Adults
Health
Prescription Medication Cost
Mental Illness and Emotional
Illness
K-12 Education
High School Dropout Rate
Overcrowded Classrooms
Illiteracy
Poverty
Lack of Jobs and Unemployment
Poorly Prepared Workforce
Affordable Housing
Substandard Housing
Homelessness
Public Transportation
Youth
After-SchoolSummer Programs
for Youth
Drug and Alcohol Abuse Among
Children
Underage Drinking
Teen Pregnancy
Issues may affect ECU
students
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Center for survey
research conducted a survey
called Pitt County Voices to
address important issues in Pitt
County.
The survey was commis-
sioned by the United Way of Pitt
County and sponsored by the Pitt
Community College Foundation,
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
Foundation and the Poverty
C,ommitteej
The survey was created to
help policy makers and Pitt
County citizens become more
aware of the community, its
needs and issues that must be
handled immediately to improve
the community according to
Donna Jacobs, communications
director for UWPC.
"We think this report will
provide valuable information for
groups and individuals to come
together and coordinate action
to improve the quality of life for
residents of Pitt County said
Ron Nowaczyk, associate vice
chancellor for economic and
community development.
The results of the survey iden-
tified six issues that need imme-
diate assistance which include
crime, health, K-12 education,
poverty, public transportation
and youth-related issues.
Theses issues have also been
divided into sub-categories. An
example of this is the issue of
K-12 education with sub-catego-
ries such as high school dropout
rates, overcrowded classrooms
and illiteracy.
All these issues were big
topics addressed by residents of
Pitt County, service providers
and UWPC campaign donors
through earlier surveys that were
conducted in September through
November according to Mandee
Foushee, project manager for ECU
Center for Survey Research.
"Since no one issue domi-
nated the findings and all of these
issues were viewed as critical to
improving life in Pitt County,
they are presented alphabetically
and unranked said Foushee.
Wings and laughs
The Axis of Stevil presented the Swash Improv Group yesterday in
a hot way, eating 100 'blazin' wings in two hours. Below, the group
gives a short performance to promote their "Plaque Attack Tour
The self defense class, Rape Aggression Defense Systems held its final session for the semester April 12, but more classes will be
held in the future. Students can register online for free, as well as faculty and staff. Classes normally hold no more than 25 participants.
Is China easing up on
monetary regulation?
Chinese government
to allow more foreign
investing
LEESCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
These issues are destined to
affect ECU students if they are
not resolved. An example of an
issue that will directly Impact
ECU students is education and
the high dropout rate in Pitt
County, according to Jacobs.
"The issues that affect part
of the county affect all of the
county. None of us are isolated
Jacobs said.
Three public forums were
held to release the results of the
problem areas found by the sur-
veys on March 15, March 28 and
April 4. A meeting was also held
March 3 to talk about the results
of the survey with community
leaders.
Leaders that attended
the meeting March 3 include
State Representative Marian
McLawhorn, Senator John
Kerry, Pitt County Commis-
sioners Chairman Jimmy Garris,
Greenville Mayor Pro-Tern Mil-
dred Council, Pitt County Cham-
ber of Commerce Board President
Suzanne Sartelle and Pitt County
Sheriff Mac Manning.
see VOICES page A3
China is one of the few com-
munist states left in the world.
China has been communist since
the government of General Chiang
Kai-shek was ousted from power
during the Chinese Civil War.
Mainland China has been com-
munist since and the remnants of
the opposition formed a democ-
racy on Taiwan. In the past few
decades the number of democra-
cies in the world has increased and
communist states have dramati-
cally decreased. Generally com-
munism has failed in places like
Russia and Eastern Europe because
of poor economic responsiveness
on the part of the government.
The collapse of these commu-
nist states has led to a financial
windfall as wealth is now more
evenly distributed. The Russian
capital of Moscow now has the
most billionaires of any city in
the world as a result of the priva-
tization of businesses formerly
owned by the state. Possibly the
most famous of these is Mikhail
Khordovsky, who is now in prison
allegedly for tax evasion, but
many feel that his political inspi-
rations threatened the Kremlin.
China has had far more suc-
cess with communism than
Russia, however there is still con-
siderable restriction on financial
freedom. However China would
like to show that it is taking steps
to correct that. Now Chinese
people can invest $20,000 per
year in foreign currencies and
investments, while the amount
used to be only $8,000. Perhaps
with this new investing free-
dom, the currency advantage
China enjoys with the United
States will not be so pronounced.
Due to similar developments,
Microsoft feels it is close to
capitalizing on China's enor-
mous market, which has been
kept at bay by China's software
pirates. China is notorious for
copyright violations of inter-
national goods mainly because
they have very relaxed laws on
such things themselves. Due
partly to Microsoft's lobbying,
the Government has recently
been cracking down on piracy.
Boeing has had similar dif-
ficulties selling aircraft in China
as the strict regulation of Chinese
airlines has kept sales at bay. The
deregulation has been slower
than anticipated and some com-
panies are growing impatient.
China has also agreed to
lift the ban of U.S. beef and
was applauded by Commerce
Secretary Carlos Guttierez. The
former CEO of Kellogg said, "As
in everything else, the numbers
will ultimately tell the story
Guttierez spoke not only of the
lift on beef ban but also on
China's economic liberation of
its people and the general level-
ing of the trade playing field.
While these changes are
good for China and for the world
economy as a whole, there are
still a lot of changes to be made
for China to pull its massive
population out of poverty and
to escape the perils that plagued
past communist regimes.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Living proof of modern-day slavery shares valuable lesson
Simon Deng, former slave in Sudan, lectured on his childhood.
The frightening truth of
his past
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Simon Deng, former Suda-
nese child slave gave a lecture
about his childhood in Hendrix
Theater on Monday. The evening
opened with an introduction by
Dr. Kenneth E. Wilburn. In his
introduction, he emphasized
that Abraham Lincoln did not
free the slaves of the world,
and that there are still govern-
ments that enforce slavery today,
including Sudan. There is also
genocide going on that remark-
ably, is similar to the Holocaust,
but is not talked about.
The capitol of Sudan, with its
corrupt government, is in Khar-
toum. Khartoum is 70 percent
Sunni Muslim. There have been
two devastating civil wars that
imposed domination over the
Sudanese.
Simon Deng was very kind
and open about his past.
"I am not ashamed to call
myself a slave, but at the same
time 1 am not proud he said.
Deng is from Darfur, Sudan.
Everyone in Darfur is Muslim
with similar features and com-
plexion. Deng is a Christian. He
has been banned from pools for
being both a slave and a non-
Muslim because he was told he
would contaminate the water.
As a child, he was also told
that if he ever saw troops, to run
and not stop because his life was
on the line.
One day the Soviet troops
came and opened fire. He ran
among the people of his village,
as he was told. He saw two of his
friends shot and killed before his
eyes. He had a pregnant relative
who could not keep up with the
group. She was eaten alive by
wild animals, which she was fed
to by the Soviets.
There were also the two
Eldesters of his hometown,
whom were highly respected.
People went to them to hear sto-
ries of earlier times. They were
both burned alive that day.
At the age of seven, Simon
Deng was kidnapped into slavery.
He was given as a "gift" to an Arab
Muslim family and became their
personal slave. He ate the leftover
scraps of their meals, and slept
with the animals in the yard.
The people got their water
from the Nile River, and he was
responsible for carrying buckets
of water to the family. If there
was not enough water for every-
one, he was beaten. He was often
punished for things he did not
do, and never refused an order
from the family he belonged
to. Even when he wanted to say
"no all he knew how was to
say "yes
Deng was later asked by the
family to join them as their son.
He had a loving family that he
remembered well. His father
offered ten cows to anyone who
knew anything about his son.
They assumed he was dead, but
had no proof.
One day he met someone
during his chores, which knew
a man of his village. The man
promised to come back to that
same spot to meet him the next
day. Deng did not believe him,
but went anyway. The man kept
his promise and was there with
a man Deng recognized from
home. That man freed him
from his three and a half years
of slavery.
Simon Deng now resides in
New York City. He believes that
America is the strongest country
that can save his home of Darfur
from the ongoing genocide
today. Deng said, "1 do not know
how to thank a nation that has
opened its doors and accepted
me as a human being referring
to the United States.
Deng has completed the
Sudan Campaign Freedom Walk.
It was a 300-mile walk from
NYC to the streets of the White
House. He completed the 300
miles on Constitution Ave.
Despite knee problems, he was
the only participant to not take
a break.
For anyone who wants
to help fight against the ter-
rorism in Sudan, you can get
involved with Students Take
Action Now in Darfur. There
are also numerous sites, such
as darfurgenocide.org, save-
darfur.org and darfurinfo.org.
The evening ended on a pow-
erful note with an active ques-
tion and answer session. Since
there have been over two mil-
lion people slaughtered in the
Sudanese genocide, Simon Deng
is an obvious enthusiast of the
involvement STAND is hoping
for. Deng says, "The actions
you take today, could save a life
tomorrow unless you would
rather sit and do nothing
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A7 I Opinion: A5 I What's Hot: Bl I Sports: B3





