The East Carolinian, November 3, 2005






2, 2005
ery
:ul
nan
stamp
ly takes
ce a
urs at
r.org
rrwound Mfwd
MCENTER
1
5299
rRKTI
559
)629
ma From $179!
i Repi Needed)
cl.com
16
GER

V
'

nter
005
rEC
www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number24 THURSDAY
November 3, 2005
Rosa Parks, a legend remembered
ECU graduates use the JET program to teach English In Japan.
Graduates go to
Japan to teach
� English speakers needed
for exchange program
ZACKHILL
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Students looking to venture
outside of the United States for
careers met in D-103 Brews-
ter Tuesday, Oct. 25, when the
Japanese Exchange and Teaching
program visited ECU.
From a statement on the pro-
gram's Web site, their mission is
"to promote internationalism at
the local level by inviting young,
overseas graduates to assist in
international exchange and for-
eign language education it
seeks to foster ties between Japa-
nese citizens (mainly youth) and
JET participants at the person to
person level
In the program, American
college graduates are exported
to Japan to teach in English
programs. Some recruits are assis-
tant language teachers assigned
to local junior and senior high
schools, as well as school boards,
to teach English.
Others are trained as interna-
tional relations coordinators and
work in Japanese government
offices. A new position gives
members a chance to work as a
sports exchange advisor, striving
to better international relations
through sports.
"The only way to gain a true
understanding of another coun-
try is to live and work among its
people said Daniel Lintz, former
JET member.
"Through daily interaction
participants can view Japan from
a candid perspective available to
few others
This is the first year the pro-
gram has come to ECU to recruit.
On hand to spearhead the effort
was Jessica Cork, advisor for edu-
cational and cultural affairs for
the Consulate General of Japan
in Atlanta.
"It's definitely a great oppor-
tunity to immerse yourself
totally in a different culture
said Cork.
The program began in 1987
and has since had more than
41,000 participants. Fifty coun-
tries have sent people to Japan,
with close to 6,000 participants
currently in Japan. Nearly half of
those are Americans.
All majors are accepted as
long as the degree is received the
July before departure. Proficiency
in Japanese is not required, but
members should have excellent
English skills and have an interest
in learning and becoming part of
the Japanese culture.
Members sign a one year con-
tract with the option of renewing
the contract twice for a maxi-
mum tenure of three years.
"The best thing about this job
is the people said Orla Thomp-
son, former JET member.
"These people are the coal-
face of internationalization. If
you're a 'people person this is
the job for you
The Japanese government
see JET page A2
Rosa Parks was honored by students and faculty at Hendrix Theater Wednesday. Garrle Moore, M. Cole Jones, Patricia Dunn and
Catherine Rigsby were among those who spoke. The ECU Gospel Choir sang the black national anthem also.
Memorial service for
Rosa Parks
TAWANDA CARLTON
STAFF WRITER
Students, staff and faculty
came out yesterday to Hendrix
Theater, in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center to celebrate the life of
an American hero, Rosa Parks.
Rosa Parks, the "mother of the
civil rights movement" was one
of the most important citizens of
the 20th century. Her refusal to
give up her seat on a segregated
bus in December of 1955 sparked
a citywide boycott of the bus
system by blacks that lasted more
than a year. Her refusal to move
raised an unknown clergyman,
Martin Luther King Jr to become
one of the most prominent civil
rights leaders in our nation's
history, and the U.S. Supreme
Court's decision to outlaw
segregation on city buses. Ever
since then, she has helped to
make Americans aware of the
history of the civil rights
struggle.
The program opened with the
National Anthem and a welcome
by SGA President M. Cole Jones.
The ECU gospel choir delivered
the black national anthem and
Garrie Moore, vice chancellor
for student life, gave remarks
on Parks.
Moore said it is important to
remember what we sit down for
and what we stand up for.
"When you have the right
people on the bus, things
happen said Moore.
Moore also said. Parks helped
many of us re-examine our com-
mitment to democracy.
"Leaders like Rosa Parks giv�
us hope and courage Moore
said.
Patricia Dunn, Greenville
City Council member at-large,
also gave remarks concerning the
see PARKS page A3
Federal Reserve raises interest rates again
$2.8 million health center
being built for uninsured
James D. Bernstein
Community Health
Center work underway
CHRIS MUNIER
NEWS EDITOR
The building of a new health
center geared toward providing
health coverage for uninsured
patients was underway beginning
last week.
The James D. Bernstein Com-
munity Health Center will be
a 15,000-square-foot structure
that takes 3.5 acres of land on
Easy Street near the intersection
of NC 11 and 33 North. In order
to complete the project, Access
East, the non-profit group who
will own the facility, is getting a
total of $2.8 million from donors
like E.R. Lewis Construction, The
Duke Endowment and the Pitt
Memorial Hospital Foundation.
The center was named in memory
of Bernstein, the founder of the
NC Office of Rural Health. It is
estimated that the center will
be completed and patients will
receive service in five years.
Dr. Thomas G. Irons, associ-
ate vice chancellor for Regional
Health Services and professor of
pediatrics, said the center is about
addressing the needs of people
who have little or no access to
basic health care.
"This is really about bringing
primary health services to these
people - good-quality, system-
atic primary care said Irons.
William J. Cromartie, distin-
guished professor of microbiol-
ogy at UNC Chapel Hill, wrote
in his article "A Weight on our
Conscience" that about 15 per-
cent of people are lacking health
coverage in North Carolina.
"The 15 percent who are
uninsured are, for the most part,
working people who earn too
much to qualify for Medlcald, the
insurance program for the poor,
and too little to be able to buy
private health insurance said
Cromartie.
"They pay taxes but still are
not able to participate in the tax-
supported system of health care
that benefits the other 85 percent
of North Carolinians
Irons went a step further and
described the problems specific
to Pitt County.
"Thirty-one percent of the
people in northern Pitt County
don't have health insurance, and
the majority of those people work
and could not possibly afford to
insure themselves Irons said.
Irons said Access East is going
to find sustainable ways to pro-
vide medications for people at
better than half the normal price
and could make it free for those
who are most in need.
"We will be able to offer med-
ications at a sharply discounted
rate Irons said.
"We'll get the same prices the
V.A. negotiates with pharmaceu-
tical companies
Access East is partnering with
Green County Health Care to
complete the new health center.
Green County Health Care will
run and operate the center.
"We made the decision at
Access East that if we could find
the space, the land and money to
buy this building, we would part-
ner with Green County Health
Care and they would operate the
facility Irons said.
Access East not only tries to
provide health services for low-
income people, but also offers
job training and classes for things
like computer skills and learning
Spanish. There will also be classes
directly related to health needs.
"We'll be teaching child birth
classes and CPR in the facility
Irons said.
see HEALTH page A2
The Federal Reserve raises Interest rates to combat rising Inflation after this year's hurricanes.
Concerned with inflation,
the board has raised
interest rates once more
LEE SCHWARZ
STAFF WRITER
Keeping in step with the
trend of the last 16 months, the
Federal Reserve has now raised
the Fed Funds rate from 3.75
percent to four percent.
This marks the 12th consecu-
tive time rates have been raised.
The reasoning behind this move
was concerns about inflation
after the recent hurricanes that
have ravaged the southeastern
coastline. Inflation is the general
rise in prices over time. If the
economy is performing at too
high a level, inflation sets in and
prices rise.
Interest rates serve as a means
of controlling the money supply,
thus regulating the performance
of the economy. When the econ-
omy is doing poorly, interest rates
are often lowered to encourage
people and businesses to spend
more money rather than save.
When the economy is doing well,
interest rates are raised to control
inflation by encouraging people
and businesses to save more
rather than spend.
Interest rates are now the
highest they have been since June
2001, when the Federal Reserve
began cutting the Fed Funds rate
to resuscitate the economy from
the effects of the tech bubble,
then the Federal Reserve was
forced to cut rates after the 9-11
attacks, which was a major blow
to the economy. If the Fed Funds
rate had not been cut at that time,
it is likely that a severe depression
would have occurred.
The fact that the economy
grew at a solid annualized rate
of 3.8 percent during the time
of the hurricanes indicates how
healthy the economy is at the
present. Some economists believe
that without the effect of the hur-
ricanes, the annualized growth
rate would have been well over
4 percent.
The Federal Reserve also
hinted at further increases as they
try to assuage inflation concerns.
When Ben Bernanke replaces
Alan Greenspan as Chairman
in early 2006, it is expected that
he will perpetuate Greenspan's
policies because Bernanke is con-
sidered to be nearly identical in
philosophically to Greenspan on
monetary policy. Many analysts
believe the Fed will keep raising
interest rates at its final meeting
of the year on Dec. 13 and at its
first meeting of 2006 on Jan. 31,
bringing the Fed Funds rate to 4.5
percent. Excessive rise in inter-
est rates might foster concerns
about deflation, the opposite of
inflation. Deflation is a general
decline in prices and can bring
see NYSE page A3
ECU graduate seeks election on Greenville City Council
Goals to improve
university neighborhoods
TAYLEIQH DAVIS
STAFF WRITER
When asked why he wants to
run for Greenville City Council,
1999 ECU graduate Larry Spell
said he wanted to improve neigh-
borhoods throughout the city.
Spell, who is running against
incumbent council member Ric
Miller, will represent District
three, the district ECU occupies.
The neighborhood boundaries
include Reade Street in the west-
ern boundary, the Tar River along
the northern boarder, 10th Street
along the southern border and
parts of Greenville Boulevard.
Major plans include propos-
ing his Council of Neighbor-
hoods, aimed toward keeping
neighborhoods beautiful, safe
communities for residents live.
"I want to join old and new
neighborhoods and people of all
walks of life to build stronger
communities' across the city
said Spell.
Spell wants neighborhoods
to be inviting places. The new
council will serve as a liaison
with City Council focused on
unifying neighborhoods. Cur-
rently, Greenville does not have
such a program.
Not all neighborhoods have
their own association, but Spell's
goal is to make sure all neighbor-
hoods eventually do. The plan
has already gained support from
several neighborhood associa-
tions, including College Court-
Coghill, Tar River University
Neighborhood and Stratford
Neighborhood.
Each association will elect
a representative to serve on the
Council of Neighborhoods as a
whole.
"My vision is that it should be a
group of citizens who propose solu-
tions to different problems neigh-
borhoods may face Spell said.
"It represents the will of the
people
"Anytime we see City Coun-
cil, it's during a crisis. We would
like to see a program that can
address concerns before they
become problems said Charles
Ewen, president of the Tar River
University Neighborhood Asso-
ciation and professor of anthro-
pology.
"I can't think of anything
better than to have the Neighbor-
hood Association endorsed by
City Council Ewen said.
One chief function of the
Council of Neighborhoods is to
support each individual neigh-
borhood association. The goal
is to have leaders running each
association in order for them to
train new representatives.
"I see the spreading of neigh-
borhood associations as a primary-
function of this body Spell said.
Another aspect that gives
value to neighborhoods around
ECU is the greenway that cur-
rently runs from Greensprings
Park on Fifth Street to College
Hill. Spell wants the greenway
eventually extended toward the
south bank of the Tar River and
throughout the city.
The greenway is important
for peoples' health because it will
encourage others to walk and
ride their bikes. The alternative
transportation will also cut costs
on gas spending.
"It's a long term commit-
ment, but we must put in the
see ELECTION page A3
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A7 I Opinion: A4 I A & E: Bl I Sports: B4





Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
CHRIS MUNIER News Editor
ZACK HILL Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY November 3, 2005
Announcements Announcements
Bowling for Diabetes
The Student National Medical
Association of the Brody School
of Medicine at ECU will host
the second "A.C.E. Bowl-a-
thon" (Awareness, Change and
Education) to raise money for
diabetes testing supplies and
community service projects
Sunday, Nov. 6.
The bowl-a-thon will begin at 1:30
p.m. at the AMF East Carolina
Lanes. 700 Red Banks Road.
Teams with up to five members
will bowl three games - teams
should raise at least $150 in
pledges. Last year's event raised
$8,000.
Registration and information is
available at acebowlathon.com or
by calling the Academic Support
and Enrichment Center at the
medical school at 744-2500.
James G. Jones Family
Medicine Lecture
The director of the San Diego
Center for Patient Safety wiil
present the annual James G.
Jones Distinguished Lecture in
Family Medicine at 12:30 p.m.
Thursday, Nov. 6 in room 2E-92
at the Brody School of Medicine
at ECU.
Dr. Joseph E. Scherger will speak
on the future of family medicine
during the lecture honoring
the founding chairman of the
Department of Family Medicine at
ECU. Scherger is clinical professor
in the Department of Family and
Preventative Medicine at the
University of California, San Diego
School of Medicine. He is also
director of quality improvement in
correctional medicine at UCSD.
For more information, contact
Jeannlne Hutson at 744-2911.
Think-In Technology
Fair
Academic Outreach and
Information Technology &
Computing Services wiil host
Teaching with Technology 2005:
A Think-In of Best Practices"
Wednesday, Nov. 2 from 10 a.m.
- 2 p.m. in the Mendenhall Great
Rooms. This event will provide ECU
faculty the opportunity to share
their expertise using technology
in both face-to-face and distance
education courses. Faculty are
invited to submit proposals for
laptop poster sessions. The
poster sessions should include
course demonstrations that
showcase the use of technology.
Faculty and staff attendees will
have the opportunity to judge
presentations and a first prize will
be awarded in each category.
For more information, visit ecu.edu
cs-acadacademicoutreach
think-in.cfm.
Friends of Joyner
Library Benefit
The Friends of Joyner Library
will be having a banquet and
silent auction at 6 p.m. Friday,
Nov. 4 In Joyner Library. The
event will support the library's
efforts, ensuring students have
the research materials they need
to become world-class graduates
while also providing literally
millions of valuable resources to
faculty, citizens and other patrons.
Margaret Hoffman, author of
Blackbeard: A Tale of Villainy and
Murder in Colonial America, will
share why for almost 300 years
the infamous pirate still haunts
our coastline. We will revisit the
fascinating history lesson and
view artifacts from the pirate's
ship, the Queen Anne' Revenge.
courtesy of the N.C. Maritime
Museum, all from a lit skyline
providing a spectacular view
of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and
Bagwell Field.
Tickets are $40 for the individual,
$65 for a couple and $250 for
a sponsor. For reservations and
information, contact Sarah Dickens
at 328-5685 or dickenss@mail.
ecuedu.
Dance of Universal
Peace
Dances of Universal Peace will
take place in the Mendenhall
multi-purpose room from 4 - 6
p.m. Saturday, Nov 6 with sacred
singing and simple, heartfelt
movements. No experience is
needed, and trained professionals
will be on hand to instruct. Live
music will be provided. The event
is free for all and refreshments will
be provided.
For more information, visit
danceofuniversalpeace.org
main.
Local
Embattled lottery commissioner
Geddings resigns from post
RALEIGH, NC (AP) - A North Carolina
lottery commissioner who resigned
Tuesday had financial dealings with
a potential gambling vendor more
recently than previously disclosed,
according to documents filed with
the state.
Kevin Geddings had financial ties
to Scientific Games Corp a leading
provider of instant-win tickets and
lottery software, during this year's
legislative session, according to a
filing Tuesday with the Secretary of
State's Office.
The company paid Geddings' public
relations firm $24,500 this year
for "communications consulting
services" and other work. That
included $5,000 paid to Geddings to
prepare Senate Majority Leader Tony
Rand. D-Cumberland, for a debate on
the lottery, the filings showed.
Geddings resigned Tuesday because
of criticism over his past ties to
Scientific Games, but the vendor's
filing puts its financial connections
with Geddings as much more recent.
Geddings disclosed last month that
he is friends with Alan Mlddleton,
the vice president for government
relations at Scientific Games. He also
said he had hired Mlddleton several
years ago, before Middleton worked
at the company, to work on public
relations projects.
An appointee of House Speaker Jim
Black, D-Mecklenburg, Geddings
had pledged to recuse himself from
any final votes on the hiring of lottery
contractors to avoid the appearance
of impropriety. He had repeatedly
said he intended to remain on the
commission.
The vendor's filing showed that
Geddings & Phillips Communications
firm received $9,500 for its work on
behalf of Scientific Games a day after
Black appointed him to the lottery
commission Sept. 22.
Scientific Games also released more
information on the work performed
by Meredith Norris, Black's former
political director who is already
being investigated by the Secretary
of State's Office about whether she
violated lobbying laws for her work
with the vendor.
Norris was paid or promised $40,000
for the work she performed on the
company's behalf, which largely
included taking out legislative leaders
and others for meals, according to
Tuesday's filing. The report lists 18
occasions In which Norris took out
different lawmakers, sometimes
including Black, Senate leader Marc
Basnlght, D-Dare, and Rand, at a cost
of $4,592.37.
Rand told The News & Observer of
Raleigh that he recalled meeting
Norris, Geddings and someone else
in late May at his Fayetteville office
before the local lottery forum. Rand
said he had dinner afterward with
Geddings, but he didn't know whom
Geddings represented.
According to Rand, Geddings and
Norris gave him some information
about lotteries in other states.
Rep. Hugh Holliman, D-Davidson,
one of the co-sponsors of the
lottery legislation signed into law by
Gov. Mike Easley in August, urged
Geddings last week to step down.
"I really believe that the members of
the commission should be above
reproach, and he certainly had a
conflict of interest Holliman said.
National
Bush outlines strategy to prepare
for potential flu pandemic
WASHINGTON (AP) - Faced with
how to stretch scarce vaccines
and where to put hacking patients
when hospitals overflow in the next
super-flu crisis, cities and states
are awaiting instructions on how to
make President Bush's $7.1 billion
plan work.
States already got an unpleasant
surprise Tuesday when Bush said
he wants them to purchase millions
of doses of an anti-flu drug with their
own money to supplement the federal
government's stockpile.
"They expect us to pay 75 cents
on a dollar for flu medicine that's
going to be a tough pill to swallow
Republican Arkansas Gov. Mike
Huckabee, chairman of the National
Governors Association, said through
a spokeswoman.
Bush outlined his strategy to get
ready for a possible worldwide flu
outbreak, emphasizing better early
warning systems to spot super-strains
of Influenza before they reach the
United States and better ways to brew
vaccines to protect against them.
On Wednesday, the Department of
Health and Human Services was
releasing crucial details on how the
plan will work, including how cities
and states will get vaccine and
medications to panicked citizens.
"Every nation, every state in this union
and every community In these states
must be ready Bush said.
Pandemics strike when the easy-to-
mutate influenza virus shifts to a strain
that people have never experienced
before, something that happened
three times in the last century.
It is impossible to say when the next
super-flu will strike, and Bush sought
to reassure a jittery public Tuesday
that there's no sign one is imminent.
Still, concern is growing that the bird
flu strain known as H5N1 could trigger
one if it mutates to start spreading
easily among people. Since 2003,
at least 62 people in Southeast Asia
have died from H5N1; most of the
victims regularly handled poultry.
Topping Bush's strategy is a $2.8
billion investment to create ways to
manufacture flu vaccines in easier-to-
handle cell cultures, instead of today's
slow method that relies on millions of
chicken eggs.
The idea is that when scientists spot
a super-flu emerging abroad, they
eventually would be able to produce
enough vaccine for every American
within six months.
That's a huge change that will take
years to implement. Bush's goal is 2010.
World
Some 10,000 Iranians denounce
U.S Israel In protest marking
seizure of U.S. Embassy
TEHRAN, Iran (AP) - Thousands of
Iranians burned flags and chanted
slogans against Israel and the United
States on Wednesday in the largest
demonstration in years outside the
former U.S. Embassy in Tehran.
More than 10,000 demonstrators
shouted "Death to America" and
"Death to Israel" in front of the former
embassy compound, marking the
26th anniversary of the Nov. 4,1979
seizure of the embassy by student
militants.
The demonstration came a week
after Iranian President Mahmoud
Ahmadinejad called for Israel's
eradication, saying the country
should be "wiped off the map
comments that caused a flood of
international condemnation and
criticisms from moderates in Iran
that he was needlessly stoking
confrontation with the West
Ahmadinejad has stuck by the
comments, and on Friday he
joined hundreds of thousands of
demonstrators marching in Tehran
and other cities to denounce Israel
in the country's annual Quds or
Jerusalem Day protest.
Wednesday's protest was far smaller
but it was still the largest turnout in
years for the annual protests organized
at the former U.S. Embassy.
Demonstrators carried a large picture
ofAhmadinejad emblazoned with his
quote, "Israel must be wiped off the
map They burned U.S. and Israeli
flags and effigies of President Bush
and Israeli Prime Minister Arial Sharon.
Some wore a traditional Palestinian
kaffiyah headdress, symbolizing their
readiness to fight Israel.
"We have to continue our confrontation
with the United States and Israel.
This could help the world get rid of
the arrogant powers the hard-line
Jomhurl Eslami daily said in an
editorial.
Since the 1979 Islamic revolution,
Iranians have celebrated the Nov. 4
takeover of the embassy by militant
students. The students took 52
American diplomats hostage for
444 days.
Though the annual protest drew
massive crowds during the heyday
of the Islamic Revolution in the
1980s, during the lifetime of Ayatollah
Ruhollah Khomeini, the past few years
they have gotten smaller, drawing
several thousand each time.
But Wednesday's was the
first embassy rally held since
Ahmadlnejad's surprise victory in
June presidential elections, which
sealed the decline of Iran's reform
movement and solidified the control
of hard-liners over the government.
Some Iranians fear Ahmadinejad
- a longtime member of Iran's elite
Revolutionary Guards - will bring
back the policies of restrictions at
home and confrontation abroad seen
under Khomeini.
The demonstrations were held two
days early this year because of an
upcoming religious holiday, which
officials were concerned would
hamper their efforts to mobilize
school students to participate.
The protesters also supported Iran's
nuclear program and asked the
government not to give It up.
The United States, which broke off
diplomatic relations with Iran since
the embassy takeover, suspects
Iran's nuclear program is a front for
developing weapons. Iran has denied
that and says it is interested only in
generating electricity.
Jet from page A1
sponsors the program, and mem-
bers are selected by the Ministry
of Foreign Affairs, the Ministry
of Public Management, Home
Affairs, Post and Telecommunica-
tions, the Ministry of Education,
culture, sports, science and tech-
nology. Local authorities are also
Involved In making the decision
as to who is accepted.
Airfare is provided and
accommodations are arranged by
the host institutions. Participants
also receive health benefits.
The application process
begins the fall before the can-
didate is scheduled to leave. The
process lasts through the spring
until late July, when the member
leaves for Japan.
Accommodations can be
made for engaged or married
participants to be assigned to
the same area, but the program
cannot guarantee couples will
end up in the same place.
A salary of 3.6 million yen
is offered, which corresponds to
about $32,000 U.S. that Is not
subject to American taxes.
Junior English major James
Tyndall has previously traveled
to Japan and is intrigued at the
prospect of returning.
"I loved the place before, and
this time I'll be getting paid good
money said Tyndall.
This writer can be contacted at
newi@theeastcarolinian.com.
Airports in eastern North Carolina are competing for business travelers as well as vacationers.
Airports using perks to lure
flyers from top competitors
JACKSONVILLE, NC (AP)
� First, there's the drive - every
bit of 125 miles just to get there.
Then there's parking. It's a
long way off, and folks need a
shuttle just to get back to the
terminal. Once there, most face
a long line to get a boarding pass
and an even longer line to go
through security.
This is what Onslow County
residents have to endure to fly out
of Raleigh-Durham International
Airport. For many, it's not worth
the trouble. They would rather fly
closer to home.
Airports throughout eastern
North Carolina are competing
for these business travelers and
vacationers. It's a competitive
market, exemplified by a new
advertising campaign by the Kin-
ston Regional Jetport. The "Fly
Kinston" billboards seen along
Jacksonville thoroughfares are
mnm
Mi trnmiat I MM Itm fcMMr
(ANCUN
ACAPULC0
JAMAICA
Sell Trips, Earn (ash, Co Free!
Now Hiring On-campus Reps
targeting customers in Onslow
who might otherwise choose the
short drive to Albert J. Ellis Air-
port near Richlands, where they
can fly direct to Charlotte and
Philadelphia on U.S. Airways.
Customers who prefer Delta
Airlines can take the one-hour
drive up U.S. 258 to the Kin-
ston Regional Jetport and fly to
Atlanta. Among the perks Kin-
ston advertises in its campaign
is free parking.
Travelers who want more
nonstop destinations can take
the 50-mile drive down to Wilm-
ington.
The airports are competing
for passengers by constantly
trying to recruit new airlines, add
new destinations and offering
perks in the airport to make the
wait more enjoyable.
The closest of the three air-
ports to Jacksonville sits just off
I
I
I
NC 11 near Richlands. Albert J.
Ellis Airport would like to keep
residents from driving to Kinston
or Wilmington if they want to
go to Atlanta by getting direct
service of its own.
U.S. Transportation Secretary
Norman Mineta announced
recently the airport received
a $500,000 grant through the
Small Community Air Service
Development Program. Airport
Director Jerry Vickers said Ellis
officials have been in negotia-
tions with an airline about ser-
vice to Atlanta, but talks are in
limbo.
"We're in a bit of a standstill
right now given the nature of
what's going on in the airline
industry with the bad econom-
ics he said.
Vickers also would like to see
the airport possibly begin service
to Washington-Dulles airport.
HeSltn from page A1
Irons said Access East has
made it their trademark to listen
to members of the community
and find out what they want in
health care. People will have a lot
of say in what goes on with the
health center.
"The community has to take
a lead in deciding what we do
Irons said.
"This is a partnership. The
board which will oversee this
facility will be 60 percent com-
posed of actual clients of the
center from the community
Irons has found out people
are very concerned about chronic
health problems, substance abuse,
medications, mental health ser-
vices and diabetes.
This center will also open up
opportunities for ECU students
in different health departments.
"I have met with more than
30 faculty, deans, department
chairs and so forth who are
keenly interested in using this
community health center envi-
ronment as a focus for educa-
tion and training students at
the undergraduate and graduate
level in areas ranging from health
psychology to education to occu-
pational therapy Irons said.
A quarter of the building
space will be devoted to an edu-
cational component.
Irons gave praise to Harvey
Lewis, co-owner of E.R. Lewis
Construction, for his generous
donations to the development of
the center site. His company gave
$538,500 for development.
"We hit the jackpot with
Harvey Lewis Irons said.
"He is one of the most gener-
ous people 1 know
Irons also addressed specula-
tion regarding the formation of
a new dental school at ECU. He
said ECU will eventually get a
dental school and that it would
be beneficial to eastern North
Carolina because of the lack of
dentists overall in this region.
However, the new health
center will offer dental cover-
age to its patients according to
Irons.
"We are excited we will be
able to provide medical and
dental services at the same loca-
tion Irons said.
For Irons, doing this kind of
work is a dream come true. He
said his family has always had
humanitarian values and for
him helping the uninsured is a
"dream come true
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian.com.
Bob Barbour Honda
Welcomes all ECU students and faculty!
1
I
I
I
See the new 06 Hondas
Low payments and financing available.
Come cc us about the College Graduate Program!
Program includes New and Used Vehicles.
Sales Hours: Mon. -Fri. 900 AM-800 PM
Sat 9.O0AM-6.O0 PM
I 800M8 484� www.ststtavcl.com
I
I
I
h
10 discount
with presentation of this coupon or any
setvice or parts purchases.
Offet expires June 30. 2006
Aof valid with any othet discounts of Specials.
Service hours: Mon-Fri. 7:30 AM-530 PM
Saturday Service 9AM-2PM
Call for an appointment
Visit us:
3300 South Memorial Dr Greenville, NC 27834 (252)355-2500
www.bobbarbourfionda.com e-mail:bbhonda@yahoo.com
I
I
I
j





