The East Carolinian, April 5, 2006












4-04-06
www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 63
WEDNESDAY
April 5, 2006
Leadership that leaves a legacy
The NAACP awarded Erica Reid, 'Woman of the Year and De'Laria
Woodruff, 'Man of the Year last Thursday night at the Legacy Dinner.
NAACP members awarded
Chancellors convened for a leadership forum on March 30 and gave helpful advice to potential leaders.
Respect and confidence are
key for being a good leader
CHRISTOPHER STEVENSON
STAFF WRITER
During the chancellor's forum on
leadership Thursday, March 30, four ECU
alumni spoke on the concept of leadership
and how ECU assisted them in their devel-
opment of becoming successful leaders.
The panel of alumni talked about what
leadership means to them.
Carol Mabe, a marketing and con-
sumer brand specialist, has worked with
some of the world's most identifiable and
succestfql brands, including Hanes, Hanes
Her Way, L'eggs, Victoria's Secret, Lee,
Wrangler and Russell Athletic.
"I think every leader is someone who
has influence over others, and I think in.
order to have influence, you have to earn
the respect and confidence by those around
you said Mabe.
Mabe also emphasized that a leader must
have a vision for the future and be able to
articulate that vision to others.
Ron Clark, Disney Teacher of the Year
in 2000 and New York Times bestselling
author, is known as "America's Educator"
because of his passionate teaching style
and the lengths to which he goes to see
kids excel in education and in life.
Clark defines leadership as the ability to
inspire others toward a similar goal. Clark
stressed that the way words are spoken can
be critical to a leader's success.
"If you've got a leader who is driven, ded-
icated and has that passion of really going
for it, then it is contagious said Clark.
As a student at ECU, Clark enjoyed
being surrounded by professors and
fellow students who shared his passion
for education.
James Maynard, founder of the Golden
Corral restaurants, has nearly 500 restau-
rants across the nation with sales in excess
of $1.3 billon. Maynard said that everyone
is a leader at some stage in life.
"Winners keep winning and leaders
keep leading said Maynard.
Maynard also emphasized that ECU
helped prepare him to achieve his career goals.
"What I loved about ECU was that
anything I wanted to learn, I found
out later how to go do that Maynard said.
As a student, Maynard spent hours
upon hours in the library, pouring over many
different business books to enhance his knowl-
edge about how the business world operated.
Valeria Lovelace is president and
founder of Media Transformations, an
educational production company com-
mitted to the formation of projects that
encourage educational and social values
among youth everywhere. Lovelace has
an impressive clientele, which includes
Nickelodeon, MTV Networks, MSNBC,
Sesame Workshop and Disney.
Lovelace said that great leaders value
the work of those they lead, appreciating
every single component.
"I believe a leader is able to bring out the
best in every single person said Lovelace.
The panel of alumni also gave sug-
gestions about how current and future
students at ECU can become leaders.
Clark emphasized that educators need to
direct students to areas where they can
gain leadership experience. Clark also sug-
gested that a leadership class is a great tool
that could prepare students for the future.
The chancellor's forum was in honor of
the 99th anniversary of the founding of ECU.
This writer can be reached at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Students and faculty
honored at Sweethearts
CLAIRE MURPHY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The NAACP had its Legacy
Dinner in Sweethearts Dining hall
Thursday, March 30 at 7:30 p.m.
The Legacy dinner is an awards
ceremony for African Ameri-
can women and men in ECU'S
faculty, staff and student body.
This year there were about 54
awards and honorees including
"Man of the Year "Strive for
Success "Woman of the Year"
and "Highest GPA
There were very strict require-
ments for each person to win
each award. Some of the crite-
ria included character, campus
involvement and grade point
average, among other things.
There were a few appreciative
performances throughout the
banquet, including singers Nata-
lie Wood and Dante'Johnson and
a dance performance by Monica
Williams.
The dinner had a very open
and friendly atmosphere, show-
ing how proud and caring every-
one was toward each other.
Jenilyn Turner provided
the initial welcome and most
introductions. She also gave
a special thanks to the com-
mittee. Christopher Foye and
Atalaya Neal gave other intro-
ductions. Harolynn Mallette,
Crystal Fuller, Melanie Handy
and Michael Miller presented
awards and certificates. Harolynn
Mallette said closing words.
The Women's Program and
Men's Program went as two
separate events last Thursday.
There were 22 male and 22
female honorees, as well as 10
from ECU faculty and staff.
There was a long list of both
male and female honorees,
all with impressive histories.
The winner of the "Man of
the Year" award was De'Laria
Woodruff Jr. The "Woman
of the Year" was Erica Reid.
"Strive for Success" went to
Je'Varis Richardson and "High-
est GPA Award" went to Ngozi
Igboko.
The students who won
awards, as well as everyone else
present at the Legacy Dinner,
have achieved a very great honor
and deserve to be recognized.
This writer can be reached at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
How many will
be able to retire?
Peace Club seeks to instigate change
VANESSA CLARKE
STAFF WRITER
At a time when apathy is
more socially acceptable than
engagement and the 18 to 25-
year-old demographic is charged
with watching too much MTV to
care about social justice, a new
group on campus is forming to
change that.
The Peace Club, led by de
facto president Jacek Teller, a
chemistry and physics major,
seeks to take advantage
of the recent shift in public
opinion, especially when deal-
ing with President Bush, whose
approval ratings are at their
lowest ever.
"It's high time to jgetj the
peace movement on campus
the sophomore said.
In order to accomplish this,
the group will mainly focus
on education. The Peace Club
hopes to raise awareness on
social justice all over the world
and here in the United States,
Teller said.
Specific instances Teller men-
tioned at the club's first meeting
on Thursday included the prison
scandal at Abu Ghraib, the lack of
due process at Guantanamo Bay
and the war on terror in Afghani-
stan and Iraq.
"Abroad he said, "Some-
thing is very wrong
Still, the issue the fledgling
group will be focusing most of
its attention on in the coming
months is the genocide in
Sudan.
The group hopes to be able
to attend "Save Darfur: Rally
to Stop Genocide sponsored
by the Save Darfur Coalition
in Washington, D.C April 30.
The rally is a part of the coali-
tion's "Million Voices for Darfur"
campaign, which pledges to
send one million postcards to
President Bush urging him to
push for more United Nations
support for the Sudan.
In addition to attending
the rally, the group plans to
show a documentary April 6 in
Mendenhall dealing either with
the war in Iraq or the genocide
in Sudan.
The club has no regular meet-
ings because Teller said that
sitting around and talking does
nothing to promote the cause of
peace and social justice.
Instead, the group will keep
in touch by e-mail or phone
when an event is taking place.
"If it's easy to participate,
people will Teller said.
For now, the group will be
low-key, according to Teller. He
said that he did not want to
force the club in any particular
direction.
"(This group is whatever we
decide it is he said.
"It will become whatever it
will become
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
It's never too early to start thinking about retirement.
Robert Fox visits to speak at Thomas
Harriot 'Voyages of Discovery' lecture
Research shows that 53
percent of today's workers
have not saved enough
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
Why the College of Arts
and Sciences is named
after Harriot
KIMBERLY BELLAMY
STAFF WRITER
Thursday, March 30, Robert
Fox, a distinguished Harriot
scholar from Oxford University,
visited ECU's Hendrix Theater to
give a lecture on Thomas Harriot,
the man after whom the College
of Arts and Sciences is named.
Fox's lecture was an overview
of Harriot's life. Topics included
skepticism about Harriot's appear-
ance and personal life and his
many accomplishments.
Some major points in his
lecture included Harriot's dis-
coveries with the sun and the
use of a telescope. According to
Fox, shortly after the telescope
was invented, Harriot observed
the moon and the sun and made
maps of the spots on these sur-
faces.
He recorded more than 450
observations of the sun over an
18-month period and concluded
that the sun was rotating due
to the fact that the spots would
always appear in a different loca-
tion, according to Fox.
Fox argued that many of
Harriot's firldings and discover-
ies were moTe advanced than the
well known scientist Galileo.
Harriot completed a book
called A Brief and True Report of
New Found Land of VA. Harriot
came close to completing an
additional book, but didn't quite
make it.
The lecture highlighted
Harriot's many contributions
in chemistry and math. After
Harriot's death in 1621 of nose
cancer, a total of 8,000 pages of
manuscripts were left behind.
Today, there isn't much cer-
tainty of what Harriot truly
looked like. Fox showed several
paintings of Harriot, but none
are necessarily accurate.
These paintings don't provide
a clear view of Harriot, according
to Fox, because the man in the
picture would have shown aging
physical characteristics, such
as a receding hair line, if it was
painted at the time it said.
One of the paintings was also
painted a few years before Harri-
see HARRIOT page A2
How much money will I have
to put away now to be able to
retire? How will I make enough to
put away enough to do so? These
are questions that many workers
are asking themselves. Money is
a reality that will never vanish
and should be treated seriously.
A recent phone interview showed
that 53 percent of today's work-
ers have saved less than $25,000
toward their retirement. Only 12
percent have saved more than
$250,000 which is what it will
probably take to live comfortably
in retirement given taxes and
inflation.
Given the fact that the major-
ity of workers say they have
saved enough to retire when the
evidence shows to the contrary, it
means that most workers are not
well-informed about the reality
of retirement. Only 42 percent
of workers have even done a
calculation to estimate their
costs in retirement. This lack of
calculation and thinking about
retirement may prove to be the
Achilles' heel which may force
some workers into destitution
after their 65th birthday.
So how does one calculate
expenses? If you are 20 now and
want to live on a modest sum
of $30,000 in retirement after
you turn six, then you would
need about $113,447.90 a year in
today's money because of about
a three percent inflation over the
next 45 years. Obviously, exten-
sive planning and investing is
necessary even to allow someone
to live modestly in retirement.
How many years will you live in
retirement? Will you have high
health care costs?
One of the authors of the
see RETIRE page A2
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A101 Opinion: A4 I What's Hot: A5 I Sports: A7





Page A2 news@Iheeastcarolinlan.com 252.328.6366
RACHEL KING News Editor CLAIRE MURPHY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY April 5. 2006
Announcements
Leadership Forum -
"What I Wish I Knew
Before I Graduated"
Wednesday, April 5 from 4 - 5 p.m.
in Bate 1013.
Join us for an open discussion
to learn Facts for your Future by
panelists, ODK Members Catrina
Davis (Career Services), Stephen
Gray (Ombuds Office) and Don
Joyner (Academic Advising) to
learn about what they wished
they had known. All students and
Omicron Delta Kappa members
are welcome to join.
Contact ODK@ecu.edu.
"Getting What
You Want From
Relationships"
Wednesday, April 5 from 6:30
- 730 p.m.
Come explore key components
of a healthy relationship
and techniques for effective
communication within a
relationship. This program
is sponsored by the Campus
Wellness Department of
Recreational Services as a new
health series for ECU female
students called "The Satisfied
Woman: Getting What You Want
From Life' For questions, contact
Recreational Services at 328-
6387.
The Time of Your Life
The play, by William Saroyan, will
run from April 6 - 8 and 10 -11 at
8 p.m. and Sunday, April 9 at 2 p.m.
in McGinnis Theatre
Wandering in and out of Nick's
waterfront saloon are vivid
characters wanting to get more
out of life, but unsure how to do
it. Inside the bar are the lonely,
the cynical and the lovelorn
disusing war, art, good and evil.
But, like a flower in the desert,
one man starts to fall in love. It's
heartbreaking, tender and funny.
This is a great character study and
an actor's masterpiece.
Tickets required: General Pubiic-
$12; Senior Citizens and current
ECU FacultyStaff-$10; and
YouthCurrent ECU Student-$8
in advance, $12 at the door.
Contact the Central Ticket Office
at 328-4788,1-800-ECU-ARTS or
ecuarts.com
B.J. Ward in Stand
Up Opera
Saturday, April 8 in Wright
Auditorium at 8 p.m.
Four-octave vocalist and
comedienne B J Ward shows no
mercy as she spoofs the arias of
Verdi, Puccini, Dvorak and more.
Tickets required: Purchase
Masterpiece Subscriptions
by Sept. 28 for best options.
Masterpiece subscription (all
events): $216 for public, $198 for
ECU facultystaff, $108 for youth,
$72 for ECU Students. Purchase
Crown Subscriptions by Dec. 1 for
best options. Crown Subscription
(choice of six events): $162 for
public. $150 for ECU faculty
staff, $84 for youth, $48 for ECU
students Advance individual
tickets, if available, may be
purchased beginning Dec. 2 for
$24 public, $22 ECU facultystaff,
$12 youth and $10 ECU student.
All tickets at the door are $24
Group discounts are available for
groups of 15 or more.
Contact the Central Ticket Office
at 328-4788.1-800-ECU-ARTS or
ecuarts.com.
2006 Whichard
Lecture in the
Humanities: Peter
Green
Monday, April 10 in the Science
Technology Building room C207
Dr. Peter Green will present the
spring 2006 Whichard Lecture in
the Humanities for Harriot College
and the Department of History. His
topic is "Possession and Pneuma:
The Essential Nature of the Delphic
Oracle Free and open to the
public
For more information, contact
Rebecca Futrell at 328-6496
Greenville Contrathon
Live, acoustic old-
time and Celtic music!
Saturday, April 8 from 7:30-
10:30 p.m. in the Willlis Building.
Workshops: 11:00 a.m Contra
Dance callers (Tom Hinds)
and3p.m International Folk Dance
(Dr. Dawn), and afternoon waltz;
BIG Contra Dance: 7:30-1030
p.m. Willis Building, First and
Reade Streets Students $3
each, afternoon and evening;
FASG members and public
$5 or $8 each, afternoon and
evening Call for into: 752-8854 .
ECU Folk and Country Dancers.
News Briefs
State
Effort to restrict adult
entertainment runs Into court
backlog
CHARLOTTE, N.C (AP) - Some 12
years after Charlotte restricted where
adult entertainment venues such as
topless bars and bookstores can
operate, a clogged federal court
system is keeping the rules from
being enforced.
A lawsuit that claims the regulations
are illegal is pending before U.S.
District Court Judge Graham Mullen,
but he says he's swamped with
criminal cases and won't get to it until
this fall at the earliest.
The rules, approved by city leaders
in 1994, said adult entertainment
venues may only operate at a certain
distance from houses, churches,
schools, parks and daycare centers.
Businesses that violated the rules
were given eight years, until 2002, to
move or shut down.
Two of the businesses the city says
are in violation were not annexed
into Charlotte until 2001, and thus
have until October 2009 to comply.
Six have been granted exceptions
from the rules because the city says a
physical or manmade barrier provides
separation from the businesses.
"Charlotte needs to stop dragging its
feet and implement what they said
they were going to said Cara Dalton,
who also lives near Chasers.