4-19-0'
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
RACHEL KING News Editor
CLAIRE MURPHY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY April 19. 2006
Announcements:
Last chance for
Buccaneer Photos
Wednesday, April 26 from 9 a.m.
until 5 p.m. in Mendenhall Great
Room One. Cap and gown may be
taken separately and packages
are available for purchase. Contact
328-9236 to reserve a time. Walk
ins are also welcome.
Interactive seminar
for non-profit hoard
members
April 27 from 8 a.m. until 10
a.m. in the Willis Building on
East First Street. ECU and the
United Way of Pitt County have
partnered to host a free Legal and
Financial Accountability Seminar
for board members and staff of
eastern North Carolina non-profit
organizations. Must register by
April 21 at 737-1345
'Guys and Dolls'
Tuesday, June 27 through
Saturday, July 1.
8 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday
and 2 p.m. Saturday in McGinnis
Theater
Set in Damon Runyon's mythical
New York City, this oddball
romantic comedy introduces us
to a cast of vivid characters who
have become legends in the
canon: Sarah Brown, the upright
"mission doll out to reform
evildoers; Sky Masterson, the
high-rolling gambler who woos
her on a bet and ends up falling
in love; Adelaide, the chronically ill
nightclub performer whose been
engaged to the same man for 14
years; and Nathan Detroit, her
devoted fiance, desperate to find a
spot for his infamous floating crap
game. Everything works out in the
end, thanks to the machinations
of Abe Burrows and Jo Swelling's
hilarious, fast-paced book and
Frank Loesser's bright, brassy,
immortal score, which takes us
from the heart of Times Square
to the cafes of Havana, Cuba, and
into the sewers of New York City.
Funny and romantic, Guys And
Dolls is ideal for all audiences.
Tickets are required and are
$20-$30 Contact 328-6829 or
1-800-ECU-ARTS for additional
information.
'The Fantastlcks'
Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday,
July 15 at 8 p.m. Tuesday through
Saturday and 2 p.m. Saturday in
Mcginnis Theater.
Try to remember a time when this
romantic charmer wasn't enchanting
audiences. The Fantasticks is the
longest-running musical in the
world, and with good reason: at the
heart of its breathtaking poetry and
subtle theatrical sophistication is a
purity and simplicity that transcends
cultural barriers. The result is a
timeless fable of love that manages
to be nostalgic and universal at
the same time. With its minimal
costumes, small band and virtually
non-existent set The Fantasticks is
an intimate show which engages
the audience's imagination and
showcases a strong ensemble
cast. It's moving tale of young
lovers who become disillusioned,
only to discover a more mature,
meaningful love is punctuated
by a bountiful series of catchy,
memorable songs, many of which
have become standards. Tickets
are required and are $20-$30
Contact 328-6829 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS for additional information.
Summer Drama Camp
Monday, July 24 through Saturday,
July 29 from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m. at
Studio Theatre, Messick Theatre
Arts Center. This is a .fun-filled
program emphasizing growth and
discovery through theatre arts.
Classes include: Beginning Acting
Technique for student aged 14-18;
Character Development for students
aged 11-13; Creative Dramatics for
students aged 7-10. $100 per child.
Contact Patch Clark at 328-1196 or
email her at clarkp@mail.ecu.edu.
Wake County Public
School System Spring
Teacher Job Fair
Saturday May 20, from 8:30
a.m. until 2:30 p.m. at Forestville
Elementary School and Knightdale
High School If you are fully
licensed, have completed your
student teaching or are eligible
for a valid teaching license, join
hundreds of other candidates
at the Spring Teacher Job Fair.
School administrators will be on-
srte to conduct interviews and to
offer contracts to select applicants.
All candidates must pre-register
and receive confirmation to
attend the job fair. Pre-register
online from May 1 -17, at wcpss.
netsignupjob-fair. For more
information contact by e-mail:
hrTecruitment@wcpss.net Phone:
(800) 346-3813 or (919) 854-1690
News Briefs:
State:
North Carolina officials take advantage of
No Child loophole
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP)-When it comes to telling
parents in North Carolina about the performance
of their children's schools, state officials proudly
share all sorts of detailed information.
But when the federal government asks North
Carolina for information based on a school's
test scores broken out by racial group, state
officials take advantage of a legal loophole
to hold back. Concerned that the scores of
a few students could keep an entire school
from demonstrating academic progress under
the federal No Child Left Behind Act, the state
does not separately report the test results of
thousands of students, even though most of
those results are published publicly on the
state's NC Schools Report Cards.
An Associated Press review found that in the
2003-2004 school year, North Carolina officials
didn't report to the federal government the test
scores of 53,074 students broken down by
racial group. On the state's school report cards,
however, officials only left out the scores of
5,302 students in racial groupings.
Without such pressure, the state picked a group
size of five students for the state report cards,
settling on the much lower number because
that is high enough to ensure student privacy.
Reporting the results of a subgroup with just one
or two students would make it easy to identify
the test performance of individual students,
officials said.
Beamon, the district administrator in Johnston
County, said students aren't hurt because their
scores are not included in information provided
to the federal government for No Child Left
Behind.
"Does it mean that those kids get slighted in any
way? I don't see how Beamon said.
"The whole notion of different or special
strategies just because of an ethnic group, there
is no bag of tricks out there for that
Federal judge refuses to stop scheduled
execution
RALEIGH, N.C (AP)-The state of North Carolina
has taken sufficient precautions to ensure
that an inmate scheduled to die this week will
remain asleep during his execution, a federal
judge said Monday in ruling that the execution
could proceed.
Lawyers for condemned inmate'Willie Brown Jr
61, had objected to the state's procedure, saying
there was a chance that Brown could awaken
but be paralyzed and suffer pain. The state said
there would be a physician and a registered
nurse present and that they would watch over
a brain wave monitor that would help determine
whether Brown remained asleep.
"It is now clear that plaintiff will not be satisfied
with anything less than an experienced,
licensed, board certified anesthesiologist
standing at his bedside in plain view of
attending witnesses U.S. District Court Judge
Malcolm Howard said in a seven-page order
denying a stay of execution.
"Plaintiff attempts to force a conflict of medical
ethics by taking the issue of the positioning
of medical professionals in and around
the execution chamber and dressing it in
constitutional clothes
The state's use of the brain monitor raised
complaints from the manufacturer and
anesthesiologists, who said the machine
wasn't intended for executions. The monitor
hasnt been used in any previous North Carolina
execution, a state spokesman has said.
National:
Stocks slide as oil, gold climb
NEW YORK (AP)-Surging gold and energy
prices dragged stocks lower Monday as inflation
fears curbed Wall Street's enthusiasm over solid
first-quarter earnings from financial services
firm Citigroup Inc.
Although CitJgroup's upbeat results fed optimism
about corporate earnings for the latest quarter,
investors again fixated on inflation and interest
rates after Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago
President Michael Moskow se!d he feels the
central bank must remain "vigilant" in its policy
of boosting rates to stem price increases.
Without new data to help gauge the economy's
health, Wall Street turned its attention to
the commodities markets, where oil prices
reached $70 a barrel and gold lingered at a
25-year high. But despite the threat of rising
raw material costs, the inflation picture has
remained somewhat positive recently, said
Russ Koesterich, portfolio manager at Barclays
Global Investments.
Citigroup's earnings grew 4 percent to reach
$1.12 per share forthe quarter, with strength in
stocks and fixed-income returns helping it beat
analysts' average estimate of $1,02 per share.
Citigroup climbed 26 cents to $48.31.
Elsewhere in the banking sector, Wachovia
Corp. said its quarterly profit gained 7 percent
on higher overall revenue and fees. Adjusted
earnings of $1.12 per share matched Wall
Street's target, but Wachovia nonetheless slid
86 cents to $54.99.
The Russell 2000 index of smaller companies
declined 5.67, or 0.75 percent, to 745.44.
Overseas, Japan's Nikkei stock average lost
1.35 percent. The markets in Europe were
closed for Easter Monday.
Former Illinois governor convicted of
racketeering, fraud
CHICAGO (AP)-Former Gov. George Ryan, who
drew international praise when he commuted
the sentences of everyone on Illinois' death
row, was convicted of racketeering and fraud
Monday in a corruption scandal that ended his
political career in 2003.
Ryan, 72, sat stone-faced as the verdict was
read and afterward vowed to appeal.
Ryan faces up to 20 years in prison for
racketeering conspiracy charge alone, the most
serious against him in the 22-count indictment.
The jury found him guilty of all counts, including
fraud, obstructing the Internal Revenue Service
and lying to the FBI.
Co-defendant Larry Warner, a Chicago
businessman and Ryan friend, was found
guilty of racketeering conspiracy, mail fraud,
attempted extortion, illegally structuring bank
withdrawals and money laundering.
Prosecutors accused Ryan of steering big-
money state contracts and leases, including a
$25 million IBM computer deal, to his friends
and political insiders while he was secretary
of state in the 1990s and then as governor
starling in 1999.
In late March, months of testimony nearly went
down the drain when the judge discovered two
jurors had failed to mention past arrests on their
court questionnaires.
Even as he faced federal charges back home,
Ryan accepted speaking invitations across the
country and was nominated forthe Nobel Peace
Prize for his criticism of the death penalty.
In 2000, the Republican governor declared
a moratorium on executions in Illinois after
13 death row inmates have been wrongly
convicted. Then, days before he left office in
2003, he cleared death row, commuting the
sentences of all 167 inmates to life in prison. He
declared that the state's criminal justice system
was "haunted by the demon of error
International:
Palestinian suicide bomber kills 9 In Tel
Aviv, setting up confrontation with Israel
TEL AVIV, Israel (AP)-A Palestinian suicide
bomber struck a packed fast-food restaurant
during Passover on Monday, killing nine other
people and wounding dozens in the deadliest
attack in more than a year.
"It is a despicable act of terror for which there is
no excuse or justification White House press
secretary Scott McClellan said.
"Defense or sponsorship of terrorist acts by
officials of the Palestinian Cabinet will have
the gravest effects on relations between the
Palestinian Authority and all states seeking
peace in the Middle East
The European Union, which has cut off aid to
the Hamas-led government, also denounced
the bombing and called for restraint by both
sides.
Islamic Jihad, which has close ties to Israel's
arch enemy, Iran, claimed responsibility for
the attack, the first in Israel since the Hamas
Cabinet took office 2 12 weeks ago.
The suicide bombing took place about 1:40 p.m.
when the bomber, carrying a bag stuffed with 10
pounds of explosives, approached The Mayor's
Falafel" restaurant in a busy neighborhood near
Tel Aviv's central bus station. The restaurant,
which had been the target of a bombing in
January, was packed with Israelis on vacation
during the weeklong Passover holiday.
Hamas says it will turn to Muslim countries to
make up its budget shortfall. Iran and Qatar
have each pledged $50 million.
Afghanistan's capital mostly In the dark
despite billions spent In foreign aid
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)-For 12-year-old
Kefaya Nabi, the worst thing about not having
electricity in her home is not being able to watch
her favorite Bollywood soap opera on TV.
The concerns of her 50-year-old shopkeeper
father, Ghulam, are more serious: How will he
heat their tiny house? How can his four children
study without light? How will his wife cook?
Such worries are common for many people
in the Afghan capital. Some 40 percent of
Kabul's 4 million residents don't have access
to the electric grid, Deputy Energy Minister
Mohammed Amin Munsif says.
Foreign donors have spent billions of dollars
rebuilding infrastructure since the Taliban
were ousted in 2001. But progress has been
especially slow in restoring electricity, with
almost all power lines and power stations
destroyed during a quarter century of war.
High-voltage lines are being built to connect
the city with hydroelectric dams in Uzbekistan,
about 190 miles over rugged mountains to the
north. But they aren't expected to be up for two
more years.
For now, those in Kabul who can afford it rely
on small, diesel-fueled generators.
Others buy electricity from neighborhood
businessmen who use big, noisy and polluting
machines to power a few homes.
"Some months I can pay for the light, but the
cost of running our television is too high
Ghulam said as the family's small TV sat idle
on a table.
The city's few street lights rarely shine at night.
Key government departments, including the
police headquarters and the defense ministry,
suffer repeated blackouts. Schools and clinics
built by international donations close before
daylight fades.
Biggest egg hunt
becomes obsession
Get something to say? Send ins you4 Piwfe Ranis!
Cultural
V.V:li :JT:
2hAAAhJUAX
"The World's Largest Easter Egg Hunt" takes place in the town of Homer.
(KRT) Nothing in this
small town of sprawling green
pastures and white picket fences
distinguishes it from any other
rural community in America,
except for the sign posted at
the Homer city limits pro-
claiming it the "Home of the
World's Largest Easter Egg Hunt
Never mind that the city
of 950 people set the coveted
Guinness World Record in 198S
or that it has been broken many
times since. When it comes to
Easter egg hunts no place, it
seems, does it quite like Homer.
For 47 years, the 10-acre horse
pasture on Mack Garrison's farm
has been the site of the most
popular Easter egg hunt in the
South. About 5,000 children,
with their parents in tow, come
from Atlanta, about 70 miles
south, and from as far away as
North Carolina and Alabama
to trample through the grass
in their Easter Sunday best in
search of 100,000 candy eggs.
Buried among them are 125 prize
eggs that can be claimed for a
live rabbit, a stuffed rabbit or an
Easter basket filled with goodies.
"This is a family tradition
that began when 1 was a kid said
Garrison, 51, whose grandfather
started the hunt for children of
people who worked in his sawmill.
"We are going to keep doing
it for as long as I am around
The event is as much a part of
the Easter tradition in the South
as sunrise service at the Baptist
church. But in the competitive
world of Easter egg hunting,
Homer has fallen behind the
times. Twenty-one years ago, it
won the title by hiding 80,000
eggs, brought in fresh from a farm
on Easter morning and boiled in
cast iron pots over an open flame.
These days it takes a lot more eggs
than that. Last Sunday, Georgia's
Stone Mountain Park set the Guin-
ness World Record with 301,000
plastic eggs, stealing the title
from the reigning record-holder,
the Rockford, 111 Park District,
which hid 292,686 eggs last year.
The modern Easter hunt,
which is more likely to involve
candy eggs or plastic ones stuffed
with candy than hard-boiled eggs,
has grown into one of the biggest
rituals of spring, with cities trying
to outdo each other in how many
eggs they can hide and how many
people show up to look for them.
Just as Georgia and Illinois
have battled over who has the
busiest airport and the biggest
aquarium, there is likely another
fight on the horizon over which
can hide the most Easter eggs.
Organizers in Rockford said they
are thinking about trying to regain
the title next year. If they do, Stone
Mountain will be standing by to
challenge them the following year.
"We all know that records are
meant to be broken said Christine
Parker, a spokeswoman for Stone
Mountain, a scenic park near Atlanta.
"If someone breaks our record,
we will probably go for it again
The obsession over hosting
the biggest Easter egg hunt is an
example of what some economists
call a "wlnner-take-all" society.
Everybody wants to be in first
place because there is little regard
see EGG HUNT page A3
Wednesday, April 19" at 5pm
Mendenhall Brickyard
Live band, Hula dancers, fire and
knife dancers, free food,
games, giveaways and
hula dance lessons.
Lyr