11-3-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
Security heightened at U.S. base
where suspected terrorist escaped
Parks
from page A1
KABUL, Afghanistan (AP)
� Security has been tightened
at the U.S. military prison in
Afghanistan following the escape
of a suspected al-Qaida leader,
a U.S. official said Wednes-
day. Indonesian anti-terrorism
officials accused Washington
of failing to tell them of the
breakout.
Omar al-Farouq, born in
Kuwait to Iraqi parents, was con-
sidered one of Osama bin Laden's
top lieutenants in Southeast Asia
until Indonesian authorities cap-
tured him in 2002 and turned
him over to the United States.
He was one of four suspected
Arab terrorists to escape in July
from the detention facility at
Bagram, the main U.S. base in
Afghanistan. It was not clear
how long he had been held in
Afghanistan.
Although the escape was
widely reported at the time,
al-Farouq was identified by an
alias and the U.S. military only
confirmed Tuesday that he was
among those who fled.
A video the four men made
of themselves after they escaped
from Bagram was broadcast on
Dubai-based television station
Al-Arabiya on Oct. 18, the broad-
caster said.
In the video, the four men
said they escaped on a Sunday
when many of the Americans on
the base were off duty, and one
of the four- Muhammad Hassan,
said to be Libyan - said he picked
the locks of their cell, according
to Al-Arabiya.
In the video, apparently shot
in Afghanistan, they show fellow
militants a map of the base and
the location of their cell. Another
shot in the video showed Hassan
leading the others in prayer. Edi-
tors at Al-Arabiya would not say
how they received the video.
An Indonesian anti-terrorism
official, Maj. Gen. Ansyaad Mbai,
on Wednesday sharply criticized
the U.S. government for failing
to inform him that al-Farouq was
no longer behind bars.
"We know nothing about
the escape of Omar al-Farouq
he said. "He is a dangerous
terrorist for us, his escape will
increase the threat of terrorism
in Indonesia.
"We need to coordinate secu-
rity here as soon as possible to
anticipate his return he said.
"The escape of al-Farouq could
bring fresh wind to the operation
of terrorism and could energize
the new movement of terrorist
actors in Southeast Asia and the
world
Attorney General Alberto
Gonzales, asked by CNN about
Mbai's comments to The Asso-
ciated Press that Indonesia was
not told about the escape, said:
"I don't know all the facts of this
particular incident. Obviously,
we consider this a very serious
problem and one we'd have to
look into the details of
A top security consultant in
Jakarta played down concerns
that al-Farouq would make his
way back to Southeast Asia and
rejoin Jemaah Islamiyah, the
regional terrorist group linked
to al-Qaida.
"He's Iraqi after all. If he's not
hiding out (in Afghanistan or
Pakistan), he's probably headed
to Iraq to join the fight there
said Ken Conboy, who recently
published a book on Jemaah
Islamiyah.
Al-Farouq was recruited into
al-Qaida in the early 1990s and
went to the Khaldan training
camp in Afghanistan from 1992
and 199S, Conboy wrote in his
book Intel.
In 1995, he was sent to the
Philippines, originally to enroll
in a flight school so he could
become proficient enough to
commandeer a passenger plane
on a suicide mission. He failed to
gain entry and instead went to a
camp in the traditional Muslim
homeland of Mindanao, where he
trained in jungle warfare tactics
along with other Jemaah Islami-
yah trainees, the book says.
From there, Al-Farouq trav-
eled by sea to neighboring Indo-
nesia, where in 2000 he set
up training camps for radicals
engaged in sectarian clashes with
the nation's Christian minority.
He was also reported to be plan-
ning a series of attacks on U.S.
embassies and other Western
interests throughout Southeast
Asia, the book says.
In 2002, al-Farouq was cap-
tured in a town south of Jakarta.
Indonesian security officials
turned him over to the United
States and he was eventually
transferred to Bagram.
Yuri Thamrin, Indonesia's
Foreign Ministry spokesman,
said he had heard nothing about
al-Farouq's escape, but conceded
that Washington may have
directly informed security offi-
cials in Jakarta.
"We have to check and make
sure whether the U.S. has given
the information to Indonesia or
not Thamrin said.
Military officials have
declined to elaborate on how the
men escaped from the heavily
fortified fail, the only detainees
they say have managed to do so.
But a spokesman said Wednesday
that an investigation into the
breakout had turned up weak-
nesses in security and that these
have been corrected.
"Physical security upgrades
include improvements to an
external door and holding cells
Lt. Col. Jerry O'Hara said, read-
ing from a statement.
More than 500 suspected
militants are held in the prison,
a plain-looking building of about
three stories in the heart of
Bagram, next to the runways and
the command center.
Several razor-wire fences sur-
round the base and areas outside
the perimeter remain mined
from Afghanistan's civil war
and Soviet occupation. Military
teams patrol constantly, and the
main entrance is a series of heav-
ily guarded checkpoints.
A U.S. military statement
issued in August about the break-
out said an inquiry had found
that "the guards and supervisors
did not follow standard operat-
ing procedures" on the night it
occurred.
"These failures led to the
escape of the four detainees
on 10 July it said, adding that
"action has either been taken or
is in the process of being taken"
to fix the problems.
The military conducted
a massive manhunt after the
breakout. U.S. troops, backed
by Afghan police and soldiers,
searched houses, manned road-
blocks and zigzagged in helicop-
ters across a dusty plain around
the base.
Kabir Ahmed, the govern-
ment leader in the area, said
the American investigators had
found where the men escaped
from the base and fled through
a field of wild grapevines.
"The soldiers found the
escapees' footprints still in the
mud he said. "It was an amaz-
ing breakout. How they did it
exactly I still don't know
legacy of Parks.
"She taught us what one
person can do to make things
right, she gave us a reflective
mirror to see how things really
were, to see our own way of racial
prejudice said Dunn.
Students who attended the ser-
vice also recognized the importance
of Parks' actions and the impor-
tance of the memorial service.
Lathan Turner, associate
vice chancellor for educational
services, gave the closing
remarks.
"In places around the world
people wear bracelets that say
what would Jesus do? So I want
to say what would Rosa Think?
If she were here right now, what
would she think about what we
are doing today? Her decision
revolutionized this country
said Turner.
Catherine Rigsby, chair of the
faculty senate, said it's time for
us to all stand together equally
privileged.
"Her death is a signal that we
must continue to fight Rigsby
said.
"This was a very fitting trib-
ute for a wonderful woman, the
memorial service was great and
the gospel choir was outstanding
said Rev. Scott Wilkinson, United
Methodist campus minister.
"This was a really great event
for ECU and the campus com-
munity. The faculty, staff and stu-
dents were here and it was great
for everyone to learn from her
example said Tamika Walker,
Senior, music education major.
The memorial service con-
cluded with a community recep-
tion in the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center.
This writer can be contacted at
new@theeastcarolinian.com.
NYSE from page A1
negative economic scenarios
such as depression just like
inflation can. Striking a balance
or equilibrium among economic
factors is essential for a healthy
economy. Numerous statistical
models are used to find optimum
balance in the economy.
In keeping with Greenspan's
policies, the Federal Reserve,
under Bernanke, will
also be on guard against the
possibility of deflation.
"The US government has a
technology called the printing
press, or today its electronic
equivalent, that allows it to
produce as many U.S. dollars as
it wishes at essentially no cost
to keep deflation at bay said
Bernanke.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
FARM SCENE: California county
votes on farming chemical use
BM THE EAST CAROLINIAN
tec
SANTA ROSA, Calif. (AP)
� The tomatoes, basil and apples
that Shelley Arrowsmith grows
on her modest 2.5-acre farm in
Sonoma County are produced
without chemical fertilizers or
pesticides.
Flowers surrounding her
vegetable garden attract what
she calls "good bugs" that eat
the troublesome ones. In her
beehives, grease pads draw mites
away from the hives and are later
eaten by ants.
While she has a choice about
whether to use chemicals, she
worries about a possible change
in the county's agricultural
industry that may leave her
without a choice: the use of
genetically altered crops.
Fear of having her produce
contaminated by such crops
prompted her to support a local
measure on the Nov. 8 ballot.
Measure M would ban the plant-
ing or cultivating of any geneti-
cally altered crops in Sonoma
County, a region best known for
its pastoral vineyards and lush
orchards.
"The bees have no boundar-
ies Arrowsmith said. "They can
go wherever they want
Voters already have approved
similar bans in three Cali-
fornia counties, but rejected
them in three others. Oppo-
nents of genetically modified
crops have lobbied for outright
bans in Hawaii and Vermont,
but California remains the
only state in the nation with
local bans.
If approved, Sonoma County
would be responsible for enforc-
ing fines up to $1,000 for each
violation.
Farmers have lined up on
both sides and the campaigns
have spent a combined $850,000,
approaching the most ever spent
on a Sonoma County ballot
fight.
Opponents of genetically
modified crops say there's insuf-
ficient research on the health
effects of eating contaminated
food. Their campaign is largely
funded by a local organic farm
and education center. Arrow-
smith, 54, worries they will
migrate to her farm from nearby
fields, perhaps through pollinat-
ing bees.
Such fears are unfounded,
said Lex McCorvey, execu-
tive director of the Sonoma
County Farm Bureau, which
opposes the ban and has raised
money from farmers and winer-
ies to fight it. He said different
species of apples or tomatoes can
be planted next to each other
and not become contaminated.
The risk of cross-pollination is
very low for crops such as corn,
he added.
-I T
Nightly Dinner Specials $6.95
Monday- Chicken Parmesan
Tuesday- Country Fried Chicken
Wednesday- Spaghetti ft Meatballs
Thursday- Greek or Caesar Salad Chix
Friday- Fish ft Chips
Saturday- Meat or 5 Cheese Lasagna
Sunday- Fried Shrimp Plate
ALL DAY ALL NIGHT
fake Out 758-2774 Take Ou
301 Jarvis (2 blocks from campus
Daily Drink Specials
Monday- $1.75 Domestic bottles
Tuesday - $2.25 Imports Bottles
Wednesday - $1.25 Mug Bud Lt $4.50 Pitchers
Thursday - $2.50 House Hi-Balls 8t $3 House Wine
Friday - $2.50 Import of the Day ft $3 Margaritas
Saturday - $3 Lits ft $2.50 Import of the Day
Sunday - $2.75 Pints Guinness, Bass,
Newcastle, Black and Tan
-SfLfcj�H
HANGOUT HEADOUARTERSKKSHn


Phone 758-4200
1East StH Street
www.eafecaribeine.coiH
PLAY TEXAS
HOLDEM POKER
7PM -10PM ON MONPAYS
nn ALL YOU CAN EAT
.00 CHICKEN WINGS
7PM - 10PM ON MONPAY NIGHTS!
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
ALL YOU CAN EAT
WEEKEND BRUNCH
BUFFET
.99
With your
College ID
Reg.Price 5.99
CMB(
Many foods commonly
found in grocery stores also are
the result of genetic tinkering,
he said.
"We've been dealing with all
these risks in agriculture since
the beginning of time McCor-
vey said.
The proposed 10-year
ban on genetically modified
crops could hurt Sonoma County
farmers in the multibillion-
dollar international agricultural
industry, he said. In the United
States, most packaged foods
have some genetically modified
component. Europe has imposed
restrictions on genetically modi-
fied crop imports.
Art I .al ranch i believes the 45
acres of genetically modified feed
corn on his 255-acre Sonoma
County dairy farm is much
cleaner than the conventional
corn he had before.
Over six years, he said the
amount and strength of the pes-
ticides his workers have had to
apply to the weed-resistant crop
has consistently dropped.
"We're using less chemicals,
we're using chemicals that have
far less impact, and it costs less
and it does a much better job
he said. "What they (supporters
of a ban) want flies in the face
of what environmentalists want
- having an environment that's
less toxic to us
EVERY SATV WAY � SUNPAY 10AM - 5PM!
Election from page A1
resources and energy to make
sure the greenway is properly
funded Spell said.
Parks and open spaces are also
important to Greenville's appear-
ance. City Council received fund-
ing to turn nearly 119 acres of land
off Highway 33 into a community
park. "We should hold on to that
land and use it as a park when the
need arises Spell said.
In efforts to improve Green-
ville's appearance, Spell has
been a huge part of the city-wide
Spring Clean Up every year. The
Public Works Department identi-
fies projects throughout the city
that need extra attention, and
Spell always encourages people to
help clean their own community.
Since 2002, Spell has served
on Greenville's Community
Appearance Commission,
responsible for making the city
look appealing while assuring
that commercial properties have
enough trees and landscaping.
The idea is to make the city
look more attractive.
"In the long run, it makes
our neighborhoods look better,
which makes people want to
bring business here Spell said.
Spell wants people to have a
great quality of life in all neigh-
borhoods in Greenville, even if
that means constantly making
sure landlords and homeowners
are maintaining their properties.
Everyone wants to feel safe in
their home, "Whether you're 18
or 88 Spell said.
On Tuesday Nov. 8, Spell will
find out whether or not he has
been elected to Greenville's City
Council. If elected, he will serve
his term for two years.
Early voting has already
begun and is available at the
election annex north of the Tar
River, just off Green Street.
Regardless of whether Spell is
elected, he will work to establish
the Council of Neighborhoods
while continuing to serve on
the Community Appearance
Commission.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.