Mullen believes he'll be able to hear
the case later this year.
"All I can say is, IVe got it, I know it's
briefed and I know it needs to be
done he said. "When I can get to
it, I will
Mother says young hit-run victim
Is brain dead
FAYETTVILLE, N.C. (AP) - An 8-year-
old boy who was hit by a car and
dragged as he headed to a friend's
house was brain dead Sunday night,
on life support until his organs could
be donated, his mother said.
Jameel Short was injured Friday night
when he and his friend, 11-year-old
Tevin Whitted, crossed the street to
Tevin's house. The two were struck
on Ireland Drive by a vehicle that
sped away.
One boy was dragged about 200 feet
and the other about 50 feet.
"I felt Jameel could live on through
someone else his mother, Joslyn
Colvin-Jackson, said Sunday.
"He has a big heart, a good heart
Tevin was released from Cape Fear
Valley Medical Center Saturday.
No one was immediately charged in
the accident.
State Highway Patrol Trooper S.E.
Everett said investigators had a
suspect, a man who was turned
in by a friend, but would not file
charges until they could consult with
prosecutors on Monday.
Colvin-Jackson said her son suffered
broken legs and a broken neck and
swelling of his brain.
She said the boys had just left the
home of a friend who lived next door
and were going to Tevin's home
across the street.
"Tevin was a1 vays at my house
Colvin-Jackson said.
"They were going across the street
to ask if he could stay the night at
our house
National
Governor favors death penalty
for twice-convicted sex
offenders
COLUMBIA, S.C (AP) - South Carolina
Gov. Mark Sanford announced
support Monday for a bill that would
make some twice-convicted sex
offenders eligible for the death
penalty.
The bill would make capital
punishment an option for offenders
convicted twice of sexually assaulting
children under 11. Such crimes "can
destroy for a long time, and maybe
forever, that young person's ability
to function, that young person's
trust in older people, trust in others
Sanford said.
Last week, the state Senate approved
the measure, which was included
in a larger bill that sets minimum
sentences and lifetime electronic
monitoring for some sex offenders.
The bill is now headed to the
House.
The bill would not affect offenders like
Kenneth G. Hinson, the 47-year-old
Hartsville man charged last month
with sexually assaulting two teenage
girls in an underground room he
constructed in his backyard. But the
death penalty punishment wasn't
added to the bill until after Hinson's
charges.
"We are engaged in a battle with
sexual predators in this state Harrison
said. "We owe it to our youngest and
most vulnerable members of society
no less
Before the Senate approved the bill
last week, McMaster told lawmakers
he believes the proposed law would
be found constitutional and said he
would be proud to argue the case
himself. He reiterated that Monday.
"South Carolina shouldn't have to
wait on another state to come up
and say whether you can do it or not
Knotts said.
"We've got a chance to do it, we need
to do it
Oklahoma lawmakers are considering
similar legislation.
Complex organ re-engineered
for the first time in bladder
transplants
BOSTON (AP) - For the first time,
scientists have rebuilt a complex
human organ, the bladder, in seven
young patients using live tissue
grown in the lab, a breakthrough
that could hold exciting promise for
someday regenerating ailing hearts
and other organs.
Only simpler tissues, skin, bone, and
cartilage, have been lab-grown in
the past. This is the first time that a
more intricate organ has been mostly
replaced with tissue grown from the
patient's own cells.
Ti .is suggests that tissue engineering
may one day be a solution to the
shortage of donor organs in this
country for those needing transplants
said Dr. Anthony Atala, the lead
researcher. He said he believes the
work provides a model for growing
other tissues and organs.
The bladder transplants, performed
on seven patients ages 4 to 19, were
being reported online Tuesday in
The Lancet medical journal. The
research team at Children's Hospital
in Boston did the first procedure in
1999 but wanted to make sure it
would work on others. The results
weren't announced while the doctors
did the other surgeries and followed
the progress of the last patient for
almost two more years.
"It gives everyone in the field
the evidence and encouragement
they've needed to say this can be
done said Dr. Stephen Badylak, a
University of Pittsburgh expert in
tissue engineering.
Growing other organs will likely hold
unforeseen challenges, however,
since organs are so specialized in
their functions, scientists stress.
The rebuilt bladders, though, were up
to three times more elastic and better
at holding urine, the researchers
report. In all seven patients, kidney
function was preserved, the study
said. The patients must still empty
their bladders regularly with a tube
but can avoid leaking In between.
She used to worry about her daughter
dying from kidney damage or urinary
infections. That's all faded into the
past. Now, she worries about all the
time her daughter fritters away on the
telephone, talking to friends.
International
Nine U.S. troops reported killed
In western Iraq
BAGHDAD, Iraq (AP) - Four American
troops were killed by hostile fire,
while five others died and three were
missing after their truck rolled over in
a flash flood this weekend in separate
incidents in western Iraq, the military
said Monday.
In violence targeting Iraqis, a suicide
truck bomb exploded Monday near
a Shiite mosque in northeastern
Baghdad as worshippers were
leaving after evening prayers, killing
at least 10 people and wounding 30,
police said.
The U.S. military said it was "using all
the resources available" to find the
two Marines and a sailor who were
missing after Sunday's accident,
which occurred nearthe Asad air base
in Anbar, near the Syrian border.
Five Marines were killed and one
was injured when the seven-ton U.S.
military truck rolled over in a flash
food. The military said it appeared to
be an accident and "not a result of
enemy action
The explosion occurred about 8 p.m.
near the al-Shroofi mosque in the
predominantly Shiite neighborhood
of Shaab, police Capt. Ali al-Obaidi
said. A suicide bomber drove the
truck, which was carrying dates
he said.
Iraqi police also reported a dramatic
attack on a Shiite family in Baghdad's
Dora district, saying four gunmen
charged into a home, lined up a
brother, two sisters, and an uncle
against a wall and shot them dead.
Some Iraqi leaders said they welcomed
the help from Rice and Straw.
"When this becomes so difficult and
when the situation cannot wait, any
intervention that serves the (national)
interest and helps save the country
from bloodbath could be useful
said Naseeral-Ani of the Iraqi Islamic
Party.
Others called it meddling.
"I think that their interference is bad,
and it further complicates issues
because this is an Iraqi matter
said Mahmoud Othman, a Kurdish
politician.
Jobs law crisis clearing
presidential route for France's
ambitious Interior minister
PARIS (AP) - French Interior Minister
Nicolas Sarkozy is sailing unscathed,
perhaps even strengthened, through
France's current crisis over a new jobs
law, even as poll numbers for others
in the government are tanking.
Protest leaders said they hoped to
again rally at least a million people
for nationwide marches and strikes
Tuesday against a law, aimed at
stemming joblessness that has
plunged the country into crisis.
No one has been hurt more than
Sarkozy's rival, Prime Minister
Dominique de Villepin. He
championed the law that would give
employers a freer hand to fire young
workers, making him the No,1 bad
guy for students and labor unions that
have led furious protests and strikes
against the measure.
A year is a long time in politics, though,
and the path to the presidential
Elysee Palace is mined with potential
pitfalls.
At the Interior Ministry, Sarkozy
oversees the police and could be
held responsible should there be a
fatal accident at the demonstrations.
His newly acquired central role in
government efforts to quell the protests
could also backfire should labor and
student leaders reject his overtures
and continue to insist the job law be
withdrawn, not simply amended to
make it less problematic.
Already Monday, protesters disrupted
air, train and car traffic and gathered
for a demonstration in front of the
Eiffel Tower, which was shut down
during last week's strike that attracted
about a million people across the
country.
A handful of members of the Green
Party staged a sit-in Monday at the
elite Sorbonne University, which has
been shuttered for weeks and saw
bloody clashes between students
and police last month.
Immigration debate is latest fight over
what it means to be an American
Retire
from page A1
(KRT) Both sides in the
emotional debate over immigra-
tion agree on at least one thing:
This is a fight over what it means
to be an American.
The passions that are being
unleashed in street protests, on
talk radio and in Congress are as
old as the American dream. We
may be a nation of immigrants,
but we sometimes recoil from
foreigners with different lan-
guages, religions, cultures and
complexions.
Even Benjamin Franklin, one
of the most open-minded found-
ing fathers, objected to foreign
newcomers, in his case, from
Germany.
"Why should Pennsylvania,
founded by the English, become
a Colony of Aliens who will
shortly be so numerous as to
Germanize us instead of our
Anglifying them?" he asked in a
1751 essay.
More than 170 years later,
President Calvin Coolidge put it
more succinctly: "America must
be kept American
Yet even ardent advocates
of tighter immigration controls
acknowledge the contributions
that immigrants have made, and
continue to make, to the most
diverse society on Earth. Polls
show deeply conflicting views
about immigration. Americans
are just as likely to think that
immigrants strengthen the coun-
try as they are to consider them
a burden.
"People are seeing immi-
gration as a negative. That's a
shame, because if it's done right,
it's a positive said Ron Wood-
ard, the director of NC Listen, a
North Carolina group that favors
tougher immigration policies.
"Americans believe in rea-
sonable legal immigration, but
they have major heartburn with
people breaking the law
Although the current debate
over immigration is in many
ways a replay of past battles, there
are some new twists.
The terrorist attacks in 2001
have heightened concerns about
border security. Globalization
and the loss of manufacturing
jobs have increased economic
anxieties. Multiculturalism and
the emphasis on tolerance for
alternative lifestyles have helped
fuel doubts about the durability
of what are considered tradi-
tional American values.
If all that weren't enough,
political polarization, TV's talk-
show culture and the fractious
Internet blogosphere have made
a hot-button issue even more
combustible.
"The middle ground gets lost.
Anybody who talks about a sensi-
ble middle ground gets devoured
by the extremes on both sides
said Edward O'Donnell, a pro-
fessor at Holy Cross College in
Worcester, Mass who specializes
in Irish-American history.
"It's either immigration is a
plague, or wide-open, unhin-
dered immigration and wide-
scale amnesty is the answer
Americans who are tolerant
of mass immigration express
confidence that the nation's
economy and culture can absorb
the newcomers.
"I see immigrants as people
who are coming to the United
States to cast their lot with Amer-
icans said Alan Kraut, a profes-
sor at American University in
Washington and the author of
three books on immigration.
"What we hear from some
quarters is that these immi-
grants are somehow different,
the notion that they will not
assimilate. I think that expresses
far too little faith in the power of
American culture
To be sure, America has dealt
successfully with large-scale
immigration before. The nation's
doors were wide open to many
immigrants during the 1800s. By
the turn of the century, roughly
15 percent of the nation's resi-
dents were foreign-born. Today,
the 33 million foreign-born
residents account for about 11
percent of the population.
Yet previous waves of immi-
gration led to nativist move-
ments and crackdowns. Irish
Roman Catholics faced scorn and
abuse in the mid-19th century,
and Congress prohibited immi-
gration from China in 1882. The
surge at the turn of the 20th cen-
tury, and fears about radicals and
anarchists, led to the first broad
clampdown on immigration.
"Just like in the early 1900s,
people are realizing today that
things have gotten out of hand
said Woodard of NC Listen.
"We need to bring it back in
balance
More and more Americans
are feeling the impact of immi-
gration, even in communities
that traditionally had few for-
eign-born residents.
In 1990, fewer than 4 percent
of people in Charlotte, N.C,
came from other countries. Now,
11 percent are foreign-born. The
population shift coincided with
the decline of North Carolina's
textile and furniture industries.
"It's bad enough that your
job went to Mexico. Now you've
got illegal Mexicans coming
into the state, and you have to
compete with them. It's a double
whammy Woodard said. "People
are saying, Enough is enough
The influx of Hispanic for-
eigners, more than half of for-
eign-born residents are from
Latin America, is contributing
to another demographic shift.
Minorities, both citizens and
noncitizens, are now the major-
ity in Miami, Los Angeles, Hous-
ton and San Francisco. New York
and Washington will join the
list soon.
Most advocates of tighter
immigration controls say their
concerns don't have anything to
do with race or ethnicity. They
say they worry about the nation's
ability to absorb the latest wave
of foreigners.
"It's not 1910 anymore. We
have an economy that doesn't
offer the same kind of upward
mobility for people with low edu-
cation said Mark Krikorian, the
executive director of the Center
for Immigration Studies.
"We've changad, not the
immigrants
Krikorian, whose grandpar-
ents came from Armenia, said
he also worried that cultural
changes had made it harder for
immigrants to absorb American
values. He pointed to demon-
strators waving Mexican flags at
recent pro-immigration rallies
as evidence of the decreased
emphasis on assimilation.
"My Mom had to memorize
the Gettysburg Address. What
are the kids in the Unified Los
Angeles School District learning?
They sure as heck aren't being
Americanized he said.
study Jack VanDerhei said "It's
clear that people currently work-
ing should factor into their retire-
ment planning the long-term
trend away from traditional
defined benefit pensions. That
means people need to be saving
more than they are
The lack of saving again points
to the consumer culture in which
we live, where Americans borrow
two billion a day from the rest of
the world via trade.
Consumers should remember
this when shopping and decid-
ing where to eat and how much
to spend.
The good news for those who
wish to retire is the economy
is positively bustling as seen
by the vigor of the job market
and the Federal Reserve's con-
stant raising of interest rates.
The raising of interest rates will
do much to strangle inflation,
thereby making retirement
easier as well. Not to mention the
higher returns can earn on savings
and money market accounts.
VanDerhei also says "But
some people are absolutely clue-
less about this and frozen into
inactivity as a result he said.
"They really should find a fee-
based professional to help them
out. It's going to cost a couple of
hundred dollars, but you'll make
that amount up many times in
the future
777s writer may be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
H3rrl0t from page A1
ot's death, but it didn't show any
signs of a deforming nose, which
would be true if the painting was
accurately painted.
One of the last factors about
the paintings that makes it ques-
tionable as to whether or not it is
truly Harriot is that one of paint-
ing's dates was changed to match
the correct timing of Harriot's
birthday, according to Fox.
Harriot was referred to as a
Renaissance man throughout
the lecture and as the title of the
lecture.
The innovations mentioned
in the lecture prove why he would
be referred to as a Renaissance
man and why ECU would choose
his name for the College of Arts
and Sciences.
The lecture included a ques-
tion and answer portion, in which
Fox answered any questions the
audience had about Harriot's life.
The crowd was very curious about
Harriot and seemed anxious to
learn more about him, even after
the lecture concluded.
This lecture is one of many
lectures that Fox gives each year.
Most of his lectures are in Oriel,
where he does annual Thomas
Harriot lectures. Oriel College
will be hosting the 17th Harriot
lecture this May.
Other speakers included
present and past deans of the
College of Arts and Sciences,
Ketes Sparrow and Allen White.
Phi Alpha Theta also helped
with this event by ushering at
the lecture.
This writer may be contacted at
newstheeastcarolinian. com.
Amanda Geiger never saw the drunk driver.
Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.
4-05-06
New
alco
(KRT) -
drink, smoke a
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and set themsel
addiction.
And paren
monitor their
are one of the
forces in prevc
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most of what sc
about addictior
been extrapolat
in adults. Now,
ing studies hi
the teenage bi
changing org
work the way
does. Research
that drugs and
rupt that massi
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making it moi
drugs and easie
addicted.
Scientists se
tion that starts
harder to kick
starts later. Ne
who are regula
age 14 will be
said Dr. Daniel
cal psychologi;
at Washington
puts early drink
greater risk of a
than people wi
21 to start drinl
Epidemioloj
shown that mos
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Volkow, directo
Institute on D
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Volkow said.
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have long assu
Grea
Prince Charle:





4-05-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NEWS
PAGE A3
New research shows clanger drugs,
alcohol pose to teenagers' brains
(KRT) Teenagers who
drink, smoke and use drugs can
derail their brain development
and set themselves up for lifelong
addiction.
And parents who strictly
monitor their teens' behavior
are one of the most influential
forces in preventing kids from
using drugs and alcohol.
Now that might not sound
like news to you.
But the truth is, until recently
most of what science has known
about addiction in teenagers has
been extrapolated from research
in adults. Now, new brain-imag-
ing studies have shown that
the teenage brain is a rapidly
changing organ and doesn't
work the way an adult brain
does. Researchers now believe
that drugs and alcohol can dis-
rupt that massive renovation of
the brain during adolescence,
making it more vulnerable to
drugs and easier for teens to get
addicted.
Scientists say that an addic-
tion that starts early in life are
harder to kick than one that
starts later. Nearly half of kids
who are regular drinkers before
age 14 will become alcoholics,
said Dr. Danielle Dick, a clini-
cal psychologist and geneticist
at Washington University. That
puts early drinkers at three times
greater risk of alcohol addiction
than people who wait until age
21 to start drinking, she said.
Epidemiological studies have
shown that most addictions start
in adolescence, said Dr. Nora
Volkow, director of the National
Institute on Drug Abuse. And
when a teenager's pleasure-
chemical systems aren't fully
developed and then get wired to
depend on substances for feeling
good, the normal flow of brain
chemicals that aid in learning,
decision making and other key
processes are often blocked,
Volkow said.
In adults, genetics are more
than 50 percent responsible for
addiction to alcohol. So people
have long assumed that genes
are the biggest reason kids drink,
too.
But new studies of twins in
Finland and Missouri showed
no evidence that genetics con-
tributed to alcohol-dependence
in 14-year-olds, Dick said.
Instead, Dick said, parental
monitoring is one of the most
consistent predictors of whether
teens start using alcohol and
other drugs.
And that means more than
just having a good relationship
with your kids. A good, warm
relationship doesn't mean kids
are going to tell parents what
they are doing, or with whom.
"Parents might say, 'Oh, if
they were doing that, they'd
tell me but the reality is, they
probably won't Dick said. What
works is knowing where children
are, whom they are with and
what they are doing. Children
with the highest level of parental
monitoring were less likely to
start drinking or using drugs,
Dick said.
For an addiction to take
hold, kids must be exposed to
addictive substances. So young
adolescents who never have a
chance to smoke or drink avoid
stirring up a genetic predisposi-
tion to addiction. In a more
permissive environment, genes
may rear their heads.
Once teens start to drink or
use drugs, the consequences turn
severe. Recent studies show that
teens who start using marijuana
before they turn 17 are at higher
risk of developing schizophrenia
than people who didn't use or
started smoking marijuana later
in adolescence or young adult-
hood.
Marijuana has often been
called a gateway drug, a substance
that can lead to use of more
harmful drugs. Most research-
ers agree that marijuana doesn't
necessarily set up the brain for
further addictions, but does
give kids practice in obtaining
illicit substances and access to a
subculture where harder drugs
are available.
The real gateway drug may
be nicotine, experts say. Most
kids try cigarettes before other
drugs.
Researchers compared sets
of identical twins in which one
twin started smoking before age
17 and the other twin smoked
later. Twins who started smoking
before age 17 became addicted to
other substances, such as alcohol
or other drugs, more readily than
their twins who waited, Volkow
said. Because identical twins
have the same genetic make-up,
the addiction of early-smok-
ing twins can't be chalked up
to genetic susceptibility alone,
she said.
Cigarette smoking also can
disrupt memory and attention,
said Dr. Leslie Jacobsen, a psy-
chiatrist at Yale University. But
withdrawal from cigarettes is
also bad, she said.
"Once you're dependent,
you're always confronted with
a certain amount of nicotine
withdrawal she said,
"Children get addicted to
smoking more quickly than they
expect, and many aren't even
aware that they are dependent
she said.
Even teens that just binge
drink on weekends can hurt their
brains, said Susan F. Tapert, an
associate professor of psychiatry
at the University of California,
San Diego. Her measurements
of a seahorse-shaped part of
the brain, called the hippo-
campus, revealed that drinkers
had shrunken hippocampuses
compared with teens that don't
drink. That is important because
the hippocampus is one of the
regions of the brain most respon-
sible for learning and memory.
Tapert doesn't see the same
dramatic change in the hippo-
campus of marijuana smokers.
But that may not matter,
Jacobsen said.
"It's not just how the brain
looks, but how it works that's
important she said.
Teens who smoke marijuana,
even those who have stopped
using for a month need to
expend much more mental
energy to do simple tasks, Tapert
said.
For instance, marijuana smok-
ers retain 5 percent to 10 percent
less information when listening
to a story. That difference may
not seem big, but could make the
difference between passing and
failing a test in school.
A University of Missouri
study of college-age students
showed that chronic binge drink-
ers make bad decisions in other
parts of life. Researchers at the
Midwest Alcoholism Research
Center in Columbia tested 19-
and 20-year-olds on a decision-
making task involving gambling
risks. People who were chronic
binge drinkers more often made
decisions that would put them
at high risk for losing money,
said Kenneth J. Sher, director of
the center.
The binge drinkers weren't
more impulsive or thrill seeking
than their non-drinking coun-
terparts and they scored simi-
larly on the ACT college entrance
exam. But bad decision-making
on the gambling test was also
associated with making unwise
decisions about drinking in life.
The heaviest drinkers had their
first full drink at age 13, and were
bingeing on almost 18 drinks
per week by the fall of the their
freshman year in college.
The researchers don't know
whether the students are heavy
binge drinkers because they are
bad at decision-making or if the
alcohol impairs their ability to
make good decisions, Sher said.
Either way, students get set
in their ways earlier than many
parents realize, he said.
"Most drinking patterns are
set before they get to college
Sher said.
Parents unwittingly give
young teens access to alcohol.
Few parents think to lock up
their liquor cabinets, Sher said.
"I think parents are clueless
he said. And many have a strong
case of denial.
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Prince Charles in his tartan.
(KRT) National Tartan
Day - which honors Scotland's
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ebrated every April 6. How
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land's role in American life?
1. A tartan is the plaid woven
fabric used to make kilts, tarns
and other pieces of clothing.
What aspect of the fabric does
"tartan" describe?
a. The color
b. The pattern
c. The thread count
d. The way it's woven
2. The colors and pattern of
the tartan tell facts about the
person wearing it. What could
you learn about someone by
"translating" his tartan?
a. What clan he belongs to.
b. What kind of job his
family has.
c. Whether he's married or
single.
d. Which district his family
comes from.
3. Holding Highland Games
competitions is another way
Americans celebrate their Scot-
tish heritage. Which of the
following is not a traditional
Scottish contest?
a. Bagpipe throw
b. Caber toss
c. Hammer throw
d. Sheaf toss
4. Many modern conve-
niences were developed by
Scottish or Scottish-American
inventors. Which was not?
a. Lawnmower
b. Pedal bicycle
c. Television
d. Typewriter
5. Let's talk Scottish influ-
ence on pop culture. Which
of the following actors is not a
great Scot?
a. Sean Connery
b. Alan Cumming
c. Colin Farrell
d. Ewan McGregor
Answers
1. d. The way it's woven
2. c. Whether he's married
or single.
3. a. Bagpipe throw
4. d. Typewriter
5. c. Colin Farrell
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WE V6 MOVEDIl Apply at out NEW ol!ic toptwi uplown 1 th S1I Hip Building - 100F E. 3nJ St.






OPUvLLu
XL
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
WEDNESDAY April 5, 2006
My Random Column
Was it just an April
Fools joke?
The Special bulletin from TEC that was
spread over campus this past weekend,
was in no part related to TEC. There is no
such Vice Chancellor as Hugh Troy and
have never been an editor by the name
of John Turtle to work at TEC
I would, however, like to thank the indi-
viduals who decided to create this unique
prank because our readership increased
due to the manner and content of the false
bulletin that was posted all over campus.
TEC would also like to thank everyone
who contributes Pirate Rants. We receive
an abundance of them daily and I would
like to apologize for not being able to run
more of them. Limited space makes it
nearly impossible to pririt all of the entries
we receive.
As far as the rest of student opinions being
published, I am still eagerly looking for an
opinion writer for Tuesday's paper and I am
also willing to publish "Letters to the Editor"
when I receive them. As far as applying for
the Opinion position, you would need to
come by the office downtown and pick up
an application.
Enjoy the warm weather; we will see how
long it lasts this time. Have a wonderful
week and we will see what unfolds until
the end of school. Fourteen more days
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor In Chief
Rachel King Claire Murphy
News Editor Asst. News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Sarah Bell
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak
Web Editor
Kristin Mumane
Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst. Copy Editor
Rachael Loner
Asst. Photo Editor
Dustin Jones
Asst. Web Editor
Pirate Rant
Opinion Columnist
Fire in Clement yields no loss of lifer but tempers still flare
Fire Observed, No-Loss-
of-Life Ignored
BENJAMIN CORMACK
CASUAL OBSERVER
Last week's Clement Hall fire
marked one of the most terrifying
moments I have personally experi-
enced here at ECU. The truth is that
1 found out about it while trying to
contact an editor at the Daily Reflec-
tor about a story I was working on. I
just got out of my two o'clock class
when I made the call. When the
editor told me she was busy trying
to get information about the fire
on campus, I thought to myself:
"Holy @$! There was a fire?"
I got concerned when I saw
that the fire had taken place near
West-End Dining Hall, because I
have friends that live in the various
halls in that area. I asked one of the
firefighters which area(s) 1 should
avoid so as to learn where the fire
had taken place. I walked over to
the large crowd of people and the
woman speaking to them through
a speaker. You can only imagine
students' joy when they heard they
couldn't go back to there rooms,
they would have to be relocated at
least for that night, and would be
given Campus Living T-shirts as a
means to cope with the shock of
the place you live being filled with
smoke. 1 believe the school also pro-
vided those affected by the fire with
toiletries for the evening. While I
am not certain about this I still feel
it's worth mentioning. I do criticize
them, but considering how quickly
the school responded, I really don't
think there was anything more that
anyone could have done.
I'm sure many ECU officials
faces were red when groups visiting
ECU caught sight of the situation,
but I think they couldn't have asked
for a better display of ECU's safety.
Yes, I know, it's a debatable issue.
But do you realize just how close
ECU is to a fire station? It's less than
mile, maybe even less than one-
half mile. I didn't actually measure
the distance. Well, it's obvious close
enough for the fire department to
arrive in enough time to stop the
fire before it spread.
I know a lot people are upset by
these recent events, but I can't help
but feel that the positive aspects of
this situation are being ignored.
For example, ECU officials are
going to be making changes to
Clement Hall with the purpose
of aiding students in fire safety.
The truth is because the building
was built so long ago, it met with
the fire codes and regulations for
that time. It seems to me that ECU
doesn't necessarily need to do this,
but they are going to do it.
Of course the most prominent
piece of good news, the one that I
also feel is the most ignored is the
fact that there was no loss of life.
Now I understand that there are
issues that need to be addressed and
that people have a right to be angry
to an extent, but I still feel that this
is being ignored. The closest I've
seen to acknowledging this fact are
shirts made by the "Clement Hall
Fire Survivors" in the dining hall.
I have some idea of what losing
someone in a fire is like. On Feb-
ruary 15, 2002, Janet Danahey,
then 23, set fire to a box of party
decorations as a prank outside of her
former boyfriend's apartment at the
College Walk Apartment complex in
my hometown of Greensboro, N.C.
Janet and her two girlfriends had
been drinking wine on Valentine's
night when they decided to play a
prank on Janet's ex-boyfriend. His
car had been their original target,
but when they couldn't find the car
Janet decided that she would instead
set a box of Christmas decorations
on fire in front of his door. The fire
quickly got out of control on the
wooden breezeway of the wooden
apartment building, and it set the
apartment building itself on fire.
Four people died in the fire, two of
whom were sisters. Rachel Llewellyn,
21, and Donna Llewellyn, 24, who I
had known from my church youth
group. I don't remember Donna too
well, but Rachel was there for me
one time when I was upset about
something. I remember her as a
very warm and kind person, who
was always willing to help others.
While I didn't know them, Ryan
Bek, 25, and Elizabeth Harris, 20,
were the other people who perished
in the fire.
Janet Danahey pleaded guilty
to four counts of first-degree
murder and one count of arson.
She was immediately sentenced to
life in prison without the possibil-
ity of parole. She currently resides
at the North Carolina Correctional
Institute for Women in Raleigh.
Personally, I don't know any-
thing about the cause of the fire
that took place here on campus or
who may be responsible, if indeed
there is someone to blame. I don't
think the cause of this fire was
intentional, and if someone is
indeed indirectly responsible for
the fire I think we should do our
best to forgive this person. While
some of us may have had to endure
some hardship, carrying the weight
of guilt for such an act could haunt
this person for the rest of their life.
Take comfort in the facts that dam-
ages are minimal and repairable,
that more will be done to prevent
such things from happening in
the future, and especially in the
fact no one died. The least we can
do, if indeed it was someone's fault
as a result of unintentional action,
is lighten the burden and the
sorrow that this person may feel.
Is it bad that the semester is not even over and I just
don't care about school anymore?
OK - we have three branches of SGA here at ECU. How
come no one ever does a feature story or editorial on
the Judicial branch?
I would just like to thank the person that wrote the
article concerning Multiple Sclerosis. My mother
has this disease and I think it's important for others
to be aware of the devastating effects MS can cause.
So, thank you, and everyone should participate in
the MS Walk on Saturday!
In response to the person who said the new lottery
shouldn't help college students, you are obviously not
a student. College students work jobs and get taxes
taken out of their paychecks to help that little second
grader get a free education. No, he can't control his
fate because he has to go to school now, and when
he gets to college, he probably won't be able to pay
for it either!
Bring on Summer Break!
If your teacher "copied and pasted" something from
your syllabus in an e-mail to you, it means that you did
not read the syllabus. The answer was there the entire
time you moron. How about get a clue, and read!
