The East Carolinian, April 12, 2006












4-11-06
www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 66
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
Casey's Race 2006 very successful
Runners remember
Casey Rogers
CLAYTON BAUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The public and ECU fraterni-
ties and sororities all converged
at the Toyota Amphitheater
in downtown Greenville last
Sunday for Casey's Race.
Benefitting the Boys and
Girls Club of Pitt Country, run-
ners turned out for the event in
mass at an estimated 200 par-
ticipants. Runners couldn't have
asked for better weather at the
event, with bright sunny skies
and a nice cool temperature for
the afternoon.
Matt Robitaille, senior con-
struction management major,
organized the event through his
fraternity, Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
The race is in honor of Casey
Rogers, a member of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon who passed away two
years ago in a car accident.
Moments before the race,
runners gathered for a moment
of silence to remember Rogers.
Runners also gave a round of
applause for Casey's mother who
was present at the event.
"1 think today was very
successful said Robitaille, "I
wouldn't be surprised if we raised
seven to 10,000 dollars today.
"It's the first time that all
the fraternities and sororities
on ECU's campus have gotten
together, and it's great to see
how many letter shirts and all
are out here said Robitaille.
He is very optimistic about
having a third Casey's race next
year, and hopes to have Greek
life come together yet again for
the event.
" The event was very well put
together. It was quite an experi-
ence; it was for a good cause.
1 enjoyed it, it was good said
William Branch, another race
participant.
"It was a lot of fun said
Lauren Johnson, sophomore-
art major and member of Alpha
Delta Pi sorority.
"I'm glad to see a lot of people
out and about, you know, sup-
porting Casey's Race. It was a
good turn out for the Greek
community and the Greenville
community
Racers and volunteers enjoyed 5
live music and catering from a f
variety of Greenville businesses ,
following the race.
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Annual race was held last weekend to benefit the Boys and Girls Club of Pitt County.
Students get their hands dirty for a good cause
A hands-on learning
experience unlike others
RACHEL KING
NEWS EDITOR
Lakisha Feley is ready to donate blood for a good cause.
ECU Air Force R0TC holds
blood drive in Mendenhall
Today is final day to give
CLAYTON BAUMAN
STAFF WRITER
The Air Force ROTC at ECU
has sponsored a blood drive to be
held by the American Red Cross
at Mendenhall Student Center.
The drive, which took place
yesterday, will be held again
today from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Students are encouraged to come
out and donate.
"This is just one of our events
that we're doing just to volunteer,
and put our name out there, just
to show that we help out said
Karlo Rodriguez, recruit and
group commander for the Air
Force ROTC.
In regards to number of atten-
dants donating today, Rodriguez
estimated around 90 people
came out.
"Giving blood is good cause
.you never know who might need
it said Herbie Sneed, senior
media productions and commu-
nications major.
"It might be you, it might be
your family members, it might
be the next president, you never
know
DrewMullane, freshman psy-
chology major said, "It's my third
time giving blood. I don't know,
it's not that bad, it's really a nice
thing to do to help people out
According to the National
Blood Data Resource Center in
a list of facts on the Red Cross
Web site givelife2.org, 15 mil-
lion units of whole blood and red
blood were collected in 2001. The
same source also stated that in
2001 nearly 14 million units of
blood were used, equaling nearly
38,000 units of blood needed on
any given day.
On the same Web site, one
fact stated that under normal
circumstances, every two seconds
someone in America will need
some form of a blood transfu-
sion.
This can vary from burn vic-
tims, to surgery, all the way to a
baby being born prematurely.
People with 'O' negative
blood are in the highest demand
because they are considered a
"universal donor They are capa-
ble of giving blood to anybody
with a different blood type safely.
For more information on
these facts and more regard-
ing giving blood, please visit
givelife2.org.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Members of an ECU religion
class joined with community per-
sons to get their hands dirty for a
good cause this past weekend.
Forty-two students and com-
munity members chased chick-
ens and learned about farm and
environmental issues this past
Saturday at "Farm Day Dr.
Calvin Mercer, professor of a
religion and social issues class,
8 organized the event on a locally
g emerging organic farm.
3 Sitting on plastic buckets on
o1 the farmhouse porch, participants
I listened as farmers Joe and Beth
S Miller described the struggles of
the modern day small farmer.
"What really made us start
farming was our desire for good
things to eat Miller said, as
she compared the experience
of eating a fresh organic tomato
with a grocery store tomato
shipped in from afar and grown
with pesticides.
One part of the day involved a
visit from a neighbor farmer who
grew up in India. He talked to
the group and then demonstrated
how chickens are killed for the
table in India by slaughtering
two chickens. Students had the
option of watching.
"For some, this was a some-
what disturbing thing to see,
but it brings home in a vivid way
what is involved in eating meat.
For us to eat meat, some animal
has to die said Mercer.
In the later discussion on the
back porch, Joe Miller pointed
out that farm animals run loose
and eat bugs, worms and grass.
"Although it ends in death,
the life of these farm animals is
quite different from the life of
those chickens you see on the
highway, caged and pumped with
hormones Miller said.
"We non-farmers overlook
and take for granted those who
are still a part of agriculture said
Greg Harris, a senior religion arid
anthropology double major.
"I can see that this kind of
farming requires a tremendous
amount of knowledge, experi-
ence, strength and character. It
is disheartening to see how far
removed so many of us are from
farming. It wasn't that long ago
that we all were farmers
Part of the day involved work-
ing on the farm, as students
divided up tasks that included
weeding blueberries, cleaning
out a chicken pen, tightening a
, see FARM page A2 Dr.CalvinMercerstandswithastudentat'FarmDay'thispastweekend.
Public Relations society holds student forum
PRSSA held forum Monday to d
Professionals invited to
speak and mingle
VANESSA CLARKE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU chapter of the Public
Relations Student Society of
iscuss questions about media.
America held what they called
"A PR Professional Forum" on
Monday. The group invited public
relations professionals from the
university to speak to communi-
cations students about their expe-
riences in this competitive field.
The bulk of the forum was
the question and answer period.
Several questions dealt with the
daily grind of being a public
relations officer. The answers
were varied.
Erica Plouffe, a staff writer
for the ECU News Bureau, said
that regardless of what she had
j, planned that day, she always
J starts it off the same way.
a "First of all, I check Google
3 and check the news just to see
what the media is saying about
us she said. This allows her to get
S a handle on if there is any press-
ing news she needs to attend to.
Nancy McGillicuddy, a public-
relations officer for News and
Communication, spends much of
her time dealing with the media,
just like Plouffe. She said culti-
vating contacts with reporters
is crucial, as is keeping a steady
flow of good information going
their way.
"Knowing what is news to
a reporter and what is not she
said, is vital to maintaining good
relations with the media.
Michael Crane is the assistant
dean of marketing and outreach
for the College of Fine Arts and
Communications. He said he
has little, if any, interaction
with the media. He deals with
the image the college projects
to insiders and outsiders alike.
He writes the brochures that go
out to prospective students and
donors. He also coordinates the
S. Rudolph Alexander Perform-
ing Arts Series, which seeks to
expose students, staff and faculty
to cultural events that they may
have otherwise not seen.
The next question had to deal
with the career paths the guests
took to get to where they are
see PRSSA page A2
Cost of part-time education is tough load
(KRT) By day Katie Colvin
works full time as a secretary at
a downtown Dallas law firm. At
night she goes to college.
She originally enrolled part
time, but when the University of
Texas at Dallas changed its tuition
schedule last year to charge more
per credit hour for part-time
students, Colvin adjusted, brav-
ing a full load of five courses,
or IS credits, this semester.
After work, the Keller resi-
dent would battle the rush-
hour exodus north on Central
Expressway to the UTD campus
in Richardson.
She fell behind in school.
By February, she decided to
drop three courses, losing nearly
$2,000 in tuition. "It was really
frustrating, because I really
enjoyed those courses the 21-
year-old said.
Now, with UTD again rais-
ing tuition more steeply for
part-timers than full-time stu-
dents, Colvin faces even bigger
obstacles.
"Next semester it will cost me
even more. I really worry because I
have two years to go she said. She
already owes $35,000 in loans.
Colvin is among a growing
group of part-time students frus-
trated by the tuition changes at UT-
Dallas and the University of Texas at
Arlington, saying they can't enroll
full time because of their jobs.
The two universities have
adopted a new pricing structure
designed to help recoup the
steeper cost of educating part-
timers, and to help prod part-
timers to take a full load, so they
can speed their way to a degree
and save money in the long term.
Pushing students to graduate
faster also frees up classroom
slots and helps the universities
absorb sharp growth each year.
Call it the Sam's Club approach
to tuition: Buy in bulk and save.
This fall, undergraduates who
take six credit hours will pay $277
per credit, while those taking 15
credit hours would pay only $217
per credit. Tuition for the six-
credit students would jump about
29 percent, or $371 a semester,
while tuition for 15-credit stu-
dents would rise a more modest
4.6 percent, or $143 per semester.
But some students who live on
their own and pay their tuition
insist they can't possibly take a full
course load to enjoy the savings.
Conceding that point, UT-
Dallas this week announced sev-
eral increases in its financial aid
programs for part-time students.
"Some of them are among
our most vulnerable students
economically and we feel an
obligation to shield them from
the full impact" of the coming
tuition hikes, UT-Dallas president
David E. Daniel said.
In addition to federal Pell
grants and state aid, UT-Dallas
currently provides a maximum
package of $1,500 in need-based
aid for part-timers and $2,000 for
full-time students. Those maxi-
mums will grow to $1,800 for
part-timers and $2,200 for full-
timers. Not all students qualify
for the maximum.
Also, UT-Dallas has set aside
$100,000 in aid for financially
strapped students taking only
three credit hours, with priority to
students who will complete their
degrees with the three credits.
UT-Dallas had previously echoed
federal policy, which does not pro-
vide aid to those taking fewer than
six credit hours per semester.
UT-Dallas officials also say
some part-timers have their tuition
covered by employers. That's true,
but those paying their own way say
they still feel the pinch.
Graduate student Mindy Nail,
25, works days for an insurance
company. Her company pays
$2,500 toward her degree each year,
and she pays about $5,000. "The
tuition increases are frustrating
she said, "but it's not an option for
me to take classes full time
Jennifer Riley, 27, works days
as head of inventory loss pre-
vention for a retailer, and takes
classes toward her accounting
degree three nights a week. She is
taking eight credits this semester
and plans to take nine in the fall.
She pays her own tuition and has
accumulated about $40,000 in
student loans.
"It's frustrating she said of
the tuition hikes, "but not surpris-
ing She said the university talks
about accommodating its working
adult students, but she has not seen
that. "I've had academic advisers
ask why I couldn't take courses
I needed during the day. They
say, "Can't you talk to your boss
to get more flexible hours?' And
I'm like, No, are you kidding?
Colvin expressed similar
frustration. She said she will only
be able to take two courses this
fall even if she wants to handle
a full load. That's because only
four courses she needs to com-
plete her degree will be offered
at night. One she already took,
and two others are scheduled at
the same time.
The concerns of part-timers
highlight conflicting goals for
the UT system. On the one
hand, there is a desire to improve
graduation rates and shorten
student time to graduation.
see TOUGH page A2
INSIDE I News: All Classifieds: A9 I Opinion: A31 What's Hot: A4 I Sports: A6






Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
RACHEL KING News Editor CLAIRE MURPHY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
Announcements:
Getting What
You Want From
Relaxation 6:30 to
7:30 p.m.
Are you feeling stressed?
Come" relax with us and learn
tips on how to remain relaxed
and stress-free as the end of
the semester approaches. This
program is sponsored by the
Campus Wellness Department
of Recreational Services as a
new health series for ECU female
students called "The Satisfied
Woman: Getting What You Want
From Life" For questions, contact
Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
Simon Deng speaks
about modern-day
slavery
Monday, April 17 from 7 - 8:30 p.m.
in Hendrix Theater
Simon Deng, former child slave in
the Sudan, will speak in Hendrix
Theatre at ECU. Deng was forced
into slavery at the age of nine
and escaped at age 11. He now
speaks around the world against
slavery and the genocide in the
Sudan. The purpose of this event
is to raise awareness about the
continued practice of slavery in
the world and about the ongoing
crisis in the Sudan. This event is
free of charge and is open to all.
Fore more information, contact
Colin Campbell, cmc0922@ecu.
edu.
International faculty
and staff potluck
dinner
Wednesday, April 26 from 6-8:30
p.m. in the Willis Building at First
and Reade Streets downtown.
The Office of International Affairs
is sponsoring a potluck dinner for
international faculty and staff
Contact brownr@ecu.edu for
additional information.
'Guys and Dolls'
Tuesday, June 27 through
Saturday, July 1
8 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday
and 2 p.m. Saturday
In McGinnis Theater
Set in Damon Runyon's mythical
New York City, this oddball
romantic comedy introduces us
to a cast of vivid characters who
have become legends in the
canon, Sarah Brown, the upright
"mission doll out to reform
evildoers: Sky Masterson, the
high-rolling gambler who woos
her on a bet and ends up falling
in love; Adelaide, the chronically ill
nightclub performer whose been
engaged to the same man for 14
years; and Nathan Detroit, her
devoted fiance, desperate to find a
spot for his infamous floating crap
game. Everything works out in the
end, thanks to the machinations
of Abe Burrows and Jo Sweriing's
hilarious, fast-paced book and
Frank Loesser's bright, brassy,
immortal score, which takes us
from the heart of Times Square
to the cafes of Havana, Cuba and
into the sewers of New York City.
Funny and romantic, Guys And
Dolls is ideal for all audiences.
Tickets are required and are
$20-$30
Contact 252-328-6829 or 1-
800-ECU-ARTS for additional
information.
'The Fantasticks'
Tuesday, July 11 through Saturday,
July 15 at 8 p.m. Tuesday - Saturday
and 2 p.m. Saturday
In Mcginnis Theater.
Try to remember a time when
this romantic charmer wasn't
enchanting audiences. The
Fantasticks is the longest-running
musical in the world, and with
good reason, at the heart of its
breathtaking poetry and subtle
theatrical sophistication is a purity
and simplicity that transcends
cultural barriers. The result is
a timeless fable of love that
manages to be nostalgic and
universal at the same time. With
its minimal costumes, small band
and virtually non-existent set. The
Fantasticks is an intimate show
which engages the audience's
imagination and showcases a
strong ensemble cast. It's moving
tale of young lovers who become
disillusioned, only to discover a
more mature, meaningful love is
punctuated by a bountiful series
of catchy, memorable songs,
many of which have become
standards.
Tickets are required and are
$20-$30
News Briefs:
State:
N.C. conservatives say stronger
identity needed here
DURHAM, N.C (AP) - North Carolina
conservatives say it's time to reclaim
the most Democrat-friendly state in
the South.