OPINION
Page A4
edltor@theeastcarollnian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
THURSDAY November 3, 2005
My Random Column
A thank you
should be given
The most popular holiday at ECU came and
went on Monday, Oct. 31. The campus fittingly
resembled a ghost town the following morning
as students recovered from a night of party-
ing, whether downtown or at the Mendenhall
Student Center.
Safety was a concern as always, but police
were on the scene, checking bags, patrolling
the streets and even patting down students
entering clubs and bars. According to city offi-
cials, it was one of the more safe and orderly
Halloween events in recent years.
Approximately 10,000 people ventured down-
town as additional protection and planning
were factors in reducing crime this year
There was a stabbing and several fights
reported, but nearly 120 law enforcement offi-
cers kept order among the masses. Police also
blocked off four blocks of downtown, confiscat-
ing two handguns and several knives.
Local businesses received record business
and clubs and bars had little trouble maintain-
ing order and enforced drinking laws, often
checking ID'S more than once upon entering
establishments.
Campus transportation also did an excellent job
taking students to and from surrounding areas
to Mendenhall. The buses ran on time and
made sure impaired students made it home
safely. No serious accidents were reported,
thanks in large part to this service.
The police and campus officials should be
praised for their effort ensuring our safety at
an event that hasn't always been so friendly to
students in the past For the most part, trying
to make it to classes the following day was the
most worrisome task of the holiday.
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Chris Munier
News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefleld
Head Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Photo Editor
Alexander Marcinlak
Web Editor
Zack Hill
Asst News Editor
Kristin Murnane
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst Copy Editor
Rachael Lotter
Asst Photo Editor
Dustin Jones
Asst Web Editor
Edward McKIm
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
25Z328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edrtorfstheeastcarollnian.com or to The East
Carolinian, SerfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
Pirate Rant
$3f8&�fi
Opinion Columnist
'm not sure whether I should laugh or cry
Hitler Youth goes pop
with Prussian Blue
GARYMCCABE
BITTER BOULEVARD
I'm pretty open-minded
when it comes to music. If you
were to scan through my MP3
Player, which if you're curi-
ous is a Creative Zen Xtra - or
as I affectionately call it, "the
iPod killer" - you'd find a fairly
broad cross-section of music. I've
got the essentials: The Beatles,
Bowie, Marvin Gaye, etc. and
I've got a lot of off-the-wall stuff
like Babyshambles, Tenacious D
and Wham!
But the other day while I was
listening to The Ron and Fez Show
on XM 202,1 heard music from a
genre I didn't even know existed:
white supremacist folk-pop. I know
what you're thinking - "racism in
music is nothing new
Well here's the catch: the
music Ron and Fez were play-
ing is by two 13-year-old twins
named Lamb and Lynx Gaede
- collectively known as Prussian
Blue. They're the Olson twins
of the white power movement
which is fitting because Lamb
and Lynx look jarringly similar
to Mary-Kate and Ashley.
Prussian Blue began perform-
ing in early 2003. Both girls sing.
Lamb plays the guitar while
Lynx plays the violin. Their girls'
mother April, however, has the
most important role in the group:
indoctrinating the girls with the
vile and venomous ideals of the
Nazi party because April Gaede
the band's manager and (surprise,
surprise) is an active member of
the National Vanguard organi-
zation, a splinter group made
up of disaffected former of the
National Alliance. Apparently
the National Alliance wasn't
racist enough for her liking.
At first I laughed at the con-
cept and wrote them off Prussian
Blue as some sort of harmless
novelty act however the more
I heard about them, the more
disturbed (and angry) I became.
It began with the origin of the
band's name. I figured it was
something along the lines having
Prussian blue-blood, of being
pure Germans. Nope.
In an interview with Viceland
Magazine, the girls dispelled my
theory. "There is the discus-
sion of the lack of Prussian blue
coloring (Zyklon B residue) in
the so-called gas chambers in the
concentration camps one of the
girls says (the magazine didn't
differentiate which one.)
"We think it might make people
question some of the inaccuracies
of the 'Holocaust' myth
Holocaust myth? Then where
did the Holocaust Museum in
Washington D.C. get all those
ghastly, heartbreaking photo-
graphs that they have on display?
If there weren't a holocaust,
where did those millions of Jews,
Gypsies, homosexuals and handi-
capped people go? To the store?
But let's not stop Prussian Blue
while they're on a roll. Viceland
then asked the girls what the larg-
est social problem facing the white
race was. They're answer: "Not
having enough white babies born
to replace ourselves and generally
not having good-quality white
people being born Let me reiter-
ate - these are 13-year-old girls.
These are 13-year-old girls
writing and singing songs with
lyrics like these, found in their
song "Sacrifice Rudolph Hess,
man of peace.He wouldn't give
up and he wouldn't cease, to give
his loyalty to our Cause.Remem-
ber him and give a pause. Robert
Matthews knew the Truth. He
knew what he had to do. He set
an example with Courage so bold.
We'll never let that fire grow cold.
Dr Pierce, a man so wise, helped so
many of us open our eyes, and see
the future for what it could be, a
future for our Race's eternity.
I did some research on who
they were singing about in this
song. Rudolph Hess, the "man
of peace was Adolph Hitler's
third in command, the "deputy
Fuhrer" if you will. He flew to
Scotland in 1941 to negotiate
peace with Britain - basically
he told Britain that if they left
Germany alone, Germany would
leave them unmolested.
I wouldn't necessarily call
the man who took dictation for
"Mein Kampf" a "man of peace
Dr. Martin Luther King was a
man of peace, they should write a
song about him actually that's
just asking for trouble.
Robert Matthews was the
leader of the white power ter-
rorist cell The Order Bruder
Schweigen (or the Order of the
Silent Brotherhood.) Dr. William
Pierce was the founder of the
National Alliance, and the truth
he knew, apparently, was spelled
out in his book "The Turner Dia-
ries" which violently depicted a
future rife with race wars. These
are heavy things to have on your
mind even when you're in your
30s. Shouldn't 13-year-old girls
be writing songs about Justin
Timberlake or their puppy? But
more importantly - I'm having
trouble with how I should feel
about Prussian Blue.
I hate their parents. I hate that
there are people in this country so
detestable as to instill that sort of
barbaric mentality into their chil-
dren. In essence, Lamb and Lynx's
parents have brainwashed them
and essentially, have eliminated
any chance of the two having
any sort of normal life. I mean,
It's almost as bad as naming your
children Lamb and Lynx.
But how should I feel about
the two girls? Should I hate them
for what they say or should I pity
them instead. At 13 years old,
should I expect them to break out
of their parent's mind control or
is that impossible after years and
years of abuse.
Finally, there's the conflict
between what I feel are issues
that I feel most strongly being as
socially liberal as I am, equality
and freedom of speech. Should
these girls have the freedom to
promote inequality? Or should
we just shake our heads and allow
it to go on? It's a catch-22.
All I know is that when 1
hear a lyric like this - "When a
mother's only children belong to
her no more. And black masked
men with guns come bashing
down the doors. Where freedom
exists for only those with darker
skin" - my blood boils. Plus
they're really bad singers - even
for 13-year-olds.
Letters To The Editor
Dear students and faculty,
Larry Spell is running for City
Council - for district 3. His motto
is "Neighbors working together to
build a stronger city" and I know
Larry can help make that happen.
I have known Larry for sev-
eral years and find him to be
a man of great integrity. He
wants the best for Greenville
and its citizens and is willing
to work hard to help Greenville
grow in ways that will benefit us
all. Larry aims to improve the
quality of life for everyone in
Greenville.
First, Larry Spell has long-term
vision. He wants to plan now
for the generations who will call
Greenville home in the future. He
knows that our property values
will go up if we continue to build
parks and green spaces into city
growth plan, and he is able to
bring people together to make this
happen. People will want to live
and work in a beautiful Greenville
if planning is done now.
Larry's style of leadership is
needed to make the center of
town safe and strong, as we work
to keep our fuel and transporta-
tion costs down. Larry has a
plan to strengthen the center of
Greenville as our population and
economy continues to grow.
Second, Larry has good
"people skills Before he makes
a decision, he talks with diverse
citizen groups and helps them
come to an agreement. He does
not make decisions alone. Larry
will work with all the boards and
commissions in the city at this
time of enormous change and
will increase citizen involvement
in City Government.
He has served as chairman of
the city Community Appearance
Commission, and has guided
that board in the direction of
a more attractive Greenville.
Larry has the skill to work with
a broad range of people. He is a
consensus builder.
Larry Spell will work with us
to ensure a future that we can all
be proud of.
Vote for Larry Spell Nov. 8!
Sincerely,
Alice Arnold
Associate Professor of Art
East Carolina University
Dear students and faculty,
A letter from 90 faculty and
human rights organizations was
recently sent to the Presidents and
athletic directors of NCAA Division
I colleges and universities urging
them to adopt a policy to refrain
from engaging in athletic competi-
tion with colleges and universities
that maintain American Indian
imagery in their sports mascots.
This initiative followed the
August S, 200S ruling by the
NCAA that it would no longer
permit 18 member institutions
with American Indian mascots
and imagery to host postseason
sports tournaments. The NCAA
also urged colleges and univer-
sities not tof engage in athletic
competition with those institu-
tions on their list of 18, a practice
already in place at the Universi-
ties of Iowa and Wisconsin.
The decision by the NCAA to
intervene came after years of infor-
mation gathering during which
member institutions were given
multiple opportunities to address
why their sports programs should
be permitted to remain outside
the NCAA's non-discrimination
policies. The ruling by the NCAA
was based on a thoughtful review
conducted by more than forty pres-
idents of member institutions.
I write to urge you to work on
your campus to establish a policy
that would preclude your university
from competing in athletic events
with non-Native institutions that
have American Indian sports mas-
cots. In so doing, you would join
the many American Indian nations
who oppose the use of Indian mas-
cots as well as the National Indian
Education Association, the United
States Commission on Civil Rights,
the NAACP, the American Psy-
chological Association and many
other civil rights, professional and
religious organizations.
Stephen J. Kaufman
Professor
University of Illinois
Facebook.com is a very effective tool to assist in pro-
crastinating. Wow! They even give you the option
of making an online photo album! Those guys are
geniuses. They keep coming up with ways we can
procrastinate and stay in others' business.
Does the size of a girl really matter to guys? If so, how
big is too big?
Gel deodorant in the cold is a very, very bad idea.
How come the Pirate Rant is the only section students
read in the newspaper and nothing else?
Did the skit done by the Black Student Union offend
anyone else? I know it was all in fun but I still do not
think it was appropriate.
Great STI article, but I would like to know some statistics.
Just because you're pregnant doesn't mean you have
to marry him.
What exactly is a friend? Someone you can depend on
no matter what or someone who only calls when they
need a ride?
Is anyone else tired of school already? I'm a sophomore
and this whole medical school thing is wearing me
out!
Go ahead hit me, and I'll call the police and you will go to
( jail. So get over yourself, and learn to drive. You are required
by NC law to yield to pedestrians at or in a crosswalk.
Anyone else think our English professor is hot?
; Why when you tell someone that you are Pro-Choice
do they say "Oh, so you're for abortion?" No, idiot, I
said I was FOR CHOICE. What's so heroic about having
, a child and not taking care of him or her?
The Pirate Rant is way too fun. I used to hate to read
random jerks complaining, but much like a car crash I
couldn't not look. Now that I'm one of those random
jerks I can't stop complaining.
Why do I feel like I have to wear a helmet just to ride my
bike to class? I was almost hit twice yesterday by rude
drivers. Bikes have the same right to be on the road as
cars. And if you see a bike in the middle of Fifth Street
stopping traffic, that's me. Its the only way I'll ever be
able to cross to campus. And to the idiot that honked at
me and almost hit me, share the road, it's the LAW!
TEC says they want to hear from me. That's funny,
I've sent in two letters to the editor this semester, yet
received no reply. What has changed?
If you have such a problem with us smoking, try to
give us some motivation. If you see a girl you like don't
disregard her because she is smoking. Tell her what
you think. People can change. Lots of people have quit
smoking, and for a lot of people it is a phase.
Go HYBRID! I loved the hybrid bus. It was great for a
ride, but better for pedestrians. We are tired of exhaust.
How am I supposed to think in class when I smell
like the muffler to a bus? I believe we should support
the hybrid buses, and get rid of those old dirty smog
creators.
What happened to pay phones? Not everyone wants a
cell phone, but sometimes we do need to make phone
calls. I don't want an electronic leash, but I do want
access to a telephone.
Note to Self: Do not sleep with girl with one ear-
ring, sounds like she gets around. Plus she's a home
wrecker!
To the person who said that the police should worry less
about alcohol and more about protecting students, if
there weren't so many drunks around town, maybe the
students wouldn't be in as much danger! Stop blaming
the Greenville police for doing their job!
To the straight guy who "would" with Orlando Bloom
don't feel bad, dude. I'm straight and I "would" too.
The non-profit organization that I work with for a proj-
ect needs to check itself, and realize that no one really
cares and stop trying to make me its slave.
Why is it that our lobby has heat, yet none of our rooms
have it? I mean, I know a little cold is probably good for
us, but not when we're bundled under three blankets
to keep warm.
If you get attention wherever you go, why run for mayor?
There is no pride in self-indulgence.
HEY! Share the first lot B spaces!
Dear Gods of rain and cold weather: bite me.
Don't you feel uncomfortable when a professor asks the
class a question and everyone sits there silently for like,
30 seconds? No? I guess it's just me.
To the lazy a" that drove their car to the ATM by
Mendenhall and then tried to run me over, it's a side-
walk. Park your car and get your lazy a out and walk
like everyone else!
Thanks for saying I was funny, but I wish you would
have specified you meant me cause there are like five
male newscasters at WZMB and now they all think you
were talking to them.
Ryan Nyquist why can't Dave Mirra be as cool and
nice as you.
If you're going be 10 or 15 minutes late every day in
class, just don't bother coming. You're a distraction,
and it takes away from class time that I pay to have. No
excuses either, ride the bus earlier.
1 don't need designer jeans and expensive clothes to look
good. I'm going to keep wearing my pajama pants to class.
Why did T�C put last Wednesday's Ceramic Guild
, info in this Wednesday's paper? Good thing you let
! everyone know about it now that it's over
I wasn't trying to show how much 1 know about the class
issue, our teacher said he gave credit If you participate in
class - hence why I always speak up, so while you sit there
wishing I would shut up, I am getting my big fat A!
I just wanted to say that I never thought I would find a
decent guy in Greenville, but I have recently found the
i most amazing guy in the world! Thanks baby for know-
ing exactly how to treat me! You are the best!
j Tony McKee, you make me not want to be a Republican
anymore.
To everyone who complains about the way ECU spends money
- especially the comment about ECU spending millions on a
football stadium while we don't have a parking deck - many
projects are donor funded and the money is earmarked for
specific projects - do your homework before you rant about it
Una's Not The In Kant Is on anonymous, way for students and staff In the
E'V�mrunttytosokethe)roplniam.SidmlslcmsamrxsidmttM
mane at www.tfimija-aroNniari.awi. or e-mailed to eaitortftheeastcarollntan.
com. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity.
AC