-19-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
Sunscreen isn't a panacea, so be
aware of clanger on the beach
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People are debating the effectiveness of sunscreen and whether it gives you the protection that's promised
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(KRT) Like a lot of blond-
haired, fair-skinned people,
34-year-old Jonjon Baus slathers
on sunscreen before he heads
outdoors. As a bicyclist and
runner, he opts for the sweat
proof formulas, and because he
rarely gets sunburned, he figures
he's safe.
"That's really how 1 gauge
how effective my sun protec-
tion is says Baus, a manager for
Track Shack, an Orlando, Fla
running store.
But In the wake of a law-
suit filed recently in California
against sunscreen manufactur-
ers, claiming they have fraudu-
lently exaggerated the effective-
ness of their products, Baus has
started to wonder.
In fact, although dermatolo-
gists still recommend the liberal
use of sunscreen, they warn that
it's entirely possible for the sun to
damage skin without burning it,
and that most of the sunscreens
currently on the market do a
better job preventing sunburn
than they do at preventing other
problems, including premature
wrinkles, age spots and even
skin cancer.
And neither sun protection
factor (SPF) ratings nor the
labeling of a product as "broad-
spectrum" gives consumers
any information on how much
they'll be shielded against ultra-
violet A rays, which don't cause
burning but do cause aging of
the skin and potentially cancer.
"I wish sunscreens were
better. That would be terrific.
But they're not says Dr. James
Spencer, a St. Petersburg, Fla
dermatologist and clinical pro-
fessor of dermatology for Mount
Sinai School of Medicine.
"But they are a useful tool,
and like any tool, if you don't use
it properly, it doesn't work
The problem is that many
people may expect too much
from a sunscreen, Spencer says,
putting them at risk for skin
cancer by spending too much
time in the sun.
The confusion comes in part
because there are different types
of sunlight responsible for skin
damage, mainly UVA and UVB.
Because UVB is what causes sun-
burn and has a well-established
link with skin cancer, it is gener-
ally considered more harmful.
But scientists now believe UVA
causes much of the premature
aging of the skin and, more criti-
cally, much of the skin's genetic
damage, which may also lead to
skin cancer. UVA rays can even
penetrate windows to reach
people indoors.
So far, there's no way to mea-
sure the U VA-screening ability of
a given product, and scientists
don't know how much UVA
contributes to the alarming rise
in skin cancer. According to the
Centers for Disease Control and
Prevention, the death rate from
melanoma in the United States
has climbed about 4 percent a
year since 1973.
Though researchers have dis-
cussed a rating system for UVA,
so far there has been no action
on the matter. And that's only
part of the problem.
Some experts say that claims
for UVB protection could be
inflated, too. In 1999, under
orders from Congress, the federal
Food and Drug Administration
drafted a slate of regulations on
see SUNSCREEN page M
Egg Hunt from page A2
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for those who come in second or
third. And cities are no exception.
"Cities see themselves as
competing with one another for
corporations, for a labor force, for
baseball and football teams and
for tourists. They are trying to get
attention wherever and however
they might get it said Glenn
Altschuler, a professor of Ameri-
can studies at Cornell University.
"One way to do that is what
we might call the Guinness
Book of World Records strategy,
which is to have the largest cake
manufactured in your city or
setting the record for hiding
Easter eggs. It is a way to put
your city on the map and getting
another 15 minutes of fame
The problem, according to
Altschuler, is that Easter, like
other religious holidays such as
Christmas, has become too com-
mercialized.
"Easter is becoming increas-
ingly unmoored from its religious
foundation he said.
"It has become so overwhelmed
by commerce that we risk losing the
very purpose for which we are sup-
posed to be celebrating the holiday
Though there are many theories
of how the Easter egg hunt began,
it is widely believed that it started
as an annual ritual in ancient
Europe, where hunters searched
the woods looking for the nests of
wild birds so they could remove
the colored eggs to make talis-
mans. This gradually evolved into
the Easter egg hunt, with painted
eggs instead of birds' eggs and
woven baskets replacing the nests.
Hosting the annual Easter
egg hunt, or roll in the case of
the White House, has become an
unofficial duty of the first lady
and the wife of just about every
governor. And Easter egg hunts
are not just for children anymore.
There are Easter egg hunts for dogs,
underwater Easter egg hunts for
adults and nighttime Easter egg
hunts for teenagers. The stakes are
higher too. To attract big crowds,
big prizes are often awarded -
things like CDs, bicycles, season
passes to parks or amusement sites
worth $100 and $50 Easter baskets.
Setting a world record is not
easy. A Guinness official flew
in from London to observe the
event at Stone Mountain and
handed over the certificate on
site. But in most cases, the event
must be videotaped and well
documented to prove that every-
thing is accurate. It takes more
than 100 volunteers and thou-
sands of dollars, though no one
would say exactly how much,
to pull off a feat worthy of the
Guinness Book of World Records.
For Stone Mountain, which
attracted more than 10,000
people to its event, the Easter egg
title is just the latest in a list.
VOiCeS from page A1
"Based on the March 3 meet-
ing, the United Way is helping to
organize an oversight committee
of community leaders to take the
report to the next level and begin
making changes in Pitt County
to improve the quality of life
for residents said Marilyn Wil-
liams, UWPC executive director.
The survey and the efforts
that UWPC are making to
improve these issues will con-
tribute to a better quality of life
for Pitt County residents as well
as students.
"This health and human ser-
vices needs assessment will play
an important role in determining
where Pitt County leaders and
organizations need to focus both
resources and collaboration to
effectively address the critical issues
facing our county Foushee said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Did you know?
Deciding to be an Organ
Donor will not affect the qual-
ity of medical care you receive,
and an Organ Donor can have
an open casket funeral.
Organ recipients are not
selected based on their fame or
wealth; organ matches are based
on blood and tissue type, organ
size, medical urgency, geographic
location and waiting time.
Age is not a factor in organ
donation though physical con-
dition is the important factor.
Physicians decide whether
organs and tissues are able to
be transplanted.
Organs are not sold in the
United States; federal law pro-
hibits buying and selling organs,
and violations can result in
prison sentences and fines.
Anesthesia is used during
marrow donation to ensure
donors do not feel any pain. Dis-
comfort is typically limited to
post-donation stiffness andor
soreness during the week after
the donation is made.
April is the month of Organ
Donation Awareness and the
Students for Organ Donation
Awareness will provide all daily
facts. Look for a fact about organ
donation in each April edition
of TEC.
Vineyard Vines Trunk Show
Wednesday & Thursday
April 19th & 20th
8am- 6pm
Presenting the newest collection of
spring designs!
Refuse to
pay retail.
Great selection of Dresses
Wedding Gowns Party
Bridesmaid Dresses Church
Cocktail
Sundresses
atalog
Connection
Division ol UAL
210 E. 5 St. 758-8612 MON-SAT10-6
BUCCANEER
THE YEARBOOK OF ECU
Now taking applications for
20062007 year.
Positions arc available for:
ManagingCopy Editor
Section Editors
Photo Editor
Photographers
PRMarketing Rep
Volunteer photographers and writers
Call 328.9246 or stop by Self Help Center, Suite 205A
(301 S. Evans Street) for more Information.
COFFMAN'S
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Tel (252) 756-8237 Fax (252) 756-6854
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Earn up to $170mo. donating plasma in a friendly place.
DCI Biologicals of Greenville 252-757-0171
2727 I .inili Street Down the Street from ECU www.dciplasma.com





PAGE A4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
4-19-06
Sunscreen
from page A3
sunscreen manufacturers but
never formally adopted them.
Critics say the agency bowed
to pressure from the sunscreen
lobby.
Representatives of the FDA
did not respond to requests for an
interview on the subject.
The proposed rules would
have prohibited "unsupported,
absolute, andor misleading
and confusing terms such as
'sunblock 'waterproof 'all-day
protection' and 'visible andor
infrared light protection
Yet doctors agree that those
terms, still widely employed in
sunscreen advertising, are mis-
leading at best.
No product, experts say, is
truly waterproof, sweat-proof or
capable of lasting all day.
"If you read the fine print
says Dr. John Meisenheimer,
chief of dermatology for Orlando
Regional Healthcare System, "it
does say that you have to reap-
ply them
Meisenheimer, a competitive
swimmer and occasional surfer,
says that each time you dive
in the water or perspire, you'll
need to put on more sunscreen
afterward, at least every 60 to 80
minutes. But he still recommends
the waterproof variety.
"They tend to stay on a little
bit better when you sweat he
says.
He also advises his patients
to use products that offer an SPF
rating of 30 or higher as well as
those that claim broad-spectrum
protection, even if there's no way
to measure how much. After all,
the doctor notes, some UVA pro-
tection is better than none.
The bottom line, derma-
tologists say, is that the more
you can stay in the shade, cover
up or liberally apply a good-but-
imperfect sunscreen, the better
off you'll be.
"We're not going to tell people
to hide in a cave and only come
out at night Spencer says.
"It's not realistic
Meisenheimer agrees. "I real-
ize I'm not going to get patients
who are lily-white down here in
Orlando he says.
"So I tell them, 'Listen, use
your sunscreens, protect yourself
as much as you can, and then just
enjoy being in Florida
Against: the makers of five
major sunscreens, including Cop-
pertone. Banana Boat, Hawaiian
Tropic, Neutrogena and Bull-
frog.
Claim: that the manufactur-
ers used deceptive advertising
and labeling to promote their
products, even though they
knew "or should have known"
their products weren't capable
of doing everything they were
advertised to do.
Seeking: an injunction against
the allegedly fraudulent claims,
compensation for consumers
and other remedies, including
a public education program on
sun protection paid for by the
industry.
Response: The companies
have vigorously denied the alle-
gations.
When possible, wear a broad-
brimmed hat, long-sleeved shirt,
long-pants and UV-light-blocking
sunglasses.
Try to stay in the shade
between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m
when the sun is most intense.
Apply sunscreen liberally to
all exposed skin, using a product
with an SPF of 15 or higher and
one that advertises both UVA
and UVB protection. Reapply
every two hours, more often after
swimming or sweating.
Use extra protection for chil-
dren. Melanoma is thought to
be linked to early childhood
sunburns. Also use extra cau-
tion near water and sand as they
reflect the sun's damaging rays.
Avoid tanning beds. The UV
light used causes skin cancer and
wrinkling. Self-tanning lotions
and sprays are a safe alternative,
but wear sunscreen for protection
outdoors.
WZMB 91.3 ECU'S radio station
is accepting application for
Summer 2006
THE DEADLINE FOR ALL APPLICATION IS
FRIDAY, MAY 12, 2006.
MUST BE A FULL-TIME REGISTERED STUDENT WITH A 2.25 GPA
Positions open include:
DJS
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SPORTS DIRECTOR
NEWS DIRECTOR
NEWSCASTERS
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PRODUCTION MANAGER
PROMOTIONS MANAGER
GRANTS MANAGER
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Call 252-744-5291
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Members
THE BRODY SCHOOL MEDICINE at EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
GpNI LAUGH YOUR BUTT OFF EVERY
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Comedy 2 One
Same comedy zone which
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Show starts at 8:15 PM w "Built
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Monday April 24th 2006
7 PM MSC Brickyard
enlfedainfoefil c