By the time I'm allowed to register for summer classes,
we'll already be in fall semester. ECU school of nurs-
ing is the best.
You're the idiot that makes up the McRoberts profile on
, Facebook you have way too much timeon your hands!
Hey TEC, don't take the anti-7"C rants too personally.
I know for a fact that the one in today's paper, (and
I I assume most all of the other ones) come from SGA
, members who I have heard do nothing but complain
about this and that all year about your paper.
If you answer your cell phone in class, during a test,
; or in clinical again, I'm going throw the freaking
thing. You know who you are.
1 really hope no one fell for that April Fool's bulletin!
So, you've had seven advisors in five years and you
"hope" you have all your requirements completed?
What's the matter? Can't you read? You should be
able to tell what the requirements for your major
are - they are listed in your catalog. Stop blaming
everyone else.
I quote, "Could TEC please higher another narrow
minded conservative?" end quote. It's hire you
narrow-minded liberal. Hire, hire, hire.Jeeezdo I miss
Tony. If liberals had brains they'd be dangerous.
ECU at best is nothing more than a four-year com-
munity college.
I love it that every time 1 get a ticket on my car from
ECU police, it spells my license plate wrong. Suckas!
Guess I won't be paying your tickets!
Did anyone else think the Cavern sucked Friday night?
It was too expensive to get in, $10 and there was no
band playing or anything, and there were too many
non-students in there. We then went to the Element
which was cheaper and a much better atmosphere.
; Why do I need to take an exercise class when I'm a
dance major?
The Vice Chancellor is just mad because he doesn't
i get to rant!
; To the person referring to me, the girl driving the red
mustang, if people would learn how to go the speed
! limit on Greenville Boulevard then 1 wouldn't be such
i a crazy driver. Maybe you should learn how to drive.
And P.S. Nothing happened and that is why I kept
; driving.
If you check out a library book please check it back in on
time. There are other people waiting to use that book!
After 20 years, I have come to one conclusion, girls
talk way too much.
In My Opinion
(KRT) The polar ice sheets
are melting faster than anyone
predicted. At their seasonal nadir
last September, arctic ice floes
were 20 percent smaller than the
average of the past 25 years.
Two studies published earlier
this month suggest that large
parts of south Florida, the Gulf
Coast and Cape Cod could be
inundated by rising sea levels in
fewer than 100 years. Although
sea levels have been rising since
the end of the last ice age, the rate
has accelerated since the 1990s.
The new studies come on the
heels of other ominous research:
A recent NASA report showed that
Greenland's ancient glaciers are
melting fast. In January, the God-
dard Institute for Space Studies
reported that 2005 was the warm-
est year on record in the Northern
Hemisphere. Since the 1890s, the
five warmest years on record are,
in order, 2005, 1998, 2002, 2003
and 2004. See a trend?
As if that weren't enough, the
United Nation's World Meteo-
rological Organization reported
late last year that global con-
centrations of carbon dioxide
reached their highest recorded
level in 2004. Indeed, between
1994 and 2004, concentrations of
C02, the most abundant green-
house gas in the atmosphere,
grew by about 20 percent.
That carbon dioxide almost
certainly got into the atmosphere
from our smokestacks and tail-
pipes. Jonathan T. Overpeck of
the University of Arizona, lead
author of one of the new stud-
ies, thinks now is the time to do
something about it.
"If we don't like the idea
of flooding out New Orleans,
major portions of south Florida
and many other valued parts of
the coastal U.S we will have to
commit soon to a major effort to
stop most emissions of carbon
into the atmosphere he said.
As with any science, there is
room for disagreement over details
and interpretations. But the broad
outline of global climate change
fueled by human activity gets
clearer with each new study.
President Bush conceded last year
that global climate change is real.
But he has yet to do much about it.
Earlier this month, a federal
appeals court slapped down the
Bush administration's attempt
to allow aging coal-fired power
plants to continue spewing carbon
dioxide and other pollutants into
the air. The administration tried to
impose its rules after it failed to get
what it wanted from Congress.
If melting polar ice sheets and
glaciers, rising surface tempera-
tures and disappearing permafrost
aren't enough to break the ice and
start a serious conversation, it's
hard to imagine what would be.
Midway through his second
term, Mr. Bush is said to be
increasingly concerned about
his place in history. Here's his
chance to do something about it
- while there's still time to act.
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Letters To The Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies every
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the regular
academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays during the
summer "Our View" is the opinion of the editorial board
and is written by editorial board members TEC welcomes
letters to the editor which are limited to 250 words (which
may be edited for decency or brevity). We reserve the
right to edit or reject letters and all letters must be signed
and include a telephone number. Letters may be sent
via e-mail to edHwctheeastcaroliniancom or to The East
Carolinian, SeHHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
The East Carolinian would like to
apologize for any misunderstandings
tliat may have occurred from the article
titled "Baseball Begins Again, "printed on
April 4, in me opinion section, in which
the writer accidentally implies tliat the
nutrition store CNC carries or supplies
athletes with illegal or banned substances.
GNCdoes not sell banned substances, and
it was not the writer's intention to imply
tltis. The following was a letter sent to
TEC from Benjamin Pratt, Director of
Corporate Communications witli GNC,
in order to state that GNC does not carry
illegalbanned substances.
Dear Editor,
GNC Corporation does not
sell banned substances, and ath-
letes who use GNC products are
not at risk of failing drug tests.
In "Baseball Begins Again
published Tuesday, April 4, a writer
wrote, "No player in their sic right
mind would step foot in a GNC
store Athletes may, in fact, not only
"step foot" in our stores, but also use
our sports nutrition supplements
without fear of damaging their
reputations or legacies. We demand
that you publish a correction, both
in print and on your Web site.
We understand why you
think of GNC when you refer
to sports nutrition supplements.
GNC is by far the largest national
specialty retailer of nutritional
supplements, so our name is the
first that comes to mind. But
when GNC is wrongly associated
with the use of illegal or banned
substances by athletes, our brand
and business are damaged.
GNC has been helping athletes
train for decades. Many professional
athletes, across the spectrum of
sports, use our products. We are not
aware of a single instance in which
an athlete has been found in viola-
tion of any doping policy based
on his or her use of our products.
Sincerely,
Benjamin Pratt
Director
Corporate Communications
GNC Corporation
Pray for the peace of Jerusalem
FY1: There is no such thing as "reverse racism By defi-
nition, racism is prejudice againsta certain race, not just
prejudice against black people. Therefore, when white
people are somehow disadvantaged in an effort to eradi-
i cate the prejudice against blacks, it is still called racism!
The day that I stop riding the elevators to the second
floor is the day when you come on the elevator and
take me off.
Is there anyone else besides me that think this recent
surge in Chuck Norris' popularity is ridiculously
i retarded?
I Why is it that Rachelle gets all the publicity when
there are 37 girls from Clement that lost their homes?
They have to move to other rooms and have lost some
stuff because it's completely black.
I want summer. I want 100-degree weather. I want
to walk outside and instantly be drenched in sweat. I
j want to never be cold again. I want to wear flip-flops
' and spaghetti straps wherever 1 go. 1 want to lie out
by the pool. I want to be tan again. As a matter of
fact, I want the weather we had back in February
strange, as that may seem.
Attention Elementary Ed Majors: You are going
to be spending at least seven hours in the class-
room with students, not including time before
and after school, planning and organizing events.
Why is it that you can't manage to spend the
entire class period you signed up for in class?
Your advisor should never be your potential future
employer, especially if you have no respect for them
because then you'll have to hate them as well.
To the girl who was behind me the other day at West
End and used her guest meal to buy me a meal because
I ran out, you are awesome times three and I just
thought you should know that. Thank you!
Since 1 work for Campus Safety and check on the
dorms at night I would just like to say I really enjoy
watching allthe drunken students try to make their
way from downtown to the Mendenhall Bus Stop on
Friday and Saturday nights. I swear it's like watching
a boozed-up American Gladiator competition!
I love ECU and I am from New York, sue me.
I'm pretty pissed, off that ECU doesn't have many
concerts and good music events
In response to the girl who wanted to know whether
guys just want to get some, or if they really want a
relationship. Wake up! All guys want to get some.
Editor's Note: The finite Rant is tut anonymous way fin students and staftin the
El :U iommunity to voke their opinions. Submissions can be submittetl anonymously
tmline at wwvr.theeastcaroiinianxtmt, ore-mailed to editormheeaskartrltnlan.
torn. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity.
I





"
nil 5, 2006
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Page A5 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
April 5, 2006
Top 5s:
Top 5 Movies:
1. tee Age: The Meltdown
2. Inside Man
3.471
4. Failure to Launch
5. V for Vendetta
Top 5 Pop Albums:
1. Prince
2. Various Artists
3. James Blunt
4. Barry Manilow
5. Ne-Yo
Top 5 TV Shows:
1. "American Idol"
2. "American Idol"
3. "Desperate Housewives"
4. "CSI: Miami"
5. "60 Minutes"
Top 5 Books:
1. The Da Vinci Code
2. The Tenth Circle
3. The 5th Horseman
4. Dirty Blonde
5. The Templar Legacy
New DVDs This Week:
1. The Chronicles ofNamia: The Lion,
The Witch and The Wardrobe
2. Brokeback Mountain
3. Crash
4. Night Watch
5. Little Manhattan
Coming Soon:
1. The Benchwarmers
2. Lucky Number Slevin
3. Phaf Girls
4. Take the Lead
5.95 Miles to Go
Getting to the 'bottom' of things
The outcome of the "super
bowl" of toilet paper
AARON BORREGO
STAFF WRITER
So 1 know what you guys
are thinking when reading the
headline - "what are they think-
ing?" Well ladies and gents, the
minds in the assignment depart-
ment granted me the privilege of
covering hard-hitting issues such
as toilet paper, which in some
cases, can be hard-hitting if you
are not careful.
So when it came time for me
to cover an important task relat-
ing to toilet paper, I thought to
myself, "where could I be better
educated 1 looked to none other
than the actual people who use
the substance, the little people.
When asked, Kristin
Murnane, our very own Assistant
Features Editor, recommended the
wet toilet paper. When asked for
clari- fication, Murnane
specified Kleenex
Cot t e n el le
wipes.
She also remarked that it
"makes me feel baby fresh after
doing the deed just like
a shower To my
amazement, 1
wasn't gagging
or falling into
a toilet to pray
to the ivory
plumbing
utensil. The last
thing I need is
to have to feel
like a wet dog's
nose all day.
I seem to
remember a time, B
not to terribly long
ago, when there was
a scare about colored
toilet paper. This certain type
of toilet paper was said to give
the user colon cancer. If that was
really to be the case, then why
would the gods that be still give
toilet paper using the same ink,
in prints, our wiping pleasure - a
sadistic intention? They wouldn't,
so stop being paranoid.
Not to be to undermining,
but 1 believe that there would
need to be some interesting facts
and certain tests to back up my
point. My point being that
I believe my initial
pick would have
to be Angel Soft
toilet paper,
but I have
been proven
to be wrong on
more than one
rare occasion.
It is believed
that although
the earliest form
of toilet paper
on a roll wasn't
' introduced until
1880, people made
do with many vari-
ous items that stemmed
from their environments. Corn
cobs, leaves and sticks or even
linen were used to quench those
"urgent" needs.
I, personally, think that as a
principle, places like ECU need
to upgrade to something besides
that one ply stuff. In a humble
guy's opinion, there needs to be
a little bit more than just sand
paper between my hands and
well you get the point.
As a weird test, I actually
slept upon a few different types
of toilet paper. I found over a
course of a week, Angel Soft and
Charmin Double Roll seem to
be the best. I know this test was
weird, but follow me for a second.
It is my feeling that the softest
ply suits my needs, even in sleep.
Therefore, if it is sleep I pursue, I
guess I am covered, but if it is for
the enjoyment of a well-earned
"dropping then I feel confident
I wasn't wrong.
Now let's analyze these two
products in terms of price. Angel
Soft is cheap and very willing to
pick everything I leave behind.
Charmin, with its effervescent
and ubiquitous label, commands
respect for its track record of
also grabbing everything I wish
it to, but I still pick Angel Soft.
Hands down, or up, whichever
you prefer.
So Borrego picks Angel
Soft to keep watch over
his naughtiest of parts. Js
You better believe I will
recommend this toilet paper to
some of you people in my classes,
it seems as thought you forgot
what toilet paper and soap were
that's another assigned article
though.
This writer can be reached at
featurei@theeastcarolinian.com.
Natalie Portman: She's bold enough to be bald
Horoscopes:
Aries - You're in the mood to knock
down barriers and maybe even walls.
Better come up with an overall plan
before you do real damage.
Taurus - Save enough cash on your
shopping trip to get a little gift. A
friend of yours would appreciate any
information you find out there.
Gemini - Thoughts turn to business
as you realize there's a profit to be
made. All you have to do is provide
a necessary 'service, and well. Do it
better than anyone else.
Cancer - Although you still have to
deal with issues you would rather
ignore, don't fret. You're stronger now,
and you'll be able to express your
thoughts quite well. Full speed ahead!
Leo - Once you've made the
connection, you'll find there's more
work to be done. You've advanced
into new territory. Now, prove you
deserve to be there!
Virgo - First, accept a creative
assignment. Then, tell your friends all
about it. They'll help you meet the very
person to show you how to do it.
Libra - A respected person is
considering you for more authority.
Don't be afraid; this could mean a big
raise in pay. You can do this.
Scorpio - Meet with loved ones and
start making big plans for the future.
Toss some crazy ideas around and
see which ones stick.
Sagittarius - What you need is new
technology that will make your home
more comfortable. You'll most likely
save money on energy bills, too.
Check it out.
Capricorn - Somebody you don't
like all the time is your best tutor now.
Ask tough questions and be willing to
really hear the answers.
Aquarius - Listen to a person who's
practically at their wit's end. You can
provide the solution to a problem that
has them stopped.
Pisces - First, you'll find something
of value or something you've been
looking for - could be the same
thing. Then, you'll have a great idea
that benefits somebody you love. It's
a good day.
Fun Facts:
All polar bears are lett-handed.
You have no sense of smell when
you're sleeping.
The search engine Google got its
name from the word googol, which
refers to the number one with 100
zeros after it.
In Kentucky, it is illegal to carry ice-
cream in your back pocket.
In the United States, more than 10
percent of lottery prizes go unclaimed.
The first domain name ever registered
was Symbolics.com.
Natalie Portman shows off her short hair at the Golden Globe Awards.
Natalie Portman goes to
any length for a movie
MARIANNE BARROW
STAFF WRITER
It's not often that you come
across a young actress who has
the whole package - brains,
beauty and incredible talent.