Voters for years have favored
Republicans in presidential and
U.S. Senate races here. But it's
been nearly a generation since a
Republican occupied the governor's
mansion. That was former Gov. Jim
Martin, elected in 1988.
The GOP has not fully controlled the
state legislature for a century.
"It is a travesty that North Carolina is
controlled by the Democrats said
U.S. Rep. Virginia Foxx, R - N.C,
on Saturday, the second day of
the N.C. Conservative Leadership
Conference.
The first ever event, which organizers
hope to hold annually, was aimed at
finding ways to better appeal to North
Carolina voters and halt the blue tide
in state government
It featured guest speakers who
called for a crackdown on illegal
immigration, lower taxes and less
state spending. They also called for
a law making English the official state
language, a constitutional ban on
same-sex marriage, and the end of
taxpayer-funded incentives used to
recruit businesses.
Jack Hawke, a former state GOP
chairman who now leads the
Civitas Institute, a Raleigh-based
conservative group that organized the
conference, said the state Republican
Party lacks a strong identity. That he
argues, has made it difficult for the
many Republicans from other states
that are moving into fast-growing
suburbs.
There has been a void in leadership
in the conservative movement in
North Carolina, especially since Sen.
Helms retired said former Raleigh
Mayor Tom Fetzer.
"We need a new generation of
conservative leaders to come forward
and accept the mantle"
Residents return home after
wildfire forces evacuations
SPIVEY'S CORNER, N.C. (AP)
- Residents evacuated from more
than 50 homes were allowed to return
Saturday after firefighters contained
a wildfire that burned on about 200
acres in northern Sampson County,
officials said.
Officials said the fire near the Sandy
Ridge Country Club had threatened
the homes and placed occupants in
immediate danger. A day care center
was also evacuated.
Firefighters had the blaze 100 percent
contained by late afternoon Saturday,
said Jamie Kritzer, a spokesman for
the N.C Division of Forest Resources.
No injuries were reported and no
structures were lost, officials said.
Kritzer said crews were still on the
scene Saturday evening, checking hot
spots in the interior of the burned area.
The fire was started Monday by a
local resident burning brush, Kritzer
said. The fire had been contained,
but firefighters were checking on it
because of the prevailing windy and
dry conditions, he said, and the fire
again became a problem Friday.
About 175 firefighters along with
a forestry airplane and helicopter
were involved in fighting the blaze,
Kritzer said.
Kritzer said the rain that parts of the
state received Saturday wouldn't make
much difference to the wildfire threat
"Quite frankly I wish we'd had a lot
more. This could prove to be a bad
fire day on Sunday he said. "We're
just really urging people to hold off
on burning at this time
Wednesday, three fires spread across
woods in Cumberland and Sampson
counties, while two-dozen brush fires
were scattered across western North
Carolina.
National:
Survivors pick the pieces after
Tennessee storms that killed 12
GALLATIN, Tenn. (AP) - Diesel smoke
filled the air as work crews used
heavy equipment to clear paths
through tornado-strewn debris and
victims rummaged for mementos in
the remains of their neighborhoods.
Clumps of yellow insulation hung
from trees like Spanish moss, and
the sound of helicopters, chain saws
and trucks created a loud, steady
rumble.
Among those searching for
keepsakes in the rubble Saturday,
Jenny Tuck carried a cedar chest and
a photograph. "I found an old picture
of my mother she said, holding up
the dirty silver frame.
"Afterthe tornadoes in west Tennessee,
I said, 'Lord help us if it comes through
a more densely populated area Gov.
Phil Bredesen said.
"And then it did a week later
Sumner County emergency officials
implemented a curfew for the areas
hardest hit areas and National Guard
soldiers were brought in to patrol.
The worst damage appeared to be in
Gallatin and other suburbs northeast
of Nashville.
"You could hear people yelling and
screaming outside and the debris
hitting the walls said Hurt, who said
one of his coworkers was killed.
Nashville Electrical Service reported
hundreds of electrical lines down and
power outages affecting up to 16,000
customers, mostly in Goodlettsville.
About 1,000 customers remained
blacked out, and it could take a week
to restore all service, the utility said.
Another line of severe thunderstorms
rolled through Alabama and Georgia
late Friday and early Saturday,
damaging homes and businesses
in Atlanta suburbs.
Falling trees injured two people
in Alabama, but no deaths were
reported. Storms also pounded
southern West Virginia, blacking
out more than 16,000 customers,
utilities said.
Candidates for New Orleans
mayor seek support from
hurricane evacuees
HOUSTON (AP) - Seven candidates
vying to be the next mayor of New
Orleans sought support from
displaced voters Saturday, two weeks
before the election to decide who
will guide the city through its long
recovery from Hurricane Katrina.
The candidates fielded questions about
rebuilding in a forum from New Orleans
that was broadcast to evacuees in
Houston, Dallas, San Antonio and
Austin, as well as Shreveport, La, and
Baton Rouge, La
Mayor Ray Nagin, who is seeking a
second term, reminded the audience
that the April 22 primary comes just
weeks before the start of the next
hurricane season.
"Do you want experienced leadership
that is tried and tested? Or do you
want to experiment at this important
time in our city's history?" he asked,
drawing applause and cheers in
Houston, where about 100 evacuees
watched from an auditorium at Texas
Southern University.
Evacuees pushed the candidates for
answers to questions about restoring
basic services, such as electricity and
trash pickup.
"I cannot lie to you and tell you
every single service in every single
neighborhood is going to come
back immediately said candidate
Ron Forman, an executive credited
with turning New Orleans' zoo into a
national showcase.
Other candidates agreed.
"If I said yes, it would be an empty
promise said the Rev. Tom Watson,
a politically influential minister who is
also running for mayor.
If no candidate gets a majority of the
votes in the nonpartisan primary, the
top two finishers will compete in a
May 20 runoff election.
Thomas Wells, who evacuated to
Houston afterthe storm but returned
to New Orleans for the forum, said he
was frustrated with the city's appeals
for residents to come home.
"I am very angry with the statement,
'come back home To what?" he
asked, complaining his wife has
to get dressed each morning out
of the trunk of the family's car. "We
are a family with dignity, and that is
unacceptable
International:
Defying curfew, thousands
protest against king In Nepal
KATMANDU, Nepal (AP) - Thousands
of emboldened protesters defied
curfews in Nepal on Sunday, clashing
with police on the fourth day of
increasingly violent demonstrations
to demand a return to democracy in
Himalayan kingdom.
The protests came despite the
royal government's threat to shoot
anyone breaking the curfew, imposed
Saturday amid a general strike to
pressure King Gyanendra to give up
absolute rule. At least two protesters
have been killed in clashes.
Police fired tear gas at stone-
throwing youths in Nepal's capital
Sunday, where at least 1,000 people
assembled in one neighborhood,
said a witness who declined to be
named for fear of police reprisal.
Police also fired rubber bullets, Private
Kantipur Television reported, showing
footage that included at least one
injured protester.
At the time, he said the move was
needed to bring order to a chaotic
and corrupt political scene and to
end a communist insurgency that
has killed nearly 13,000 people in the
past decade.
Many Nepalis at first welcomed the
king's move. But the insurgency since
has worsened and the economy has
faltered, fueling the discontent that
has been on display in recent days as
thousands of workers, professionals
and business people have for the
first time joined students and political
activists at protests.
Apart from Saturday's shootings,
the government has arrested more
than 800 people since Wednesday.
Police were seen Saturday detaining
another 20 rights activists for defying
the curfew.
For the first time, the parties' protest
has the backing of the communist
rebels, with whom they formed a
loose alliance in December.
Roadside bombs hit central
Iraq; U.S. troops kill suspected
Insurgents on anniversary of fall
of Baghdad
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - Five roadside
bombs killed at least three people
in Iraq on Sunday, the three-year
anniversary of the Baghdad's fall to
U.S. forces. Iraq police and soldiers
bolstered security in the capital to
prevent attacks on "Freedom Day
The holiday marks the April 9, 2003
event in which a huge crowd of Iraqis
cheered as U.S. Marines hauled down
the statue of Saddam Hussein on
Firdous Square, marking the collapse
of his regime.
Most Iraqis welcomed the end of
Saddam's regime, but the insurgency,
militias, rising sectarian violence,
electricity shortages and political
vacuum have all sapped much of
the enthusiasm generated by the
collapse of dictatorship.
"Iraqis are pleased and displeased
said Qassim Hassan, a soldier. They
are pleased because they got rid of
tyranny and dictatorship, but they
are displeased because they went
from bad to worse. The Iraqi street
is seething between sadness and
terrorism
Even U.S. officials acknowledged
the mixed nature of the Iraq war's
current stage.
"Despite much progress, much work
remains U.S. Ambassador Zalmay
Khalilzad and Gen. George W. Casey,
Jr said in a joint statement.
The legitimate security forces must
quell sectarian violence. Population
centers must be secure to allow
Iraq's new institutions to take root
and businesses to flourish. Finally,
the people must be able to trust their
leadership
The "Freedom Day" holiday appeared
to draw little public attention. The Iraqi
Islamic Party, a the biggest Sunni
party, issued a statement rejecting the
day, saying it was "an anniversary of
occupying Iraq, not liberating it
But some Iraqis embraced the
memory of Hussein's statue coming
to the ground.
This is a dear day, we got rid of the
dictatorship said Fadhil Abul-Sebah.
"It doesn't mark the fall of Baghdad,
it marks the fall of Saddam and
the regime, because Baghdad will
never fall
" tBr v-vifi
TOUgh from page A1
But the system also wants to
improve enrollment for minority
students, particularly Hispan-
ics, many of whom must work
full time to pay for college.
Most universities in the UT
system have shied from raising
tuition rates in the manner of UT-
Arlington and UT-Dallas, adopting
different strategies to help working
I a students graduate more quickly.
II UT-Brownsville, for instance,
ljw!iich enrolls a high percentage
lMof Hispanics because of its loca-
tion, has avoided using higher
tuition rates for part-timers. UT-
Brownsville president Juliet V.
Garcia noted that 48 percent of
undergraduates there are part-
timers. "Our ability to provide
education to those students is
vital to the economic well-being
of the community she said in
an e-mail. "On the other hand,
we recognize the need to make
a greater impact in enrolling
students full time
In addition to a flat rate
tuition for full-timers, students
pay the same rate no matter
how many credit hours they
take above IS, the university
is spending $300,000 to create
on-campus jobs for up to 70
full-time, working students. The
school also discounts tuition
for night and weekend classes,
to encourage more students to
enroll, and it is hiring faculty to
schedule more classes in those
off-peak times to accommodate
working students.
Students got to speak their minds to an audience.
Students make an impact
with public speaking skills
Influencing peers with
speech
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The School of Communica-
tion held its fourth annual Ora-
torical Exhibition on Monday
in Wright Auditorium, with the
theme "One Person Can Make a
Difference
Faculty, students and staff
were all invited to the free event,
where six students demonstrated
their public speaking skills. The
speakers are selected from COMM
2420 and COMM 2410 each year.
The audience had the chance
to see the students who have
exceeded the requirements for
their communication class or
classes.
According to a press release by
Barbara Bullington, SOC Instruc-
tor, Pam Hopkins said, "It's one
thing to see a public figure deliver
an effective speech It's even
better to see a peer stand up and
impact an audience with words.
That's powerful
Hopkins also insists that
going to the Oratorical Exhibition
can show students what public
speaking is all about and how
effective it is.
Each student was given five to
seven minutes to present them-
selves on the topic of their choice.
The theme is chosen each year
by the SOC speech committee,
who are looking for new topics
that will interest and educate the
audience.
Similar to past exhibitions,
the select students have proved to
be strong speakers. This year's six
speakers were Marie Carpenter,
junior marketing major, whose
topic was "Everyday Heroes
Laura Clark, sophomore biol-
ogy major, chose the topic of
"An Uncommon Leader for an
Uncommon time Freshman
history education major Kristin
Hales' topic was "Mind Your
Manners Daniel Robinson,
sophomore business management
major, chose the topic "Loved
and Hated by Many Luke Mon-
tsinger, junior marketing major,
discussed "Vlnce McMahon's
Impact on the Business of Pro-
fessional Wrestling April Bain,
senior nutrition and dietetics
major, chose the topic "Call to
Duty
Students participating do
not have to be communication
majors or minors.
SOC instructor Sachlyo Shear-
man said that delivering a speech
to a crowd of hundreds made
up of faculty, peers and other
members can help the participat-
ing student be comfortable and
improve skills.
"It helps the community to
know what students are learning
at the School of Communica-
tion Shearman said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
PRSSA from page A1
today in the public relations pro-
fession. Few of them went to col-
lege strictly for public relations.
Peggy Novotny, the director
for marketing and communica-
tions for the College of Human
Ecology, actually began her career
as a teacher. After having her chil-
dren, she said she did not want
to be stuck grading papers all
night when she could be taking
care of her family. So, she looked
for a job that would allow her to
"check out at S p.m she said.
What she ended up doing
was selling herself to a mall as a
writer, to get her foot in the door.
It was this inventive approach
that landed her a job in the public
relations field.
"It's a matter of brush-
ing off that blue suit, some-
times she said, as well as
putting yourself out there.
Doug Boyd took a different
approach to breaking into the
public relations field. Boyd, an
Information and communica-
tions specialist at the Office
of News and Information for
the Health Sciences Division,
got his Associate in Arts from
N.C. State Agricultural Insti-
tute. This gave him an area of
expertise outside of the com-
munications field and it helped
him to land a job at a newspa-
per as an agricultural reporter.
The speakers also talked about
the Clement Hall fire, which is an
example of good public relations
management, according to Plouffe.
This was mostly because she was
"able to serve as a liaison between
what people knew and what people
needed to know" by pointing
out to reporters who it was they
would need to talk to, she said.
The university was able to
keep the message unified because
of the way its public relations
officers handled the situation,
Plouffe added.
Crane agreed. He said that it
is a vital aspect of their jobs to
connect well with the media, to
build credibility and trust with
reporters. This allows them to
"help shape the message
The forum ended with the
guests giving out some advice for
public relations writing. They talked
about the need to edit and go over
their work to make sure what goes
out to the public or to the media is as
perfect and professional as it can be.
Novotny advocated going
over everything with a fine-
toothed comb.
"Don't let anything off your
desk until you've proofed it and
proofed it she said. Better yet,
she added, allow a colleague to
edit it as well.
Still, Boyd cautioned against
relying too heavily on what
others; he said that it caused some
writers to get sloppy.
The question and answer
period was followed by a meet
and greet that allowed students
to mingle with the professionals
and possibly even forge contacts
within their intended profession.
This writer can be reached at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Farm
from page A1
clothesline, sewing clothes, clear-
ing new land and chasing chickens
who escaped from the pen. Harris
worked with three other students
to plant several rows of corn.
"It is important to sit in the
classroom and read books about the
issues surrounding modern food
production Mercer explained.