4-19-06
Page A5
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
WEDNESDAY April 19, 20Q6
StlC
y
ID
191
or
cation.
ucians
ERSITY
)th
nfo.
Our View
Laughter is the best
medicine, after all
In 1995, an Indian doctor, Madan Kataria, discov-
ered a new way to get your exercise and center
yourself. It's called "Laughter Yoga
It doesn't require jokes or a sense of humor, so
virtually anyone can do it, even if you aren't exactly
a born comedian. It revolves around yoga's tradi-
tional breathing exercises and simulated laughter,
and it only takes 20 minutes. When done in a
group setting, the simulated laughter quickly turns
into very real, contagious laughter that "flows out
like a fountain
Described as "simple, gentle, empowering and
tension-releasing and between giggles, stretch-
ing exercises help promote health.
This type of yoga can be done regardless of
age, language, culture, religion or political beliefs
because laughter, an exclusively human expres-
sion, is the same in every tongue. Laughter Yoga,
by the way, is not just utilized for health benefits, it
is reputed to be good for the soul, as well. Which
is not really surprising, considering that laughter
is associated with happiness, satisfaction and
peace, among many other positive things.
Amazingly, after Dr. Kataria and his wife came
up with the idea, they tested it out in a local park
and it became an overnight success. Soon, there
were "laughter clubs" popping up all over Mumbai,
India. He dedicated his life to Laughter Yoga in
1997 and in the first 10 years, Laughter Yoga had
spread like wildfire "through a grass-roots move-
ment" into over 40 countries.
As of June 2005, a foundation, Laughter Club
International, had been established to coordinate
and support the "exponential growth" of this new
exercise. Here are a few statistics on Laughter
Yoga as of June 2005. There are over 100 certi-
fied Laughter Yoga Teachers who have trained
over 5,000 certified Laughter Yoga Leaders, who
in turn train others. There are more than 5,000
Laughter Clubs established to practice Laughter
Yoga worldwide and over 250,000 members cur-
rently practicing.
It sounds like a great way to relax and have a good
time, but of course, I laugh out loud sometimes
just because I see someone else laugh, I certainly
don't have to have a reason. The great thing about
Laughter Yoga is, you don't need a reason.
A word of caution, though, medical specialists
say that performing this exercise for more than
30 minutes per session is very dangerous, and
that's no laughing matter.
All information comes from laughteryoga.org
- check it out.
I'MASQPEENAS
THE NEXT PEPSON
BUT I DW THE
LINE WT BUYING
tTHArvOTMADfc
PCOM RfTROTDK
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Rachel King Claire Murphy
News Editor Asst, News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Kristin Murnane
Features Editor Asst. Features Editor
Pirate Rant
Opinion Columnist
Censorship out of fear is not justifiable
Fee Free to Laugh
BENJAMIN CORMACK
CASUAL CORNER
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Rachael Letter
Asst. Photo Editor
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the
summer. "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board
and is written by editorial board members TEC welcomes
letters to the editor which are limited to 250 words (which
may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed
and include a telephone number. Letters may be sent
via e-mail to editor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
I know this is kind of an old
topic, but after watching "South
Park" over the past two weeks I
finally have the confidence to
talk about an issue that has been
bugging me to no end.
With this war on terror there
has been a great deal of need to
be sensitive to Islam and Muslims
who are not a part of the extrem-
istterrorist movement. Even I
have tried to understand Islam.
I accepted a copy of the Quran
from a Muslim group of students
that had a booth set-up here on
campus some months ago. I've
tried to read it as much as I could,
but things have gotten in the way.
From what I have read though, I
feel that I at least grasp some of
the aspects of Islam; however I
do not completely understand
it. I say this in order to make the
point I'm about to make
very clear.
The biggest challenge and ste-
reotype that I think Muslims face
today is that they can't take criticism
and they have no sense of humor.
However, what may be a stereotype
carries a gruesome air of truth.
Some of you may remember
a story about a Dutch cartoon
depicting the Muslim prophet
Mohammed. Reaction to this car-
toon was a sense of "displeasure"
to say the least. Property was
destroyed, people were injured and
hundreds of people died world-
wide in the responding riots.
The truth is that this whole
thing may have started as some-
thing positive or at least some-
what innocent. A Danish author
of children's books wanted to
produce a book about the life of
Muhammad, but he couldn't find a
willing artist. This could have been
because many Muslims believe that
illustrations of Muhammad are
forbidden by the Koran. Yet many
religious scholars claim that this is
not true. The other reason many
authors refused to take the job
may have been because of a story
you may not have heard about.
Theo van Gogh, Dutch film-
maker, television producer, pub-
licist, actor and a man 1 can only
describe as an active practitioner
of free speech, produced a film
titled Submission, a film which
deals with the topic of violence
against women in Islamic soci-
eties; telling the stories of four
abused Muslim women. The
title itself, "Submission is the
translation of the word "Islam"
into English. In the film, the
women's naked bodies are veiled
with semi-transparent shrouds as
they kneel in prayer, telling their
stories as if they are speaking to
Allah. Quranic verses unfavorable
to women are painted on their
bodies in Arabic. After the movie
was released in 2004, both Theo
van Gogh and Hirsl All, the script
writer, received death threats.
While Van Gogh was known
as a friendly and tolerant char-
acter, in the 1980s, he became a
newspaper columnist, using his
column over the years to vent
his anger at politicians, actors,
film directors, writers and other
people he considered to be part
of "the establishment
On November 2, 2004 at the
Amsterdam East borough office,
Theo van Gogh was shot eight
times, his throat was slit, he was
stabbed in the chest and left for
dead with two knives planted
in his torso. Pinned to his body
with one of the two knives was a
note that included this translated
statement, "Islam will be victori-
ous through the blood of mar-
tyrs. Only the death will separate
the truth from the lies
The Danish newspaper
Jyllands-Posten reported this
story and initiated a debate
over how much Danes should
censor themselves. The paper's
editor requested a cartoon about
Muhammad from Denmark's
40 syndicated cartoonists, 12
accepted the invitation. This is
how these infamous cartoons
came to be, and were published
last September.
This is how certain extremist
Islamic nations and individuals
responded:
In Iran, a suicide bombing
course was created to exact
revenge on the Danes. Their
applicants were Iranian students
- men and women - who regis-
tered for "martyrdom-seeking
operations" training.
Around the same time, a promi-
nent Iranian newspaper sponsored
a competition for fresh cartoons
about the Holocaust as a test for the
west's commitment tofree speech.
President MahmOud Ahma-
dinejad banned Danjsh imports
and halted all trade and business
ties with the country in an effort
to place Iran at the head of the
anti-Denmark campaign. Iraq,
the United Arab Emirates, Qatar
and other countries stepped in
line behind the boycott.
ProtestersinSyriaand Lebanon
firebombed Danish embassies.
Muslim journalists were
arrested for republishing the car-
toons in Jordan, Algeria and Yemen.
I was raised as a Christian,
and as such I have respect for God
and Jesus, among other religious
figures, and images of them. How-
ever, I'm not so blindly faithful
that I assume that God looks like
Santa Claus or that Jesus looked
as white as he is classically por-
trayed because other people say
so or because of numerous pieces
of artwork. Many experts who
have conducted anthropological
research believe that Jesus was
dark skinned and, being that he
was said to be a carpenter, more
muscular than the image he is so
often represented by. Some even
claim Jesus was black. For all we
really know James Caviezel, who
played Jesus in The Passion of
the Christ, is the spitting image
of him.
Also, I've watched episodes
of shows like "Family Guy "The
Simpsons and Adult Swim's
"Robot Chicken" that have
depicted God and Jesus as charac-
ters in skits as well as the subjects
of skits. In one particularly memo-
rable episode of "Robot Chicken"
there was a parody of Kill Bill, called
Kill Bunny, in which Jesus pursues
the Easter Bunny for having him
crucified, fights with Santa Claus,
spars with George Burns and even
fights several rabbis with a sword.
What was my reaction? It was the
same as when I saw God pour a
beer in midair and accidentally
zap a woman he was trying to
pick up with a lightning bolt on
an episode of a "Family Guy I
laughed. Sure I could see how it
could be offensive, but I could also
see the humor in it. I guess I'm
just open minded enough to see
things as being funny for the sake
of being funny and not done with
the purpose of being offensive
or necessarily critical of society.
Truthfully though, I think that
what Jesus, Mohammed, Buddha,
Moses or any other religious
figure looked like isn't as impor-
tant as the message they send.
Going back to the episode
of "South Park 1 think it is
important to make note of some-
thing that happened during this
episode. While the executives at
Comedy Central were unwilling
to show an image of Mohammed,
they had no qualms, issues, or
trouble with running a clip that
featured Americans, President
Bush and even Jesus defecating on
each other. So this is OK, but just
showing an image of Muhammad
is not? Why? Because it may incite
a terrorist attack? Like we don't live
with that fear everyday already.
A cartoon was not the moti-
vation behind using planes full
of innocent people as weapons.
A cartoon did not start a con-
flict that has been going on for
thousands of years. Frankly a
cartoon inciting anyone to do
anything is practically insane
and illustrates a very weak ego.
Anyone who is willing to kill over
something as trivial as a cartoon
needs to be stopped. That's why,
aside from the first amendment,
I think in our society it feels
OK to make jokes and cartoons,
because we've shown no toler-
ance for people who kill for their
message. That's why instead of
spending a couple of cents on a
bullet, we instead spend thou-
sands of dollars to prosecute
people like Timothy McVeigh,
Eric Rudolph and other activists
who feel justified in bombing
abortion clinics and places of
business. That's why we attach
the term "hate crime" to racially
motivated crimes. That's why
Zacarias Moussaoui and Saddam
Hussein are being prosecuted
instead of just being killed like
they thoughtlessly did to others. I
also believe it's why we're pursuing
people like Osama bin Laden.
Living a life where you are
afraid to have a rational opinion
about something because you're
afraid of being harmed physically,
emotionally or in any other way
is not right. Living in a society
where the feelings of one group
is prioritized over others is not
right. Living in a society where
people are afraid of what a car-
toon might cause, who it might
offend or what it may incite is
ridiculous. If someone does
something wrong, we should
not be afraid to punish them or
be timid about punishing them.
Our society does still have a long
way to go, and I wish I could
always feel strong enough to
speak-out as I am now, but at
least we as a society believe that
killing innocent people is never
justified and that those that do
should pay for it.
In My Opinion
(KRT) Denial is an amazing
thing. It can keep you curled up
on the sofa, munching chips.
Nine of 10 adults recognize
that America has a weight prob-
lem, a Pew Research Center
survey has found.
They've seen the saddlebags
- on somebody else. They know
about the serious health con-
sequences - for somebody else.
They're worried about the poten-
tial drain on the health-care
system - from somebody else.
But when they look in the
mirror or at their friends, every-
thing is fine.
Seven of 10 adults told research-
ers that someone they know is fat. But
only four of 10 admitted that they,
too, needed to shed some pounds.
Government statistics suggest
otherwise. In 2004, the National
Center for Health Statistics found
that the number of obese Ameri-
cans had more than doubled in 20
years, to 31 percent. Another third
was classified as overweight.
Either researchers need to
recalibrate, or a lot of Americans
are kidding themselves.
Pew researchers did encoun-
ter some self-realization. Adults
said dieting is hard, and exercise
is the key to success. But they're
not excited about doing either.
To tackle the obesity epi-
demic, Americans need a more
realistic scale.
To the guy who rides the loud, red crotch rocket through
Pirate's Cove, there's really no need to rev your engine so
loud that I can't even hear my TV or music. Trust me, no
one is impressed by you doing that anyway.
I'm been in love with you for the last seven months and
have never known how to tell you, and now it's too late
because you are graduating.
To the girl on the second floor, shower shoes were on the
list of items to bring while living in the dorms. Oh and
by the way, please put on some clothes when you decide
to leave your room. We're tired of seeing you in your bra
and underwear while our friends are visiting.
Boy in my psychology class, ii you want to sleep that's
cool by me. You may want to consider a pillow instead of
bobbing for apples throughout a lecture that I'm actually
trying to listen to.
To all you guys out there that have ex-girlfriends, they
are your ex-girlfriends for a reason. Remember that when
a beautifully awesome girl comes along that likes you.
Don't let your ex talk you into getting back together
just because she sees you with someone else. She doesn't
want to be with you, she just doesn't want you to be with
anyone else.
To the girl in the gray Honda Accord, learn how to drive
because if 1 would have been in my truck, 1 would have
rammed your rear.
The student workers for Campus Living put up with a
whole lot from other students, faculty, staff and parents.
They are able to deal with issues like the Clement fire
(which included relocating 700 residents immediately),
and put up with students who still think they are in high
school by have their parents call anytime something goes
wrong and they still have a great attitude! Keep up the
good work guys!
Girls that are constantly walkingeating alone on
campus and talking on their cell phones are insecure.
What else could possibly explain your obsession with
putting a phone to your ear the minute you are alone?
Yes TEC 1 do agree that most of the anti-TEC rants have
come from SGA members. I heard someone who 1 know
is on SGA bragging about submitting the one about the
tuition increase that was published in today's paper, and
the guy who did it is rude and dumb. The person didn't
even spell medal right. So don't take it too personally.
Why does CNN news need to tell how much Reade
Seligmann and Collin Finnerty's parents estimated tax
value is on their homes in N.J. It only suggests that the
dancer has other motives behind her allegations. Here
is another example of how being poor and being rich is
brought in to racism. The whole case is messed up and
the dancer knows it.
To the guy 1 met on the drunk bus a few weeks back,
even now that I'm sober, I have the weirdest attraction
to you!
Roommate - if you're never here and I move your stuff
that you have thrown all over the floor don't get mad
and also don't preach to me about how "Godly" you are
when you spend the week with your boyfriend 1 really
don't care to hear it!
To the girl who came to me for help with her Pirate Login.
Paraphrase does not equal passphrase. I do not make the
password policies becauseif it were up to me the minimum
would be 16 characters. You were cursing at me because you
tried using your name for the password, which you typed
wrong because of your two inch long nails. And yes pass-
phrase requires all that because you have all that impor-
tant information in your e-mail. BTW You're Welcome!
To the guy in love with a librarian, I'm in love with you
too! Please come say hi.
Please learn the difference between me and I. Do not
say, "Between you and 1 Do not use "myself" when you
Is it just me or is the entire guys tennis team beautiful! It's
so worth risking my life walking down that hill to watch
you boys in action!
Wright Place is now selling Naked Superfood Juice and it
is amazing. The "Green Machine" kind is the best thing
that has ever happened in my life. Everyone should try
it, now!
Pease learn to use capital letters when you write e-mails.
The word "I" should be capitalized.
Maybe it's just me, but on a warm day the campus smells
like dog doo.
When you break up with a person who still likes you, it is
not possible to just be friends so if you have no intention
of getting back together with her, leave her alone!
Yes, I knew you had a humongous booger sticking out of
your nose, and 1 didn't tell you.
I'm about to graduate and have no desire to pursue a
job in my field of study. Anyone else in the same boat?
It's about time someone called out the yankees who think
they bankroll our school by paying $14,000 a year. What
you pay is barely enough to cover your fees and nothing
else. When you know what you're talking about, then you
can say something.
Why are people so jealous of fraternity guys and sorority
girls. It's not our fault you can't be us.
To all the girls who have been sporting the white all winter
I will not look at you funny anymore when you think
you look really cute in your white skirt, because Easter
was Sunday and you can wear your white now! Just keep
in mind that you are in the south and we do have rules
that must be taken into consideration!
Why is my best friend such a whiner?
Why are you so obsessed with cleaning? Oh wait, I forgot
you have no life.
Why do the old guys at the SRC feel its necessary to play
shirts vs. skins? Yeah, your old, I'm sorry, but nobody
wants to see your old, flabby skin. Try wearing matching
shirts or something.
My room mate isn't doing his paper right now because
he's too busy sending in rants to TEC.
If all three parking meters in front of Tyler are broken,
and we can't park in the A2 or B2 spaces, where are we
supposed to park to pack our cars? Grow a heart and use
some common sense before you give me a ticket.
Slower traffic keep right. This means that if you're going
to go slow get in the right lane so other people can get by.
Get it? Got it? Good! Now do it.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is m anon)inous way fbr shutent and staff in the
CUanmiOTHytowtfr(iiiaLs.Suini5nofLsumhividiHirttttBi(iym(j0.Jv
online at www.theeastcamHnlan.iom, or e-mailed to fMiirVthmMcamlinian.
com. The editor reserves the right to edit OpMon for content and brevity