However, Natalie Portman seems
to have all that and more on lock-
down. It takes a lot of guts for a
woman whose career depends on
attractiveness to shave her head
during a shot for a movie. She
could have worn a cap and gone
through extensive make-up, but
Portman is fully committed to
doing anything to make a great
movie.
Natalie Hershalg was born
in 1981 in Jerusalem, Israel,
and later used Portman for her
acting career. At the age of three
she moved to America with her
parents, who eventually settled
in New York. While eating in a
pizza parlor at age 11, she was
discovered by a talent agent. At
such a young age it was suggested
that Portman try modeling, but
she was more interested in acting.
She made her way into show busi-
ness in her highly regarded debut
film The Professional. She played a
12-year-old girl who was the only
weakness to an accomplished
assassin.
After getting her name and
abilities out in Hollywood, Port-
man made several other films
including Mars Attacks but she
then decided to take a break
and concentrate on high school.
She earned straight As at her
hometown high-school in Syos-
set, N.Y.
Education is extremely
important to Portman, who
enjoys math and literature and
O
Did you know?
Natalie Portman:
1. Has trained In jazz, ballet
and tap-dancing
2. Said she would never be
In a horror or teen film
3. Math was her favorite
school subject because
"There's always an answer
is fluent in five languages.
To members of the press she
stated, "I'm going to college. I
don't care if it ruined my career.
I'd rather be smart than a movie
star She fulfilled those goals by
attending Harvard to study psy-
chology and received her college
diploma in 2003.
Portman's sensibility and
class shine through in her per-
formances as well. Her trademark
roles usually portray a character
who is overly intelligent and
mature for her age - a role that
is not so far off from her own
life. She became famous world-
wide through her role as Senator
Amidala in the Stars Wars series,
and after that, she began landing
more and more key roles.
The average college student
can appreciate Garden State, a
recent indie film she starred in
alongside Zach Braff. This down
to earth movie is full of thought
provoking quotes that have
filled away messages throughout
campuses nationwide. Portman
shares this earthy and intellec-
tual exterior, which makes her
one of the most respected young
actors in the business right now.
You also probably recognize
her from the new hit picture
V for Vendetta. She was chosen
over Scarlett Johansson and
Bryce Dallas Howard to play the
main character, Evey. Like always,
Portman dedicated herself fully
to perfecting her character and
worked with a dialectologist to
perfect a British accent. But by
far, the act of shaving her head
has caused the biggest buzz for
Portman. She actually looked
see PORTMAN page A6
New season, new me Best theme parks of Mid-Atlantic region
Spring gives us all an excuse to tidy up
SENSIBLE PARTIER
TRUTH WRITER
It's spring and it seems like Mother Nature is
finally getting her act together. The blue skies and
warmth hints at summer and new possibilities.
Personally, I know that I have desperately been in
need of some spring cleaning. We're not talking
about cleaning house either, with this new season
I have been craving a new outlook.
I've had a crazy past couple of weeks (I know,
who hasn't) and along with chucking alj of my
old emotional baggage, I'm ready to come clean
and enjoy the cloudless days. Breaking up with a
long-time boyfriend has been painful but strangely
liberating. Don't get me wrong; there was wallow-
ing and self-pity, but at the end of it all, I only felt
more confident that I can do anything I want on
my own. So I made a hair appointment to get it all
chopped off and have a pact with a friend to adopt
a new golden glow through self-tanning. Sure, 1
know, a new hairdo and a tan won't fix everything,
but boy is It a good distraction and ego boost while
you're wading through the nastier issues.
I've been feeling a lot better lately, maybe
because of a little exterior revamping, but mostly
because I'm learning to put a lot of things into per-
spective. Not to sound like a brochure or anything,
but college really is a time to discover yourself and,
more importantly, to like what you find.
Now I'm handing this right of passage off to all
of you to encourage you to do the same. This time
of the year is the perfect chance to shake things
out, get a new perspective and just be able to relax
and savor the ride.
Maybe you're nervous about turning over a
new leaf, and 1 completely understand. With big
So many options near
Greenville
TOMEKA STEELE
SENIOR WRITER
Summer is just around the
corner and everyone's looking for
fun ways to spend a day. Roller
coasters are the ultimate thrill.
They give us stomach-turning
exhilaration and loads of amuse-
ment. There are many places in
North Carolina and neighboring
states where one can find some
of the best roller coaster rides and
other thrill rides around.
Busch Gardens, Paramount
Carowinds and Emerald Point's
Wet 'n Wild Water Park are just a
few places within a couple of hours
drive where one can find all the
roller coasters they can fathom.
In Williamsburg, Va Busch
Gardens has been a tourist des-
tination for people from the
East Coast for years. They have
a variety of attractions, rides,
shows and animal attractions for
people of all ages.
Busch Gardens will have
an updated ride this year that
will include footage and scene
enhancements in 3-D and greater
ride vehicle propulsion. The ride is
called "Curse of DarKastle" and is
sure to be a hit amongst the other
fantastic roller coasters at Busch
Gardens.
"Alpengeist" is one of the best
rides at Busch Gardens. It is the
world's tallest inverted roller
coaster. Riders experience every
motion while sitting in a hanging
chair that speeds along the rails
at high speeds and down a 170-
foot drop.
For an old school roller coaster
feel but still a heart pumping
thriller, "Loch Ness Monster" at
Busch Gardens is another excit-
ing roller coaster. Reaching speeds
see COASTER page A6 Riders let their feet dangle on this roller coaster.
Summer Vacation Series: Remembering Magic
Take a trip to Disney World
SARAH CAMPBELL
STAFF WRITER
Growing up, one of my all time favorite vaca-
tions was my family's trip to Walt Disney World. As
a child, the magic of Disney World seemed too good
to be true; it was like heaven on Earth. However, I
recently began to wonder if a trip there now would
be as magical.
I couldn't quite remember everything that
Disney World had to offer, so I decided to do a bit
of research. It turns out that the happiest place on
Earth holds magic for people of all ages.
The four theme parks are Disney World's claim
to fame. Each of them offers visitors something
equally as unique as magical.
Two of Disney World's most famous attrac-
see SPRING page A6 It's just like the sign says; it is the Happiest Celebration on Earth.
see DISNEY page A6





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROUNIAN FEATURES
4-0! '
(ot somdiung to soy? 3cnd us yout Pimte Hanls!
Casey's 2nd Annual

Race for Kids" 5k runwaik
Presented by The Greek Community at
East Carolina University
Benefiting The Boys and Girls Club of Pitt County
Sunday April 9th, 2006 l:OOPM, Greenville NC
CONTACT: Matt (919) 389-9269
mlrOII2@ecu.edu
www.ecu.edustudentlifegreek
UOdSlGr from page A5
of 60 miles per hour and featuring
a 114-foot drop, this coaster takes
you through loops and will have
you screaming your head off. It
will also have you laughing at the
face you made on the drop that
flashes on monitors once you exit
the ride.
Paramount Carowinds on
the North Carolina and South
Carolina border is another great
theme park to find excellent roller
coasters. All together this park has
nine fabulous thrill rides made for
terrifying amusement. "Thunder
Road" is one classic twin-racing
roller coaster that takes you back-
ward or forward. Backward is the
best especially down the huge
drop.
"Hurler" is also a great wooden
roller coaster that has amazing
drops and views of the park from
the top. One of the most known
thrill rides at Carowinds is "Drop
Zone, Stunt Tower In this ride,
people are suspended in hanging
seats and pulled up 16 stories and
then dropped and free fall at 56
miles per hour.
For the summer months,
everyone wants to get to a great
water park with thrill rides
that keep you cool at the same
time. Wet 'n Wild Emerald Point in
Greensboro, N.C. is theperfect place
to cool off and have tons of fun.
They have plenty of
water slides such as "Twin
Twisters an enclosed water slide
with more than :50 feet of twists
and turns. "Daredevil Drop
another water slide that drops ou
76 feet down.
Wet 'n Wild also has "Sky-
coaster which uses cabli
hang people and pulls then, up
into the air and lets them
fall to the ground. For fun ai
stay cool, Wet n' Wild is a gieal
place to be.
"I've been to Wet 'n Wild Emer-
ald Point lots of times and I I' ive
it. It's the perfect place to go
hot summer's day for great slid "
said senior sociology majo. lil-
fany Bonaparte.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
D!Sney from page15
tions, Splash Mountain
and Space Mountain, are
housed in Disney's Magic King-
dom. Here, visitors can also take
a trip to Cinderella's Castle, the
Swiss Family Treehouse and the
Haunted Mansion, Tower of Terror.
If you've always wanted to
travel around the world, Disney's
Epcot is the perfect treat for you.
Epcot offers visitors a chance to
immerse themselves in the cul-
tures of countries ranging from
Japan to Morocco.
Journey into the wonderful
world of show-biz at Disney's
MGM Studios. Here, visitors get
a once in a lifetime opportunity
to explore the behind the scenes
action of movies, television
shows and stage performances.
Disney's Animal Kingdom
offers visitors a taste of the wild.
Upon entrance into the Animal
Kingdom, visitors are struck with
the beauty of the Tree of Life,
which has 325 animals carved into
it to created a unique work of art.
On the Kilimanjaro Safari,
visitors can see animals such
as giraffes, hippos, elephants,
rhinos and lions roaming free
in the savannah landscape.
Besides these four theme parks,
there are countless other things
for Disney visitors to explore.
Disney's Wide World of Sports
Complex offers visitors an oppor-
tunity to view memorabilia from
legends like Wayne Gretzky and
Shaquille O'Neal.
If you're the life of the party,
you may want to venture to
Downtown Disney. The West
side offers restaurants, theatre
and shows, while Pleasure Island
is filled with live entertalnmt n(
and nightclubs.
Venturing into the magi il
world of Disney reminds people
of all ages that you're never
old to have a good time.
For more Information
about Walt Disney World's
theme parks and resorts visit
waltdisneyworld.com.
One thing to remember when
planning a trip like this on
that it will cost you quite a bit oi
money if you want to do It light.
For those of you graduating in
May, this would make a great tdp
to celebrate your accomplishment,
so start saving now and you
have a great time with all of you l
friends as a last college trip.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
POflman from page A5 Spring from page A5
forward to having her head
shaved live during a torture scene,
ieportedly saying that she had
wanted to do it for a long time.
Though she is still very young,
Portman has commanded respect
and admiration from her peers as
well as audiences.
It's refreshing for girls'to
see a young woman with such a
bright future who excels in many
different areas, but what's even
more captivating is her humble-
ness and understated elegance.
Whatever the reason, one thing
is certain and that is no matter
what it takes, Natalie Portman is
going places.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
changes come a lot of attention,
and sometimes a little ridicule.
People might look at you dif-
ferently or judge you because of
your newfound self-acceptance.
That can make anyone a little
hesitant, but people judge - it's
just what they do. Some judge
too quickly, and unfortunately
in our age group's case, judgment
weighs heavily on appearance.
If we know that it's impos-
sible to please everyone, why is
everyone exhausting themselves
trying? By just letting go of the
small things, you might find that
understanding the big picture
is easier.
So maybe you're a little weird,
who isn't? It's possible that you
don't look photo shoot ready
every day of your life, who doe?
Perhaps you tripped on the side-
walk in front of dozens of people
one day, who cares?! Oh wan
that was me last Thursday. Bui
after being completely horrific d
for a second and straightenin
my crooked aviator sunglasses I
got over it and laughed.
So go soak up the new seas. n,
and the new changes you have
the ability to make for yours
Put on those oversized shades
and strut through Wright Mace.
When you see the girl matching
right next to you with the newly
cut hair and slightly bronzed fact,
don't hesitate to give a little wave
This writer can be'evntacted at
features@theeastcarolinian. con i
Service
North Carolina
April 3-8, 2006
Every campus in the UNC system is participating in this statewide
prelect sponsored by Student Government Association.
ECMs Goal To complete 1000 hours of community service within
city of Greenville during this week of April 3-8.
For mere Information, contact our Service NC Representation,
Ion Massachi at ISM0512@ecu.edB or
Contact ECU Velunteor Center to sign up for a service project
at 328-2735328-2802 or Weunteer@ccu.edu
Come learn more
about the different
majors and
concentrations
offered by the
College of Business.
Socials will be held after presentations.
Pizza and sodas will be provided.
Taking
Care of
Business!
Marketing:
Monday, April 3rd
5-6:30pm
Bate 1032
Management:
Tuesday, April 4th
5 - 6:30pm
Bale 3007
Finance:
Wednesday, April 5
5 - 6:30pm
Bate 1031
Decision Sciences:
Monday, April 10lh
5 - 6:30pm
Bate 1032
Accounting:
Tuesday, April lllh
5 - 6:30pm
Bate 3007
Not sure which major is right for you?
Come lo all of our programs to help you
decide.
- Meet your professors
- Explore career options
- Speak to alumni with real world
experience
m
College Of Business ra
Please Call 328-1084 to RSVP
The Pirati





Page A7 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY April 5, 2006
V.
2006 MLB Season Outlook
Predictions for this year's
diamond action
JOSH FERNANDEZ
STAFF WRITER
Spring is the best time of year
- beautiful, warm weather, school
coming to a close, troubles of the
winter slowly melting away. But
for me, the best aspect of spring
is Opening Day - the start of
another season of Major League
Baseball.
Every year since I can remem-
ber, the first few days of April
were always so exciting for me.
My family, being Orioles fans,
would make the short trek to
Baltimore from Olney, Md for
O's games regularly. It was the
best feeling, seeing the backdrop
of the city with Camden Yards
standing majestically in front,
especially for the first time of any
particular season.
There was nothing quite like
reaching my seat (third base
side, 10 rows back) after a long
fallwinter of Redskins football,
tearing open a fresh bag of pea-
nuts and sitting back for one of
162 games that, in all likelihood,
I would watch either in person or
on television.
However, I must digress.
Now that the season has
officially begun (two days ago),
many of you are probably won-
dering what we have in store for
MLB's 2006 offering of baseball
action. Well, due to my natural
obsession with baseball that
has once again surfaced in the
face of another season, I will
share with you my observations,
ruminations, and other ations"
pertaining to the outlook of the
season, division by division.
American League East
The AL East is proving once
again it's up there with the most
competitive divisions in the
league and is, without a doubt,
the most popular. It is home to
the New York Yankees and Boston
Red Sox, the two most popular,
well-funded and talented teams
in all of baseball. Division-mates
Baltimore, Toronto and Tampa
Bay are once again in position
to ride on the coat-tails of those
perennial powerhouses.
However, don't count out
any of these teams, especially
Toronto, a club that, this off-
season, bolstered itself on the
mound and in the batter's box.
The additions of former-Oriole
closer B.J. Ryan (a 2005 all-star),
pitcher A.J. Burnett and big bat
Troy Glaus should spark more
production from an already
highly talented team that has
been essentially out of the picture
since winning the World Series
almost 15 years ago.