"But it can also certainly help
to get a hands-on feel for the
issues by being on the land and
seeing how the academic discus-
sion plays out in real life
Joe Miller's main passion on
the farm is making honey which
he sells to neighbors and other
interested persons. While Beth
Miller, who was stung the day
before, demonstrated the bee
suit, Joe explained the process
of beekeeping and later at the
potluck meal, students enjoyed
fresh baked bread and honey
from the farm.
"I think everyone should eat
at least one piece of food a day
where they know the farmer's
name said Dr. Susan Vickery
Mercer, one of the participants, as
she ate a piece of the bread.
Vickery started Farm Day IS
years ago at an organic farm in
Pittsboro.
Nursebees Apiary is located sev-
eral miles from Greenville. In addi-
tion to the bees, the farm includes
fruit trees, chickens, vegetables and
an increasing crop of pecans.
This writer can be contacted at
news&theeastcarolinian. com.





")
Page A3
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
My Random Column
Entertaining Web sites
So I would like to share with you some rather
amusing Web sites to keep you busy as the end
of the semester heads quickly in our direction.
whopperettes.com
This one is based on the new Burger King
advertisements. You have the ability to make your
own Whopper, which goes along with the "Have
it your way" slogan and girls dressed up as parts
of the hamburger combine to make a monstrous
Whopper. You can add up to any combination
of 30 items. So if you want 25 patties and all the
rest ketchup, it's all yours, True to its form, you can
have it your way.
virtual-bubblewrap.com
This one is the ultimate bubble wrap site. You
can use manic mode to pop the bubbles as you
quickly move over them, or regular mode to pop
one at a time. It also gives methods and suggest-
ing for popping real bubble wrap and etiquette tips
for those around you. The disclaimer says it all
malerestrooms.com
Now this Web site is a monologue of what hap-
pens in a males public bathroom. It is much more
entertaining then the Female Restroom that you
can link to from this site, though it is worth seeing
once. It was a nice insight to the opposite sex's
experience when they walk into the bathroom. It
lasts for a while so time is quickly passed while
watching the video.
ebaumsworld.comfishy.html
Fish beware, the more you eat, the bigger you get.
You start off as a very small minnow and grow
into a big blue fish as you consume more and
more fish that are smaller then you. The problem
is that the fish move at various speeds so the
game moves rather slow, thus the appeal. Hours
are wasted and nothing gained; sounds like a
good afternoon to me.
blockfrenzy.com
The goal of this Web site is to keep the red block
from touching the sides or being hit by the blue
blocks. You control it by dragging the red block
around the screen. There is a reference guide
to inform the player of how good their time
was. The site even lets you know before you
start playing that "the game is highly addictive
venganza.orggamesindex.htm
OK, so I know that I have received several
attempts from supporters to run something about
the Flying Spaghetti Monster. So here is a Web
site in which the player must convert people into
pastafarians, a.k.a. little pirate people, before the
time runs out by hitting them with the Spaghetti
Monsters "noodly appendage It is an interesting
game that must be seen to understand the wrath
of the Spaghetti Monster.
Pirate Rant
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Rachel King
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Claire Murphy
Asst. News Editor
Kristin Murnane
Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Rachael Lotter
Asst. Photo Editor
Opinion Columnist
Pedophile in Department of Homeland
Security caught in Internet sting
Member of Department
of Homeland Security
arrested
BENJAMIN CORMACK
CASUAL OBSERVER
Now normally you'd think it
would be a good thing when the
words "Department of Homeland
Security" and "arrested" appear
in the same sentence. However,
when that sentence is, "Member
of Department of Homeland Secu-
rity arrested that's not so good.
On April 4, Department of
Homeland Security deputy press
secretary Brian J. Doyle, 55, was
arrested and charged with seven
counts of use of a computer to
seduce a child and 16 counts of
transmission of harmful mate-
rial to a minor. Basically, this
guy tried to have sex with a girl
he thought was 14 years old. I
say "thought" because the girl
was in fact a detective posing as
one online.
Doyle later confessed to police
to all of his actions. Doyle's rela-
tionship with the fictional girl
started on March 12, and con-
tinued until his arrest. According
to a statement from the sheriff's
office that arrested Doyle, he said
in his online conversations who
he was and that he worked for the
U.S. Department of Homeland
Security. He even gave out the
phone numbers to his home, his
office and even get this his
government issued cell phone.
The good news just keeps on
coming. Authorities also believe
that Doyle could have held simi-
lar conversations with others
online. At some points during
online chats he would address
the detective by the wrong name.
Doyle also sent photos of himself
that were not sexually explicit
but said he would send nude
photos if the "girl" would buy
a Web camera and send him
nude photos. You can even see
Doyle's Department of Home-
land Security name tag in one of
the photos!
This guy is supposed to be
protecting us? Even if you exclude
the laws he broke in attempting
to have sex with a child, the
guy has already done stuff that
could land him in jail for life.
He put the security of the United
States at risk by handing out that
information. Who knows who
else he may have conversed with
and what secrets or other infor-
mation he may have divulged.
Who knows what people could
do with the information he may
have given out.
1 honestly believe that if Brian
J. Doyle had been left to do what
he was doing, either the security
of our nation would have been
compromised or he could have
eventually risen to a higher seat
of power and used his authority
to protect himself and others like
him. Brian J. Doyle should be
labeled as a sexual deviant and a
traitor and should be prosecuted
as such to the fullest extent of
the law.
Doyle is divorced and has
children, which beg the ques-
tions, why didn't it work out?
What would his ex-wife and
children have to say about him? 1
won't be surprised if there's more
to this story.
One of the most disturbing
facts about this whole incident
is that all of this was going on
within an organization that has
been given the authority to mon-
itor individuals that they believe
are terrorists. This means they
have the authority and capability
to monitor the personal commu-
nications of just about anybody.
Yet, they apparently didn't think
to monitor one of their own.
Now to be fair, a Department of
Homeland Security spokesman
said that they would cooperate
in the investigation, but that still
doesn't exclude one important
fact, they hired Doyle.
Being such an important gov-
ernment organization, you would
think that in doing a background
check for potential employees
that they would have discovered
some things that would have
raised a few eyebrows. Even
after hiring someone, you would
think that the risk of leaking
information vital to the safety
and security of the United States
would be a concern. As such, you
would assume that they would
also monitor those working for
them rather than just those they
assume are terrorists.
1 guess because Doyle didn't
fit the profile of a terrorist or
because he wasn't a Muslim, any-
thing that made him look like a
pedophile wasn't their problem.
Personally, I would like to know
who hired him or how he got this
job, because whoever it was has
got some questions to answer.
Here's an idea, maybe the
Patriot Act should extend to
those that work for the govern-
ment. Since they're, you know,
also in a position that could be
potentially beneficial to terror-
ists. Just a thought.
Who is the idiot that wrote that piece? Ever hear of
"innocent until proven guilty?" Now that the DNA
doesn't match her facts are starting to look a little
shaky huh? If the lacrosse team is innocent, 1 hope
you are prepared to write an apology.
If you hate ECU so much and talk so negatively
about it, then why do you go here?
Special thanks to ECU Parking & Traffic for jump-
starting my car in an ECU lot after my battery died.
Not only was the officer helpful, but he was very
prompt and pleasant. How nice!
Remind me, please, what is so bad about Higher One?
Why is it that half of the times I go to West End
for lunch, the dining hall is being taken over by
children! I can barely get dessert because the little
kids eat it all before the actual ECU students can
get to them! All I want is dessert!
Basically every university at its best is a four year
community college, not just ECU.
I hate to break it to you people who want to sound
so smart. ECU police do write parking tickets. I have
watched an ECU police officer write me one. In fact,
I have the ticket with the officers name to prove it.
Can someone please tell my why it is always so
cold in the buildings on campus? I've been here
four years and they nave never been able to get the
room temperature right. It's always too hot in the
winter and freezing in the summer. Something's
not right here!
I'm in love with you, you idiot. Dump the girlfriend
so we can go out to dinner.
Over the past week, I have seen many girls and one
guy wearing pink shorts hit the handicap button
on the doors around campus instead of opening
it themselves. Why do they do this? I personally,
thank God I have the ability to open the door
myself, but I guess you can't expect a guy in pink
shorts to open his own door.
Wrong sucker, you did not misspell "higher You
spelled it quite correctly. The word you misspelled
was "hire" as in you want to employ someone. And
yes, Tony McKee was a lone voice of reason sur-
rounded by a horde of naive, liberal, self-centered,
"what-about-me" suckers.
This weekend 1 called safe-ride about eight times.
1 got an automated message telling me to call back
all eight times. Thanks Safe Ride!
Play more free movies on Sundays, stop discriminat-
ing against people that aren't dorks and like to go
out on Friday and Saturday.
Is this semester labeled as the "group project" semes-
ter? I never did one for three years, but I am doing
three this semester alone.
Did you see that bus driver who hit the fence last
week? I am not sure how I feel about 18-year-olds
who are responsible for a 25,000 pound vehicle
To the person whose car was towed for being "too
close to the driveway I feel you, I got a ticket for
parking in my driveway the wrong way. Best part is,
the ticket was $50, and it would be $500 to appeal
it. So I just flip off the meter maid that rides around
near campus.
I'm so lucky every day I am always the 10,000th or
100,000th or 1,000,000th person to visit a Web site.
I don't give a crap what they do in your little country
town that no one's heard of - we're in Greenville
Newsroom 252.328.9238
Fax 252.328.9143
Advertising 252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the
summer "Our view" is the opinion of the editorial boatd
and is written by editorial boanj members TEC welcomes
letters to the editor which are limited to 250 words (which
may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed
and include a telephone number. Letters may be sent
via e-mail to editorwtheeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Caivlinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
In My Opinion
(KRT) We Latinos are on
fire these days, in more ways
than one. Immigration protests
across the country have reignited
the Latino engine but also refu-
eled the opposite side.
Some people think we
threaten American identity
because we don't assimilate,
which I don't get. Heck, even our
tortillas assimilate wheat, spin-
ach or multigrain? By the third
generation, most of us will speak
only English. Half will marry
outside our ethnic box.
Some critics wrote to me upset
that so many of you younger
ones walked out of school. They
buy the perception that Latinos
don't value education (and, be
honest, our high dropout rates
don't help), that we're "dumbing
down" U.S. schools.
I'd argue that the protesters,
especially the younger ones,
learned more last week than they
had all year. A protest is democ-
racy in action, and 1 can't think
of a better way to learn about
First Amendment rights - includ-
ing the right to stage walkouts
and wave any flag you like - than
firsthand experience.
And the Mexican flags, ay Dios
mio, that has taken on a life of its
own. (And if you haven't seen the
memo, organizers of the Sunday
protest in Dallas discouraged any-
thing but the Stars and Stripes.)
Symbols mean different things
to different people. Many folks
who e-mailed me were quite exer-
cised by images of a "Mexican
mob" waving its flag, signaling the
beginning of the "reconquista
They actually believe Latinos
are migrating here because they
want to take back what used to
be Mexico. Believe me, we Lati-
nos aren't that coordinated; the
answer is actually much simpler
- a better-paying job.
So many myths to dispel. So
I call on my fellow pochos - the
culture straddlers - to step it up.
In states like California, New
Mexico, Arizona, Texas and
Florida, we Latinos will soon be
the workforce majority. Millions
of those workers are first-genera-
tion Americans - pochos.
Countries like Canada,
England and Ireland actively
recruit immigrants because, as
their populations age, they need
younger blood to sustain the
comfy life retirees worked hard
to ensure. U.S. politicians and
educators realize this, and some
are freaking out. They know, for
instance, that Texas' economic
health depends on how well you
first-generation workers do.
It's tough to be a pocho, but
there are millions of us now,
byproducts of foreign economic
instability and America's insa-
tiable appetite for cheap labor.
And if we all make a long-term
commitment, we can make sure
more of our children go to college
and fewer end up in jail.
Demonstrations are valuable
and worthy, but, ultimately, they
are only mileposts along the way.
Education is really our only long-
term salvation.
On Monday, a national coali-
tion of pro-immigrant groups
urges Latinos to take the day off
from work, stay home and save
their pennies to show the eco-
nomic impact we have, whether
or not here legally.
What about Tuesday, my fellow
pochos and sympathizers?
Dolores Huerta, a co-found-
ing member of the United Farm
Workers, said at a university rally
in California that the marches
are great, but we need to vote.
And in Dallas, as in many
other big cities, Spanish surnames
dominate the public school ros-
ters, so the classroom is another
good starting point. Teachers
and principals will tell you that
their biggest challenge is engag-
ing Latino parents, who aren't as
involved as they should be.
Latino students, part of your
job is re-educating your parents.
What worked at home doesn't
necessarily work here. Encour-
age your parents to take owner-
ship of the schools, just as they
did the streets. And you pochos
who've beaten the odds, give
back - participate in career days,
mentor a kid or help fill out col-
lege applications.
Protests generate energy,
but they are a means, not an
end. Sunday's march in Dallas
may have been the biggest in
the city's history, but do not be
fooled. If the symbolism doesn't
fuel substance, our efforts will
prove empty.
. The real work starts Tuesday,
with a daily recommitment every
day thereafter.
A broken down car with graffiti becomes a piece of
art when children around Greenville get a chance
to express their creativity don't be so negative
and take your ass back to the trailer park.
When 1 go to bed with a girl, they always insist on
sleeping against the wall. Why is that?
As for campus safety, please know that parking and
traffic are ticketing and towing as fast as they can
and the ECU police are giving out speeding tickets
as fast as they can. Now be patient and continue to
walk in groups in well lit areas!
The reason why the perp was last seen near Fourth
Street is because a member of campus safety tried
chasing down the guy when he noticed that the guy
had a purse in his hands while running. 'Applause
Also, if you don't feel safe around campus at night
walking back from your cars or where ever, then
! call safe ride and they will contact a member of
campus safety to escort you to where you're going
on campus. It's their job to help protect us andkeep
things safe.
Why do we need all of these numbered and reserved
parking spaces for campus administrators? These
parking spaces are often noticeably empty. I agree
that the chancellor should have a reserved space,
but everyone else should park on the basis of get to
work first, park closer to where you work. Set the
example for others to follow.
Don't even put your trust in the ECU police, how
many of criminals do they find. 1 am still trying to
figure out how Krispy Kreme got robbed.
Thanks a lot for giving Safe Ride their credit. We try
out absolute best to make it to you guys asap.
Could someone please tell my co-worker that just
because I look at your boyfriend (whom is married
and cheating on his wife with her) that 1 don't want
him? Thanks.
When one thinks of London, the black taxis and
red double decker busses come to mind. When
one thinks of New York City, the yellow taxis and
limousines come to mind. When one thinks of
Greenville NC, tow trucks, parking tickets and petty
crime comes to mind. I can hardly wait to graduate
just to get out of here.