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
4-19-06
On-campus conveniences Apartment amenities
F
"Jt
m
SB
i1-
PI F
ii
i

Welcome
to the T
New
W
R S
77e Best
ofBoth
Worlds
Located in the heart of
ECU's campus, the new
Campus Towers offers
today's students the
perfect blend of location,
style & convenience.
With a cutting-edge
computer lab, a game
room, TV lounges and
new laundry facilities,
Campus Towers offers
all the conveniences of
on-campus living with
the upscale amenities of
apartment life.
Forget the early morning
commute. Sleep late and
walk or bike to class.
Come visit the new Campus Towers today!
(252) 752-2865 info@campustowers.com
635 Cotanche Street Greenville, NC 27858





Page A7 The East Carolinian, Self Help Building
Phone (252) 328-9238 Fax (252) 328-9143
WEDNESDAY April 19, 2006
FOR RENT
Duplex 2 BDRM 2 BATH Central
Heat AC ECU Bus Route Partial
Furnished 218 Wyndham Circle 252-
714-1057 252-756-2778 Available
July 1st.
One two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,9,12
month leases Water Cable included
ECU bus Wireless Internet pets
dishwasher disposals pool laundry
(252) 758-4015
Beautiful house for rentsublease
over summer. Up to five bedrooms
available. House is huge and in
amazing shape. Located at 4th and
Eastern. Only $1000month. Call
en (252)883-9481
Walk to Campus and Downtown. 2
Bedroom, WasherDryer hookup,
newly renovated, hardwood floors,
central heat and air. Very Clean and
Neat. 111 Holly Street off 1st Street.
$425-Call 412-8973
Bradford Creek Apartment available.
Close to ECU. Free Rent and Pet Fee
for June. 3bd, 2.5 ba. $795 a month.
Short or Long Term Lease. Early
May move also negotiable without
added rent for a grand total of 1.5
mos pet fee free to move in by
May 15th. Interested? Please call
Yolanda at 252-328-2259 or email:
hollingsworthy@ecu.edu
Wyndham Circle Duplex: 2
bedroom 2 bath, washerdryer
hookups, huge yard & deck
Desirable Student Location! $625
month. Available summer or fall.
Walk to ECU, Pre leasing For
May, June, July, August, All
size homes, view details at
collegeuniversltyrentals.com
-or- call 321-4712
Two, three and five bedroom houses.
Starting at $550 - 2 bedroom, 3
bedrooms $600-$850. Most fenced,
with central HVAC, Security systems,
WD or hookups, all Pets OK! Call
Tilley Properties 830-9502
Now accepting applications for
summer and fall at Captains
Quarters, University Terrace,
Tower Village, The Trellis. Call
Hearthside Rentals 355-2112 or
355-5923. Visit our website at www.
hearthsidemanagement.com
Sublease for June and July.
Willoughby Park Condo 2Bd2Bth.
Pool and Tennis Courts. Cable
WaterSewer incl. $625mth. For
more info call 252-327-2060
For Rent: Very nice 4 br, 2.5 bath
house with 2 zone, central heatair;
off street parking; close proximity to
ECU campus. Completely renovated.
25 rent discount for prompt pay.
Call 752-1000, ask for Murrell.
Townhomes avail now! Over
1500 SQ ft. Enjoy your own
private floor! Rates starting
at only $340.00. Lease today
& get One Month Free I Call
University Suites 9 252-551-
3800
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Brick Duplex,
Central Air Stancil Drive Walking
Distance to ECU $540month Pets
OK wfee Call 353-2717 or 355-
5439
Walk to campus 3 BR 1.5 BA Recently
Renovated Meade St. Hardwood
Floors, ceiling Fans, WD, All Kitchen
Appliances Large FrontBackyard &
storage shed. $675month Aug. 1st
341-4608
Brand new 2 & 3 bedroom
townhouses for rent. 1.5 to 2.5
baths. Dudley's Grant off Firetower
Rd. All appliances. WasherDryer
hook-ups $695-795 per month. Call
341-0223 for more information.
House for Rent near campus on
Charles Blvd. 34 bedroom house,
front living area, central heatair
(completely closed in front & rear
porch), 2 full baths w washer &
dryer in main bath. Refrigerator,
range, rolling barcounter in
kitchen. Rear deck, large backyard.
Clean Pilley Properties 830-9502
$850month
FOR SALE
The Buccaneer is back! The ECU
yearbook has returned so make sure
to reserve your copy. Order online at
www.yearbookupdatesecu or call
1-888-298-3323 Hurry! Deadline
to order is 5pm 4-24-06
a player or coach please contact
Lydia Rotondo at (252)329-8080
for more information.
Area high school seeking field
hockey coach for fall 2006.
Afternoon availability 3-5 pm If
interested, call Lydia Rotondo at
(252)329-8080
HELP WANTED"
Nanny Needed Greenville Family
is in Need of a Full time Nanny.
Good Pay with benefits. We will
provide a vehicle and Possible
Living Arrangement. You must
be energetic, responsible, and be
able to spend time summers at the
beach. This is a great opportunity
For the right person. Please call 714-
8824 to set up your Interview.
Mobile waitstaff wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-150week. Perfect
for college student Some Lunch
Time (1fa-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 551-3279 between 2-5 only.
Sorry Greenville residents and year
around dorm residents only. Leave
message if necessary.
Lifeguards and swim instructors
needed for outdoor pool June 1-
August 20. Candidates must be
certified in Lifeguarding, AED, First
Aid and CPRPR. $7.50 per hour.
Apply at www.greenvillenc.gov or
call Jessica at 329-4043 for more
information.
Mgrs. and Lifegrds at Pools and
Beaches in Greenville, Atlantic
Beach, and Wilson. Call Bob 714-
0576
Active Handicapped Male Needs
Personal Attendant M-F, 7-10am
And Every Other Weekend. $10
Hr. Duties Include Bathing And
Dressing. Please Call 756-9141.
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250day.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. Call (800) 965-652(T
ext. 202
Live this summer at the Beach and
work with Telescope PicturesSunrays
Studio in Ocean City, MDVirginia
Beach. VA. Earn up to $10,000.
Housing is Available. For more
information visit our website and
Apply On-Line www.sunraysstudio.
com or call 1.724.322.1858. E.O.E
VA Beach based Comm GC in
business for 22 years is seeking
a construction estimator. Ideal
candidate should have the ability
to prepare and review bid packages,
perform material takeoffs and cost
comparisons. Sign on bonus and
relocation expenses paid for right
candidate. Forward resume to:
melissa@brownbuild.com or fax:
757-456-5395. EOE
Need Extra $$ Variety of positions
open @ a new downtown restaurant.
Call Anne @ 252-757-1716 or 252-
327-6375
Wanted: Student to assjst kids
ages 14, 13, and 9 with homwork
. Must be math major with GPA of
3.4 or better. Strong in science a
plus. Must be non-smoker, f lexible
hours, transportation, available
to work afternoons, nights, and
some weekends. Call 252-917-6787
or 252-752-1572 for in ter view.
OTHER
Retreatmyrtlebeach.com Spring
BreakGrad Week 1-800-645-3618
We Have What You're Looking For!
$100 Per Person & Up!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Last chance for yearbook.photos! All
Spring and Summer 2006 graduates
should come to Mendennall Great
Room 1 on April 26th from 9am-
5pm. Call 328-9236 to schedule
a time.
Ground
Is looking for PACKAGE HANDLERS lo load vans
and unload Intllcni for he AM shift hours 1 AM hi
SAM. S8.0Whour.luillon assistance available after
31) days. Euture career opportunities in management
possible. Applications can he (tiled out at 2410 United
Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville.
SERVICES
Interested in coaching boys lacrosse?
If you've had past experience as
HIRING NOW
I Looking for a great
I summer job? McLawhom
I Crop Services needs
I reliable, honest, energetic
I people work outdoors,
I monitoring crops from
I May through August Work
I near Klnston, Greenville,
I New Bern Let us train
you. HURRY! HIRING NOW!
I Must be 19 or have one
I year of college and need
I reliable vehicle. Full time
hours. We train) Excellent
I pay mileage.
I Mall or fax resume to:
mcsi
P0 80K370
CovaCltv.NC. 21523
UK: 252-637-2125
6pHn& te tn
m
. owdy Student Stores
6JeW
Same day as Parefoot on the Mall, stop by
Thursday, April 20
t 10 a.m 3 p.m Student Plaza
Ronald E Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars
Wright Building 328-6731
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Apparel, tradebooks, in addition to ail you
can carry textbooks for s5 (old edition)
No other discounts apply. Prior purchases excluded.
k Ifew (Mm
D
1(0)5?
jpa fe M$
Location 316 ElOth St.
SuitesC&D
(Across from El Ranchito)
Hours: 8AM 6PM
Telephone: 439 2665
Reserve your textbooks for
fall, e-mail us your schedule at
piratetextbooks@yahoo.com






.RAGEA8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN NEWS
4-19-06
You will soon recejv
lots of money.
Get more cash for your books at U.B.E. buyback.
&
U.B.E. BOOK BUYBACK.
The most you've gotten from your books all semester.
Uptown Greenville 516 South Cotanche Street www.ubeinc.com
U.B.E. Uptown Greenville 516 South CotancheSt.
at D 0 XMonday - Wednesday, April 24-269:00am to 6:00pm.
Thursday & Friday, April 27&289:00a.m. to 7:00p.m
Saturday, April 299:00am to 6:00p.m.
Sunday, April 30CLOSED
Monday - Thursday, May 1-49:00am. to 7:00p.m.
Friday, May 59:00a.m to 6:00pm

We're Open on Commencement Day Do some Pirate shopping before heading out of town!
HOURSSaturday, May 69:00am to 6:00p.m.

U.B.E. Remote Book Buyback at the Alpha Phi House (Bottom of College Hill) Just jog down to Alpha Phi and trade those books for cold cash!
ae 0 XMonday - Friday, April 24-289:00am to 5:00p.m.
Saturday & Sunday, April 29 & 30NO REMOTE
Monday - Thursday, May 1-49:00am to 5:00p.m.