As much as I'd like to see my
Oriples surprise everyone and
win the division, something
they haven't done since 1997, I
see the Blue Jays taking second
place with the Orioles and Devil
Rays battling for fourth or fifth.
First and thrrd will be either New
York or Boston - I'm leaning
toward the Yankees taking the
division once again, especially
after watching them slap a 15-
spot on the Athletics Monday
night. However, offense alone
won't win them a 27th division
title. Their pitching has been
under much scrutiny by the
media and baseball-heads and
must perform more consistently
than last season.
Once again, the story behind
this division will be Boston and
New York's $100 million-plus ros-
ters versus the relatively humble
payrolls of the other's - never-
theless, look for the result to be
New York at the top, followed by
Toronto, Boston, Baltimore and
what will be a scrappy and com-
petitive Tampa Bay club rounding
out the division.
AL Central
The world champion Chi-
cago White Sox reside in this
division, a team that finished
with 99 wins in 2005, but could
have easily ripped off well over
100 if it wasn't for a late-season
slide. Obviously that doesn't
matter since they took home the
hardware, but it's worth noting,
nevertheless.
The big challenger to their
divisional dominance is Cleve-
land. The Indians just resigned
22-year-old center fielder Grady
Sizemore to a $23 million con-
tract, which is the most ever guar-
anteed money for a player with
less than two years of major league
service. They also are coming
off a 93-win season and are
surely seeking redemption after
their collapse in last year's play-
offs. Led by guys like Sizemore,
Travis Hafner and Jhonny Peralta,
offense surely shouldn't be hard
to come by in Ohio this year.
However, the Twins can't be
counted out; this is a team that,
for the past several years, had
been at the top of this division
before the inception of the newly
dominant White Sox. Look for
catcher Joe Mauer, one of the
purest hitters in baseball, to have
his breakout year. Also, long-time
Twin Torii Hunter, if healthy,
could help this club remain at the
top of the Central division.
But the main reason the
Twins will do well (and continue
to do so) is their farm system.
They groom some of the best
players (Boston's David Ortiz,
for example) and know how and
when to use them.
I don't normally like to write
teams off from the start, but in
this division, it's safe to do so
- don't look for Kansas City or
Detroit to make much noise this
year, but simultaneously, don't
totally disregard them. They
could do a bit of damage to the
other teams in their division, but
won't be sitting atop the stand-
ings. I see it like this, Chicago,
Cleveland, Minnesota, Detroit
and KC bringing up the rear.
AL West
The West should turn out
similarly to how it looked in
'05, but the only difference will
be Oakland taking the division
instead of Los Angeles (at Ana-
heim, mind you). The A's are a
very versatile team and have so
many tools; they even have the
option of possibly dealing Barry
Zito (who lasted had a rough
see MLB page A8
NFL Draft 2006: So
many picks with
so many picks
Talented DBs provide
deep talent pool in
secondary
RON CLEMENTS
STAFF WRITER
The Pirates will be wrapping up their spring workouts this week and will play the annual Purple-Gold game Saturday afternoon.
ECU enters last week of spring drills
(SID) ECU officially began
its last week of spring workouts
under the guidance of second-
year head coach Skip Holtz and
staff with a two-hour session
Monday afternoon at the Cliff
Moore Practice Complex.
The Pirates returned to action
in shells after conducting their
second intra-squad scrimmage
of the season Friday afternoon
at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. After
turning in its 13th practice of the
spring period Monday, ECU has
just one more workout scheduled
for Wednesday before closing
camp with the Purple-Gold Game
Saturday.
"1 thought we made some
more progress Friday Holtz said
after reviewing the game tape
over the weekend. "We've still got
a ways to go to get where we want
to be but there were many posi-
tives to build on, both offensively
and defensively
Holtz indicated he adjusted
the program's depth chart
Monday morning to reflect
some of the more impressive
performances from Friday's con-
test. One of the most notable
changes was the promotion of
redshirt freshman Brett Clay
to the sole understudy position
behind James Pinkney at quar-
terback after sharing the status
with Patrick Pinkney last week.
In addition, Holtz shuffled
personnel on the No. 2 offensive
line with the insertion of fresh-
man transfer Andrew Farr at right
tackle, redshirt freshman Stephen
Heis at right guard, junior Fred
Hicks at center, redshirt fresh-
man Joshua Stahl at left guard
and senior Lance Neisz at left
tackle. On the other hand, he
also said that some players solidi-
fied their standing after Friday's
scrimmage such as second-team
defensive tackles Wendell Chavis
and Dontre Brown, along with
top reserve safeties Herman Best
and Chris Mattocks.
"It's all about making plays
Holtz explained. "While I was
pleased with the intensity, enthu-
siasm and the physical part of it,
this is the stage of the spring where
you look for execution and people
who consistently make plays and
a difference out there. As I've said
before, this is a work in prog-
ress and changes are part of it
After opening Monday's ses-
sion with its traditional indi-
vidual drills, ECU quickly moved
to an extended team segment and
spent the remainder of practice
working on blocking assign-
ments deep within the Pirates'
playbook and different defensive
coverages and alignments. In
addition, Holtz also spent time
covering situational tendencies
again, such as clock management,
down and distance and red-zone
efficiency.
After Wednesday's full-
gear practice, ECU'S coaching
staff will conduct a player draft
to select roster positions for
the Purple-Gold Game, which
is scheduled for a 3:00 p.m.
kickoff inside Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium.
Tickets, which are priced at
$5.00 for the contest or $10.00
with the addition of a plate of
barbecue from the Pirate Purple
Gold Pigskin Pigout Party, can be
purchased at the ECU Athletics
Ticket Office or by calling (252)
328-2300 locally or (800) DIAL-
ECU outside the Greenville area.
The defensive backfield may
be where NFL teams find the
most depth in this year's NFL
Draft. As many as 12 players from
the secondary could be drafted in
the first round.
Michael Huff, after making
big plays in the Rose Bowl for
Q the National Champion Texas
55 Longhorns, leads the 2006 class
of talented defensive backs.
A versatile player who can
play either cornerback or safety,
Huff is an excellent tackier with
good coverage skills and size. He's
6 feet 1 inches and 205 pounds
with great instincts, which play a
part in his proclivity for being in
the right place at the right time
to make plays - similar to that of
Baltimore's Ed Reed.
Huff is not the only DB who
can play corner or safety. Vir-
ginia Tech's Jimmy Williams,
Tennessee's Jason Allen and
Donte Whitner of Ohio State
all possess that same quality.
Williams, who played corner in
Blacksburg, has the ability to be a
shut-down corner, but his size at
6 feet 3 inches and 216 pounds,
gives NFL teams the option of
putting him at safety in running
situations.
Both Huff and Williams will
be drafted within the first 16
picks. The Detroit Lions covet
Huff with the ninth pick while
St. Louis at 11, Denver at 15 or
Miami at 16 are likely spots for
Williams.
Ohio State's Whitner has
been sjiooting up draft boards
and is now a probably first-
rounder along with his Columbus
teammate, cornerback Ashton
Youboty. Kansas City is torn
between Youboty and Clemson's
Hill. Hill's 4.3 time in the 40-yard
dash at the combine popped
open many eyes. Should he
still be available come the 20th
pick, the Chiefs would definitely
snatch him up. If not, a corner
like Youboty would still fill a
need and not exactly be a bad
consolation prize.
Huff, Williams and Hill
should be the first three defen-
sive back taken off the board.
Before the Buckeyes, Whitner '
and Youboty get drafted, Miami's
Kelly Jennings should go. I have
Jennings rated as the fourth best
DB, but that is no slight to his
talent. He's not as big as Williams
or as fast as Hill, but is still a solid
cover corner.
While his stats at "The U"
may not be that impressive, it's
mainly because opposing teams
threw away from him. He's a
legitimate cover corner with 4.39
speed and an exceptional ability
to change direction.
Youboty, one of several junior
DBs in the draft, should be the
first underclassman taken, but
followed very closely by Southern
Cal safety Darnell Bing. Bing,
6-2, 220, is a hard-hitting safety
and a sure tackier. The New York
Giants, who own the 25th pick,
could make the Big Apple home
for Bing.
Two other juniors that have
helped themselves immensely at
the combine and other workouts
see NFL page A9





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN SPORTS
4-05-06
MLB
from page A7
opening outing to say the least) and not severely
hurting their pitching in the process.
The acquisition of Frank Thomas could be ben-
eficial if he stays healthy, but that could be asking
I lot from the Big Hurt, who is entering his 16th
season. However, he looked to be perfectly healthy
after taking Randy Johnson deep opening night in
Oakland in his first at bat of the season.
I don't see the Rangers or Mariners surpassing
the aforementioned clubs for the sole reason of
pitching, or lack thereof. Seattle is still in a tran-
sitional phase where they are figuring out their
team identity after a complete drop-off from their
unprecedented 116 wins in 2001 and 93 in 2002.
The Rangers are in a precarious early-season
position due to several pitchers finding their way
to the disabled list, most notably their ace, Adam
Katon. If the bats can support the pitchers until
the club learns what kind of staff they really have
throwing for them, the Rangers could start off
well; the only question is if they have staying
power because in MLB, longevity directly relies on
pitching. My guess on how I believe this division
will look come October is this: Oakland, LA (at
Anaheim), Seattle and Texas.
National League East
Annually the most competitive division in all
of baseball, the NL East looks to be much different
from last year's result of nine wins separating first
from fifth (the first-place Braves finished 90-72, the
fifth place Nationals ended at .500, 81-81).
After the dismantlement of the Marlins by their
. front office (once again) and the bolstering of the
entire Mets roster, the status quo in this division
looks to be in favor of the team from Queens.
The Mets, by far, made the most off-season
moves out of all teams. First-time Mets in 2006
are Carlos Delgado, Paul Lo Duca, Billy Wagner,
Jorge Julio and Julio Franco, with stars like Pedro
Martinez, Carlos Beltran, Jose Reyes, Cliff Floyd
and David Wright returning. This team looks to
fare quite well in this division and, from what I've
observed, should reach the later rounds of the post-
season, possibly the World Series.
However, the Braves will never make it easy.
Atlanta has won this division 14 straight times and
is looking to continue that streak this season. After
hitting 51 homers in 2005, Andruw Jones, who also
went deep on opening day against the Dodgers,
should continue his powerful ways and belt-out
another 40-50 this year while looking to up his aver-
age from his mediocre .263 effort from last season.
The main key to the Braves winning, though, is
for their young guys to step up. Ryan Langerhans, Jeff
Francoeur and Wilson Betemit put out unexpected
numbers last year and should continue that trend
under the watchful eye of manager Bobby Cox. The
addition of Edgar Renteria to the lineup will bol-
ster their offense as well; his return to the NL will
rekindle his production from his days as a Cardinal.
The Nationals and Phillies are a solid teams,
but I don't see them competing with Atlanta or
New York. And you can forget about the Marlins
this year since they resemble nothing of what they
were just a half-year ago; rebuilding is the name of
the game for Florida and a record at or near .500
would be quite a treat to the Marlin-faithful. The
NL East will pan-out like so: New York, Atlanta,
Washington, PhHly and Florida - with much more
than nine wins separating first and fifth.
NL Central
The Cardinals will win 100 games again. They
have the best hitter alive in Albert Pujols, the best
game-manager alive in Tony LaRussa and a deep
roster of skilled hitters, defenders and base run-
ners. They can hit the long ball and steal bags;
their pitchers can strike out the side with pure
gas and pick apart hitters with pinpoint accuracy;
they have rabid fans that fill the seats whether the
opponent is the Astros or the Rockies. They are the
best franchise in baseball and will continue to be
until some significant event occurs that prohibits
them from being so.
Enough brown-nosing the Cards. The Cubs
are sitting on the razor's edge this year. They have
an excellent lineup that boasts speed and power;
guys like Derek Lee, Aramis Ramirez, Juan Pierre
and Jacque Jones will be the primary run producers
this year, while Kerry Wood and Mark Prior (on the
DL already) will try to last the whole season and be
productive for their ball club when they return to
the rotationbullpen.
The question is can they play as a cohesive team
and can Dusty Baker keep his club in a position of
contention for the length of the season?
The Brewers and Reds will be competitive this
season. Both teams shine in different spots of their ros-
ters but lack the depth that Houston and St. Louis have.
Cincinnati will look to pitchers Aaron Harang
and Bronson Arroyo to keep them in games, while
Adam Dunn, Ken Griffey and Felipe Lopez provide
run support. Milwaukee and Pittsburgh should
have decent seasons - about 70 wins each - but
shouldn't be much trouble for the big boys. Result:
St. Louis, Houston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Milwaukee
and Pittsburgh.
NL West

'T
This is easily the worst division in MLB. Their
winner last season, the San Diego Padres, finished
2005 at 82-80, one game up on the Nats, who
were in last place in the east. The other four teams
finished with sub500 records. This division will
end up in a much different result this time around,
but in regard to the paltry records, I don't see them
changing much.
The Dodgers look to be the team to beat this
season. After acquiring shortstop Rafael Furcal and
Nomar Garciaparra, the Dodgers added a bit of pop
to their order. But questions still look over what
type of team this will be after the disappointing
effort from last season.
Arizona and Colorado will be non-factors this
year. They lack the tools to compete in the race for
a playoff spot, much less in their own division. The
real question, obviously, is what to expect from
the Giants. Media-darling Barry Bonds is back,
along with all his off-field baggage and steroid-
fueled body - what should we expect from him?
He'll surely pass Babe Ruth; he's only got six more
homers to go.
But can he hit 40? 30? 15? Can he still almost
single-handedly lead his team like he's done in
the past? And can a team whose average age is
equivalent to the faculty of any given department
at ECU beat a bunch of young guys who are in their
primes? We'll have to wait and see, but I will tell you
this much: Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco,
Arizona and Colorado should be the order you can
expect to see in the standings come October.
So there you have them - my predictions and
thoughts on the newly started 2006 MLB season.
There's nothing better than a brand-new season
of baseball.

This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Not much will change here this season - in fact,
the final standings may very well end up identical
to last year's. St. Louis and Houston will remain
the powerhouses of this division and continue to
dominate the National League.
ECU Plastic
Surgery
Richard Zeri, MD
Call 252-744-5291
to schedule your
confidential consultation.
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4-05-06
THE EAST CAROUNIAN SPORTS
LaRussa won't let Cardinals pitch around Rollins NFL
from page A7
Rollins extended his hit streak to 37 games with a double in his last at bat Monday afternoon.
(AP)Tony La Russa watched
too many teams pitch around
Mark McGwire to let it happen
to Jimmy Rollins.
Rollins' hitting streak was
on the line when he came to the
plate with two outs in the eighth
inning and the Philadelphia Phil-
lies trailing the St. Louis Cardinals
13-5 in Monday's season opener.