To understand the racial divide on campus all you
have to do is pick up today's TEC. Why do we have
a black student union when we already have a stu-
dent union for all students. It seems that African
American students are creating their own divide on
this campus when the only colors we should care
about are purple and gold.
If you life pina coladas, and getting caught in the
rain. If you re not into yoga, if you have half-a-brain.
If you like making love at midnight, in the dunes
of the cape. I'm the lady you've looked for, write to
me and escape.
Editor1 Note: The Pirate Runt is on nnonsTruitts way or.tii.lt nt and staff in the
ECUcomrminity'tomicethdropirmim.SulimiisiimstanrvsuhmittedaitorryrrHHidv
online at wwvtllceastcarolinian.com, or e-mailed to editormheeastcarollm.nl.
earn. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and bruin





What's Hot
Page A4 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
Top 5s:
Top 5 Movies:
1. tee Age: The Meltdown
2. The Benchwarmers
3 Take the Lead
4. Inside Man
5. Lucky Number Sleven
Top 5 Albums:
1. Rascal Flatts
2. Pink
3. The Flaming Lips
4. Morrissey
5. Daniel Powter
Top 5 TV Shows:
1. "American Idol-Tuesday"
2. "American Idol-Wednesday"
3CSI"
4. "Grey's Anatomy"
5. "Desperate Housewives"
Top 5 Books:
1. Gone
2. The Da Vinci Code
3. The Secret Supper
4. Tomb of the Golden Bird
5. Tenth Circle
Top 5 Movie Rentals:
1. Crash
2. Million Dollar Baby
3. Ocean's 12
4. The Aviator
5. The Notebook
Coming Soon:
1 Scary Movie 4
2. The Wild
3. The Sentinel
4. Silent Hill
5. American Dreamz
Horoscopes:
Watch out guys: Turn on or turn off?
?
Aries- It's good for you to hang out
with a person who helps you stay
calm and cool. You can provide the
energy. Together, you've got it made.
Taurus- A tough job is somewhat
easier if you're doing it for a good
reason. How about financial security,
and maybe retiring early? Or paying
off one bill.
Gemini- Just when you're almost
at your wit's end, a miracle occurs.
Somebody you thought could not be
counted upon shows up, at just the
right time. A favor is returned.
Cancer- It's not a good day to travel,
or even to send out packages. Focus
your attention on legal matters, and
getting things to balance. It's not easy,
but can be done.
Leo-You're a romantic, through
and through. So, as you're studying,
learn something that will make your
relationship even sweeter than before.
Poetry, perhaps?
Virgo- Gather up as much as you
can, to feather your own nest. Then
you can discuss a controversial topic
in comfort.
Libra- One of your advantages is
that you like to read. Browse through
the instruction manual and make an
important discovery.
Scorpio- You're doing the job
the hard way. Find out where the
orders come from. You can get
around the middle-man and increase
your profits.
Sagittarius- Others are beginning to
see the sense in your argument. Even
some who thought you were crazy
are coming over to your side.
Capricorn- Listen at keyholes, and
you'll discover where the power
really lies. Once you have that
figured out, you'll know where to
place the pressure.
Aquarius- Follow the recommendation
from a distant friend. Get involved
with people who can help you solve
tough problems.
Pisces- The way you manage your
money is drawing positive attention.
This inspires others to give you
more money to manage. Resist the
temptation to spend. If you don't you
could end up in the opposite situation.
What are girls looking for
in a guy?
MEREDITH STEWART
SENIOR WRITER
Every girl has their own opin-
ion as to what they find attractive
in a guy. Although everyone is
very different there are some
things that most girls can agree
on, that they would consider
attractive or not.
The first things I notice about
a guy are his eyes. Many girls
swoon for guys who have blue eyes,
but like me and I'm sure many
others can agree that green eyes
are sexy as well as deep brown
Hair color has
never really been
a big thing to me.
Every guy looks
different; so one
hair cut could look
good on one and
bad on another.
Most of the time
I don't even know
what a guys' hair
looks like because
he is usually wear-
ing a hat. I think
that's an athletic
look, which is
realty cute on
most guys.
A guy's per-
sonal choice of style really isn't
that important as long as his
clothes fit his body. Tight jeans
are just too much for me and
really baggy clothes always look
like they are about to fall off, just
wear things that fit. I've dated
guys who dress really preppy
(popped collars and boat shoes)
to guys who wear mostly skate
clothes (Volcom hoodies and
DC shoes). I like it when a guy
bums to class and around his
house, it shows that he's com-
fortable with himself. He has
to know how to look good and
Helpful Info
Turn On:
-Confidence
-Sense of humor
-Talkative
-Goal oriented
-Intellectual
Turn Off:
-Bad Breath
-Quiet
-Non-Sociable
-Clingy
-Can't get along with friends
dress up when going out though;
1 like to dress up before going
downtown and I want my guy to
look just as good. It's really not
that important to me though, I
would not discriminate against
a guy who chose to do otherwise.
I've also heard many of my girl
friends comment on guys' shoes.
If they have ugly shoes they are
immediately out. I on the other
hand find that very shallow, but
humorous at the same time.
I think glasses can change
a guy's whole image. When
I see a guy wearing glasses I
immediately think smart,
witty and charming. All stereo-
typical traits, but 1 just can't
help it. When
a guy who wears
glasses switches to
contacts 1 believe
it takes away the
innocent look and
switches his image
altogether.
Hairy guys are
one of. the big-
gest turn-offs ever.
Really hairy legs,
arms, backs and
chests are just gross.
Guys just an FYI
- having one long
eyebrow (aka uni-
brow) looks ridicu-
lous. Shave it, pluck
it or wax it right now to save
yourself any further embarrass-1
ment. Just as a personal prefer- jx
ence, facial hair is not attractive, o
A scruffy face really hurts and a
even well groomed facial hair
just is not appealing, although
you will find many other girls
feel the exact opposite. I guess
it really depends on what type
of person you are looking for.
Quiet guys are probably one
of the only things that make
me nervous. I like to know what
others are thinking and if they
are too quiet it's difficult to get to
Trying to turn on the light bulb of interest in a girl's head can be difficult sometimes, use this guide.
know them. Outspoken and con-
fident guys usually get the girl.
As right or wrong as 1 may
be on some of these accusations,
keep in mind that every girl looks
for different things in guys. Many
say that it's not what is on the
outside that counts, but I believe
physical attraction is part of the
package. Why would you ran-
domly start talking to someone
who you did not find physically
attractive? Something has to be
there to draw you in. Once you
like what you see, then you can
spend time with each other
and find out your common
interest, goals and maybe even
dating plans. It's really impor-
tant to just be yourself; if people
do not like you for you, just
remember there are about 23,000
other students who go here and
would love to get to know you.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Getting some sun time
This is not your average bunny. He has magical secrets in April.
Celebrity Profile:
The Easter Bunny
But it's
my life
Playing The Game' like
no other
COLLEGE VIXEN
TRUTH WRITER
Magical rabbit takes a
'paws" for an interview
JOSEPH MINNICH
STAFF WRITER
1 Taking a trip to the beach with someone you love can be great
Fun Facts:
You share your birthday with at least
9 million other people in the world.
People with blue eyes are better able
to see in the dark.
The most productive day of the work
week is Tuesday.
J. Edgar Hoover liked to fire FBI
agents whose palms were sweaty
when shaking hands.
The average NFL player's career lasts
only three and a half years.
More than 50 percent of the people
in the world have never made or
received a telephone call.
Oak trees are struck by lightning
more than any other tree.
The best beaches for
summer
MARIANNE BARROW
STAFF WRITER
The skies are beginning to get
a little bluer, the sun is bringing
the heat and students are losing
layers of clothing. Naturally,
everyone's minds are starting to
hone in on the one place they
know for certain that they can
relax, or maybe get a little crazy.
So let's take it to the beaches.
There are different reasons
for a little getaway to the shore
and there are many places to
choose from. Maybe you feel that
spring break wasn't quite long
enough and want to head back
to the beach for some wild, sand
filled fun. The top three choices
for that option would be South
Beach in Miami, Fla Culebra
Island in Puerto Rico and Santa
Barbara in East Beach, Calif.
These top picks have been
known to consistently meet
everyone's party requirements
of good drinks, extreme dancing
and beautiful views.
However, it's possible that an
untamed vacation isn't exactly
what you're looking for. There
might be a special someone who
you want to sweep away to an
isolated island for a few days. For
this kind of situation, a beach
that's a little dreamier is probably
a better choice.
One of the most suggested
resorts isn't too far away on Kiawah
Island in South Carolina. Also,
for a couple willing to shell out
money for an amazing time, there
is East Hampton in New York.
Finally we have a flawless beach in
Santa Catalina, Calif. These three
locations have all the character-
istics of a romance-novel type of
retreat. There are secluded beaches
and plenty of activities specifically
for couples.
Perhaps the best solution for
trying to decide on a beach to
vacation is one that's part wild,
kind of passionate and really
see BEACH page A5

As Easter approaches, ECU stu-
dents have no time to think about
the days off from school. We are
too busy worrying about what
the Easter Bunny is going to be
bringing us. Well, for shame ECU.
The Easter Bunny is upset
with you and he requested that
1 be his mes-
senger of truth.
Pay attention
to the tale of
the most under
appreciated
hare of all time.
TEC: Why
did you want
to talk to me,
Mr. Bunny?
EB: First off,
my name is
Hue Effner, but
1 go by Eff. I
chose you, Joe,
because you are
my only true fan at this school.
Nobody else knows anything
about my past.
TEC: Impossible.
EB: It's true. I saw some freshmen
in the Wright Plaza the other day.
I asked them where the Easter
Bunny came from, and they said
"a hole What a shame.
TEC: You mean, they didn't
Easter Bunny
Fast Facts
Favorite food: Carrots, duh.
Favorite show: Flavor of Love
Ideal woman: Blonde
Shoe size: 26 wide
Age: Approximately 500 years old
Nationality: German
Aliases: Oschter Haws, Hue Effner
even know that you were born
in Germany around the 1500s?
Nobody knows about your heroic
pilgrimage to America in the
1700s? What do they teach these
kids in history class?
EB: I'm used to disrespect from
history professors. Life was good
when I just left chicken eggs for
the Pennsylvania Dutch children
in their bonnets.
1 loved being known as the
Oschter Haws by all of the chil-
dren. They loved me too. They
even left car-
rots for me. For
a few years
they treated
me as good as
Santa Claus.
TEC: I don't
understand.
Now every-
body knows
your name. Did
life get worse
as you became
more popular?
EB: I don't
know what
happened to
people in the last few centuries.
It seems like they just expect
candy from me.
Nowadays, it's more like a
job than a holiday. Since people
started to treat me like a business-
man, I decided to become one.
TEC: What are you talking about,
see BUNNY page A5
For the past couple of weeks
I have been spending some time
alone during the weekdays. 1 am
doing well in all of my classes
and actually feel as if 1 have some
order in my life. I'm starting to
realize who I am as an individual
and learning to appreciate myself
for who 1 am.
But as soon as the weekend
rolls around I am downtown
partying like no other. My friend
Catherine and 1 went to a club
last weekend to have a few beers
and enjoy being single. We were
talking about everything under
the moon when two really hot
guys approached us and began
small talk. My flirtation skills
are not up to par, but I must have
done something right. Those
guys began buying us drinks and
before I knew it a couple of drinks
turned into about 12. Catherine
and I excused ourselves "to the
restroom" and just left the club.
We were both buzzed and
were beginning to get the munch-
ies. It was only 11:30 p.m. and we
couldn't possibly go home, so
we stopped by Boli's to get a bite
to eat. While we were waiting
for our food a couple more guys
came up to us, ended up buying
us bread sticks and a few shots.
At that point I couldn't decide
if this was really the "single" life.
Do single guys just go around
buying stuff for girls hoping to
get lucky? Are they that desperate
see LIFE page A5





4-12-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEATURES
PAGE A5
Blinny from page A4
Eff? You have a business?
EB: 1 have businesses, plural.
Who do you think owns
all the candy companies? Her-
shey's? Mars? Ha! No human
could handle that much power.
All of these subsidiaries are
just a front for BunnyMunny,
Inc. I surpassed Bugs for the
richest rabbit in the world
title in 1981. Bugs is still my
man, though.
TEC: On the other hand, 1 hear
things got rough with the Cad-
bury Bunny for awhile
EB: Yeah, that stretch where he
tried to compete in my markets
was stressful. I showed that pretty
boy who was boss. 1 bought him
out in 2000 when the Repub-
licans took office. He couldn't
handle the drop in stock prices.
Sucker.
TEC: Since we are on the sub-
ject, what is with the bunny-egg
thing? They don't actually go
together.
EB: Come on Joe, you're
a smart guy. Think about
the symbolism. The egg is
a perfect example of the renewal
and rebirth of life. You know
how we rabbits are all about
making new life. That is how
the rabbit got tied into spring so
long ago. Even so, I can't just
uGdCh from page A4
leave baby bunnies in a kid's
basket. The parents would kill
me. So, I started with the egg
and now I have an empire "over
easy
TEC: Disregarding that terrible
pun, what does the future hold
for Hue Effner, the richest rabbit
on the planet?
EB: It's high time 1 got into the
world of reality TV. I hear Flavor
Flav has a good idea running.
What do you think of "Bunny
of Love?"
TEC: Let me get this straight.
You are a 500-year-old talking
rabbit that still has not found a
girlfriend?
EB: Maybe you are not as smart
as I thought. What do you think
I do while 1 am in Greenville? I
am always downtown looking for
that one lucky lady. I have a thing
for blondes.
TEC: Wow, thanks for your time
Eff. Is there anything else you
would like to say?
EB: I have spoken my mind.
When you gorge on those Kit
Kats and Peeps this Easter, just
remember how much work I put
into this. All I ask for is a little
appreciation.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
SfM RIGHT
M BfERS
CUP
STRIP
o
Hanging out with your friends on the beach can be a great escape.
CLIP & SAVE
relaxing. The top three beaches
in the nation that flaunt all these
qualities, guarantee a good time
to anyone who visits.
In the most recent polls
Hawaii was a favorite choice.
Two of the top three picks came
from Hawaii, Hananma Bay
and Kannapali. The reasoning
behind this being a crown-
ing place for vacation is pretty
obvious: surfing, partying and
enjoying the mesmerizing scen-
ery are some of the perks. The
third spot is actually a park, St.
Joseph Peninsula State Park in
Florida which is a different but
equally entertaining approach
to the normal beach visits.
School is almost over and after
finals and the usual end-of-the-
year pressures most of us are going
to need somewhere to go where
we can just soak in the sun and
let go of the stress. The beach is
notorious for supplying its visitors
with the good times they're look-
ing for. Now all you have to do is
choose the one that's right for you,
pack up your bathing suits and
leave everything else behind.