iber 3, 2005
1 to assist in pro-
: you the option
Those guys are
ith ways we can
ness.
i guys? If so, how
ery bad idea.
' section students
lse?
;nt Union offend
but I still do not
rw some statistics.
mean you have
iu can depend on
f calls when they
I'm a sophomore
ig is wearing me
and you will go to
e. You are required
m in a crosswalk.
sor is hot?
u are Pro-Choice
on?" No, idiot, I
roic about having
her?
d to hate to read
i like a car crash I
of those random
let just to ride my
resterday by rude
be on the road as
die of Fifth Street
ly way I'll ever be
ot that honked at
, it's the LAW!
e. That's funny,
his semester, yet
smoking, try to
;irl you like don't
g. Tell her what
people have quit
i phase.
It was great for a
tired of exhaust,
iss when I smell
e should support
e old dirty smog
;veryone wants a
i to make phone
h, but I do want
rl with one ear-
lus she's a home
should worry less
:ting students, if
town, maybe the
er! Stop blaming
ab!
Drlando Bloom
I "would" too.
k with for a proj-
lat no one really
lave.
one of our rooms
irobably good for
;r three blankets
ly run for mayor?
lite me.
rofessor asks the
: silently for like,
to the ATM by
! over, it's a side-
a" out and walk
wish you would
lere are like five
ley all think you
be as cool and
ate every day in
re a distraction,
pay to have. No
e clothes to look
ma pants to class.
Ceramic Guild
d thing you let
ver
w about the class
ou participate in
hile you sit there
my big fat A!
it I would find a
:ently found the
s baby for know-
lebest!
be a Republican
CU spends money
ling millions on a
king deck - many
' is earmarked for
you rant about it.
itudents and staff In the
submitted anonymously
tttiwuftheeastmroltnlan.
r content and brevity.
COMIC?
Page A5
THURSDAY November 3, 2005
Two Dudes
by Aaron Warner
WHAT'S 7WSUPPOSEP
�raEMt,PWE?cwnw
VISIT THE LIKAtY? PO VOU
THINK WE'RE TOOPUWIOHO,
KNOW WHAT KUKARYTHAT'S
KFOK?!HOT
Cg
Jpcfey- i2ft
lu iyj
Tr�2tf x&&J
POHTWOBW,
s��tww75.�6sooh
as we cash ih our wttl�s
we're ovt of hew.
A College Girl Named Joe
SOWHEHPOI
6ETT0�ECTTHISHE'S
HEWMVRhWC0MH6
CF YOURS, IftOHYA?OVER AGAIN TONIGHT
lair, m f

ICAHTSaiEVEYOU
haveawwwew.
I�EANrT'S�KF wny?
JUST mitie YOU I'VE HAP
LOTS Of
POYFRIEHPS.

by Aaron Warner
"She's a very
successful
woman.
Together we can stamp
out prejudice. It only takes
one voice to make a
difference. Find yours at
www.freedomcenter. org
UHMMJ UndtmoMftd i
FREEDOM CEN
xMmioa
I FREEDOM CENTER
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Steer flesh
5 Liberator
10 Adder cousins
14 Countertenor
15 State gambling
16 Cogwheel
17 Pronounce
indistinctly
18 Ladd and King
19 Furthermore
20 RasTafari
Makonnen
23 Grown acorn
24 Old Peruvians
27 Kenneth or Bart
30 Aussie Rod
34 Hanoi holiday
35 Gull relative
36 Second spin?
37 Levin or
Gershwin
38 Battering device
39 Benefactors
40 Manger morsel
41 Fitting
42 Luanda's land
43 Chip in chips
44 Holy cow!
45 Packs away
46 Beasts of
burden
47 Pigs'pads
49 Garfunkel or
Carney
50 Avoids
58 Essence
60 Out in front
61 Appropriate
moment
62 New thought
63 "Giant" ranch
name
64 Clinches
65 Work for
66 Parts of
windows
67 Fires
12341'678'1 22111213
14�
17"I
2021313233
233024432526
27282934
353637
38394640
414249
44455354
4748
505152555657
585960
6263!
6566'
� 2005 Tribune M.din SwviCM, Inc. All rights reserved.�110306
DOWN
Uproarious party
Jazz giant
Fitzgerald
Needle case
Friendless
Liquor container
Part in a play
Latin & others
8 Sicilian rumbler
9 "Upside Down"
singer
10 Once more
11 Choices
12 Family men
13 Packed-house
letters
21 Auditory organ
22 Fathers
25 Make bubbly
26 Ohio and
, Colorado
27 Drinker's tubes
28 Pekoe server
29 Forceful cajoler
30 Release
31 Turning light
32 Stringed
instruments
33 Poet St. Vincent
Millay
36 Go on a tirade
39 Out of fashion
43 Unstable
46 Metric square
measure
48 Hawke of
"Reality Bites"
Solutions
sNV31s3NVdNaV3
s3O1v1V3aV3a1
3IN11aV3HVHiid
dOHV3i3Sa33 1s
1aIsjjiiS
s3SsVSM01sM0M
31NVV1O0NV1dV
1VOsNOaiVdnVa
Vti13a!a3aNa3i
131a3AV1aaV1s
sV0Ni�AV0
31ssVi3s31iVH
oS1VsNV1v1an1S
HV3001iO-1ol1V
sdSVa33a33a
49 Robert and Alan 55 Costa.
51 Wyatt of the Old
West
52 Ostrich cousin
53 Penn or Young
54 Actress
Blanchett
56 Portent
57up (admit)
58 a la
mode
59 Cider-sweet
woman?
Pt-tlKT
RIC MILLER
The Student's Choice
�Supports Downtown Development
�Tough on Crime Student Safety
�Open Door Policy to Students
Local Government Involvement
Present Mayor Pro Tem and Council Member for District 3
Former Chairman, Greenville Utilities Commission
Business and Professional Organizations
Board of Directors, Greenville Industries, Inc.
Former State Director, North Carolina Home Builders Association
Charitable Organizations
Board Member, the Brody Foundation, Brody School of Medicine
Member and Former Chairman, Salvation Army Advisory Board
SecretaryTreasurer, Breakfast Kiwanis Club
I thank you in advance for your consideration and vote Tuesday,
November 8, 2005. Be assured, I will always be available to listen
and discuss the issues facing our community.
Sincerely,
't?
Paid for by the Committee to re-elect Ric Miller





OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarollnian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor in Chief
THURSDAY November 3,2005
My Random Column
A thank you
should be given
The most popular holiday at ECU came and
went on Monday, Oct. 31. The campus fittingly
resembled a ghost town the following morning
as students recovered from a night of party-
ing, whether downtown or at the Mendenhall
Student Center.
Safety was a concern as always, but police
were on the scene, checking bags, patrolling
the streets and even patting down students
entering clubs and bars. According to city offi-
cials, it was one of the more safe and orderly
Halloween events in recent years.
Approximately 10,000 people ventured down-
town as additional protection and planning
were factors in reducing crime this year.
There was a stabbing and several fights
reported, but nearly 120 law enforcement offi-
cers kept order among the masses. Police also
blocked off four blocks of downtown, confiscat-
ing two handguns and several knives.
Local businesses received record business
and clubs and bars had little trouble maintain-
ing order and enforced drinking laws, often
checking ID'S more than once upon entering
establishments.
Campus transportation also did an excellent job
taking students to and from surrounding areas
to Mendenhall. The buses ran on time and
made sure impaired students made it home
safely. No serious accidents were reported,
thanks in large part to this service.
The police and campus officials should be
praised for their effort ensuring our safety at
an event that hasn't always been so friendly to
students in the post For the most part, trying
to make It to classes the following day was the
most worrisome task of the holiday.
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Chris Munier Zack Hill
News Editor Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Herb SneerJ
Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak
Web Editor
Kristin Murnane
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst Copy Editor
Rachael Loiter
Asst Photo Editor
Dustin Jones
Asst Web Editor
Edward McKIm
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and Is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edtor@theeastcarollnian.com or to The East
Carolinian, SelfHelp Building, Greenville, NC 27858-
4353. Call 252-328-9238 for more information. One
copy of TEC Is free, each additional copy Is $1.
Opinion Columnist
m not sure whether I should laugh or cry
Hitler Youth goes pop
with Prussian Blue
GARY MCCABE
BITTER BOULEVARD
I'm pretty open-minded
when tt comes to music. If you
were to scan through my MP3
Player, which if you're curi-
ous is a Creative Zen Xtra - or
as I affectionately call it, "the
iPod killer" - you'd find a fairly
broad cross-section of music. I've
got the essentials: The Beatles,
Bowie, Marvin Gaye, etc. and
I've got a lot of off-the-wall stuff
like Babyshambles, Tenacious D
and Wham!
But the other day while 1 was
listening to The Ron and Fez Show
on XM 202,1 heard music from a
genre I didn't even know existed:
white supremacist folk-pop. I know
what you're thinking - "racism in
music is nothing new
Well here's the catch: the
music Ron and Fez were play-
ing is by two 13-year-old twins
named Lamb and Lynx Gaede
- collectively known as Prussian
Blue. They're the Olson twins
of the white power movement
which is fitting because Lamb
and Lynx look jarringly similar
to Mary-Kate and Ashley.
Prussian Blue began perform-
ing in early 2003. Both girls sing.
Lamb plays the guitar while
Lynx plays the violin. Their girls'
mother April, however, has the
most important role in the group:
indoctrinating the girls with the
vile and venomous ideals of the
Nazi party because April Gaede
the band's manager and (surprise,
surprise) is an active member of
the National Vanguard organi-
zation, a splinter group made
up of disaffected former of the
National Alliance. Apparently
the National Alliance wasn't
racist enough for her liking.
At first I laughed at the con-
cept and wrote them off Prussian
Blue as some sort of harmless
novelty act however the more
I heard about them, the more
disturbed (and angry) I became.
It began with the origin of the
band's name. I figured it was
something along the lines having
Prussian blue-blood, of being
pure Germans. Nope.
In an interview with Viceland
Magazine, the girls dispelled my
theory. "There is the discus-
sion of the lack of Prussian blue
coloring (Zyklon B residue) in
the so-called gas chambers in the
concentration camps one of the
girls says (the magazine didn't
differentiate which one.)
"We think it might make people
question some of the inaccuracies
of the 'Holocaust' myth
Holocaust myth? Then where
did the Holocaust Museum in
Washington D.C. get all those
ghastly, heartbreaking photo-
graphs that they have on display?
If there weren't a holocaust,
where did those millions of Jews,
Gypsies, homosexuals and handi-
capped people go? To the store?
But let's not stop Prussian Blue
while they're on a roll. Viceland
then asked the girls what the larg-
est social problem facing the white
race was. They're answer: "Not
having enough white babies born
to replace ourselves and generally
not having good-quality white
people being born Let me reiter-
ate - these are 13-year-old girls.
These are 13-year-old girls
writing and singing songs with
lyrics like these, found in their
song "Sacrifice Rudolph Hess,
man of peace.He wouldn't give
up and he wouldn't cease, to give
his loyalty to our Cause.Remem-
ber him and give a pause. Robert
Matthews knew the Truth. He
knew what he had to do. He set
an example with Courage so bold.
We'll never let that fire grow cold.
Dr Pierce, a man so wise, helped so
many of us open our eyes, and see
the future for what it could be, a
future for our Race's eternity.
I did some research on who
they were singing about in this
song. Rudolph Hess, the "man
of peace was Adolph Hitler's
third in command, the "deputy
Fuhrer" if you will. He flew to
Scotland in 1941 to negotiate
peace with Britain - basically
he told Britain that if they left
Germany alone, Germany would
leave them unmolested.
I wouldn't necessarily call
the man who took dictation for
"Mein Kampf" a "man of peace
Dr. Martin Luther King was a
man of peace, they should write a
song about him actually that's
just asking for trouble.
Robert Matthews was the
leader of the white power ter-
rorist cell The Order Bruder
Schweigen (or the Order of the
Silent Brotherhood.) Dr. William
Pierce was the founder of the
National Alliance, and the truth
he knew, apparently, was spelled
out in his book "The Turner Dia-
ries" which violently depicted a
future rife with race wars. These
are heavy things to have on your
mind even when you're in your
30s. Shouldn't 13-year-old girls
be writing songs about Justin
Timberlake or their puppy? But
more importantly - I'm having
trouble with how 1 should feel
about Prussian Blue.
1 hate their parents. 1 hate that
there are people in this country so
detestable as to instill that sort of
barbaric mentality into their chil-
dren. In essence, Lamb and Lynx's
parents have brainwashed them
and essentially, have eliminated
any chance of the two having
any sort of normal life. I mean,
it's almost as bad as naming your
children Lamb and Lynx.
But how should I feel about
the two girls? Should I hate them
for what they say or should 1 pity
them instead. At 13 years old,
should I expect them to break out
of their parent's mind control or
is that impossible after years and
years of abuse.
Finally, there's the conflict
between what I feel are issues
that I feel most strongly being as
socially liberal as I am, equality
and freedom of speech. Should
these girls have the freedom to
promote inequality? Or should
we just shake our heads and allow
it to go on? It's a catch-22.
All I know is that when I
hear a lyric like this - "When a
mother's only children belong to
her no more. And black masked
men with guns come bashing
down the doors. Where freedom
exists for only those with darker
skin" - my blood boils. Plus
they're really bad singers - even
for 13-year-olds.
Letters To The Editor
Dear students and faculty,
Larry Spell is running for City
Council - for district 3. His motto
is "Neighbors working together to
build a stronger city" and I know
Larry can help make that happen.
1 have known Larry for sev-
eral years and find him to be
a man of great integrity. He
wants the best for Greenville
and its citizens and is willing
to work hard to help Greenville
grow in ways that will benefit us
all. Larry aims to improve the
quality of life for everyone in
Greenville.
First, Larry Spell has long-term
vision. He wants to plan now
for the generations who will call
Greenville home in the future. He
knows that our property values
will go up if we continue to build
parks and green spaces into city
growth plan, and he is able to
bring people together to make this
happen. People will want to live
and work in a beautiful Greenville
if planning Is done now.
Larry's style of leadership is
needed to make the center of
town safe and strong, as we work
to keep our fuel and transporta-
tion costs down. Larry has a
plan to strengthen the center of
Greenville as our population and
economy continues to grow.
Second, Larry has good
"people skills Before he makes
a decision, he talks with diverse
citizen groups and helps them
come to an agreement. He does
not make decisions alone. Larry
will work with all the boards and
commissions in the city at this
time of enormous change and
will increase citizen involvement
in City Government.
He has served as chairman of
the city Community Appearance
Commission, and has guided
that board in the direction of
a more attractive Greenville.
Larry has the skill to work with
a broad range of people. He is a
consensus builder.
Larry Spell will work with us
to ensure a future that we can all
be proud of.
Vote for Larry Spell Nov. 81
Sincerely,
Alice Arnold
Associate Professor of Art
East Carolina University
Dear students and faculty,
A letter from 90 faculty and
human rights organizations was
recently sent to the Presidents and
athletic directors of NCAA Division
I colleges and universities urging
them to adopt a policy to refrain
from engaging in athletic competi-
tion with colleges and universities
that maintain American Indian
imagery in their sports mascots.
This initiative followed the
August S, 2005 ruling by the
NCAA that It would no longer
permit 18 member institutions
with American Indian mascots
and imagery to host postseason
sports tournaments. The NCAA
also urged colleges and univer-
sities not to engage in athletic
competition with those institu-
tions on their list of 18, a practice
already in place at the Universi-
ties of Iowa and Wisconsin.
The decision by the NCAA to
Intervene came after years of infor-
mation gathering during which
member institutions were given
multiple opportunities to address
why their sports programs should
be permitted to remain outside
the NCAA's non-discrimination
policies. The ruling by the NCAA
was based on a thoughtful review
conducted by more than forty pres-
idents of member institutions.
1 write to urge you to work on
your campus to establish a policy
that would preclude your university
from competing in athletic events
with non-Native institutions that
have American Indian sports mas-
cots. In so doing, you would join
the many American Indian nations
who oppose the use of Indian mas-
cots as well as the National Indian
Education Association, the United
States Commission on Civil Rights,
the NAACP, the American Psy-
chological Association and many
other civil rights, professional and
religious organizations.
Stephen J. Kaufman
Professor
University of Illinois
Pirate Rant
Facebook.com is a very effective tool to assist in pro-
crastinating. Wow! They even give you the option
of making an online photo album! Those guys are
geniuses. They keep coming up with ways we can
: procrastinate and stay In others' business.
Does the size of a girl really matter to guys? If so, how
I big is too big?
! Gel deodorant in the cold is a very, very bad idea.
; How come the Pirate Rant is the only section students
read in the newspaper and nothing else?
! Did the skit done by the Black Student Union offend
anyone else? I know it was all in fun but I still do not
think it was appropriate.
Great STI article, but I would like to know some statistics.
Just because you're pregnant doesn't mean you have
to marry him.
What exactly is a friend? Someone you can depend on
no matter what or someone who only calls when they
need a ride?
Is anyone else tired of school already? I'm a sophomore
and this whole medical school thing is wearing me
out!
Go ahead hit me, and I'll call the police and you will go to
jail. So get over yourself, and learn to drive. You are required
by NC law to yield to pedestrians at or in a crosswalk.
Anyone else think our English professor is hot?
Why when you tell someone that you are Pro-Choice
do they say "Oh, so you're for abortion?" No, idiot, I
said I was FOR CHOICE. What's so heroic about having
a child and not taking care of him or her?
The Pirate Rant is way too fun. I used to hate to read
random jerks complaining, but much like a car crash I
couldn't not look. Now that I'm one of those random
jerks I can't stop complaining.
Why do I feel like I have to wear a helmet just to ride my
bike to class? I was almost hit twice yesterday by rude
drivers. Bikes have the same right to be on the road as
cars. And if you see a bike in the middle of Fifth Street
stopping traffic, that's me. Its the only way I'll ever be
able to cross to campus. And to the idiot that honked at
me and almost hit me, share the road, it's the LAW!
TEC says they want to hear from me. That's funny,
I've sent in two letters to the editor this semester, yet
received no reply. What has changed?
If you have such a problem with us smoking, try to
give us some motivation. If you see a girl you like don't
disregard her because she is smoking. Tell her what
you think. People can change. Lots of people have quit
smoking, and for a lot of people it is a phase.
Go HYBRID! 1 loved the hybrid bus. It was great for a
ride, but better for pedestrians. We are tired of exhaust.
How am I supposed to think in class when I smell
like the muffler to a bus? I believe we should support
the hybrid buses, and get rid of those old dirty smog
creators.
What happened to pay phones? Not everyone wants a
cell phone, but sometimes we do need to make phone
calls. I don't want an electronic leash, but I do want
access to a telephone.
Note to Self: Do not sleep with girl with one ear-
ring, sounds like she gets around. Plus she's a home
wrecker!
To the person who said that the police should worry less
about alcohol and more about protecting students, if
there weren't so many drunks around town, maybe the
students wouldn't be in as much danger! Stop blaming
the Greenville police for doing their job!
To the straight guy who "would" with Orlando Bloom
don't feel bad, dude. I'm straight and I "would" too.
The non-profit organization that I work with for a proj-
ect needs to check itself, and realize that no one really
cares and stop trying to make me its slave.
Why is it that our lobby has heat, yet none of our rooms
have it? I mean, 1 know a little cold is probably good for
us, but not when we're bundled under three blankets
to keep warm.
If you get attention wherever you go, why run for mayor?
There is no pride in self-indulgence.
HEY! Share the first lot B spaces!
Dear Gods of rain and cold weather: bite me.
Don't you feel uncomfortable when a professor asks the
class a question and everyone sits there silently for like,
30 seconds? No? 1 guess it's just me.
To the lazy a" that drove their car to the ATM by
Mendenhall and then tried to run me over, it's a side-
walk. Park your car and get your lazy a out and walk
like everyone else!
Thanks for saying I was funny, but I wish you would
have specified: you meant me cause there are like five
male newscasters at WZMB and now they all think you
were talking to them.
Ryan Nyquist why can't Dave Mirra be as cool and
nice as you.
If you're going be 10 or IS minutes late every day in
class, just don't bother coming. You're a distraction,
and it takes away from class time that I pay to have. No
excuses either, ride the bus earlier.
I don't need designer jeans and expensive clothes to look
good. I'm going to keep wearing my pajama pants to class.
Why did TEC put last Wednesday's Ceramic Guild
info in this Wednesday's paper? Good thing you let
everyone know about it now that it's over
I wasn't trying to show how much I know about the class
issue, our teacher said he gave credit If you participate in
class - hence why I always speak up, so while you sit there
wishing I would shut up, I am getting my big fat A!
I just wanted to say that I never thought I would find a
decent guy in Greenville, but I have recently found the
most amazing guy in the world! Thanks baby for know-
ing exactly how to treat me! You are the best!
Tony McKee, you make me not want to be a Republican
anymore.
To everyone who complains about the way ECU spends money
- especially the comment about ECU spending millions on a
football stadium while we don't have a parking deck - many
projects are donor funded and the money is earmarked for
specific projects - do your homework before you rant about it.
Editor's Note TV Ptntte (toil Is an anonymous way for students and staff In the
.Ucommunltytovoketheiriiplnlons Submtxlom cm be submitted antinymousry
imllne at www.theeastcantllnlim.com, or emailed to edltonmheeasttarollnlan.
com. The editor reserves the right to edit opinions for content and brevity.
ACc