Reliever Adam Wainwright's
first three pitches were out of the
strike zone, and those remain-
ing among the sellout crowd
of 44,614 at Citizens Bank Park
booed each one.
Before the next pitch, La
Russa got catcher Yadier Molina's
attention and signaled for a
strike. The right-handed Wain-
wright threw a fastball down
the middle and Rollins ripped
it down the right-field line for
a double to extend his hitting
streak to 37 games.
"You have to play the game.
We can't walk him in that spot
La Russa said.
It was the eighth time during
his streak that began against San
Francisco last Aug. 23 that Rollins
kept it going during his last at-bat.
He ought to thank La Russa for
giving him a chance this time.
La Russa was in his third year
managing the Cardinals in 1998
when McGwire hit 70 homers to
break Roger Maris' single-season
record of 61. It was frustrating for
La Russa to see McGwire often
get nothing to hit from pitch-
ers, especially in tight games. He
didn't want Rollins' streak to end
with a walk when his team had
an eight-run lead.
"Some of that is him, but
mostly it's about us La Russa
said. "I wouldn't want the St.
Louis Cardinals to walk him in
his last at-bat. That's not what
we represent
Rollins went 0-for-3 with a
sacrifice fly before getting his hit.
He hit two hard liners at center
fielder Jim Edmonds, grounded
out to first base and fouled out
his first time up when shortstop
David Eckstein made a spectacu-
lar, sliding catch near the railing
down the left-field line.
If the score was close, Rollins
probably wouldn't have swung at
a 3-0 pitch in the eighth inning.
Bitf Wainwright's fastball was too
good to pass up down eight runs.
"If he had thrown a ball and I
couldn't get to it, I wouldn't have
swung Rollins said.
Phillies manager Charlie
Manuel had conflicting thoughts
about Rollins swinging ahead 3-
0 in the count.
"You usually don't have to
give Jimmy the take sign if we're
losing the game Manuel said.
"I wanted to see him have every
chance. He got a good ball and he
hit it. But the question will always
be there about swinging 3-0
Wainwright had no problem
challenging Rollins.
"Obviously a guy who plays
as hard as he does and gets a
streak going like that, I respect
that Wainwright said. "It's kind
of a pitcher's duty if a guy has
something going like that to give
him a chance at it
A three-time All-Star short-
stop, Rollins ended the 2005
season with a 36-game hitting
streak, the ninth-longest over
one season in big league history,
and the longest in the majors
since 1987, when Paul Molitor hit
safely in 39 consecutive games.
Rollins' pursuit of Joe DiMag-
gio's major league record 56-game
hitting streak has a catch, however.
DiMaggio accomplished his
feat in the same season in 1941.
The major league marks for longest
hitting streak in one season and
longest hitting streak spanning
two seasons are separate records.
DiMaggio holds both with his
56-game streak in 1941, but there
is a difference in the NL records:
Pete Rose (1978) and Willie
Keeler (1897) share the NL mark
at 44 games. However, Keeler got
a hit in his final game of 1896,
so his run of 45 games overall is
the first record Rollins is chasing.
The previous Phillies fran-
chise record of 31 was set by Ed
Delahanty in 1899.
Rollins is a notoriously slow
starter with a .227 batting average
in April over the last two years.
But he had several good swings
against reigning NL Cy Young
Award winner Chris Carpenter
and relievers Randy Flores and
Wainwright in his first game.
"You don't get rewarded for
good swings Rollins said. "I
wasn't worried. As long as my
swing is there, I know I'll get a
hit somehow
Rollins goes for 38 on
Wednesday against tough left-
hander Mark Mulder. If he keeps
going, Rollins could tie Keeler at
45 next Thursday in Atlanta and
would have a chance to break the
NL mark in Colorado the follow-
ing night.
both played cornerback at FSU
- Fresno State's Richard Mar-
shall and Florida State's Antonio
Cromartie. Marshall impressed
scouts with his speed while
Cromartie's versatility as a return
man moved him up as a possible
first-rounder.
The other first-day junior
prospect grew up in Kinston
- Marshall safety Chris Hawkins,
who transferred to Marshall
following two years in Chapel
Hill.
Safety Ko Simpson, a redshirt
sophomore from South Carolina,
and senior teammate Johnathan
Joseph formed half of a Game-
cock secondary that yielded just
186 passing yards per game while
picking off 12 passes and was
fourth in the SEC in pass defense
efficiency. Joseph had four picks
himself while the 6-foot-l-inch,
200-pound Simpson was fifth in
the conference in tackles.
Tennessee's Allen, the other
first-round prospect from the
SEC, might have the best foot-
ball smarts of the entire group.
He knows where to be, whether
he's at safety or corner. He has
the speed and raw talent to play
corner, should he be needed
there. His true talent is at safety,
where he can lock on to tight
ends or a third receiver and is a
form tackier.
Two other cornerbacks to
keep an eye on during the first
day of the draft, Friday, April
29, are Antoine Bethea and
Danieal Manning, Jr. Every year
a defensive back from a small
school jumps up into the first or
second round.
Thisyearshouldbenodifferent.
Bethea, from Howard, has a
lot of buzz around him thanks
to him 40-time of 4.39 and his
nearly 6-foot frame. Like Sterling
Sharpe and Steve McNair, Bethea
was a three-time Black College
All-American. While some team
might reach for him due to his
speed and raw talent in the first
round, a third-round choice is
more likely for Bethea.
Manning is another one of
those versatile players; he can
play corner, safety or be used
as a return man. He was very
productive at Division II Abilene
Christian, and his workouts
have been solid. At 5 feet 11
inches, 202 pounds, he brings
with him 4.4 speed and great
instincts.
He was seemingly ubiqui-
tous for the Wildcats, leading
the team in interceptions and
returning punts and kicks - two
for touchdowns. He also returned
one of his three picks for a score,
was fifth on the team in tackles,
forced two fumbles and blocked
three kicks.
North Carolina State's Marcus
Hudson and Ohio University's
Dion Byrum, who hails from
Monroe, N.C could both hear
their names drafted before the
last pick is called.
ECU'S Zach Baker has the
ideal size for an NFL safety at 6
feet 2 inches, 208 pounds with a
time in the 40 of 4.5. Baker was
third on the Pirates in tackles
and tied for the team lead in
interceptions with three in 2005.
He could prove to be a steal for
some team in the later rounds or
via post-draft free agency.
This is the third part in a
series of NFL Draft previews.
Next week I will preview wide
receivers and tight ends. The
NFL Draft is April 29-30 in New
York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeastcarolinian. com.
Colon Cancer.
Get the test.
Get the polyp.
Get the cure.
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BUCCANEER IS BACK
FVERY PIRATE HAS A HISTORY
Last Chance for Graduate Photos
Missed your hist photo appointment? All is not losr! Yearbook photos for May 2006 graduates
will be held once again on Wednesday, April 26th in Mendenhall Student Center Great Room
1 from 9am-5pm. Call 328.9236 to reserve your time. As always, walk-ins are welcome.
Student Organization Photos
Purchasing pages in the Buccaneer is a fantastic way to garner exposure for your organization.
Yearbooks stand the test of time and our rates fit any organization's budget. You even have the
final say in how your page will lohk. Call 328.9246 for more information. Deadline to reserve
space is Tuesday, May 2nd.
Every Pirate Has A History, Treasure Yours
Originally known as the Tecoan, the ECU Student Yearbook was the cornerstone publication
of the social and academic environment on campus from 1923-1990. Now in it's new era,
the Buccaneer will once again act as the eyes for future generations of ECU students to look
into the past. Purchase a yearbook by calling 1.888.298.3323 or visit www.yearbookupdates.
comecu. Deadline to order online is April 24th at 5pm. Inquiries after this date should be
directed ro 328.9236.
Photo by: Chris Vo
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100 Est. 1956
Lynndale Shoppes 505 Red Banks Rd Greenville, NC
Tel (252) 756-8237 Fax (252) 756-6854
www.coffmansmenswear.com
One out of five adults finds
themselves as the designated
"caregiver" for a loved one who
can no longer manage alone. Thia
role can often snowball, weighing
heavily on you as you try to cope
with the demands of caregiving.
There may be services and
organizations right in your
parent's neighborhood that can
help when you're not around.
The outcome is better care for
your parent, and less anxiety
for you. Visit www.familycare
ffivingl01.org and discover
a world of support, answers and
advice - for both of you.
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From the National Family
Cartgiver Association and
the National Alliance for Caregiving
with the generous support of Eisai Inc.





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN SPORTS
4-05-06
MLB
from page A7
opening outing to say the least) and not severely
hurting their pitching in the process.
The acquisition of Frank Thomas could be ben-
eficial if he stays healthy, but that could be asking
i lot from the Big Hurt, who is entering his 16th
season. However, he looked to be perfectly healthy
after taking Randy Johnson deep opening night in
Oakland in his first at bat of the season.
I don't see the Rangers or Mariners surpassing
the aforementioned clubs for the sole reason of
pitching, or lack thereof. Seattle is still in a tran-
sitional phase where they are figuring out their
team identity after a complete drop-off from their
unprecedented 116 wins in 2001 and 93 in 2002.
The Rangers are in a precarious early-season
position due to several pitchers finding their way
to the disabled list, most notably their ace, Adam
Uaton. If the bats can support the pitchers until
the club learns what kind of staff they really have
throwing for them, the Rangers could start off
well; the only question is if they have staying
power because in MLB, longevity directly relies on
pitching. My guess on how I believe this division
will look come October is this: Oakland, LA (at
Anaheim), Seattle and Texas.
National League East
Annually the most competitive division in all
of baseball, the NL East looks to be much different
from last year's result of nine wins separating first
from fifth (the first-place Braves finished 90-72, the
fifth place Nationals ended at .500, 81-81).
After the dismantlement of the Marlins by their
front office (once again) and the bolstering of the
entire Mets roster, the status quo in this division
looks to be in favor of the team from Queens.
The Mets, by far, made the most off-season
moves out of all teams. First-time Mets in 2006
are Carlos Delgado, Paul Lo Duca, Billy Wagner,
Jorge Julio and Julio Franco, with stars like Pedro
Martinez, Carlos Beltran, Jose Reyes, Cliff Floyd
and David Wright returning. This team looks to
fare quite well in this division and, from what I've
observed, should reach the later rounds of the post-
season, possibly the World Series.
However, the Braves will never make it easy.
Atlanta has won this division 14 straight times and
is looking to continue that streak this season. After
hitting SI homers in 2005, AndruwJones, who also
went deep on opening day against the Dodgers,
should continue his powerful ways and belt-out
another 40-50 this year while looking to up his aver-
age from his mediocre .263 effort from last season.
The main key to the Braves winning, though, is
for their young guys to step up. Ryan Langerhans, Jeff
Francoeur and Wilson Betemit put out unexpected
numbers last year and should continue that trend
under the watchful eye of manager Bobby Cox. The
addition of Edgar Renteria to the lineup will bol-
ster their offense as well; his return to the NL will
rekindle his production from his days as a Cardinal.
The Nationals and Phillies are a solid teams,
but I don't see them competing with Atlanta or
New York. And you can forget about the Marlins
this year since they resemble nothing of what they
were just a half-year ago; rebuilding is the name of
the game for Florida and a record at or near .500
would be quite a treat to the Marlin-faithful. The
NL East will pan-out like so: New York, Atlanta,
Washington, Phflly and Florida - with much more
than nine wins separating first and fifth.
NL Central
Not much will change here this season - in fact,
the final standings may very well end up identical
to last year's. St. Louis and Houston will remain
the powerhouses of this division and continue to
dominate the National League.
The Cardinals will win 100 games again. They
have the best hitter alive in Albert Pujols, the best
game-manager alive in Tony LaRussa and a deep
roster of skilled hitters, defenders and base run-
ners. They can hit the long ball and steal bags;
their pitchers can strike out the side with pure
gas and pick apart hitters with pinpoint accuracy;
they have rabid fans that fill the seats whether the
opponent is the Astros or the Rockies. They are the
best franchise in baseball and will continue to be
until some significant event occurs that prohibits
them from being so.
Enough brown-nosing the Cards. The Cubs
are sitting on the razor's edge this year. They have
an excellent lineup that boasts speed and power;
guys like Derek Lee, Aramis Ramirez, Juan Pierre
and Jacque Jones will be the primary run producers
this year, while Kerry Wood and Mark Prior (on the
DL already) will try to last the whole season and be
productive for their ball club when they return to
the rotationbullpen.
The question is can they play as a cohesive team
and can Dusty Baker keep his club in a position of
contention for the length of the season?
The Brewers and Reds will be competitive this
season. Both teams shine in different spots of their ros-
ters but lack the depth that Houston and St. Louis have.
Cincinnati will look to pitchers Aaron Harang
and Bronson Arroyo to keep them in games, while
Adam Dunn, Ken Griffey and Felipe Lopez provide
run support. Milwaukee and Pittsburgh should
have decent seasons - about 70 wins each - but
shouldn't be much trouble for the big boys. Result:
St. Louis, Houston, Chicago, Cincinnati, Milwaukee
and Pittsburgh.
NL West
This is easily the worst division in MLB. Their
winner last season, the San Diego Padres, finished
2005 at 82-80, one game up on the Nats, who
were in last place in the east. The other four teams
finished with sub500 records. This division will
end up in a much different result this time around,
but in regard to the paltry records, 1 don't see them
changing much.
The Dodgers look to be the team to beat this
season. After acquiring shortstop Rafael Furcal and
Nomar Garciaparra, the Dodgers added a bit of pop
to their order. But questions still look over what
type of team this will be after the disappointing
effort from last season.
Arizona and Colorado will be non-factors this
year. They lack the tools to compete in the race for
a playoff spot, much less in their own division. The
real question, obviously, is what to expect from
the Giants. Media-darling Barry Bonds is back,
along with all his off-field baggage and steroid-
fueled body - what should we expect from him?
He'll surely pass Babe Ruth; he's only got six more
homers to go.
But can he hit 40? 30? 15? Can he still almost
single-handedly lead his team like he's done in
the past? And can a team whose average age is
equivalent to the faculty of any given department
at ECU beat a bunch of young guys who are in their
primes? We'll have to wait and see, but 1 will tell you
this much: Los Angeles, San Diego, San Francisco,
Arizona and Colorado should be the order you can
expect to see in the standings come October.
So there you have them - my predictions and
thoughts on the newly started 2006 MLB season.
There's nothing better than a brand-new season
of baseball.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
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4-05-06
05-06
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SPORTS
PAGE A9
l.org
335
IICINE
X
LaRussa won't let Cardinals pitch around Rollins NFL
from page A7
Rollins extended his hit streak to 37 games with a double in his last at bat Monday afternoon.
(AP)Tony La Russa watched
too many teams pitch around
Mark McGwire to let it happen
to Jimmy Rollins.