4-19-06
What's
Page B1 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
WEDNESDAY April 19, 2006
Top 5s:
Top 5 Movies:
1. Ice Age: The Meltdown
2. Inside Man
3. ATI
4. Failure to Launch
5. V for Vendetta
Top 5 Albums:
1. Rascal Flatts
2.LLC00IJ
3. Toby Keith
4. Pink
5. The Fray
Top 5 TV Shows:
1. "American Idol-Tuesday"
2. "American Idol-Wednesday"
3. "Desperate Housewives"
4. "CSI: Miami"
5. "60 Minutes"
Top 5 Books:
1. Two Little Girls in Blue
2. Gone
3. The Da Vinci Code
4. Shiver
5. The 5th Horseman
Top 5 Movie Rentals:
1. King Kong
2. Derailed
3. Memoirs of a Geisha
4. Chicken Little
5. A History of Violence
Coming Soon:
1. American Dreamz
2. The Sentinel
3. Silent Hill
4. Stick It
5. Akeelah and the Bee
Horoscopes:
Aries- Stand up straight and accept
a challenge. It's OK if you won't get
paid much at first. You'll gain enough
in fringe benefits.
Taurus- Go to a person who has too
much, and it won't be long before
you find a way to reach your goals.
There is one.
Gemini- You're getting to the point
in the discussion where money must
be considered. You'd betterfigure out
how much you have, and how much
you're willing to give. Do it before the
meeting.
Cancer- The controversy rages, and
you could be caught in the middle.
Hold out until tomorrow, and the
problem will solve itself.
Leo- Hurry and do an important
household job before conditions
change. Your career will take up a lot
more of your time after tomorrow.
Virgo- Others begin to realize how
much work you've done. Accept their
appreciation. You've earned it.
Libra- Thinking about the topic
counts as mental preparation. Get
your friends to help; don't try to do it
all by yourself.
Scorpio- If you have experience,
draw on it now and get much more
for your efforts. If you don't have
much experience, consult somebody
who does.
Sagittarius- Invest in finishing a
project you've had hanging around
for too long. It'll cost you a few bucks,
but you'll make that much back,
and more.
Capricorn- An obstacle you've been
struggling with for weeks is beginning
to fade. The next phase is easier, and
a lot more fun.
Aquarius- No more procrastination.
Do what you promised. Don't
worry you will be well rewarded for
your efforts.
Pisces- Consult people who have
more experience. They'll put you
on the right path. Learn from their
mistakes and save yourself a lot of time.
Exploring a warm, wet trend: Soap
No longer just for your
mouth!
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
People, how many times
have you sat next to the kid
whose general stench is com-
parable to that of a small piece
of death smothered by south
of rancid? As the scope of this
week shifts from toilet paper
to soap, I am going to uncover
some hidden secrets about this
product that everyone needs to
use on a daily basis.
It seems as though a stu-
dents have forgotten about our
little friend so we will start with
a definition.
Definition: Soap is a cleans-
ing agent made from the inter-
action of fats and oils with
alkali. Oils and fats for soap axe
compounds of glycerin and a
fatty acid. When oils are mixed
with an alkali, they form glyc-
erin and the sodium salt of the
fatty acid.
Most soap removes greast-
and dirt because some of their
components are surfactants
(surface-active agents). Surfac-
tants have a molecular structure
that acts as a link between water
and the dirt particles.
Enough chemistry, I know
you aren't reading this to learn.
Records mentioning the use
of soapy materials date from
ancient times about 2,000 years.
Soap making was common
in Italy and Spain during the
eighth century.
So there you go, absolutely
no excuse for not getting
chummy with this product.
There are two people who don't
shower, dirty nippies and small
children. Unless you are one of
the preceding two, get off your
butt nancy boy (or girl for that
matter) and get In the water.
Not showering prepares you
for the rapture of the second
coming, the mass contamina-
tion of the sewage system and
possibly the 1960s, but that's it.
Sometimes everyone smells,
including yours truly. However,
that is nothing a little bit of
fatty oil loving can't solve. You
must use water when using soap
and just as the directions on
shampoo say, lather thoroughly,
rinse and repeat.
Although I understand this
task can be a little daunting,
consider this. You stink and it
may hurt someone's feelings.
Just the other day some guy
with an apparent phobia of
showering gave new meaning
to "the business end of a wil-
debeest
I felt sad that this individual
felt it not important enough to
spare the world from smelling
like a urine-drenched onion.
Those crazy kids and their
poor hygiene practices. I must
confess that the girl next to you
actually gagged once. Way to go
buddy with your wonderful use
of impressionable people skills.
As this article proves, you
must not fear the soap. You
must use the soap wet the
soap and love the soap.
Hmm, it seems as though
we could all use a little bit of
this soap in our lives. I'm not
saying to go overboard but
there is only so much cologne
one can wear before becoming
a sensory hazard in need of a
prompt hose down.
see SOAP! page B2 Lathering up with some kind of mild soap at least once daily is recommended for everyone.
Time to shed that winter skin
Tanning on the beach is dangerous and not the route to choose.
How to get a perfectly
bronzed body
MARIANNE BARROW
STAFF WRITER
It's the end of the school
year and for a while there, it was
already feeling like the middle of
summer. Looking around campus
it's easy to see that skirts, shorts
and tank tops are slowly making
their seasonal appearance. So
maybe you want to wear more
skin-baring clothing but you
have one pesky little problem:
you're so pale that you're afraid
once the sun hits your legs it'll
blind everyone around you.
Don't worry, I know where
you're coming from and I'm right
there with you. This is the awk-
ward time of year where winter
skin has been uncovered and
that can be intimidating. How-
ever, thanks to years and years of
research and technology you no
longer have to worry about being
the pasty kid.
We've got three major choices
for you to get that golden glow
that you're looking for. First,
there's the tanning bed. This
method has become so popular
that apartment complexes come
with free use of tanning beds.
I'm assuming that most of you
have tried this route. Based on
recent studies and facts, tanning
beds have proven to be extremely
detrimental to the health of users.
Its high levels of concentrated
UV radiation makes risks of skin
cancer and premature aging
very real.
Although tanning salons tell
customers that the new mixture
of UVA and UVB rays in the beds
are safer and simulate the sun's
rays, it's always going to be bad
for your skin. Sure you may feel
great now and through your 20s
but the long-lasting effects of
frequent visits to the tanning bed
are going to show up eventually.
I admit to being a tanning
junky, I used to work in an
upscale salon and tanned several
times a week. It was then that I
began to realize how dangerous
it was and after seeing women
come in with leather looking
skin, I stopped.
Thankfully, new advances
have come through for self-tan-
ning. If you're like me and first
tried this when you were in
seventh grade, I know you're wor-
ried. When self-tanners were first
introduced their consistency for
streaky, orange limbs was pretty
amazing. I recall going to my
middle school gym class with
legs that can only be described
as oompa loompa orange and
silently cursing the genius at
see SKIN page B2
Not all girls
are looking
for a proposal
We just want to have fun
SENSIBLE PARTIER
TRUTH WRITER .
Globe trot like a pro this summer
The best bets for some
great international
summer travel
LIZ FULTON
STAFF WRITER
Fun Facts:
In an average lifetime a person will
walk the equivalent of three times
around the world.
New York's Central Park is nearly
twice the size of the entire country
of Monaco.
A Blue whale's heart is the size of a
Volkswagon Beetle.
The average American consumes nine
pounds of food additives every year.
Black bears are not always black.
They can be brown, cinnamon, yellow
and sometimes white.
The venom of the king cobra Is so
deadly that just one gram of it can
kill 150 people.
Breathe deep. Take a moment
and reflect.
Spring semester is almost over
and it's time to take advantage of
all those upcoming class-free
days and spend them traveling
the unknown and undiscovered.
After all, soon we'll be out in
the real world and the time for
taking the beaten path will be
about as relevant as sleeping in
on a Tuesday.
If you couldn't get enough of
my previous travel plans article,
then brace yourself for a whole
new batch of adventures.
Is backpacking through
Europe the ultimate outing?
Then I would like to suggest a
quick stop in Ireland. Drop into
Dublin not only fdr the shop-
ping and the sheer beauty of the
country's largest city, but for the
Guinness Storehouse. There you
will experience unbelievably
good beer that jtastes fresher than
any you have ever tasted. Even
better is the fact that it's compli-
mentary following the paid tour
of the storehouse.
It's not every year that the
greatest international sport-
ing event takes place. For some
reason the United States has not
jumped on the soccer bandwagon
with the rest of the world, but if
you are in the Gelsenkirchen
or Nuremberg area during June,
cheer the Americans to victory
as they take on Czechoslovakia
and Ghana.
Speaking of Ghana, if you
are lucky enough to be a his-
tory major, work some magic to
secure a spot to their two week
excursion through the country
during the first two weeks of
June. Notable spots on the trek
include Kumasi, the past capital
of the Ashanti Kingdom, Aburi's
Botanical Gardens and Herbal
Medicine Institute. Just make
sure you're immunized against
malaria.
If you have a fear of flying,
Start planning now and it could be you on that plane overseas.
head North to the underrated
and often overlooked land mass
that is Canada. Stop in Vancou-
ver to take a stroll down the Cap-
ilano Suspension Bridge. Similar
to the bridge in Grandfather
Mountain, it is minutes from
downtown Vancouver and con-
nects to a series of other bridges
that hang 100 feet above the
forest floor.
Once your feet are planted
back on the ground, head down
to Robson Street, Vancouver's
most eclectic collection of spe-
cialty stores and restaurants. The
street's Web site promises an
"opportunity to 'people watch' as
the world shops the street As
a very infrequent visitor to our
"neighbor to the north" I can
only hope for an Avril Lavigne
or Celine Dion sighting.
If seeing one of Canada's
favorite crooners isn't enough,
then catching a music festival
see TRAVEL page B2
Generally speaking, guys
are quick to label girls. She's too
needy, always wants to talk about
feelings, freaks out about the
tiny things and you know the
rest. While some of this might
be true about some1 women, I
personally find it offensive to be
classified into a giant group of
whiney girls.
The best way to express this
false generalization is through
the classic college guy motto,
which should be tattooed to their '
foreheads, so no other girl has to
waste her time. "Hey listen I'm in
college and I don't want a serious
relationship Shocker.
Listen boys, we know that
you're in college - surprise, we're
there too. Here's another eye-
opener, not every girl is trying to
marry you as soon as she shows
interest. I know you're busy with
classes and that you're trying to
go out to party with your friends
believe me, so are we.
It's the 21st century and the
ladies are going places, we don't
want to be held down anymore
than you do. If Carrie Bradshaw
has taught her dedicated viewers
anything, it's that women can
play the field just as fiercely as
men. Don't get me wrong, dating
is (hopefully) enjoyable. Going
out to a nice dinner and enjoying
a good conversation never gets
old. However, just because we go
out on a few dates it doesn't mean
we expect a ring within the next
month. Relax already, we want to
have fun and experience as much
as we can, too.
But the sad thing is, college
life usually doesn't add up to an
extremely romantic situation.
Sharing meals at the dining hall
and switching dorm rooms based
upon roommates' schedules
doesn't exactly bring spark to
a new relationship. Also, stum-
see FUN page B2






PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROUNIAN FEATURES
4-19-06
Skill from page B1
Neutrogena who had tricked me
into using their lotion.
After that 1 swore off the
stuff until this year, when to my
surprise others who tried new
formulas raved about it. Person-
ally 1 have been using Jergens'
natural glow daily moisturizer
and am extremely pleased with
the results. This kind of tan in
a bottle is unique because you
apply it day by day and begin to
see your skin darken gradually.
They also come in three differ-
ent shades such as fair, medium
and dark skin tones which allows
you to match up your perfect
color. Not only does it make
you tan in a more natural way, but
the moisturizing half gives your
skin a healthy shimmer as well.
Sometimes there's a special
occasion that you need to look
stunning for and gradual self
tanning won't do. In this case I
highly recommend Mystic Tan.
It's a booth that you stand up
in (naked or in a bathing suit,
that's up to you) while a machine
sprays your body with a fine
mist, producing an amazing
and realistic tan in hours. The
whole process takes about 10 sec-
onds and you're left with natu-
ral, beautifully bronzed results.
Before experiencing Mystic Tan
it's recommended that you exfo-
liate thoroughly so your tan lasts
longer, but besides that the act
of getting a golden tan from this
method is flawless.
Over 15 million people have
used Mystic Tan and been pleased
with the results, and it's hard to
argue with numbers like that.
There are several ways to get
a tan and this is the perfect time
to experiment to get your perfect
just-on-vacation glow. With all
the new studies and testing done
on self-tanner 1 honestly believe
that it's safe to use now, much
safer than lying in a tanning bed
for 20 minutes.
Now you don't have to be
afraid to get out that cute skirt
and the rest of your killer summer
clothes, it's time for you to
uncover your freshly bronzed skin.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
FUfl from page B1
bling home after a night of drink-
ing only to wind up, oh yes, lying
on a single bed and "watching a
movie" isn't the most magical
way to spend an evening. By
the way, we know where you are
going with that idea, we aren't
that stupid.
So maybe your girlfriend
keeps complaining about the
small things. Well here's the
best hint I can give you, it's all
about the small things. Where's
the finesse? The typical girl isn't
expecting jewels and fancy out-
ings every night, just a little well-
deserved attention and a compli-
ment every now and then.
When it comes right down to
it, men and women mostly look
for the same thing. A person to
have fun with, make them feel
appreciated and someone who's
willing to be there when you
need them. Although women
are more sensitive than men on
average, it doesn't mean that
all of them are looking to drag
you into a life-long commit-
ment. They're also not asking
for too much when we tell you
to put a little more effort into a
relationship once it's gotten past
the initial infatuation period. If
that's too hard for you to handle,
then you should re-evaluate why
you're in the relationship and
stop dragging her around with
false hopes.
Regardless of yourgender, take
a second to stop and think about
what the other person's thinking
or the messages they're sending. If
you can't understand them, then
just ask. Though sometimes it
seems like men and worrien are
from opposite sides of the spectrum,
I really think we're much closer
than everyone wants to admit.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcaroiinian.com.
SfM RIGHT
H EVERM
CUP
STRIP
o
CLIP & SAVE
Soap! from page B1
Oh, to the people who say
our obsession with soap is
caused by a conspiracy, Johnny
Vegas, cry me a river and peddle
those hippie wares somewhere
else where someone cares.
Might I make a suggestion, if
you want to smell like a wet dog
when you get up, be careful that
someone doesn't roll up some
newspaper and put your nose
in it.
So can we try to actively con-
tain one's personal "aroma?" I
will recommend only one soap,
any kind. We all know you're
proud and think your own stink
is magic but get a clue Bruno,
you smell like the far reaches of
the inner sanctum of a tuna's
tail pipe.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
TT3V6I from page B1
not on your home turf could
turn out to be the ultimate music
experience. Starting July 20th,
Spain will host its 12th Festival
Internacional de Benicassim fea-
turing Depeche Mode, Echo and
the Bunnymen, The Strokes and
a whole bunch of acts no one in
the United States has probably
heard of before.
In August, hop across the
pond to Great Britain for the
Reading and Leeds Festivals. So
what if you've seen Pearl Jam, or
my new favorite, The Arctic Mon-
keys, before? The more important
question is if you've ever seen
them play in England?
As a final hurrah of the
summer, tell all of your friends
that you visited Savoca, Sicily, the
location used in The Godfather
where Michael is exiled after kill-
ing Sollozzo and McClusky in the
restaurant. There you can walk
the same streets that the wedding
party took to the Bar Vitelli.
Wherever your travels may
take you this summer, remem-
ber to enjoy the scenery, take
lots of pictures and know how
to say "where is the toilet"
in five different languages.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
10 Discount to
ALL Students
1525 S. Evans St, Greenville, NC
MonSat. 9:30-6:00 Sun. 1:00-4:00 .
Special Home Game Hours: Friday 8am-9pm
Polo Shim larkcrs Swrntshin
T-Jhitls Walk-Is
Saturday 7am-10pm
: uk Ani'MMami mar, iwriiinoir Sunday 9:30am-4: )0pm
www.Plr.wMult.om J r
Your Coupon
could be here!
Call our advertising reps at 328-9243
for a spojt in next week's Clip Strip.
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
NOAH
Star of NBC's hit show ER
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving www.HumaneSeal.org
Washington, D.C. 202-686-2210, ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
WATCH
how quickly your goods fly off
your shelves with a coupon in
I the Clip Strip! Call 328-2000. I
Report news, students need to know. C
Accepting applications for STAFF WRITERS
Learn Investigative reporting skills .
Must have at least a 2.0 GRA .?
WEVE MOVEDII Apply at our NEW offlca located uptown al llj Sell Help Building - 100T E. 3rd St.
Get Started. Get Ahead. Live.
Summer School 2006