ber 3, 2005
to assist in pro-
you the option
Those guys are
th ways we can
less.
guys? If so, how
ry bad idea.
section students
se?
nt Union offend
but I still do not
n some statistics,
mean you have
j can depend on
calls when they
I'm a sophomore
; is wearing me
ind you will go to
. You are required
r in a crosswalk.
or is hot?
i are Pro-Choice
m?" No, idiot, I
aic about having
ler?
1 to hate to read
like a car crash I
)f those random
et Just to ride my
;sterday by rude
�e on the road as
le of Fifth Street
! way I'll ever be
it that honked at
it's the LAW!
That's funny,
lis semester, yet
smoking, try to
irl you like don't
. Tell her what
eople have quit
phase.
t was great for a
tired of exhaust,
s when I smell
should support
old dirty smog
eryone wants a
to make phone
, but I do want
with one ear-
is she's a home
tiould worry less
ing students, if
own, maybe the
r! Stop blaming
b!
irlando Bloom
"would" too.
i with for a proj-
at no one really
ive.
ne of our rooms
obably good for
� three blankets
y run for mayor?
teme.
ofessor asks the
silently for like,
to the ATM by
over, it's a side-
out and walk
rish you would
ere are like five
ey all think you
be as cool and
te every day in
e a distraction,
ay to have. No
i clothes to look
na pants to class.
Ceramic Guild
i thing you let
rer
about the class
iu participate in
ille you sit there
ny big fat A!
11 would find a
:ntly found the
baby for know-
e best!
e a Republican
XI spends money
ng millions on a
tag deck-many
is earmarked for
wi rant about it.
udrnB and staff In tht
utmtttedanonymouity
torvtthftattcawlinian.
content and brrvlty.
COMICS
Page A5
THURSDAY November 3, 2005
Two Dudes
by Aaron Warner
wKniwrvrnm
TO WEAN, PWE? CANT (W
vrjrnuE ukaky? to you
THINK WE'RE TOQPWrV TONO,
KNOW WHAT UIKAKYTHAT'S
KFOK?NOT
C�
Jfrs&r '
fcimvE
POTT WORRY,
SIWr7TfW75.ASSOON
AS WE CASH IN OUR 9CMWS
WE'RE OUT OF HERE.
A College Girl Named Joe
SO WHEN 701
6ET TO WEFT THISHE'S
HEWPOVFZIEWC0HMHG
OF YOURS, IKJHYA?0VERA6A1N
TONi&rr
DAV
iJM Cmfi i
Sjtv i IcZ-LiM f s
by Aaron Warner
IONTBaiEVEYOU
HAVEAWyWPfNP.
iMEANirsftFw mm?
JUST S&IN6 YOU I'VE HAP
THIS WAV. LOTS OP
S� POYFRIENPS.

PAYO
YOUR EDUCATION
Tuition costs shouldn't stop you from reaching your goals
in lift By joining the Army National Guard, you'll receive
the money you need to help pay for college as well as the
skill and training you need to get the career you want.
If you're looking to get through college, with the Army
National Guard, you can!
252-916-9073 � 1-800-GO-
I - coin
WtfX
"She's a very
successful
-telack woman
Together we can stamp
out prejudice. It only takes
one voice to make a
difference. Find yours at
www. freedomcenter.org
UNttxmtl Underwound
FREEDOM CEI
ENTER
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Steer flesh
5 Liberator
10 Adder cousins
14 Countertenor
15 State gambling
16 Cogwheel
17 Pronounce
indistinctly
18 Laddand King
19 Furthermore
20 Ras Tatari
Makonnen
23 Grown acorn
24 Old Peruvians
27 Kenneth or Bart
30 Aussie Rod
34 Hanoi holiday
35 Gull relative
36 Second spin?
37 Levin or
Gershwin
38 Battering device
39 Benefactors
40 Manger morsel
41 Fitting
42 Luanda's land
43 Chip in chips
44 Holy cow!
45 Packs away
46 Beasts of
burden
47 Pigs' pads
49 Garfunkel or
Carney
50 Avoids
58 Essence
60 Out in front
61 Appropriate
moment
62 New thought
63 "Giant" ranch
name
64 Clinches
65 Work for
66 Parts of
windows
67 Fires
123'1'678910111213
14'S16
1719
202122
23242526
2728293031323334
353637
383940
414243
444546
474849
5051525354555657
5859601
6263;
6566�
O 2005 Tribune Media Services. Inc. All right reserved.110306
DOWN
Uproarious party
Jazz giant
Fitzgerald
Needle case
Friendless
Liquor container
Part in a play
Latin & others
8 Sicilian rumbler
9 "Upside Down"
singer
10 Once more
11 Choices
12 Family men
13 Packed-house
letters
21 Auditory organ
22 Fathers
25 Make bubbly
26 Ohio and
1 Colorado
27 Drinker's tubes
28 Pekoe server
29 Forceful cajoler
30 Release
31 Turning light
32 Stringed
instruments
33 Poet St. Vincent
Millay
36 Go on a tirade
39 Out of fashion
43 Unstable
46 Metric square
measure
48 Hawke of
"Reality Bites"
Solutions
sNV01s3NVdNdV3
s30'V1V3dV3a1
3IAI11aV3HVH11d
dOdV310Sd33 1S
1dV,S31XS
s3SsVsMO1SM0M
31NV� V1OONV1dV
iVOsN0y1VdWVd
Vy13a1y3dNd3i
i31d3AV1dyV1S
sV0N1HV0
31SsV"i3S311VH
0s1VsNV1v1Hn1S
tiV39011O1011V
SdSVd33d�-33a
49 Robert and Alan 55 Costa.
51 Wyatt of the Old
West
52 Ostrich cousin
53 Penn or Young
54 Actress
Blanchett
56 Portent
57up (admit)
58 a la
mode
59 Cider-sweet
woman?
RIC MILLER
The Student's Choice
'Supports Downtown Development
�Tough on Crime Student Safety
�Open Door Policy to Students
Local Government Involvement
Present Mayor Pro Tern and Council Member for District 3
Former Chairman, Greenville Utilities Commission
Business and Professional Organizations
Board of Directors, Greenville Industries, Inc.
Former State Director, North Carolina Home Builders Association
Charitable Organizations
Board Member, the Brody Foundation, Brody School of Medicine
Member and Former Chairman, Salvation Army Advisory Board
SecretaryTreasurer, Breakfast Kiwanis Club
I thank you in advance for your consideration and vote Tuesday,
November 8, 2005. Be assured, I will always be available to listen
and discuss the issues facing our community.
Sincerely,
"Paid for by the Committee to re-elect Ric Miller






FWGEA6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
11-3-05
B
S
u
D
A
N
C
E
T
E
A
M

E
C
u
G
o
s
p
E
L
C

THE INC � SWASH IMPROV � J2G ECDA � TAP DANCERS p
A Step Towards Relief
StiiderifeOrganization Hurricane Iplief Eyent
i