Rollins' hitting streak was
on the line when he came to the
plate with two outs in the eighth
inning and the Philadelphia Phil-
lies trailing the St. Louis Cardinals
13-5 in Monday's season opener.
Reliever Adam Wainwright's
first three pitches were out of the
strike zone, and those remain-
ing among the sellout crowd
of 44,614 at Citizens Bank Park
booed each one.
Before the next pitch, La
Russa got catcher Yadier Molina's
attention and signaled for a
strike. The right-handed Wain-
wright threw a fastball down
the middle and Rollins ripped
it down the right-field line for
a double to extend his hitting
streak to 37 games.
"You have to play the game.
We can't walk him in that spot
La Russa said.
It was the eighth time during
his streak that began against San
Francisco last Aug. 23 that Rollins
kept it going during his last at-bat.
He ought to thank La Russa for
giving him a chance this time.
La Russa was in his third year
managing the Cardinals in 1998
when McGwire hit 70 homers to
break Roger Maris' single-season
record of 61. It was frustrating for
La Russa to see McGwire often
get nothing to hit from pitch-
ers, especially in tight games. He
didn't want Rollins' streak to end
with a walk when his team had
an eight-run lead.
"Some of that is him, but
mostly it's about us La Russa
said. "I wouldn't want the St.
Louis Cardinals to walk him in
his last at-bat. That's not what
we represent
Rollins went 0-for-3 with a
sacrifice fly before getting his hit.
He hit two hard liners at center
fielder Jim Edmonds, grounded
out to first base and fouled out
his first time up when shortstop
David Eckstein made a spectacu-
lar, sliding catch near the railing
down the left-field line.
If the score was close, Rollins
probably wouldn't have swung at
a 3-0 pitch in the eighth inning.
Bu,t Wainwright's fastball was too
good to pass up down eight runs.
"If he had thrown a ball and I
couldn't get to it, I wouldn't have
swung Rollins said.
Phillies manager Charlie
Manuel had conflicting thoughts
about Rollins swinging ahead 3-
0 in the count.
"You usually don't have to
give Jimmy the take sign if we're
losing the game Manuel said.
"I wanted to see him have every
chance. He got a good ball and he
hit it. But thequestion will always
be there about swinging 3-0
Wainwright had no problem
challenging Rollins.
"Obviously a guy who plays
as hard as he does and gets a
streak going like that, I respect
that Wainwright said. "It's kind
of a pitcher's duty if a guy has
something going like that to give
him a chance at it
A three-time All-Star short-
stop, Rollins ended the 2005
season with a 36-game hitting
streak, the ninth-longest over
one season in big league history,
and the longest in the majors
since 1987, when Paul Molitor hit
safely in 39 consecutive games.
Rollins' pursuit of Joe DiMag-
gio's major league record 56-game
hitting streak has a catch, however.
DiMaggio accomplished his
feat in the same season in 1941.
The major league marks for longest
hitting streak in one season and
longest hitting streak spanning
two seasons are separate records.
DiMaggio holds both with his
56-game streak in 1941, but there
is a difference in the NL records:
Pete Rose (1978) and Willie
Keeler (1897) share the NL mark
at 44 games. However, Keeler got
a hit in his final game of 1896,
so his run of 45 games overall is
the first record Rollins is chasing.
The previous Phillies fran-
chise record of 31 was set by Ed
Delahanty in 1899.
Rollins is a notoriously slow
starter with a .227 batting average
in April over the last two years.
But he had several good swings
against reigning NL Cy Young
Award winner Chris Carpenter
and relievers Randy Flores and
Wainwright in his first game.
"You don't get rewarded for
good swings Rollins said. "I
wasn't worried. As long as my
swing is there, I know I'll get a
hit somehow
Rollins goes for 38 on
Wednesday against tough left-
hander Mark Mulder. If he keeps
going, Rollins could tie Keeler at
45 next Thursday in Atlanta and
would have a chance to break the
NL mark in Colorado the follow-
ing night.
both played cornerback at FSU
- Fresno State's Richard Mar-
shall and Florida State's Antonio
Cromartie. Marshall impressed
scouts with his speed while
Cromartie's versatility as a return
man moved him up as a possible
first-rounder.
The other first-day junior
prospect grew up in Kinston
- Marshall safety Chris Hawkins,
who transferred to Marshall
following two years in Chapel
Hill.
Safety Ko Simpson, a redshirt
sophomore from South Carolina,
and senior teammate Johnathan
Joseph formed half of a Game-
cock secondary that yielded just
186 passing yards per game while
picking off 12 passes and was
fourth in the SEC in pass defense
efficiency. Joseph had four picks
himself while the 6-foot-l-inch,
200-pound Simpson was fifth in
the conference in tackles.
Tennessee's Allen, the other
first-round prospect from the
SEC, might have the best foot-
ball smarts of the entire group.
He knows where to be, whether
he's at safety or corner. He has
the speed and raw talent to play
corner, should he be needed
there. His true talent is at safety,
where he can lock on to tight
ends or a third receiver and is a
form tackier.
Two other cornerbacks to
keep an eye on during the first
day of the draft, Friday, April
29, are Antoine Bethea and
Danieal Manning, Jr. Every year
a defensive back from a small
school jumps up into the first or
second round.
Thisyearshould be no different.
Bethea, from Howard, has a
lot of buzz around him thanks
to him 40-time of 4.39 and his
nearly 6-foot frame. Like Sterling
Sharpe and Steve McNair, Bethea
was a three-time Black College
All-American. While some team
might reach for him due to his
speed and raw talent in the first
round, a third-round choice is
more likely for Bethea.
Manning is another one of
those versatile players; he can
play corner, safety or be used
as a return man. He was very
productive at Division II Abilene
Christian, and his workouts
have been solid. At 5 feet 11
inches, 202 pounds, he brings
with him 4.4 speed and great
instincts.
He was seemingly ubiqui-
tous for the Wildcats, leading
the team in interceptions and
returning punts and kicks - two
for touchdowns. He also returned
one of his three picks for a score,
was fifth on the team in tackles,
forced two fumbles and blocked
three kicks.
North Carolina State's Marcus
Hudson and Ohio University's
Dion Byrum, who hails from
Monroe, N.C could both hear
their names drafted before the
last pick is called.
ECU'S Zach Baker has the
ideal size for an NFL safety at 6
feet 2 inches, 208 pounds with a
time in the 40 of 4.5. Baker was
third on the Pirates in tackles
and tied for the team lead in
interceptions with three in 2005.
He could prove to be a steal for
some team in the later rounds or
via post-draft free agency.
This is the third part in a
series of NFL Draft previews.
Next week I will preview wide
receivers and tight ends. The
NFL Draft is April 29-30 in New
York City.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.

BUCCANEER IS BACK
FVFRY PIRATE HAS A HISTORY
Last Chance for Graduate Photos
Missed your last photo appointment? All is not losr! Yearbook photos for May 2006 graduates
will be held once again on Wednesday, April 26th in Mendenhall Student Center Great Room
1 from 9am-5pm. Call 328.9236 to reserve your time. As always, walk-ins are welcome.
Student Organization Photos
Purchasing pages in the Buccaneer is a fantastic way to garner exposure for your organization.
Yearbooks stand the lest of time.and our rates fit any organization's budget. You even have the
final say in how your page will look. Call 328.9246 for more information. Deadline to reserve
space is Tuesday, May 2nd.
Every Pirate Has A History, Treasure Yours
Originally known as thcTccoan, the ECU Student Yearbook was the cornerstone publication
of the social and academic environment on campus from 1923-1990. Now in ir's new era,
the Buccaneer will once again act as the eyes for future generations of ECU students to look
into the past. Purchase a yearbook by calling 1.888.298.3323 or visit www.yearbookupdaies.
comecu. Deadline to order online is April 24th at 5pm. Inquiries after this date should be
directed to 328.9236.
Photo by: Chris Vo
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Page A10 The East Carolinian, Self Help Building
Phone (252) 328-9238 Fax (252) 328-9143
WEDNESDAY April 5, 2006
FOR RENT
For Rent: Very nice 4 br, 2.5 bath
house with 2 zone, central heatair;
off street parking; close proximity to
ECU campus. Completely renovated.
25 rent discount for prompt pay.
Call 752-1000, ask for Murrell.
Walk to Campus! 6, 5, 4, & 3
Bedroom houses (duplexes) all
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cable, and alarm system all included
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1st and August 1st. Call Mike 439-
0285.
Large 5 Bedroom house two blocks
from ECU. 110 Rotary Ave. Large
bedrooms and closets, central
ac, newly renovated and real nice.
$1550 341-8331
Sublease: one bedroom apartment.
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away. 15 minute walk to school.
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Brand new 2 & 3 bedroom
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2bed 1.5 bath duplex available
now, short term lease accepted.
Buccaneer Village call 561 -7368 531-
9011 Pinnacle Property Mgt.
FOR SALE
The Buccaneer is back! The ECU
yearbook has returned so make sure
to reserve your copy. Order online at
www.yearbookupdatesecu or call
1-888-298-3323 Hurry! Deadline
to order is 5pm 4-24-06
SERVICES"
Interested in coaching boys lacrosse?
If you've had past experience as a
player or coach please contact Lydia
Rotondo at (252)329-8080 for more
information.
Area high school seeking field hockey
coach for fall 2006. Afternoon
availability 3-5 pm If interested, call
Lydia Rotondo at (252)329-8080
HEIP WANTED
Manager and Sales Persons
Needed. Full Time. Part Time.
Day or Evening Hours. Great
Working Conditions Excellent
Pay End of Year Bonus. Located
at Nags Head Beach North
Carolina. Contact Gary at 252-
305-5558 or 252-441-5558
Live this summer at-the Beach
and work with Telescope Pictures
Sunrays Studio in Ocean City,
MDVirginia Beach. VA. Earn up
to $10,000. Housing is Available.
For more information visit our
website and Apply On-Line
www.sunraysstudio.com or call
1.724.322.1858. E.O.E
Bartenders wanted! Up to $250
day. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520. ext. 202
Mgrs. and Lifegrds at Pools and
Beaches in Greenville, Atlantic
Beach, and Wilson. Call Bob 714-
0576
Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth baseball coaches for the
spring t-ball program. Applicants
must possess a good knowledge of
baseball skills and have the ability
and patience to work with youth.
Hours vary from 3:30 pm to 8:00
pm, Monday-Friday with some
weekend coaching. Flexible hours
according to class schedules. This
program will run from April 24-mid
June. Salaries start at $6.50 per
hour. Apply at the City of Greenville,
Human Resources Department,
201 Martin L. King Dr. Phone 329-
4492. For more information, please
contact the Athletic Office at 329-
4550, Monday through Friday, 10
am until 7 pm.
After school childcare needed.
Monday-Friday 2:00-5:30.
Transportation necessary. Call after
6pm 355-3884.
Lifeguards and swim instructors
needed for outdoor pool June 1-
August 20. Candidates must be
certified in Lifeguarding, AED, First
Aid and CPRPR. $7.50 per hour.
Apply at www.greenvillenc.gov or
call Jessica at 329-4043 for more
information.
Work hard, Play hard, change lives!
Girls resident camp looking for
counselors, lifeguards, wranglers,
boating staff, crafts, Unit Leaders,
Business Manager, and Health
Supervisor. $200-$300week! June
3-August 13th, Free Housing! (336)
861 -1198 or Keyauwee@northstate.
net www.keyauwee.com for an on-
line application.
WZMB is currently accepting
applications for a student office
assistant. You must be a registered
student with a gpa of at least 2.3.
Attention to detail and a strong
math background would be helpful.
If interested please come by the
radio station in the basement of
mendenhall to fill out an application.
This position is for the summer only.
Deadline is Monday, April 10.
Mobile waitstaff wanted for
Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-150week. Perfect
for college student Some Lunch
Time (11a-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 551-3279 between 2-5 only.
Sorry Greenville residents and year
around dorm residents only. Leave
message if necessary.
Local law firm has a part-time
mail roomrunner position open.
Responsibilities include: general
office support, errands, file
maintenance, phone and mail
room support. Must have own
transportation and be computer
literate. Please send resume and
available summer and fall hours
to: Legal Administrator, 1698 E.
Arlington Blvd Greenville, NC
27858 or fax to 252-353-1096. EOE.
Resumes without available hours
attached will not be considered.
Babysitter: Mature, responsible
babysitter needed for infant and
toddler three daysweek beginning
in May. Must have good driving
record, excellent references and
reliable transportation. Contact
kaswank@earthlink.net, 353-0187.
Part-time position now for energetic,
committed Christian to coordinate
programs for children, youth, and
adults at historic Calvary Episcopal
Church, in Tarboro, NC, 30
minutesfrom Greenville. Calvary
has programs on Sundays and
Wednesday evenings as well as
seasonal programs such as Vacation
Bible School and Lenten education
series for a liberal congregation
of 350. A furnished office and
telephone provided. Annual salary
is $13,500. Deadline for letter
of interest and resume with at
least three references is March 31,
2006. A background check will be
conducted. Send letter, resume, and
references to: Calvary Church, P.O.
Box 1245, Tarboro, NC 27886.
Wanted: Student to assjst kids
ages 14, 13, and 9 with homwork
. Must be math major with GPA of
3.4 or betjer. Strong in science a
plus. Must be non-smoker, flexible
hours, transportation, available
to work afternoons, nights, and
some weekends. Call 252-917-6787
or 252-752-1572 for interview.
Now Hiring Tokyo To Go (Big Lots
Shopping Center). Applications
on door. Drop off at Any Jersey
Mike's for more info call George
341-6630
Campus Towers in Greenville, NC
seeks a general manager or leasing
manager to provide leadership in the
development and implementations
of a comprehensive marketing
and leasing program with the
goal of 100 occupancy. Campus
Towers is a new student housing
facility serving the students of East
Carolina University. Candidates
with experience in student housing
preferred. Bachelor's degree, self-
motivation, strong computer,
interpersonal communication skills,
and an energetic and positive sales
approach required. To apply, please
send resume to nheard@campusadv.
com; fax to 512-472-0982; or call
512-472-6222.
HrewiM tip: Landscaping with water-
retaining plants helps protect
your home from wildfire. Find other
useful tips at Firewise.org.
m
33ER AN'
OTHER
The Greenville Greens, an affiliate of
the NC Green Party, meets monthly
on the first Thursday of each month.
Next meeting is Thursday, March 2,
at 7pm, Sheppard Memorial Library,
Room B. A true progressive voice
in NC politics! Contact us at ncgp.
gvillelocal@yahoo.com
Retreatmyrtlebeach.com Spring
BreakGrad Week 1-800-645-3618
We Have What You're Looking For!
$100 Per Persons Up!
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Summer School 2006


Title
The East Carolinian, April 5, 2006
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 05, 2006
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1896
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/59414
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