4-19-06
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tec
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100F E. 3rd SI
Page B3 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY April 19, 2006
Once a Pirate, always a Pirate
McCullough csn be found at first
Former player's return
to ECU has been
'rewarding'
RON CLEMENTS
STAFF WRITER'
At some point in 2005 Clay-
ton McCullough realized that
his dream of becoming a Major
League Baseball player wasn't
going to happen. So, after spend-
ing four years bouncing around
the minor leagues, he decided
Dase for the Pirates on gameday.
to return to ECU to complete
the necessary nine credits he
needed to earn his bachelor's
degree in Communication. But,
he just couldn't stay away from
baseball.
Reuniting with his former
ECU pitching coach, Tommy
Eason, McCullough volunteered
to help Eason with the Pitt Com-
munity College baseball team.
Eason was on Keith LeClair's
staff in 2002, the final season
for McCullough (and LeClair),
and is now the head coach at
PCC. In November McCullough
received a phone call from one
Billy Godwin.
"Coach Godwin called me
and asked me would 1 think about
coming to ECU to help them
out, work with catchers said
McCullough.
"They needed somebody
who specialized in working with
catchers and kind of give them
a hand in hitting and pitching
and whatever else. And it's just
worked out great. I can finish
school and get a chance to get
some good experience at coach-
ing over here at ECU, where I
played
Growing up around baseball,
his dad was a professional scout;
the former Pirate All-Conference
catcher cannot see himself with
a "normal" job. Although his
coaching duties are on a volun-
teer basis, McCullough said just
being involved with the ECU
program he saw grow first-hand
while LeClair was the coach is
"rewarding
ECU has qualified for the
last seven NCAA baseball tour-
naments, a streak that began in
McCullough's freshman year.
During his four years at ECU, he
saw the Pirates get better year in
,g and year out and his productiv-
ity increased as well. Following
fj his senior year, the Cleveland
n Indians drafted McCullough. He
spent the summer of 2002 play-
o ing Rookie League ball in Burl-
ington before joining Cleveland's
single A team in Lake County,
Ohio. He came back to North
Carolina in 2004 to join the Kin-
ston Indians and, over the course
of the next two years, would
get called up to AA and AAA
teams before going back to Lake
County.
"It was great to play differ-
ent levels, see different stadiums
and different brands of base-
ball. It was very worth while
McCullough said.
In the end, it was his career
goal that brought McCullough
back to Greenville.
"My dream growing up was
to play in the Major Leagues
McCullough said.
"I played at a high level in
college, high levels in the minor
leagues, but I just saw that my
opportunity was probably not
going to be a Major League Base-
ball player. 1 could have stayed
and gone back and bounced
around the minors for a few
more years, but I was so close
to my degree and coaching was
what I ultimately wanted to for
my career, for the rest of my
life. There was no better time
than now to start that and go
ahead and get done with my
"school
"I just realized that I wasn't
going to be a Major League
player and once you start telling
yourself that, it's tough to go out
there everyday and get after it. So
it was time for me to come back
and start something fresh
Returning to Greenville
during the inaugural season
of Clark-LeClair Stadium
means something special to
McCullough.
"Coach LeClair embodied
this program so well - his work
ethic and his determination
McCullough said.
"He set the stage for all this
to be here. Coach LeClair came
in here and took this program to
a new level to where we're con-
tending for a chance to play in
the College World Series and play
for a national title. The school
hasn't gotten there yet, but
we feel like we're on the cusp of
that
While LeClair continues
to struggle with Lou Gehrig's
Disease, he remains a positive
influence on McCullough and
LeClair's coaching traits and abil-
ity to "create an atmosphere of
fun" are something McCullough
wants to emulate.
"He was great at handling
every kind of player McCullough
said of LeClair.
"He didn't have special treat-
ment for the best player on the
team and didn't treat the last
guy like he was the last guy.
Everybody felt like they were
important and they were part of
something special. His biggest
quality was making everybody
realize that they had a role on
that team, and it may not be
to start every game and pitch
every Friday night, but those
guys on the bench felt just as
important as the guys playing.
He was just so good at commu-
nicating and making guys feel
comfortable
LeClair's dedication to an
off-season weight lifting regi-
men helped build the Diamond
Bucs into a national power,
but not just through condition-
ing.
"He felt like it was a tremen-
dous part of this program, that
team continuity and chemistry
you build working out together,
running together, going through
some of the toughest thing you'll
ever have to, so that when get
into the games, it'll be easy
because that guy sitting next to
you did the same thing you did
McCullough said.
McCullough sees some of
those same traits and dedication
in ECU's current first-year coach,
Godwin.
"He has a tremendous desire
to win. He's so competitive
McCullough said.
"He asks these guys to just
play hard. We'll get you guys
ready to pUiy during the week
in practice and then just go out
and give it your 100 percent and
things will work out for them-
selves. I think these guys have
really responded to that
With a sweep of Albany this
past weekend and a 2-1 win over
in-state rival N.C. State last week,
the Pirates (25-13, 4-5 Confer-
ence USA) have now won six
straight and built some momen-
tum as they head back into con-
ference play with a three-game
set against Marshall beginning
Friday.
Qualifying for an eighth
straight NCAA tournament is an
obvious goal for the 2006 Pirates
and breaking that streak is not
something the new coaching
staff wants to do.
"All the guys realize that's
part of this program, to carry
on the tradition McCullough
said.
"You don't want to be the
team that stops that
While ECU has started 4-5
in C-USA, McCullough is con-
fident the Pirates have gotten
things turned around and should
be able to build some more
momentum with a home series
against Marshall before play-
ing host to nationally ranked
Tulane the following weekend.
"If you look too far ahead,
then you can stumble on
some games that you should
win, so the old cliche, you just
gotta take care of today and
the rest will take care of itself
McCullough said.
"That 40-win mark has kinda
been, 'If you get to 40, you're
in But with the schedule we've
played, having played at the
number one team in the nation,
at the number two team in the
nation, three games against N.C.
State, UNC Wilmington, three
games, you throw in Houston,
Tulane and Southern Miss - it's a
pretty demanding schedule.
"You would hope that end of
the end of the year, if we're not
at that 40-win mark, that magical
number, they'll look at us and
say, 'East Carolina played a real
tough schedule and beat some
good teams We got one on the
road against Rice. We've beaten
some good teams, College of
Charleston is ranked. We've had
some good games against tough
teams, so we hope that will carry
some weight
Once May comes, and
McCullough has his degree
in hand, he, and the rest of
the Pirates, will hopefully be
planning for a trip to Omaha.
Because, of course, it would be
a nice addition to McCullough's
coaching resume.
This writer can be contacted at
sports Stheeastcarolinion.com.
Bush, the Texans await you
Ho'uston is set to take
USC's Bush with the first
pick
RON CLEMENTS
STAFF WRITER
Before Reggie Bush declared
himself eligible for the NFL Draft,
the Southern California junior
running back was already consid-
ered a lock to go to the Houston
Texans with the first pick of next
week's NFL Draft. Nothing has
really changed as Bush has been
solid in his workouts and the
nation's best college player from
the last two seasons should rel-
egate the oft-injured Domanick
Davis to a backup role.
There were three running
backs drafted within the first 10
picks in 2005 - Ronnie Brown,
Carnell Williams and Cedric
Benson. Bush is the lone top run-
ning back in this year's class, but
this year's class may have more
talent and certainly has more
depth than last year. Bush's team-
mate at USC, LenDale White,
DeAngelo Williams of Mem-
phis and Minnesota's Laurence
Maroney could all be drafted in
the first round and will certainly
all be off the board by the end of
round two.
Bush did everything at USC
-played wideout, returned punts
and kicks and, of course ran the
ball for an incredible 8.7-yard
average per carry. Bush scored
16 rushing touchdowns for the
potent USC offense, while scor-
ing two more via passes from
Matt Leinart. He also returned
a punt for a score against Wash-
ington. In his three seasons with
the Trojans, the 5-11,200-pound
Bush scored a total of 42 touch-
downs, 25 on the ground, 13
through the air, three via punt
returns and one kickoff return for
a score against UCLA in 2003. He
even threw a touchdown pass in
2004 versus Arizona State.
With elusiveness like Barry
Sanders and the speed and versa-
tility of Deion Sanders, the 2005
Heisman winner is a perfect fit
for a Texans team without a great
offensive line. His playmaking
ability should take some of the
pressure off the newly re-signed
David Carr, so that Carr will
have time to get the ball out to
Houston's now outstanding trio
of receivers in Corey Bradford,
Andre Johnson and Eric Moulds.
After Bush, we probably won't
see another running back taken
until the Baltimore Ravens at
13 or the Minnesota Vikings at
17. Baltimore does have Jamal
Lewis, but adding depth behind
Lewis with a guy who could step
right in would make sense. The
Vikings lost Michael Bennett to
New Orleans, but added Chester
Taylor. Taylor's not exactly a top-
notch NFL back.
Regardless of who drafts the
next running back, that running
back will be DeAngelo Williams.
Williams led all college backs in
rushing in 2005 with 1,964 yards
and is the NCAA career leader
all-purpose yards. He is fourth in
career rushing yards, trailing only
Heisman winners Tony Dorsett,
Ricky Williams and Ron Dayne.
The 217-pound Williams was
a workhorse in college and a team
that's been missing an every-
down back from its offense like
Minnesota would love to land the
Memphis senior, who ripped ECU
for 226 yards last October.
Former Minnesota Gopher
Laurence Maroney will come
off the board shortly after Wil- ,
liams. Maroney is one of the 5
biggest backs in this draft and
really came into his own after
being part of a 1-2 combination
in 2004 with Marion Barber III.
Maroney led the Big Ten in rush-
ing and was fifth in the nation
despite splitting time in 2005
with Gary Russell. He is big and
fast with surprising breakaway
ability. Carolina could use a guy
like Maroney in the backfiel'd to
give the Panthers and DaShaun
Foster a similar combo to 2004
when they had a healthy Stephen
Davis and Foster.
Many draftologists figured
USC's LenDale White could go
as high as 10 to Arizona. Then
several things happened, none
of them good for White's draft
stock. First, the Cardinals signed
free agent Edgerrin James away
from Indianapolis. Then, speak-
ing of Indianapolis, White's per-
After coming off two stellar years with the USC Trojans, Bush is expected
:o ue taKen D'
y the Texans with the first pick of this year's NFL Draft.
formance at the combine was far
from stellar. The largest running
back in the draft only did 15 reps
in the bench press and his 40-
time was unimpressive.
The 6-foot-2, 235-pound
White earned a reputation as
a Jerome Bettis-type finisher
in 2005, leading the nation in
touchdowns with 24. His off-
season workouts, however has
dropped his stock from a poten-
tial top-10 pick to the late first
round, with Pittsburgh being a
likely spot, to replace the retired
Bettis.
One player whose combine
workouts did not hurt him was
Louisiana State's Joseph Addai.
Addai saw himself rise from a
low-second-round pick to a pos-
sible late first-rounder. His blister-
ing 40-time of 4.37 seconds shot
his draft stock off like a rocket,
propelling him high on the
draft boards of teams in search
for a running back. He has good
hands, catching 20 balls for 180
yards and a score in 2005. Addai
may have passed White on some
boards and could see himself in
New England or Indianapolis as
a third-down back.
Despite sitting out in 2004
due to transfer rules, Wisconsin
junior Brian Calhoun made him-
self a early Heisman candidate in
2005 by rushing for more than
600 yards and nine touchdowns
in Wisconsin's first four games.
Calhoun finished second in the
Big Ten and sixth in the nation
with 1,636 yards and 22 touch-
downs. He should be the sixth
J U
running back taken in this draft,
somewhere early second round.
Calhoun's teammate at Wis-
consin, Matt Bernstein is the
best fullback in this 2006 class.
Bernstein helped pave the way for
three 1,000-yard back in Madi-
son - Michael Bennett, Anthony
Davis and Calhoun. Described
as a "guard in the backfield the
270-pound Bernstein can run
if needed. Getting the bulk of
carries in a 2004 game against
Penn State because of an injury
to Davis, "Bernie" ran for 123
yards on 27 carries in a Badger
win. A much-underrated player,
Bernstein could and should go on
the first day of the draft.
The other fullback who could
go on day one is Colorado's Law-
rence Vickers. At 6-foot-l, 245
pounds, Vickers is big enough to
play fullback, but light enough to
line up at tailback in short yard-
age. He is strong, but not exactly
a blazer - as demonstrated by his
4.86 40-time.
Some other backs to keep
an eye out for on day one of the
draft are UCLA's Maurice Drew,
Florida State scat back Leon
Washington and Chris Barclay
of Wake Forest.
This is the fifth of my NFL
Draft previews. In Tuesday's
edition of TEC, 1 will preview
the quarterbacks and Thursday,
I'll have my mock draft. The
NFL Draft is'April 29-30 in New
York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE B4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-19-06
ECU Ice Hockey 2006:
The Inaugural Season
Pirates make statement
in first year of ECU Ice
Hockey
TONY ZOPPO
SPORTS EDITOR
There was a time when ice
hockey and the South mixed
about as well as oil and water.
It was as if there was a great
dividing line (much like the
Mason-Dixon) that separated the
good hockey regions from the
sub-par, or where hockey flat out
barely existed. Massachusetts,
New York, Minnesota, Illinois,
Michigan, Vermont - basically
anywhere in the Northeast and
Midwest, hockey thrived and was
played on streets or patches of ice
wherever an ample surface could
be found. There was simply no
room for hockey in the southern
regions of the United States.
However, hockey has grown
widespread across the country,
visiting and taking hold in places
that once would have never
played host to the sport. One of
those places is North Carolina.
Transplanted northerners
in areas such as Gary, Raleigh,
Chapel Hill, Durham and Char-
lotte (along with the Carolina
Hurricanes of course) helped
bring interest to the south and
built the foundation for the
popularity of hockey in the
south as it is now. Until last
year, ice hockey had no place in
Greenville with very little public-
interest and no legitimate facility
to host a team. However, there
was certainly interest in the area.
Enter Brent Falcon, Jordan
Meyers and Corey Fleitz (plus
a new ice rink, "Bladez on Ice")
and suddenly there was not only
hockey in Greenville, there was
a team at ECU.
"After I stopped playing with
the East Coast Eagles, I had very
few options if I still wanted to
play said Falcon, who is
the president of the team.
"You miss playing at a real
competitive level with people
your age. That's a main reason
that we are doing this. With
what we heard around town, a
lot of people were waiting for
this to happen
Falcon, Meyers and Fleitz
all played on the East Coast
Eagles, one of the most promi-
nent travel programs in the
region. Falcon was teammates
with both of them at different
times, with Meyers moving on
first and Fleitz coming in the
season after.
Although all three players
hail from different states than
North Carolina (New York, Texas
and Minnesota), all three had
some of their most competitive
experience in Raleigh. Fifteen
out of 18 players on ECU'S roster
are from out of state, including
seven players from New York,
three from Maryland, one from
Minnesota and another from
Pennsylvania.
"1 think northern players
have brought talent and a lot of
interest in hockey to the south-
ern regions and the sport grew a
lot Falcon said.
"The popularity has taken
hold and there is a better crop
of southern players year by year.
1 feel like there's much more
opportunity for kids in the Caro-
linas to play hockey than there
was before
That opportunity turned to
success this past year for Falcon
and the other members of the
newly formed ECU Ice Hockey
team as the Pirates finished their
first full year of action with a
record of 14-7 overall and 9-3 in
the Southwest Division.
ECU hit the ice and didn't
look back during the fall semes-
ter, blazing a path to a 7-2 start
by the beginning of December,
with victories against VCU, Rad-
4-19-0
ford, Old Domin-
ion, William and Mary, Christo-
pher Newport and VMI.
The team was astounded by
the amount of support the team
received, as more than 300 ans
showed up to watch opening
night in Greenville on October
28 against Radford. The Pirates
didn't disappoint as they fought
to a hard-earned 4-3 victory in a
game rife with physical play and
flaring tempers.
ECU carried that physical
mentality throughout the year,
relentlessly punishing oppo-
nents physically and wearing
teams down: Despite their rough
start to the spring semester
(consecutive road losses to the
ranked Clemson Tigers), ECU
bounced back with two victories
over Appalachian State and then
one of the biggest emotional and
symbolic wins of the season - a
4-2 victory over the Tar Heels of
Chapel Hill. In front of a crowd
of over a stifling 600 spectators,
the ice hockey team became one
of the few athletic programs at
ECU to have topped UNC in any
sport, varsity or club, in recent
memory. The Pirates took that
game in convincing fashion as
they wore the Heels down, as
they did with so many teams,
with merciless physical play.
However, the Pirates didn't
boast just the ability to set the
tone physically; they had their
fair share of scoring talent as
well.
Mike Ormsbee recorded 42
points in the regular season (24
goals, 18 assists), good for a top
five finish in the conference.
Ormsbee was dominant on the
offensive side of the ice, which
was never displayed more accu-
rately than when he scored six
goals in a single game against
UNC-Wilmington.
Sophomore forward Corey
Fleitz was second on the squad
in points with 25 (9 G, 16 A),
while Tyler Falcon, one brother
of three on the ECU team (Brent
and Ian) was second on the team
in goals as he collected 12 for
the season, and ranked third in
points with 21.
After a rough 5-4 mark in
the spring, ECU entered the
Blue Ridge Hockey Conference
Tournament sore, riddled with
injuries, and all but outmatched,
which makes what they did even
more impressive.
The Pirates faced a famil-
iar foe in the first round and
came out victorious, 5-2, against
VMI, a team they had split a
series with earlier in the season.
The win propelled ECU into
the second round, where the
pounded Clemson 8-3 in a blow-
out of one of the best teams in
the tournament. Clemson had
previously defeated the Bucs
6-5, and 7-3 in ECU's opening
spring series.
The team now found them-
selves staring an opportunity to
win the BRHC Tournament dead
in the face. In just their first year
of existence, ECU had made a
statement simply just getting to
this point, and had a chance to
shock
t h e
confer
ence.
In a hard
fought clash of
two very talented
teams, the Richmond
Spiders, who had beaten
ECU 7-3 in the fall semes
ter, came out victorious
once again by a score of
6-4. Disappointing loss
nonetheless, the team was
pleased with how their first
season unfolded.
"We had really high expec-
tations but we had no idea we'd
gain the kind of support we
got from the community said
Falcon.
"We weren't surprised with
how the season turned out but
we were definitely pleased that
all our hard worked came to
fruition at the end of the
season
Looks like there's room for
hockey in the South after all.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Defens
during
State U
Austin,
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in the B
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against
Sophomore Corey Fleitz leads the way with a pep talk before the game against Clemson in the Blue
Ridge Hockey Conference Tournament, held in Wilmington, N.C.
Nathan Buhr (above) takes a rest on the ECU bench during the UNC Chapel Hill game. Buhr finished
the season with 11 goals on six goals and five assists. Head Coach Wayne Cox (below) walks through
the locker room during intermission of one of the Pirates' games this past season. The first year coach
led the team to a 14-7 overall mark.






4-19-06
4-19-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B5
The Pirates warm up before one of their home games at Bladez on Ice. ECU compiled a 7-1 record at
home, bringing in over 300 fans to each game on average and a stunning 600 for the game against
UNC Chapel Hill.

Defensemen Jon Huck and Jordan Myers make a joint effort in stopping an offensive attack from VMI
during the Pirates 5-2 win in the BRHC tournament. Huck is a sophomore transfer from Appalachian
State University and is one of seven players on the team who hails from New York. Meyers is an
Austin, Texas native and played for the East Coast Eagles AA squad.
Defensemen Jordan Meyers flattens a Clemson forward during the Pirates match up with the Tigers
in the BRHC Tournament while Tyler Falcon cleans up the mess and gathers the puck. ECU went
on to win the game in convincing fashion, 8-3, which propelled them into the championship game
against the Richmond Spiders.
Freshman forward Ian Falcon concentrates as he plays with a practice puck before the game. Falcon,
brother of Brent and Tyler (Tyler's twin), finished the season with 17 points on five goals and 12 assists
and also led the team with 75 penalty minutes. Coach Cox (below) speaks with the prospective
members of the team when ECU held tryouts near the beginning of the 2005 fall semester.
hr finished
ks through
'ear coach
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-19-06
4-19-06
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4-19-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE B7
It's PAY DAY.
You bought 'em. You read 'em. Now it's PAY DAY.
Sell your books to Dowdy Student Store and
you'll get top dollar for them.
Dowdy Student Store Wright Place Buyback Hours:
Monday, April 24th: 8am - 7pm
Tuesday, April 25th - Wednesday, April 26th: 8am - 5pm
Thursday, April 27th: 8am - 7pm
Friday, April 28th: 8am - 5pm
Saturday, April 29th: 11am - 3pm
Monday, May 1st - Thursday, May 4th: 8am - 7pm
Speight & Mendenhall Bus Stops, College Hill Hours:
Monday, April 24th - Friday, April 28th: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Monday, May 1st - Thursday, May 4th: 8:30am - 4:30pm
Others may SAY they buy back more used books and SAY they give you more
cash. But, ECU-Dowdy Student Stores has been recognized as one of the best
buyback programs IN THE ENTIRE NATION because we treat students fairly and
with respect. We also work with one of the largest book wholesalers in the
country, and buy back books not just for East Carolina, but for all
of the schools they represent.
We're YOUR campus bookstore, and we're
looking out for YOU.
Cash, plus
a Free
T-Shirt
While
Supplies
Last!
m
Student Stores
Ronald E. Dowdy
Wrisht Buildins 252-328-6731 1-877-499-TEXT
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
"Ranked 3rd by Follett Book Company, one of the leading collegiate textbook wholesalers in the US.
Free t-shirts available to students selling back their books, while supplies last.
WtAhl tVbhAM





PAGE B8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-19-06
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 19, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 19, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1901
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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