Tuesday, November 8th
JP 7:00 pm
Hendrix Theater
Admission is FREE,
Donations are Encouraged!
o
c
K
D
A
N
C
E
R
S

N
P
H
C
S
T
E
P
P
First 200 people get FREE T-shirts!
0 Come out and support this great cause while being e
entertained by the best acts at ECU!
i
R
R
s
V.�V-
IVIITS
Hrei
TIHIOS W
Presented by
ie 328-6004
The Chumscrubber
Mercury Film
Charlie and The
Chocolate Factory
Blockbuster Film
Titanic
TOi
SavagGJn&aster Tour
oncerm Washion Show)
MSC Great Rooms @ 8pm l
a November Sth � m
SH0WTIMES:
Thurs Nov. 3rd at 9:30pm
Friday Nov. 4th at 7pm and Midnight
Sat Nov. 5th at 9:30pm
Sun Nov. 6th at 7pm
Thurs Nov. 3rd at 7pm
Friday Nov. 4th at 9:30pm
Sat Nov. 5th at 7pm and Midnight
Sun Nov. 6th at 3pm
Nov. 8th at 5pm
All movies are shown at
Mendenhall in Hendrix Theatre
Upcoming Movies:
The Constant Gardener
The Skeleton Key
Revere Show
Mendenhall Gallery
Nov. 4th
New York City Trip
�P: November 22-27th, 2005
M Registration is available
� in the MSC Central Ticket Office.
Only 10 Seats Remaining
Questions? Call 328-4715, Visit www.ecu.edustudentunion or email STUDENTUNION@MAIL.ECU.EDU





CLASSIFIEDS
Page A7
THURSDAY November 3, 2005
FOR RENT
pets 752-7738
or 252-341-1726
Cannon CourtCedar Court: 2
bedroom 1.5 bath townhouse. One
ECU bus stop. For more information
call Wainright Property Management
756-6209 or visit our web-site www.
rentingreenville.com
2 & 3 Bedroom units 1-3.5 Baths -
Rent from $575.00 Blocks from ECU
& ECU Bus Route. Call 717-9871;
717-9872
Beech Street: 3 bedroom 2 bath
apartment. Close to ECU. Cat allowed
with fee. For more information call
Wainright Property Management
756-6209 or visit our web-site www.
rentingreenville.com
Large 2 & Bedroom townhouses,
1.5 to 2.5 baths, full basement,
WD Hook-ups, great storage,
enclosed patio, ECU bus route, No
2 and 3 bedroom houses for rent.
Close to ECU. Pet allowed with
fee. For more information call
Wainright Property Management
756-6209 or visit our web-site www.
rentingreenville.com
1 & 2 bedroom apartments, walking
distance to campus, WD conn
pets ok no weight limit, free water
and sewer. Call today for security
deposit special - 758-1921.
2 BD 2 BA Wyndham Cirde Duplex
Available Dec 1st and an 1st 595.00
mo. 321-4802 newly decorated
Cathedral ceilings, nice landlord I
Great Price!
For Rent 2013A River Drive
(Dockside) 2 Bedroom - 2 Bath - 1st
month rent free - Available anuary
- $600month - Call 252-355-6339
College Part: 1 St 2 bedroom
apartments, On ECU bus stop.
WaterSewer included. For more
information call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209 or visit our
web-site www.rentingreenville.
FREEI 1st Mo. Rent plus High Speed
Internet - 4 bedrooms, 3 baths,
Central heatAC, fireplace, fenced
yard, dogs OK. Near ECU, PCMH,
427W. 4th St. JIIOO.OOMo. 347-
6504
One two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,9,12
month leases Water Cable included
ECU bus Wireless Internet pets
dishwasher disposals pool laundry
(252) 758-4015
Cypress Gardens: 1 & 2 bedroom 1
�immtiMmmMim
bath apartment. On ECU bus stop.
Basic Cable included. For more
information call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209 or visit our
web-site www.rentingreenville.
3 BDR 2 BA Plus Bonus Room All
Appliances, Fenced Yard, Deck, Pets
OK. 4 Blocks from ECU $850 Per
Month. Sec. Dep. Negotiable. Avail.
Now. Call 252-258-1810.
Park Village: 1 & 2 bedrooms. Close
to ECU. WaterSewer included. For
more information call Wainright
Property Management 756-
6209 or visit or web-site www.
rentingreenville.com
Gladiolus, jasmine, & Peony
Gardens: 1, 2, & 3 bedrooms.
Close to ECU. Pets allowed with
fee. For more information call
Wainright Property Management
756-6209 or visit our web-site www.
rentingreenville.com
1 and 2 bedroom apts. On ECU bus
route. Water and Sewer included.
Pets allowed with deposit. Show
your student ID and receive a
discount! I Call Kingston Condos for
more details at 252-758-7575
Roommate needed in beautiful 3
BDR house, 2 Bath one block from
campus, females non-smoking ;
high speed wireless internet option;
WD, all kitchen appliances, parking,
no pets. Please call 347-1231
ROOMMATE WANTED
Sublease $349 Utilities Included Call
919-394-8315
One room available in four bedroom
house. 1 2 maile from campus. Rent
Now,
all your incoming
calls can be free.
L-(Even ALL of Mom's.)
Now,
when people are wasting your time, they're not wasting your money.
Unlimited CALL ME" Minutes
FREE Incoming Picture Messaging
11 Q
per month
Plus, ask about:
� AOL" Instant Messenger� service - FREE Trial
� Unlimited Nights & Weekends starting at 7 p.m.
l�5� -
LG VX6100
amera Phone
TUSC.COM
B88-BUY-USCC
l� US. Cellular
We connect with yotc
Otter vatd �i two-year sendee agreement
surcharges, overage charges and taxes apply.
SLSSS'diteainta3 Smlo5�&
HZ!L,inS ik 1-i.j- �-TT-iuiiiiaMlituIn lui.iiiI iif imumiiii n inranr nf 1Pr rnrmrtrrrnYtn ilirnir in nrr nr frnI p �-��ppT ��- nync r
is $325 plus 14 utilities. Available
now. Call 757-348-6060 or e-mail
anil 010@mail.ecu.edu
Sublease an. '06 thru June '06 Rent
$235 a month plus split cable and
utilities Near Campus On bus route
call Stephanie 252-531-3217
FOR SALE"
For Sale: Used Laptop: IBM ThinkPad
600x with Windows XP Loaded,
DVD Drive, Wireless Ready. Asking
$400 O.B.O. Contact Stephanie @
919-389-2541
HELP WANTED
Help wanted for sales and stock
Heavy lifting required Apply at The
Youth Shop, 923 Red Banks Rd
Arlington Village 756-2855
LayoutDesign Assistance for new
County Women's Journal. Great PT
opportunity with growth potential.
Must be flexible and dependable.
252-341-8877.
Bartenders Wanted! $250day
potential. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520 ext. 202
Part-time Sales position; afternoon
hours; apply in person @ Larry's
Carpet One, 3010 E. 10th Street,
Greenville, NC - No Calls, please!
Mon Thru Fri Daytime Deli And
Cashier Position Available. $6.00
Per Hour Tips. Call for interview
252-916-3712
Greenville Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting 14-18
part-time youth basketball coaches
and officials for the upcoming
basketball program. Applicants
must possess a good knowledge
of basketball skills and have the
ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18 in
basketball fundamentals. Hours
are from 4pm to 9pm, weekdays
and some weekend coaching.
Flexible with hours according to
class schedules. This program will
run from November 29 through
the beginning of March. Salary
rates start at $6.50 per hour. For
more information, please contact
the Athletic Office at 329-4550,
Monday through Friday, 10am until
7pm. Apply at the City of Greenville,
Human Resources Department,
201 Martin L. King Dr. Phone 329-
4492.
Tiara Too Jewelry Colonial Mall Part-
time Retail Sales Associate Available
year round! Day and Night hours
Apply in Person
PERSONALS
Who said Virginity isn't a laughing
matter. National Lampoon's Adam &
Eve. Opening in theatres November
4th. www.nationallampoon.com
adam&eve She's got it all. He's not
getting any. Get Yours!
OTHER
Bahamas Spring Break Celebrity
Cruise! 5 Days From $299! Includes
Meals, Taxes, Entry To Exclusive
MTVu Events, Beach Parties With
Celebrities As Seen on Real World,
Road Rules! On Campus Reps
Needed! www.SpringBreakTravel.
com Promo code: 32 1-800-678-
6386
1 Spring Break Website! Low
prices guaranteed. Free Meals &
Free Drinks. Book 11 people, get
12th trip free! Group discounts for
6-1- www.SpringBreakDiscounts.
com or www.LeisureTours.com or
800-838-8202.
Spring Break - Early Booking
Specials - Free Meals & Drinks -
$50 Deposit - 800-234-7007 www.
endlesssummertours.com
Cancun, Acapulco, Jamaica From
$499! Travel With America's Largest
& Ethics Award Winning Spring
Break Company! Fly Scheduled
Airlines, Free Meals, Drinks, Biggest
Celebrity Parties! On-Campus
Marketing Reps Needed! www.
SpringBreakTravel.com Promo code:
32 1-800-678-6386
AREYQU
dioSrelinSalorefw
s era trademarks and service marks of their raspedre owners All rights reserved.
HAVEMTTOID
www.�hr�yourtrte org
1-800-355-SHARE
I CoWton on OroUft 4 '�iol Donation





PAGEA8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � NEWS
11-3-05
AFFORDABILITV
CONVENIENCE
��
LOCATION
WYNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From ECU.
Energy Efficient.
Kitchen Appliances.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
Pets OK With Deposit.


,ilft SI 1
a rADTM
HT�j

� � �
EASTGATE VILLAGE
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance.
Pets OK With Deposit.
Nightly security patrols.
BRADFORD CREEK
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath Duplexes.
Country Club Living Without The Price
On Bradford Creek Golf Course.
Approximately 1,350 Sq t.
Covered Parking.
Fully Equipped Kitchens. m J
Washer & Dryer. m
Pets OK With Deposit.
DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath.
6 Blocks From ECU.
Approximately 1350 Sq.ft.
Covered Parking.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer.
Pets OK With Deposit.
5A4 7A70 RIVERWALK
D01-0y 3 Bedroom And 3 Bath Houses.
wgLA DCkJT Kitchen Appliances.
DO 1 -KfcN I Dishwasher.
3200-F Moseley Drive Washer & Dryer.
Greenville, NC 27858 Central Air & Heat.
Professionally managed by Covered Parking.
Pinnacle Property Management No Pets Allowed.
WWW.PINNACLEPROPERTyMAHAGEMENT.COM
Offerins Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
Convenient To ECU, Pitt Community Collese & The Medical District