This writer can be contacted at
katures@theeastcaroiinian.com.
$ W W W n i 9. 9. S S W
10 "o Discount to
ALL Students
1525 S. Evans St, Greenville. NC
MonSat. 9:J0-6:00 Sun. 1:00-4:00 ty
Special Home Game Hours: Friday 8am-9pm
Prtlo ShirfN Jarlcm Sweatshirt
T-shirts Walkh
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Saturday 7am-10pm
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I
Lll6 from page A4
pi are girls just that good? I'm not
quite sure, but as the night went
on, we ended up leaving those
guys and of course making our
way to another club.
We got marked in "over" and
made our way to the all-you-can-
drink spot. Catherine wasn't
sure if drinking more was such
a good idea, but since it was my
first time going out completely
single I just couldn't help myself.
Of course guys were everywhere
and Catherine and 1 went sepa-
rate ways to mingle and meet
new people. Now that I can look
back that probably was not the
best of ideas, but at the time we
did not care. As unsafe as it was,
I met some guy and we ended up
dancing together until 2 a.m. and
then Pita Pit was on my mind. I
have an undying craving for that
place, especially late at night.
Of course it was crowded
and my friend and 1 could barely
walk to the door. As we got in
line I happen to glance over my
left shoulder. Who else would
be there other than the one and
only Jordan? I went up and talked
to him, which was the first time
we had seen each other since
we went our separate ways after
Spring Break. He was there with
his boys and 1 was there with
some random guy who I couldn't
even introduce to him because I
kept forgetting his name. 1 could
tell that he was really upset, but
the alcohol in me just wouldn't
allow me to care. Catherine and
1 left both of the guys at the res-
taurant and called a cab back to
her apartment.
The next day I woke up around
2 p.m not feeling too bad but
with the lingering memory of
Jordan's face at the Pita Pit. I felt
bad because I know he thinks I
am now seeing that guy, when
in fact I'm not. When I dug
through my bottomless purse I
finally found my cell phone, and
when I flipped it open it said 13
missed calls, nine of which were
from Jordan along with three text
messages and a couple of voice
mails. I was so nervous to listen
and read the messages, but my
curiosity would not have it any
other way.
I read the texts, which only
asked why I wasn't answering
his phone calls. Next I began
listening to my messages, which
only brought tears to my eyes. He
explained how he felt seeing me
out last night with another guy.
He said he just wanted to save
me from him and beat the other
guy up. I'm not quoting him or
anything, but we'll just leave
it at that. I didn't really know
what to think about the whole
situation. I know that 1 want to
be single and just have a good
time. I'm not prepared to deal
yore men and women on the front lines are surviving life-threatening injuries
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with the consequences of having
a relationship of any kind. I
called Jordan back only to let
him down again, but he claims
that he will be there waiting for
me whenever 1 change my mind.
He's a wonderful guy that I
don't even deserve. I'm now
questioning what I thought
I wanted in my life. I
know that I can't learn all about
myself in two simple weeks. I
believe I am going crazy trying
to live up to the stereotypical
college life, and I'm not quite
sure if I am cut out for it. I'm
now wondering if what I've
been doing is really what I want
or even who I am. Discovering
myself is much harder than I ever
imagined. I guess I have nothing
but time to complete my per-
sonality and work on my karma.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
WATCH
. how quickly your goods fly off .
your shelves with a coupon in
I the Clip Strip! Call 328-2000. I
L J
,
' Your Coupon '
' could be here! ,
Call our advertising reps at 328-9243
for a spot in next week's Clip Strip.
Report news students need to know, tc
Accepting applications tor STAFF WRITERS J
Learn investigative reporting skills f
Must have at least a 2.0 GPA Z1
WEVE MOVED Apply at our NEW office locaMd uptown l llj 5H Htp Bunding 10OF E. 3rd SI.
Gt& something to say? Send us yow Piwfe Rants!
NEED A JOB THIS
summer
Like to paint? Campus Living will be hiring student
painters for full time only, at $7.00 per hour, for the
paint crew this summer. If you are interested in
applying, please stop by Office Suite 100, Jones Hall
or visit us online at www.ecu.educampusliving
and follow the student employment links for a
downloadable application. Applications
must be returned to the housing
office by April 15.
It's a fun job
but
somebody's
got to do it!

.
t






Page A6 sports@tHeeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
Sports Briefs
N.C. State reportedly pursuing
Callpari to replace Sendek
(AP) - Rick Barnes decided
to remain at Texas. Now, North
Carolina State reportedly has turned
its attention to Memphis coach
John Calipari. The search (or Herb
Sendek's successor is about 10 days
old. According to various reports,
Barnes turned down an offer of more
than $2 million a season from N.C.
State athletic director Lee Fowler.
Barnes is close to a new deal with the
Longhoms that includes a significant
raise. Soon after getting spumed by
Barnes, Fowler and school chancellor
James Oblinger flew to Memphis
to talk with Calipari, a meeting that
reportedly lasted about two hours.
ESPN.com reported "Monday that
Calipari and his staff traveled to
Raleigh to visit N.C State, but The
Commercial Appeal in Memphis said
in Tuesday's editions that Calipari
remained in Memphis. Calipari didn't
immediately return a message left by
The Associated Press, and neither did
Memphis AD R.C. Johnson
D.A. to press ahead with
investigation of Duke lacrosse team
NFL Draft 2006: Throw it deep
(AP) - Standing before a mostly
black audience, the district attorney
in charge of the Duke University rape
investigation said Tuesday he does
not need DNA to bring charges and
vowed, This case is not going away"
District Attorney Mike Nifong spoke
one day after defense attorneys said
DNA testing failed to connect any of
Duke's lacrosse players to the alleged
attack on a black stripper who said
she was raped at a party by members
of the nearly all-white 47-man team.
Nifong stopped short of confirming
the defense assessment of the DNA
results, but said the case would
not be hampered by a lack of DNA
evidence. No charges have been
filed. Nifong said prosecutors were
awaiting a second set of DNA results,
but did not say how those differed
from the tests reported Monday. A
spokeswoman for the state attorney
generals office said the state crime
lab gave all the results of DNA tests it
has performed to Nifong on Monday.
Nifong added that in 75 percent to 80
percent of sexual assaults, there is no
DNA evidence to analyze. The district
attorney said a rape case can built on
testimony from the alleged victim and
other witnesses. Nifong also said the
hospital exam of the woman has led
him to believe a crime occurred at the
March 13 party.
Capel takes over as Oklahoma
coach
(AP) - Jeff Capel was hired as
Oklahoma's basketball coach Tuesday,
resigning at Virginia Commonwealth
to replace Kelvin Sampson and
take over a program under NCAA
investigation. Capel was 79-41 in
four seasons as coach at VCU. He
signed a two-year contract extension
last month that ran through 2012.
Sampson left to become Indiana's
coach March 29. Sampson was
279-109 in 12 seasons at Oklahoma.
The Sooners are awaiting a decision
from the NCAA in a case involving
more than 550 improper recruiting
phone calls by Sampson and his staff.
The accusations against Oklahoma
include "lack of Institutional control
one of the NCAA's most serious
findings. Capel, whose father is an
assistant coach for the Charlotte
Bobcats, led VCU to the Colonial
Athletic Association title and an NCAA
tournament berth in 2004 and then
to the NIT in 2005 - the school's
first consecutive postseason berths
since 1985. His Rams finished this
season 19-10 and did not make tne
postseason after losing to Hofstra
in the conference tournament
quarterfinals. The signature of his
VCU teams was defense. This season,
the Rams allowed 62.4 points a game
On offense, they averaged only 12.5
turnovers and made nearly eight
3-polnters a game. Capel inherits
an Oklahoma team that loses three
of its top four scorers and top three
rebounders in seniors Taj Gray,
Terrell Everett and Kevin Bookout, but
features a strong recruiting class that
includes McDonald's All-American
guard Scottie Reynolds from Hemdon,
Va. Capel started 28 games as a
freshman guard alongside Grant
Hill on Duke's 1994 team that made
it to the NCAA championship game
but lost to Arkansas He graduated
in 1997, then played in the CBA
and in France before beginning his
coaching career as an assistant to his
father, Jeff Capel Jr at Old Dominion.
He moved to VCU as an assistant in
2001 and became the head coach
the following year. At 27, he was the
youngest head coach in Division I
at the time.
Chad Jackson (left) and Santonio Holmes (right) are two of the most highly touted wide receiver's coming into this April's NFL Draft.
New class of receivers
provides depth, speed
RON CLEMENTS
STAFF WRITER
Even as a tight end, Mary-
land's Vernon Davis is considered
the best receiver prospect in this
year's NFL Draft. Tight ends
Included, Davis leads a class of
receivers that is deep with good
receivers, more so than great
ones. Davis is one of the few
exceptions to the latter.
Only Davis, Georgia's Leonard
Pope and UCLA's Marcedes Lewis
are expected to be selected at the
tight end position on the first day
of the draft, which encompasses
the first three rounds of the
seven-round draft. Davis is the
gem of this year's class. Drawing
comparisons to Shannon Sharpe,
Davis truly is a wide receiver
in a tight end's body. At 6 feet
3 inches, 253 pounds, he is a
big target for any quarterback
to find in the flat or over the
middle. With great hands and
a knack for finding holes in the
secondary while at College Park,
Davis also has great speed for a
big man - running the 40-yard
dash in 4.38 seconds at this year's
combine in Indianapolis.
Davis will come off the board
within the first 10 picks with San
Francisco or Arizona being likely
homes for the talented tight end
whose skills are not limited to
catching the ball. He is also an
excellent blocker with good foot-
work and technique.
After Davis, Georgia's Pope
will be the next tight end to go.
While not as gifted as Davis, Pope
is no slouch. He had a very pro-
ductive career with the Bulldogs,
catching 45 balls for 591 yards
and five scores while starting all
13 games in 2005. The 6-foot-7
Bulldog junior provides huge
matchup problems in the NFL
and should be a late-first-round
or early-second-round pick.
Later in the second round
or early third is when Lewis will
come off draft boards. Another
big receiver at 6 feet 6 inches, 256
pounds, Lewis was the best tight
end in the Pac-10 over the last
three years. He is too fast for most
linebackers, but yet too strong
for most safeties to cover. While
an excellent receiver, his block-
ing abilities leave some room for
improvement. That aspect of his
game should develop with coach-
ing at the next level, but he'd be a
great value pick in the third round.
Other tight ends to keep
an eye on during day two that
could prove to be steals are
Southern Cal's Dominique Byrd,
Colorado's Joe Klopfenstein,
Notre Dame's Anthony Fasano,
Oregon's Tim Day, Tony Scheff ler
of Western Michigan, North Car-
olina State's T.J. Williams and the
Big Ten's best tight end in 2005,
Wisconsin's Owen Daniels.
Scheffler is not the only
Western Michigan Bronco who
will hear his name called out on
draft day. Greg Jennings led the
NCAA in receptions in 2005 with
98. He was also third in receiving
touchdowns and fourth in yard-
age. Playing at a small school will
hurt him, but a day-one draft
choice, he still should be.
Before Jennings goes, there
are plenty of receivers who proj-
ect higher than the NCAA's best
statistical receiver from a year
ago - showing just how deep this
class of wideouts is.
Three receivers stand out
from the pack - and all for differ-
ent reasons. Chad Jackson from
Florida and Ohio State's Santonio
Holmes are 1-2, the order depend-
ing on which draft preview you
might be reading. Jackson is
bigger and stronger while Holmes
is faster and had a more produc-
tive college career.
Whomever is the first receiver
taken will depend on the team
need and whether that team
wants the smaller Holmes, who
is 5 feet 11 inches, 190 pounds,
or the freakishly athletic 6-foot-
1, 213-pound Jackson. Jackson's
stock soared with his incredible
strength and conditioning show-
ing at the combine. Jackson was
pegged as a possession receiver
in college, catching 88 balls for
900 yards - a 10.6-yard average
- in his final season as a Gator.
The Florida junior squashed that
see NFL page A7
Taylor's actions
way out-of-bounds
Pitcher who lost eye back
on mound, determined to
succeed in college baseball
Taylor has had more than one run-in with the law and may be facing up to 46 years in prison if convicted.
Redskins star facing
serious prison time
OPINION
JOSH FERNANDEZ
STAFF WRITER
1 must make two things clear
before we begin: one, I lean to
the "left-of-center" - what one
otherwise may call a liberal. 1
am a supporter of gun control. I
believe the capacity to intention-
ally or unintentionally kill out-
weighs the benefit of protection.
Specifically, 1 don't see a purpose
in any civilian possessing small
firearms, assault weapons, or
other firearms not intended for
hunting (a sport 1 don't totally
disagree with, but, regardless,
does not Involve tools of rapid-
fire killing potential.
Second, and much more suc-
cinctly, I am a die-hard Washing-
ton Redskins fan. The Redskins are
one of my most cherished aspects
of my life; I was born a Redskins
fan and 1 will die a Redskins fan.
That said, the trial on aggra-
vated assault and battery charges
of Redskins safety Sean Taylor,
brings us full circle to our starting
point, which is my support of gun
control and that this sentiment
supersedes my love for the team
that Taylor happens to play,for.
For those unfamiliar with
this, an incident pitting Taylor
against a possible 46 years In
prison, let us review the three
days in June of 2005 that led up
to the upcoming April 17 trial
and one other significant day
that altered the makeup of the
prosecution's case against the
23-year-old defendant:
June 3, 2005: Miami-
Dade County police publicly
name Taylor as a "person of
interest This is in regards to an
assault case involving firearms;
Taylor was being sought for
questioning. Taylor allegedly was
present at, and possibly involved
in, an incident on June 1,2005 in
Miami, in which bullets allegedly
were fired into a stolen vehicle.
June 4, 2005: Taylor,
accompanied by defense attorney
Fred Moldovan, surrenders at 10
p.m. to Miami-Dade Police at
the Cutler Ridge district police
station. He is then transported to
see TAYLOR page A7
(AP) John Fortenberry
was shaking hands after a game
when an opponent noticed
something strange about his
right eye.
It wasn't there.
"1 couldn't find my patch
that morning, and they were
all staring at me pretty hard
Fortenberry said.
At least Fortenberry can
laugh about his frightening
injury. He says he's used to the
double takes that come with
having a patch concealing an
empty socket.
Two years after a batted ball
struck him in the face and cost
him his eye, the sophomore
pitcher at East Central Commu-
nity College has returned to the
mound and is determined not
to let the injury keep him from
playing at a major college.
"He has a disability as far
as only having one eye, but as
a player he's just like the rest of
the guys said coach Jake Yar-
borough. "He works hard, and
he's got a competitive streak
about him. If he's interested
in (a college scholarship), 1
think he has a chance
Fortenberry is 3-2 this
season with a 5.76 ERA and 19
strikeouts in 29 innings while
pitching with a helmet and cage
mask protecting his face. The
mask, which resembles those
worn by college hockey players
and some bullriders, occasion-
ally blocks his vision when he
looks back to second base.
But the right-hander can
watch a runner on first when
working from the stretch.
"If it had been my left eye,
it would have been a lot worse
he said.
Still, what happened to
Fortenberry's right eye on Jan.
23,2004, was pretty gruesome.
Pitching in an intrasquad
scrimmage, he threw a fastball
outside. The hitter turned on
the pitch and drove it into
Fortenberry's right cheek.
"It was more of a sound
than a sight said Yarborough,
coaching third base at the
time. "You could hear it, it was
a smack, and you knew it was
bad
Fortenberry said the impact
crushed his eyeball and shat-
tered several facial bones. He
crumpled to the ground in what
the coach called a bloody mess,
but remained conscious as he
was taken to a hospital.
"I remember all of it he
said. "1 just fell down, grabbed
my face. That was all I could
think of
Doctors rebuilt Fortenber-
ry's face with three plates and
29 screws now hold it together,
but they couldn't save the eye.
A ball made of coral was placed
in the socket, wrapped in the
network of remaining blood
vessels and muscles and tucked
behind a black patch - which
he'll wear until he receives his
prosthetic eye.
"The first couple of days
(after the injury), I woke up and
thought, I'm probably done.
I'm not going to play again
Fortenberry said. "And then
somebody came in and told me
I couldn't ever play again, and
I don't really like when people
say that. So I had to get back
out here and show that I could
He returned to the field
before last season, pitching
In a sandlot against a semipro
team near his hometown of
Carthage, Miss and the first
hitter he faced tapped a weak
grounder back to the mound.
"I jumped out of the way of
it. I was scared he said.
Eventually, his face healed,
his courage returned and he
pitched for East Central in
2005, going 2-4 as a freshman
with a 4.06 ERA with 46 strike-
outs in 51 innings.
Yarborough says Forfcn-
berry's fastball tops out at 84
mph, his curveball breaks more
sharply than before and, most
importantly, no college coach
or pro scout can question his
toughness.
"I knew he had the determi-
nation to come back Yarbor-
ough said.
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4-12-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A7
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Alabama booster convicted in football
recruiting scandal found dead
(AP) An Alabama booster
convicted of bribing a high
school football coach to get a
top recruit for the Crimson Tide
was found dead Tuesday in his
Memphis home, and police were
investigating it as a homicide.
Police hadn't yet confirmed
the body was that of Logan
Young, but his defense attor-
ney said it was the Alabama
booster.
"We're treating it as a mystery
homicide Sgt. Vince Higgins
said in a telephone interview.
He said officials assume the
victim was Young but needed
to use fingerprints and dental
records to confirm the identity. A
medical examiner was at Young's
upscale home near a Memphis
country club trying to determine
the cause of death.
"Suffice it to say, there was
quite a physical struggle in this
and this individual was injured
severely he said.
Nashville defense attorney
Jim Neal said he had been told
the body was found by a house-
keeper.
"I've had two or three calls
about it, all to the same end,
found killed in his home.
I heard that there was blood
everywhere. That is all 1 know
Neal said.
Higgins said Young's house-
keeper found the body after she
arrived for work this morning.
The body had not been removed
from the house and no family
members immediately arrived
at the house.
The 65-year-old Young was
convicted under federal law of
money laundering and racketeer-
ing conspiracy in the case involv-
ing the peddling of defensive
lineman Albert Means.
Young was sentenced last
June to six months in prison
and six months home confine-
ment then two years super-
vised release. But he had been
allowed to remain free pending
his appeal. Final briefs in Young's
appeal were to be filed by July 14,
according to court records.
His attorneys had argued
Young needed a kidney trans-
plant and could not get proper
medical care in prison.
Former high school coach
Lynn Lang, who avoided jail time
after pleading guilty to taking
part in a racketeering conspiracy,
testified against Young, saying
Police tape surrounds the home of Alabama booster, Logan Young.
the booster paid $150,000 to get
Means to sign with Alabama in
2000.
The NCAA has said it believed
Means was unaware his football
talents were being brokered.
The player later transferred to
Memphis, where he finished his
college career.
Lang testified at Young's trial
that other universities, including
Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas,
Memphis, Mississippi, Michigan
State and Tennessee, offered him
money or jobs to get Means.
No charges were filed against
anyone with those schools. Three
former coaches, Rip Scherer
of Memphis, Jim Donnan of
Georgia and Alabama assistant
Ivy Williams, testified Lang was
lying.
Means' recruitment became
part of an NCAA investigation
that led to sanctions against
Alabama in 2002, costing the
Crimson Tide scholarships and
bowl appearances.
Attorney Tommy Gallion,
who represented Williams and
former Alabama assistant Ronnie
Cornell in a defamation suit
against the NCAA and others,
called the news tragic.
"I have no idea who could be
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NFL from page A6
thinking in Indianapolis by dem-
onstrating his speed in the 40 by
way of a 4.32 time - the fastest of
anyone at the combine.
Holmes was just .02 of a second
slower than Jackson, which is still
like lightning. Holmes was the
spark for the sometimes stagnant
Ohio State offense. While he
only had 53 catches last season,
his amazing 977 yards for an
18.4-yard average and 11 scores
stands out. Jackson will probably
be the first receiver gone, but
Holmes will be right after him.
The third receiver that looks
to go in the first round is Miami's
Sinorice Moss. Moss is also light-
ning-quick with a 4.38 40-time,
but he's only 5-foot-8. The reason
scouts are so high on him is his
versatility. Like older brother
Santana, Moss is a dangerous
return man with outstanding
hands. While Devin Hester han-
dled most of the return duties for
the Hurricanes in 2005, Moss was
still a member of the kick return
team his senior year, handling
five kicks for 88 yards. Invaluable
as an all-around special teams
player, Moss also blocked three
kicks while at Miami.
New Mexico's Hank Baskett
will probably be the next receiver
taken off the board, early-to-mid-
second round. A great athlete,
Baskett was the Mountain West
Conference's high jump cham-
pion in 2004. He's big, 6 feet 3
inches, 220 pounds, fast and ath-
letic and is easily the best receiver
from a non-BCS conference.
All Jason Avant did at Michi-
gan was make big play after big
play for the Wolverines over the
last two years. Following the
departure of Braylon Edwards to
the NFL, Avant was able to come
out of Edwards' shadow and
shine this past season. He led the
Wolverines in catches, yards and
touchdowns and was a finalist for
the Biletnikoff Award in 2005.
Other receivers in this deep
pool who should come off the
board on day one are Arizona
State's Derek Hagan, Notre
Dame's Maurice Stovall, Mike
Hass of Oregon and Martin
Nance from Miami, Ohio. Hass
led all receivers in 2005 with
1,532 yards. No other receiver
had more than 1,300.
This is the fourth in a series
of draft previews. Next week, I
will preview the running backs.
The NFL Draft is April 29-30 in
New York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
TaylOr from page A6
Miami's Turner Guilford Knight
correctional facility and, as
reported by the Associate Press
the next day, is released after
posting bond of $16,500.
June 5, 2005: Miami-
Dade police issue a statement
indicating that Taylor had been
arrested for aggravated assault
with a firearm, a felony and bat-
tery, a misdemeanor, for alleg-
edly pointing a gun (assault) at a
person during a dispute over two
all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) that
Taylor claimed were stolen from
him. Taylor then allegedly left
the scene, but returned shortly
thereafter and punched one
person (battery).
January 28: The
Miami-Dade County prosecutor
announced that he was filing new
charges against Taylor, which
would increase his potential jail
time from 16 years to the current
46 years, if he is convicted. The
new charges include increasing
his felony assault charges from
one to three, which reflects the
allegation that he brandished a
firearm at three individuals who
Taylor believed stole the ATVs.
So there you have it, the
events in their simplest form.
Initially, I gave Taylor the benefit
of the doubt, not because he's a
Redskin, but because I simply
had a sneaking suspicion he just
didn't do it.
But this isn't the first time
Sean's found himself in trouble
with the law since becoming a
Redskin in 2004. That same year,
on Oct, 29, 2004, he was pulled
over by Virginia State Police for
going 82 in a 55 mph zone. He
was then arrested and charged
with driving while intoxicated
because he declined to take a
Breathalyzer test, an offense
that carries a mandatory loss of
license for one year and is a sure
H80
Per
Month
This coupon good for
an extra $5 on your
2nd and 4th donation
sign he was most likely drunk
and knew he had the money to
get out of it.
As you probably have already
guessed, he was acquitted of the
charges against him; it turns
out that after he denied the
Breathalyzer test, the arrest-
ing officer administered a six-
part field sobriety test that the
court deemed inconsequential in
upholding the conviction (Taylor
performed fine on some of the
tests, such as tilting his head
back and touching his nose three
times, but struggled on others.
On one, he hopped around and
let his foot touch the ground
while counting, and on another
he missed three letters while
saying the alphabet, starting at
"e" and ending at "p").
Today, with only five days
remaining before the trial, writ-
ers like myself are deliberating
and ruminating and speculating
just like good journalists should.
But that's not the scope of my
column today.
Let me start by saying that
Taylor is entering the third year
of a seven-year,18 million con-
tract. He has more money than
98 percent (a figure I made up for
the sake of argument) of people
his age and will surely get his
contract restructured pending
the result of the trial and his
performance in the upcoming
2006 season. It's safe to say he'll
get his wish, along with even
more millions of dollars than
he's already getting.
Taylor was a star at the Uni-
versity of Miami and was drafted
fifth overall in the 2004 NFL
Draft. He's been in the NFL for
two full seasons and has started
29 of the 32 regular season games
Washington has played since he
became a Redskin, something
most NFL rookies don't normally
do. He's been an integral part of
the Redskins' defensive strategy,
was a leader in their 2005 run
to the playoffs, will most likely
be around for years to come and
consequently, has been in the
spotlight the entire time. He's
one of the favorites of long-
time 'Skins fans for his tough
and gritty demeanor; he's also,
unfortunately, the role model
for a whole generation of young
football players.
That said, not only were
Taylor's actions wrong and ille-
gal, but, considering his good-
fortune (he is living the dream
of millions of people - getting
paid millions of dollars to play a
game), the fact that, due to foot-
ball, he's now set for life, and his
uncanny athletic ability, what he
did was idiotic, stupid, selfish,
immature and about a hundred
more adjectives that describe his
moronic behavior.
And touching back on my
liberalism and opposition to
civilians possessing small fire-
arms (just like the one bran-
dished by Taylor), I believe this
is a direct result of lax federal
gun restrictions, not to mention
a consequence of a gun-loving.
Second Amendment-adoring, a
"gotta protect mine, don't care
'bout yours" societal mentality
that resides in the collective con-
sciousness of a large portion of
American culture and society.
In other words, Sean Taylor,
an impulsive (not to mention
young, rich and powerful)
man who grew up in a society
that embraces guns instead of
decrying them, decided that
brandishing an easily-obtained
pistol in the faces of three
individuals (not to mention
punching one) he assumed
stole his property was the ideal
way to solve his dilemma.
Sean Taylor, aside from his
millions of dollars and huge
celebrity, is merely an immature
man whose cognitive processes,
in regards to solving his personal
problems, reflect that of a 15-
year-old thug.
The fact of the matter is
Taylor is simply in the hands of
the law now and there's nothing
his money can really do about it.
Yes, he posted the $16,500 bail
without so much as a dimple on
his checking account. And, yes,
he likely is shelling out tens of
thousands of dollars (if not more)
on legal representation, a luxury
that many accused individuals
do not have the means of which
to pay for. Hey, he's even got his
celebrity as a crutch to fall back
on - and we all know how easily
celebrities, politicians and ath-
letes get out of and recover from
jams similar to the one Taylor
finds himself in.
But, like I expressed before,
at this point, the money doesn't
matter because it's at the
judge's discretion to decide Tay-
lor's fate after weighing the evi-
dence and arguments, while also
considering the circumstances
and involved parties. And I hope
justice is carried out properly.
Aside from my undying dedi-
cation to my favorite team, the
team that gave Sean Taylor a
whole lot of responsibility and
took a huge chance by drafting
and signing him, what he did
was wrong and he needs to learn
to handle his problems civilly
and properly. Guns and violence
aren't the solution to your prob-
lems. As Gandhi once famously
said, "Nonviolence is a weapon of
the strong" - a sentiment people
like Taylor ought to take to heart.
This writer can be contacted at
sportstheeastcarolinian. com.
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Page A6 sports@theeastcarollnian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
Sports Briefs
N.C. State reportedly pursuing
Callparl to replace Sendek
(AP) - Rick Barnes decided
to remain at Texas. Now, North
Carolina State reportedly has turned
its attention to Memphis coach
John Calipari. The search for Herb
Sendek's successor is about 10 days
old. According to various reports.
Barnes turned down an offer of more
than $2 million a season from N.C
State athletic director Lee Fowler.
Barnes is close to a new deal with the
Longhorns that includes a significant
raise. Soon after getting spumed by
Barnes. Fowler and school chancellor
James Oblinger flew to Memphis
to talk with Calipari, a meeting that
reportedly lasted about two hours.
ESPN.com reported "Monday that
Calipari and his staff traveled to
Raleigh to visit N.C. State, but The
Commercial Appeal in Memphis said
in Tuesday's editions that Calipari
remained in Memphis. Calipari didn't
immediately return a message left by
The Associated Press, and neither did
Memphis AD RC. Johnson.
D.A. to press ahead with
Investigation of Duke lacrosse team
NFL Draft 2006: Throw it deep
(AP) - Standing before a mostly
black audience, the district attorney
in charge of the Duke University rape
investigation said Tuesday he does
not need DNA to bring charges and
vowed, "This case is not going away
District Attorney Mike Nifong spoke
one day after defense attorneys said
DNA testing failed to connect any of
Duke's lacrosse players to the alleged
attack on a black stripper who said
she was raped at a party by members
of the nearly all-white 47-man team.
Nifong stopped short of confirming
the defense assessment of the DNA
results, but said the case would
not be hampered by a lack of DNA
evidence. No charges have been
filed. Nifong said prosecutors were
awaiting a second set of DNA results,
but did not say how those differed
from the tests reported Monday. A
spokeswoman for the state attorney
general's office said the state crime
lab gave all the results of DNA tests It
has performed to Nifong on Monday.
Nifong added that in 75 percent to 80
percent of sexual assaults, there is no
DNA evidence to analyze. The district
attorney said a rape case can built on
testimony from the alleged victim and
other witnesses. Nifong also said the
hospital exam of the woman has led
him to believe a crime occurred at the
March 13 party.
Capel takes over as Oklahoma
coach
(AP) - Jeff Capel was hired as
Oklahoma's basketball coach Tuesday,
resigning at Virginia Commonwealth
to replace Kelvin Sampson and
take over a program under NCAA
investigation. Capel was 79-41 in
four seasons as coach at VCU. He
signed a two-year contract extension
last month that ran through 2012.
Sampson left to become Indiana's
coach March 29. Sampson was
279-109 in 12 seasons at Oklahoma.
The Sooners are awaiting a decision
from the NCAA in a case involving
more than 550 Improper recruiting
phone calls by Sampson and his staff.
The accusations against Oklahoma
include "lack of Institutional control
one of the NCAA's most serious
findings. Capel, whose father is an
assistant coach for the Charlotte
Bobcats, led VCU to the Colonial
Athletic Association title and an NCAA
tournament berth in 2004 and then
to the NIT in 2005 - the school's
first consecutive postseason berths
since 1985. His Rams finished this
season 19-10 and did not make the
postseason after losing to Hofstra
in the conference tournament
quarterfinals. The signature of his
VCU teams was defense. This season,
the Rams allowed 62.4 points a game
On offense, they averaged only 12.5
turnovers and made nearly eight
3-pointers a game. Capel inherits
an Oklahoma team that loses three
of its top four scorers and top three
rebounders in seniors Taj Gray,
Terrell Everett and Kevin Bookout, but
features a strong recruiting class that
includes McDonald's All-American
guard Scottie Reynolds from Herndon,
Va. Capel started 28 games as a
freshman guard alongside Grant
Hill on Duke's 1994 team that made
it to the NCAA championship game
but lost to Arkansas. He graduated
in 1997, then played in the CBA
and in France before beginning his
coaching career as an assistant to his
father, Jeff Capel Jr at Old Dominion
He moved to VCU as an assistant in
20C1 and became the head coach
the following year. At 27, he was the
youngest head coach in Division I
at the time.
Chad Jackson (left) and Santonio Holmes (right) are two of the most highly touted wide receiver's coming into this April's NFL Draft.
New class of receivers
provides depth, speed
RON CLEMENTS
STAFF WRITER
Even as a tight end, Mary-
land's Vernon Davis Is considered
the best receiver prospect in this
year's NFL Draft. Tight ends
included, Davis leads a class of
receivers that is deep with good
receivers, more so than great
ones. Davis is one of the few
exceptions to the latter.
Only Davis, Georgia's Leonard
Pope and UCLA's Marcedes Lewis
are expected to be selected at the
tight end position on the first day
of the draft, which encompasses
the first three rounds of the
seven-round draft. Davis is the
gem of this year's class. Drawing
comparisons to Shannon Sharpe,
Davis truly is a wide receiver
in a tight end's body. At 6 feet
3 inches, 253 pounds, he is a
big target for any quarterback
to find in the flat or over the
middle. With great hands and
a knack for finding holes in the
secondary while at College Park,
Davis also has great speed for a
big man - running the 40-yard
dash in 4.38 seconds at this year's
combine in Indianapolis.
Davis will come off the board
within the first 10 picks with San
Francisco or Arizona being likely
homes for the talented tight end
whose skills are not limited to
catching the ball. He is also an
excellent blocker with good foot-
work and technique.
After Davis, Georgia's Pope
will be the next tight end to go.
While not as gifted as Davis, Pope
is no slouch. He had a very pro-
ductive career with the Bulldogs,
catching 45 balls for 591 yards
and five scores while starting all
13 games in 2005. The 6-foot-7
Bulldog junior provides huge
matchup problems in the NFL
and should be a late-first-round
or early-second-round pick.
Later in the second round
or early third is when Lewis will
come off draft boards. Another
big receiver at 6 feet 6 inches, 256
pounds, Lewis was the best tight
end in the Pac-10 over the last
three years. He is too fast for most
linebackers, but yet too strong
for most safeties to cover. While
an excellent receiver, his block-
ing abilities leave some room for
improvement. That aspect of his
game should develop with coach-
ing at the next level, but he'd be a
great.value pick in the third round.
Other tight ends to keep
an eye on during day two that
could prove to be steals are
Southern Cal's Dominique Byrd,
Colorado's Joe Klopfenstein,
Notre Dame's Anthony Fasano,
Oregon's Tim Day, Tony Scheff ler
of Western Michigan, North Car-
olina State's TJ. Williams and the
Big Ten's best tight end in 2005,
Wisconsin's Owen Daniels.
Scheffler is not the only
Western Michigan Bronco who
will hear his name called out on
draft day. Greg Jennings led the
NCAA in receptions in 2005 with
98. He was also third in receiving
touchdowns and fourth in yard-
age. Playing at a small school will
hurt him, but a day-one draft
choice, he still should be.
Before Jennings goes, there
are plenty of receivers who proj-
ect higher than the NCAA's best
statistical receiver from a year
ago - showing just how deep this
class of wideouts is.
Three receivers stand out
from the pack - and all for differ-
ent reasons. Chad Jackson from
Florida and Ohio State's Santonio
Holmes are 1-2, the order depend-
ing on which draft preview you
might be reading. Jackson is
bigger and stronger while Holmes
is faster and had a more produc-
tive college career.
Whomever is the first receiver
taken will depend on the team
need and whether that team
wants the smaller Holmes, who
Is 5 feet 11 inches, 190 pounds,
or the freakishly athletic 6-foot-
1, 213-pound Jackson. Jackson's
stock soared with his incredible
strength and conditioning show-
ing at the combine. Jackson was
pegged as a possession receiver
in college, catching 88 balls for
900 yards - a 10.6-yard average
- in his final season as a Gator.
The Florida junior squashed that
see NFL page A7
Taylor's actions
way out-of-bounds
Taylor has had more than one run-in with the law and may be facing up to 46 years in prison if convicted.
Redskins star facing
serious prison time
OPINION
JOSH FERNANDEZ
STAFF WRITER
1 must make two things clear
before we begin: one, 1 lean to
the "left-of-center" - what one
otherwise may call a liberal. 1
am a supporter of gun control. I
believe the capacity to intention-
ally or unintentionally kill out-
weighs the benefit of protection.
Specifically, I don't see a purpose
In any civilian possessing small
firearms, assault weapons, or
other firearms not intended for
hunting (a sport I don't totally
disagree with, but, regardless,
does not Involve tools of rapid-
fire killing potential.
Second, and much more suc-
cinctly, 1 am a die-hard Washing-
ton Redskins fan. The Redskins are
one of my most cherished aspects
of my life; I was born a Redskins
fan and I will die a Redskins fan.
That said, the trial on aggra-
vated assault and battery charges
of Redskins safety Sean Taylor,
brings us full circle to our starting
point, which is my support of gun
control and that this sentiment
supersedes my love for the team
that Taylor happens to play4for.
For those unfamiliar with
this, an incident pitting Taylor
against a possible 46 years in
prison, let us review the three
days in June of 2005 that led up
to the upcoming April 17 trial
and one other significant day
that altered the makeup of the
prosecution's case against the
23-year-old defendant:
June 3, 2005: Miami-
Dade County police publicly
name Taylor as a "person of
interest This is in regards to an
assault case involving firearms;
Taylor was being sought for
questioning. Taylor allegedly was
present at, and possibly involved
in, an incident on June 1,2005 in
Miami, in which bullets allegedly
were fired into a stolen vehicle.
June 4, 2005: Taylor,
accompanied by defense attorney
Fred Moldovan, surrenders at 10
p.m. to Miami-Dade Police at
the Cutler Ridge district police
station. He is then transported to
see TAYLOR page A7
Pitcher who lost eye back
on mound, determined to
succeed in college baseball
(AP) John Fortenberry
was shaking hands after a game
when an opponent noticed
something strange about his
right eye.
It wasn't there.
"1 couldn't find my patch
that morning, and they were
all staring at me pretty hard
Fortenberry said.
At least Fortenberry can
laugh about his frightening
injury. He says he's used to the
double takes that come with
having a patch concealing an
empty socket.
Two years after a batted ball
struck him in the face and cost
him his eye, the sophomore
pitcher at East Central Commu-
nity College has returned to the
mound and is determined not
to let the injury keep him from
playing at a major college.
"He has a disability as far
as only having one eye, but as
a player he's just like the rest of
the guys said coach Jake Yar-
borough. "He works hard, and
he's got a competitive streak
about him. If he's interested
in (a college scholarship), 1
think he has a chance
Fortenberry is 3-2 this
season with a 5.76 ERA and 19
strikeouts in 29 innings while
pitching with a helmet and cage
mask protecting his face. The
mask, which resembles those
worn by college hockey players
and some bullriders, occasion-
ally blocks his vision when he
looks back to second base.
But the right-hander can
watch a runner on first when
working from the stretch.
"If it had been my left eye,
it would have been a lot worse
he said.
Still, what happened to
Fortenberry's right eye on Jan.
23, 2004, was pretty gruesome.
Pitching in an intrasquad
scrimmage, he threw a fastball
outside. The hitter turned on
the pitch and drove it into
Fortenberry's right cheek.
"It was more of a sound
than a sight said Yarborough,
coaching third base at the
time. "You could hear it, it was
a smack, and you knew it was
bad
Fortenberry said the impact
crushed his eyeball and shat-
tered several facial bones. He
crumpled to the ground in what
the coach called a bloody mess,
but remained conscious as he
was taken to a hospital.
"I remember all of it he
said. "I just fell down, grabbed
my face. That was all I could
think of
Doctors rebuilt Fortenber-
ry's face with three plates and
29 screws now hold it together,
but they couldn't save the eye.
A ball made of coral was placed
in the socket, wrapped in the
network of remaining blood
vessels and muscles and tucked
behind a black patch - which
he'll wear until he receives his
prosthetic eye.
"The first couple of days
(after the injury), I woke up and
thought, I'm probably done.
I'm not going to play again
Fortenberry said. "And then
somebody came in and told me
I couldn't ever play again, and
I don't really like when people
say that. So 1 had to get back
out here and show that 1 could
He returned to the field
before last season, pitching
in a sandlot against a semipro
team near his hometown of
Carthage, Miss and the first
hitter he faced tapped a weak
grounder back to the mound.
"I jumped out of the way of
It. I was scared he said.
Eventually, his face healed,
his courage returned and he
pitched for East Central in
2005, going 2-4 as a freshman
with a 4.06 ERA with 46 strike-
outs in 51 innings.
Yarborough says Forfcn-
berry's fastball tops out at 84
mph, his curveball breaks more
sharply than before and, most
importantly, no college coach
or pro scout can question his
toughness.
"I knew he had the determi-
nation to come back Yarbor-
ough said.
4-12-06
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4-12-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A7
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Alabama booster convicted in football
recruiting scandal found dead
(AP) An Alabama booster
convicted of bribing a high
school football coach to get a
top recruit for the Crimson Tide
was found dead Tuesday in his
Memphis home, and police were
investigating it as a homicide.
Police hadn't yet confirmed
the body was that of Logan
Young, but his defense attor-
ney said it was the Alabama
booster.
"We're treating it as a mystery
homicide Sgt. Vince Higgins
said in a telephone interview.
He said officials assume the
victim was Young but needed
to use fingerprints and dental
records to confirm the identity. A
medical examiner was at Young's
upscale home near a Memphis
country club trying to determine
the cause of death.
"Suffice it to say, there was
quite a physical struggle in this
and this individual was injured
severely he said.
Nashville defense attorney
Jim Neal said he had been told
the body was found by a house-
keeper.
"I've had two or three calls
about it, all to the same end,
found killed in his home.
I heard that there was blood
everywhere. That is all I know
Neal said.
Higgins said Young's house-
keeper found the body after she
arrived for work this morning.
The body had not been removed
from the house and no family
members immediately arrived
at the house.
The 65-year-old Young was
convicted under federal law of
money laundering and racketeer-
ing conspiracy in the case involv-
ing the peddling of defensive
lineman Albert Means.
Young was sentenced last
June to six months in prison
and six months home confine-
ment then two years super-
vised release. But he had been
allowed to remain free pending
his appeal. Final briefs in Young's
appeal were to be filed by July 14,
according to court records.
His attorneys had argued
Young needed a kidney trans-
plant and could not get proper
medical care in prison.
Former high school coach
Lynn Lang, who avoided jail time
after pleading guilty to taking
part in a racketeering conspiracy,
testified against Young, saying
Police tape surrounds the home of Alabama booster, Logan Young.
the booster paid $150,000 to get
Means to sign with Alabama in
2000.
The NCAA has said it believed
Means was unaware his football
talents were being brokered.
The player later transferred to
Memphis, where he finished his
college career.
Lang testified at Young's trial
that other universities, including
Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas,
Memphis, Mississippi, Michigan
State and Tennessee, offered him
money or jobs to get Means.
No charges were filed against
anyone with those schools. Three
former coaches, Rip Scherer
of Memphis, Jim Donnan of
Georgia and Alabama assistant
Ivy Williams, testified Lang was
lying.
Means' recruitment became
part of an NCAA investigation
that led to sanctions against
Alabama in 2002, costing the
Crimson Tide scholarships and
bowl appearances.
Attorney Tommy Gallion,
who represented Williams and
former Alabama assistant Ronnie
Cottrell in a defamation suit
against the NCAA and others,
called the news tragic.
"I have no idea who could be
see SCANDAL page A8
NFL
from page A6
thinking in Indianapolis by dem-
onstrating his speed in the 40 by
way of a 4.32 time - the fastest of
anyone at the combine.
Holmes was just .02 of a second
slower than Jackson, which is still
like lightning. Holmes was the
spark for the sometimes stagnant
Ohio State offense. While he
only had 53 catches last season,
his amazing 977 yards for an
18.4-yard average and 11 scores
stands out. Jackson will probably
be the first receiver gone, but
Holmes will be right after him.
The third receiver that looks
to go in the first round is Miami's
Sinorice Moss. Moss is also light-
ning-quick with a 4.38 40-time,
but he's only 5-foot-8. The reason
scouts are so high on him is his
versatility. Like older brother
Santana, Moss is a dangerous
return man with outstanding
hands. While Devin Hester han-
dled most of the return duties for
the Hurricanes in 2005, Moss was
still a member of the kick return
team his senior year, handling
five kicks for 88 yards. Invaluable
as an all-around special teams
player, Moss also blocked three
kicks while at Miami.
New Mexico's Hank Baskett
will probably be the next receiver
taken off the board, early-to-mid-
second round. A great athlete,
Baskett was the Mountain West
Conference's high jump cham-
pion in 2004. He's big, 6 feet 3
inches, 220 pounds, fast and ath-
letic and is easily the best receiver
from a non-BCS conference.
All Jason Avant did at Michi-
gan was make big play after big
play for the Wolverines over the
last two years. Following the
departure of Braylon Edwards to
the NFL, Avant was able to come
out of Edwards' shadow and
shine this past season. He led the
Wolverines in catches, yards and
touchdowns and was a finalist for
the Biletnikoff Award in 2005.
Other receivers in this deep
pool who should come off the
board on day one are Arizona
State's Derek Hagan, Notre
Dame's Maurice Stovall, Mike
Hass of Oregon and Martin
Nance from Miami, Ohio. Hass
led all receivers in 2005 with
1,532 yards. No other receiver
had more than 1,300.
This is the fourth in a series
of draft previews. Next week, I
will preview the running backs.
The NFL Draft is April 29-30 in
New York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theea5tcarolinian.com.
TaylOr from page A6
Miami's Turner Guilford Knight
correctional facility and, as
reported by the Associate Press
the next day, is released after
posting bond of $16,500.
June 5, 2005: Miami-
Dade police issue a statement
indicating that Taylor had been
arrested for aggravated assault
with a firearm, a felony and bat-
tery, a misdemeanor, for alleg-
edly pointing a gun (assault) at a
person during a dispute over two
all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) that
Taylor claimed were stolen from
him. Taylor then allegedly left
the scene, but returned shortly
thereafter and punched one
person (battery).
January 28: The
Miami-Dade County prosecutor
announced that he was filing new
charges against Taylor, which
would increase his potential jail
time from 16 years to the current
46 years, if he is convicted. The
new charges include increasing
his felony assault charges from
one to three, which reflects the
allegation that he brandished a
firearm at three individuals who
Taylor believed stole the ATVs.
So there you have it, the
events in their simplest form.
Initially, I gave Taylor the benefit
of the doubt, not because he's a
Redskin, but because I simply
had a sneaking suspicion he just
didn't do it.
But this isn't the first time
Sean's found himself in trouble
with the law since becoming a
Redskin in 2004. That same year,
on Oct, 29, 2004, he was pulled
over by Virginia State Police for
going 82 in a 55 mph zone. He
was then arrested and charged
with driving while intoxicated
because he declined to take a
Breathalyzer test, an offense
that carries a mandatory loss of
license for one year and is a sure
$180
Per
Month
This coupon unml for
an extra $5 on your
2nd .ind 4th don al inn
sign he was most likely drunk
and knew he had the money to
get out of it.
As you probably have already
guessed, he was acquitted of the
charges against him; it turns
out that after he denied the
Breathalyzer test, the arrest-
ing officer administered a six-
part field sobriety test that the
court deemed inconsequential in
upholding the conviction (Taylor
performed fine on some of the
tests, such as tilting his head
back and touching his nose three
times, but struggled on others.
On one, he hopped around and
let his foot touch the ground
while counting, and on another
he missed three letters while
saying the alphabet, starting at
"e" and ending at "p").
Today, with only five days
remaining before the trial, writ-
ers like myself are deliberating
and ruminating and speculating
just like good journalists should.
But that's not the scope of my
column today.
Let me start by saying that
Taylor is entering the third year
of a seven-year, $18 million con-
tract. He has more money than
98 percent (a figure I made up for
the sake of argument) of people
his age and will surely get his
contract restructured pending
the result of the trial and his
performance in the upcoming
2006 season. It's safe to say he'll
get his wish, along with even
more millions of dollars than
he's already getting.
Taylor was a star at the Uni-
versity of Miami and was drafted
fifth overall in the 2004 NFL
Draft. He's been in the NFL for
two full seasons and has started
29 of the 32 regular season games
Washington has played since he
became a Redskin, something
most NFL rookies don't normally
do. He's been an integral part of
the Redskins' defensive strategy,
was a leader in their 2005 run
to the playoffs, will most likely
be around for years to come and
consequently, has been in the
spotlight the entire time. He's
one of the favorites of long-
time 'Skins fans for his tough
and gritty demeanor; he's also,
unfortunately, the role model
for a whole generation of young
football players.
That said, not only were
Taylor's actions wrong and ille-
gal, but, considering his good-
fortune (he is living the dream
of millions of people - getting
paid millions of dollars to play a
game), the fact that, due to foot-
ball, he's now set for life, and his
uncanny athletic ability, what he
did was idiotic, stupid, selfish,
immature and about a hundred
more adjectives that describe his
moronic behavior.
And touching back on my
liberalism and opposition to
civilians possessing small fire-
arms (just like the one bran-
dished by Taylor), I believe this
is a direct result of lax federal
gun restrictions, not to mention
a consequence of a gun-loving,
Second Amendment-adoring, a
"gotta protect mine, don't care
'bout yours" societal mentality
that resides in the collective con-
sciousness of a large portion of
American culture and society.
In other words, Sean Taylor,
an impulsive (not to mention
young, rich and powerful)
man who grew up in a society
that embraces guns instead of
decrying them, decided that
brandishing an easily-obtained
pistol in the faces of three
individuals (not to mention
punching one) he assumed
stole his property was the ideal
way to solve his dilemma.
Sean Taylor, aside from his
millions of dollars and huge
celebrity, is merely an immature
man whose cognitive processes,
in regards to solving his personal
problems, reflect that of a 15-
year-old thug.
The fact of the matter is
Taylor is simply in the hands of
the law now and there's nothing
his money can really do about it.
Yes, he posted the $16,500 bail
without so much as a dimple on
his checking account. And, yes,
he likely is shelling out tens of
thousands of dollars (if not more)
on legal representation, a luxury
that many accused individuals
do not have the means of which
to pay for. Hey, he's even got his
celebrity as a crutch to fall back
on - and we all know how easily
celebrities, politicians and ath-
letes get out of and recover from
jams similar to the one Taylor
finds himself in.
But, like I expressed before,
at this point, the money doesn't
matter because it's at the
judge's discretion to decide Tay-
lor's fate after weighing the evi-
dence and arguments, while also
considering the circumstances
and involved parties. And 1 hope
justice is carried out properly.
Aside from my undying dedi-
cation to my favorite team, the
team that gave Sean Taylor a
whole lot of responsibility and
took a huge chance by drafting
and signing him, what he did
was wrong and he needs to learn
to handle his problems civilly
and properly. Guns and violence
aren't the solution to your prob-
lems. As Gandhi once famously
said, "Nonviolence is a weapon of
the strong" - a sentiment people
like Taylor ought to take to heart.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Vm a Student and a Plasma Donor
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PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-12-06
SCdnddl from page A7
behind this. I was shocked that
Phillip Shanks was beaten and
this was more shocking Gallion
said in a statement read by his
secretary.
Shanks was assisting Gal-
lion on the lawsuit in May 2004
when he was attacked in his
office and left unconscious. Key
case documents were stolen, he
said. No one was ever charged
in the case.
Defense attorney Robert
Hutton said he last talked with
Young last week and called his
death a total shock and a real
loss.
"He was very generous man.
He was generous with people
around him. A pastor of a Catho-
lic Church, he asked for money
for some program, for the roof
or something, and he gave him
the money. Logan wasn't even
Catholic Hutton said.
"He was a wonderful char-
acter. I really enjoyed him as
a person. It's just a horrible
tragedy
His attorneys had argued
Young needed a kidney trans-
plant and could not get proper
medical care in prison.
Former high school coach
Lynn Lang, who avoided jail time
after pleading guilty to taking
part in a racketeering conspiracy,
testified against Young, saying
the booster paid $150,000 to get
Means to sign with Alabama in
2000.
The NCAA has said it believed
Means was unaware his football
talents were being brokered.
The player later transferred to
Memphis, where he finished his
college career.
Lang testified at Young's trial
that other universities, including
Georgia, Kentucky, Arkansas,
Memphis, Mississippi, Michigan
State and Tennessee, offered him
money or jobs to get Means.
No charges were filed against
anyone with those schools. Three
former coaches, Rip Scherer
of Memphis, Jim Donnan of
Georgia and Alabama assistant
Ivy Williams, testified Lang was
lying.
Means' recruitment became
part of an NCAA investigation
that led to sanctions against
Alabama in 2002, costing the
Crimson Tide scholarships and
bowl appearances.
Attorney Tommy Gallion,
who represented Williams and
former Alabama assistant Ronnie
Cornell in a defamation suit
against the NCAA and others,
called the news tragic.
"I have no idea who could be
behind this. I was shocked that
Phillip Shanks was beaten and
this was more shocking Gallion
said in a statement read by his
secretary.
Shanks was assisting Gal-
lion on the lawsuit in May 2004
when he was attacked in his
office and left unconscious. Key
case documents were stolen, he
said. No one was ever charged
in the case.
Defense attorney Robert
Hutton said he last talked with
Young last week and called his
death a total shock and a real
loss.
"He was very generous man.
He was generous with people
around him. A pastor of a Catho-
lic Church, he asked for money
for some program, for the roof
or something, and he gave him
the money. Logan wasn't even
Catholic Hutton said.
"He was a wonderful char-
acter. I really enjoyed him as
a person. It's just a horrible
tragedy
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Phone (252) 328-9238 Fax (252) 328-9143
WEDNESDAY April 12, 2006
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internet, lawn care, basic cable
and alarm system all included in
rent. Available June 1st Call Mike
439-0285.
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Brick Duplex,
Central Air Stancil Drive Walking
Distance to ECU $540month Pets
OK wfee Call 353-2717 or 355-
5439
Walk To Campus! 1 block from the
Library. 2 bedroom apartments with
hard wood floors and central heat
air. Washer, dryer, dishwasher, high-
speed internet, basic cable, water &
sewer all included. Available August
1st. Call Mike 439-0285.
Sublease for June and July.
Willoughby Park Condo 2Bd2Bth.
Pool and Tennis Courts. Cable
WaterSewer incl. $625mth. For
more info call 252-327-2060
Duplex 2 BDRM 2 BATH Central
Heat AC ECU Bus Route Partial
Furnished 218 Wyndham Circle 252-
714-1057 252-756-2778 Available
July 1st.
Wyndham Circle Duplex: 2
bedroom 2 bath, washerdryer
hookups, huge yard & deck
Desirable Student Location! $625
month. Available summer or fall.
FOR SALE
The Buccaneer is back! The ECU
yearbook has returned so make sure
to reserve your copy. Order online at
www.yearbookupdatesecu or call
1-888-298-3323 Hurry! Deadline
to order is 5pm 4-24-06
HELP WANT
Wanted: Student to assjst kids
ages 14, 13, and 9 with homwork
. Must be math major with CPA of
3.4 or betjer. Strong in science a
plus. Must be non-smoker, flexible
hours, transportation, available
to work afternoons, nights, and
some weekends. Call 252-917-6787
or 252-752-1572 for interview.
Manager and Sales Persons
Needed. Full Time. Part Time.
Day or Evening Hours. Great
Working Conditions Excellent
Pay End of Year Bonus. Located
at Nags Head Beach North
Carolina. Contact Gary at 252-
305 5558 or 252-441-5558
Lifeguards and swim instructors
needed for outdoor pool June 1-
August 20. Candidates must be
certified in Lifeguarding, AED, First
Aid and CPRPR. $7.50 per hour.
Apply at www.greenvillenc.gov or
call Jessica at 329-4043 for more
information.
Live this summer at the Beach
and work with Telescope Pictures
Sunrays Studio in Ocean City,
MDVirginia Beach. VA. Earn up
to $10,000. Housing is Available.
For more information visit our
website and Apply On-Line
www.sunraysstudio.com or call
1.724.322.1858. E.O.E
Work hard, Play hard, change lives!
Girls resident camp looking for
counselors, lifeguards, wranglers,
boating staff, crafts, Unit Leaders,
Business Manager, and Health
Supervisor. $200-$300week! June
3-August 13th, Free Housing! (336)
861-1198 or Keyauwee@northstate.
net www.keyauwee.com for an on-
line application.
Babysitter: Mature, responsible
babysitter needed for infant and
toddler three daysweek beginning
in May. Must have good driving
record, excellent references and
reliable transportation. Contact
kaswank@earthlink.net, 353-0187.
Mobile waitstaff wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-15CVweek. Perfect
for college student Some Lunch
Time (11a-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 551-3279 between 2-5 only.
Sorry Greenville residents and year
around dorm residents only. Leave
message if necessary.
Mgrs. and Lifegrds at Pools and
Beaches in Greenville, Atlantic
Beach, and Wilson. Call Bob 714-
0576
Active Handicapped Male Needs
Personal Attendant M-F, 7-1 Oam
And Every Other Weekend. $10
Hr. Duties Include Bathing And
Dressing. Please Call 756-9141.
Now Hiring Tokyo To Go (Big Lots
Shopping Center). Applications
on door. Drop off at Any Jersey
Mike's for more info call George
341-6630
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
OTHER
Retreatmyrtlebeach.com Spring
BreakGrad Week 1-800-645-3618
We Have What You're Looking For!
$100 Per Person & Up!
Racial
Steering
It Illegal.
Fight Housing
Discrimination
and Win.
nationalfairtiMising.com 1-886-222-FAIR
CAN YOU BE THERE
YOUR OLDER PAREN1
WITHOUT ACTUALLY
HAVIN6 TO BE THERE?
EH
"Before giving, I always look
for the Humane Seal
NOAH
Star of NBC's hit show ER
The Humane Charity Seal of Approval
guarantees that a health charity funds
vital patient services or life-saving
medical research, but never animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving www.HumaneSeai.org
Washington, D.C. 202-686-2210, ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
g HIRING NOW
Looking for a great
summer job? McLawhom
Crop Services needs
reliable, honest energetic
people work outdoors,
monitoring crops from
May through August Work
near Klnston, Greenville,
New Bern. Let us train
you HURRY! HIRING NOW!
Must be 19 or have one
year of college and need
reliable vehicle Full time
hours. We train! Excellent
pay mileage.
Mall or fax resume to;
MCSI
man
Cm Clq. DC. 21523
Fix252 637-212S
One out of five adults finds
themselves as the designated
"caregiver" for a loved one who
can no longer manage alone. This
role can often snowball, weighing
heavily on you as you try to cope
with the demands of caregiving.
There may be services and
organizations right in your
parent's neighborhood that can
help when you're not around.
The outcome is better care for
your parent, and less anxiety
for you. Visit www.familycare
givingl01.org and discover
a world of support, answers and
advice - for both of you.
Family
Caregiving
It's wot ill up to you.
From the National Family
Cartgivers Association and
the National Alliance for Caregiving
rith the generous support ofEisai Inc.
Get Started. Get Ahead. Live.
Summer School 2006
.





PAGE A10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
4-12-06
On-campus conveniences Apartment amenities
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1ST
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iiu

Welcome
New
mnc
w
77? Best
ofBoth
Worlds
Located in the heart of
ECU's campus, the new
Campus Towers offers
today's students the
perfect blend of location,
style & convenience.
With a cutting-edge
computer lab, a game
room, TV lounges and
new laundry facilities,
Campus Towers offers
all the conveniences of
on-campus living with
the upscale amenities of
apartment life.
Forget the early morning
commute. Sleep late and
walk or bike to class.
Come visit the new Campus Towers today!
(252) 752-2865 info@campustowers.com
635 Cotanche Street Greenville, NC 27858


Title
The East Carolinian, April 12, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 12, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1899
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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