11-3-05
Arts & Entertalnm
Page B1 features@theeastcarollnian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY November 3, 2005
Announcement:
Rebel 48:
Friday, Nov. 4 marks the date for the
Rebel 48 Student Exhibition and
Reception from 6 - 9 p.m. Located at
Emerge Gallery, the show will feature
work from ECU students in visual art,
literary and musical concentrations.
This show is free and open to the
public, however donations for Emerge
Gallery are greatly appreciated.
Got Problems?
Dear Features,
Can you suggest some fun classes to
take this spring? Registration will be
taking place this week and next week
and I'm having a hard time figuring
out which classes to take.
- Ready to Learn
Dear Ready to Learn,
If you're still looking for some fun
General Education classes, we'd
recommend Introduction to Sociology,
Criminal Justice 1000 and an English
class called The Short Story. The
sociology and justice classes give
you a basic overview of concepts
which actually apply to real life. It
always comes In handy to know why
people tend to act the way they do, or
what rights you have as an American
citizen. If you're looking for Humanities
classes, The Short Story will work out
nicely if you enjoy reading. The stories
are not very long (hence the section
name) and you get the opportunity to
read stories by many famous authors
from all over the world that will really
have an Impact on you. If you haven't
done so already, refer to your course
catalog and talk to your advisor about
what kind of course track you should
be on for your major.
Recipe:
Creamy Com and Spinach Enchiladas
These enchiladas have a creamy
richness that is hard to resist.
They also have a nice tang from
the tomatillo-based green sauce.
Scrumptious and fast, the cream
spinach and cream-style corn
tucked inside make them even
more luscious. Serve with sliced
tomatoes and just wait for the
"mmm's Use a metal measuring
cup to scoop the filling.
Difficulty: Easy
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour
Yield: 4 servings
Filling:
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, chopped
(about 1 cup)
2 12 cups shredded rotisserie
chicken, pulled apart by hand
1 (4-ounce) can diced mild
green chilies
2 teaspoons chili powder
1 (14 34-ounce) can cream-
style corn
1 (10-ounce) box frozen
creamed spinach, thawed
12 cup light sour cream
1 cup already shredded
Monterey jack cheese (4 ounces)
12 teaspoon salt
12 super size corn tortillas (each
about 612-lnches across)
Sauce:
34 cup green taco sauce or salsa
verde (not chunky)
12 cup light sour cream
Shredded Monterey jack cheese,
to taste
12 cup finely chopped cllantro leaves
Position a rack in the bottom third
of the oven and preheat the oven
to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Lightly
coat a 13 by nine-inch pan and a
piece of foil large enough to cover
the pan with nonstick cooking spray.
To make the filling: Heat the oil In a
12-Inch nonstick skillet over medium-
high heat. Add the onion and cook,
stirring frequently, until it Is clear, about
four minutes. Add the chicken, chiles
and chili powder, and cook for two
minutes, stirring constantly. Remove
from the heat and stir In the corn,
spinach, sour cream, cheese, and salt.
Race a stack of six tortillas between
damp paper towels and microwave
on high power until the tortillas are
hot and soft enough to roll, about
one minute. Cover with a cloth towel
to keep warm. Remove one tortilla
at a time, keeping the other tortillas
covered, and place a rounded 13
cup of the filling down to the center.
Roll Into a cylinder and place in the
prepared pan, seam side down and
close enough to touch. Repeat with
the remaining tortillas. Cover the pan
tightly with foil and bake until the
enchiladas are hot, about 30 minutes.
To make the sauce: Meanwhile,
stir the taco sauce and sour cream
together in a small bowl. Uncover
: the pan and spread the sauce over
the hot enchiladas. Sprinkle cheese
and cllantro over the top. Return to
l the oven, uncovered, and bake until
the cheese melts and the sauce is
bubbly, about 10 minutes.
From foodtv.com
e&?iezm3 et? toesjuTJl?
Obi-Wan Kenobi, played by Ewan McGregor, and Anakin Skywalker, played by Hayden Christensen are dueling to the death in Sfar Wars: Episode III Revenge of the Sith.
The entire 'Star Wars'
saga is now available to
own on DVD
TREVOR KIRKENDALL
STAFF WRITER
I
Star Wars fans can now rejoice
as the final chapter of the com-
plete saga, Episode III - Revenge of
the Sith, is now available to own
on DVD. The film was released
this past Tuesday as a double-disc
collector's edition, but has yet to
be released as a box set with its
predecessors The Phantom Menace
and Attack of the Clones.
Episode III shows director
George Lucas returning to the
classic space opera that made
him famous in the late 1970s and
early 1980s with his original tril-
ogy. There is more action in this
Star Wars episode than any of the
previous two episodes combined.
The film opens up with Obi-
Wan Kenobi (Ewan McGregor)
and Anakin Skywalker (Hayden
Christensen) attempting to
rescue a kidnapped Chancellor
Palpantine (Ian McDiarmid)
from the evil Separatist General
Grievous (voice by Matthew
Woods). Upon their return, Pal-
pantine appoints Skywalker to
the Jedi Council to be a sort of
"spy The council, led by the
famous Yoda and Mace Windu
(Samuel L. Jackson), distrusts
the Chancellor and asks Anakin
to "spy" back on him.
The choice Anakin has is a
difficult one. Who should he
trust? And why should he trust
them? This is where Anakin starts
slipping towards the Dark Side of
The Force at a more exponential
pace. He also fears for the life his
wife Padme (Natalie Portman)
Rated M for Mature
Blitz: The League plays
dirty and loves it
SCOTTY WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
Most gamers with a semi-
deep history of gaming remem-
ber the "NFL Blitz" series. The
series utilized the 32 NFL teams,
and played full-field eight-on-
eight football with a dash of
mayhem. Sponsored by Midway
Games Inc the game involved
lots of touchdowns and late hits.
Players could unleash some seri-
ous anger problems on defenders
after taking them down and a lot
of normal rules of football did
not apply, like pass interference
and holding. The game proved
immensely popular and spawned
a series of not just football, but
baseball games. The game play
was remarkably easy to pick up
and even novice gamers could
put up 50 points in a game. It
seemed that video game design-
ers had struck gold.
However, the NFL disap-
proved of the animated bedlam
and asked Midway Games to
produce a version of Blitz that
would have more appeal to fans
of the "Madden" franchise. They
came up with "NFL Blitz: Pro"
which disappointed in sales.
Most of the sports gaming com-
munity enjoyed playing more
lifelike simulation games such as
"Madden NFL" where the action
was realistic and tailored to the
purist of football. According to
an article in the Chicago Tribune,
the NFL signed an exclusive
contract with Electronic Arts
to produce football games in
December of 2004, and they are
the only company that can use
actual NFL teams and players in
their releases.
Midway Games has responded
by making up its league and
throwing out the rulebook - lit-
erally on football. "Blitz: The
League" has said goodbye to the
NFL namesake and is striking out
on its own with a league of dirty-
talking, dirty-hitting monsters.
This game is the Grand Theft
Auto of football games. If the
ESPN series "Playmakers" had a
home game, this would be it. Par-
ents who complained about the
violence in the original Blitz will
cringe at free-flowing blood and
profanity, as well as the barely-
dressed cheerleaders. All of these
combined factors gave "Blitz: The
League" a Mature rating, and you
have to be 17 to purchase it. This
is with good reason, because the
game is packed with language,
violence and overall lawless
conduct - but no apologies from
Blitz this time.
see BLITZ page B3
and the babies that she's carry-
ing (this will be, of course, Luke
and Princess Leia of the original
trilogy). His fear only helps
him get to the Dark Side much
quicker and turn into the mon-
ster that we all know. The film
also achieves a new level of great-
ness that no other Star Wars film
ever has when Padme becomes
very scared about her husband,
and is torn between her love for
him, or her fear of him. Portman
does an exceptional job display-
ing thjs confusion to us. Her role
is much more solid and complete
than 'her embarrassing perfor-
mance in Attack of the Clones.
This film is not about what
happens to the characters, but
how it happens to them and
why. We all know who Anakin
becomes, who the Emperor is and
what the Galactic Empire is. What
Episode III does for us is show us
how these things happened. It
shows us what possesses young
Anakin into becoming the evil
Sith lord we are all familiar with
(Sith, for those who are not up
in the Star Wars lingo, are those
who practice the methods of the
Dark Side). One will not attend
this movie to see what happens,
but rather to see why it happens.
Those who saw the film in the
theaters when it was released in
May should be excited that this
is now available to own so that
they can own every episode of
the Star Wars saga and show it in
sequential order to future gen-
erations. For those who missed it
back in May, this is your chance
to see the best Star Wars film of
this new trilogy. It may not be as
mesmerizing on the DVD player
as it was in the theater, but there
should still be some magic and
excitement there.
r(INTERNATIONAL)
NOISE CONSPIRACY
- Wi
As with all the other Star
Wars DVDs, Episode III is packed
with hours and hours of bonus
features. Included on the Episode
III DVD are deleted scenes, Star
Wars Battlefront II Playstation 2
and Xbox game demo, "A Hero
Falls" music video by composer
John Williams and trailers and
TV spots. Several documentaries
are also included.
"Within a Minute a docu-
mentary about the making of one
of the film's epic battle scenes,
the myth of Darth Vader in "The
Chosen One" and "It's All For
Real: The Stunts of Episode III
The final chapter is now out
in stores to rent and buy. Once
bought, the whole Star Wars col-
lection will be yours.
Grade: A
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
TEC'S
Masterpiece
Spotlight
&
Little music, big message
International Noise M&tSfS "fJL
International Noise
Conspiracy wants to be
heard
SCOTTY WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
Listening to the Interna-
tional Noise Conspiracy's new
album, Armed Love, the Swed-
ish group tends to remind you
of a few different names. Their
up-tempo, hard-driving rock
riffs remind you of Australian
import Jet (specifically songs
like "Are You Gonna Be My Girl"
and "Cold Hard Bitch"). Their
eclectic keyboard work could
make you think you're listening
to The Doors, of all groups, and
at times you may even hear some-
thing that sounds like Incubus.
A slightly dynamic yet con-
tinually hard-driven sound is
the best way to describe the
music of the International Noise
Conspiracy. This release is their
third, released on Warner Bros.
Records, following the albums
Survival Sickness and A New Morn-
ing, Changing Weather. Both of
these albums came out on Epi-
taph Records, and with the new
scene, the INC is looking to do
some new things.
One of the more intriguing
features of Armed Love is the same
feature many people are find-
ing out about rock albums - the
music is remarkably versatile and
can be blended into a number of
different avenues. The music of
INC at times wanders into the
blues - flirts with rhythm and
blues, and at times sounds like
a leap back in time, hence The
Doors reference.
This album sports the work of
Rick Rubin, a co-founder of Def
Jam Records who has produced
albums for the Red Hot Chili
Peppers, the Beastle Boys and
even metal staples like Slayer
and System of a Down. The abil
ity of Rubin is clear in the way
this album flows, because INC
certainly sounds like a band to
be reckoned with.
The biggest drawback to this
album would be the political
leanings. Not everyone wants
their music to be a demon-
stration anthem, and it's hap-
pened in the past where artists
will ride political bandwag-
ons to stardom and popular-
ity. Just ask Toby Keith how
good the patriotism bandwagon
can be for your musical career.
For those looking for a politi-
cal lean or a clear statement of
ideas in their songs, good luck
finding it. The messages in their
songs don't appear particularly
revolutionary and if there are mes-
sages about communism they're
buried deeply in the music. Don't
tell that to the band, however.
"Make no mistake about it, we
are a revolutionary, anti-capital-
ist, Marxist, communist rock
band lead singer Dennis Lyxzen
stated in a press release.
They might say it, but the
music is masking it if it's there
at all. Perhaps there's something
in the music that communicates
revolutionary messages, if some-
thing that gets you nodding your
head is revolutionary.
If the politics of the music
isn't your thing, you can cer-
tainly have fun rocking out to the
music. Even if you don't like the
things they're saying, their music
is catchy and makes for a power-
fully addicting vehicle. They're
no small thing either - INC has
gotten spots on the likes of the
Warped Tour and Lollapalooza,
as well as a few stints in the
Coachella Festival.
The band's music is dynami-
cally hard and the sound has
something in it that makes you
see INC page B3
I can't think of too many
films that I can watch over and
over again without beginning
to hate it. Even a film like Pulp
Fiction, which I think is
absolutely brilliant, has lost a
lot of quality points in my book
basically because I've seen it a
million times.
So I began thinking about this
concept lately - I tried to think
of a film that I've seen countless
times yet I would sit down and
watch it anytime. I thought of a
lot of movies I love, such as Rear
Window, Private Parts and Beverly
Hills Cop, but I couldn't think of
one. So I brought it up during a
conversation with my brother
Brian and without hesitation, he
gave me the definitive answer
- Revenge of the Nerds.
I can't believe I didn't think
of it first. Brian and I have been
watching Revenge of the Nerds
constantly since we were seven
and 11 years old, respectively.
We didn't own a real copy of
the tape - we taped the film
when it aired on television.
Obviously because it aired on
television, it was highly censored,
which is probably the only way a
7-year-old should see the movie.
It was actually very odd to see the
original version of the film when
I bought it on DVD, although I
did finally understand how the
nerds' fraternity party went from
"pathetic" to "extraordinary It
was Booger's "wonder joints
I'm not sure why I love this
movie so much. The plot is pretty
basic and hackney. Two lovable
nerds, Louis Skolnick (Robert
Carradine) and Gilbert Lowell
(Anthony Edwards) move out of
their parents' home to begin their
studies at fictional Adams College.
see NERDS page B3





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
11-3-05
Local talent rocks out in Greenville
Finally some good music
for students to enjoy
SCOTTY WIUJAMS
STAFF WRITER
Greenville isn't exactly a
major music hub like Atlanta
or New York City, but neverthe-
less there's a little something in
the Emerald City if you've got a
tuned ear for music.
If you're a hard rocker, there's
one name all music fans in
Greenville know better than
any other - Parmalee. They are a
group that came to power right
here in our backyard, and they
have been rocking all through-
out the South since 2001 when
they united. They play all over
the state, and still make frequent
stops here in Greenville to play
familiar places. Parmalee is a
group you'll readily recognize
upon hearing, because of a pleas-
ing three-part harmony and very
recognizable guitar work between
the band members. They have
come from playing small places
locally to playing with Puddle
of Mudd, Chevelle and Velvet
Revolver. If you want to get
acquainted with Parmalee, visit
their Web site at parmalee.com
and pick up a copy of either their
full-length debut album Inside, or
their acoustic album, Unplugged.
Both albums are well worth
whatever you'll pay for them.
If you like your music a little
more personalized, you should
check out the solo acoustic work
of Brad Benson. Brad's also a
regular in the area, with excellent
acoustic guitar skills and one of
the most powerful voices you'll
Crowds enjoy the music at local event 'X-Fest' in Kinston last month.
with a little more of a classical
feel, you'll enjoy the music of
the Tar River Community Band.
hear live. Brad has played with
Parmalee and has also shared
stages with Nickelback and Three
Doors Down. Brad has a sound
t hat has to be heard, and an emo-
tional presence that can move you
out of your seat. His three-song
EP, Eternal Life, contains some of
his very moving original pieces.
The songs "Deep Water" and
"Collapse" are musical experi-
ences anyone with an ear for
good acoustic music needs to get
an ear on. On Wednesday nights
you'll find Brad hosting open-
mic night at Scores Sports Bar. If
you want to know more about his
musical schedule you can find
it at myspace.combradbenson.
If you're into something

Trying to figure out this
God thing?
(and church doesn'i seem to be the answer'
RiverDeep
Songs, Stories, and tlie stuff of life
An Informal coffee-house style
worship gathering
7 PM Sundays @ Mudslingers (former
downtown Via Cappucino)
www.rivendeeponline.com
11Boutique
kiiFill) h
dVflirty M
Piihtoos
Mt Nv Shipmenti Arriving Daly
- ' l 1 � � .� .� ' �
fill- 1 Ik f.�
Bring this ad in and receive 15off one regular priced
item
(Excludes BCBG Dresses)
Located in L�romnd� Shopping Cantw
Slora Hour Mon-Sat 10�m-9pm Sun 1-6 pm
(22)321-8864
Mark A. Ward
A T T R N I Y AT LAW
Board Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
� Traffic Offenses
� Drug Offenses
�DWI
� State & Federal Courts
252.752.7529 � Visit (Xir website at www.mark-waixl.com
This group isn't a commercial
band, so they don't make CDs
or release tracks, but you will
be able to enjoy some quality
classical music as well as some
jazz and swing music. They're
a volunteer band and they raise
just enough money to pay for
band expenses and use other
proceeds to benefit charities, so
the majority of the musical expe-
rience with this band will be for
the love of it. It makes for a purely
enjoyable musical experience.
They typically play from
August until the spring at a
concert called Sunday in the
Park. If you're a musician and
you enjoy playing quality music,
you can even join them. They
don't audition people and they
will even help you find instru-
ments. They will have a Christ-
mas concert at Colonial Mall in
December if you're interested in
hearing some orchestral music.
If you're not interested in a
particular band and just want a
place to stop by and hear some
music, you can stop by Cafe
Caribe, which has a popular
dueling piano setup weekly for
your enjoyment. If you haven't
heard dueling pianos, stop by
Cafe Caribe Thursday-Saturday
nights. Also, venues like The
Cavern and the new Dr. Unk's
Oasis consistently host live bands.
The music to be found in
Greenville has something to
offer for lovers of musical enjoy-
ment, as well as those looking
to get an eye on some up-and-
coming bands.
Keep checking the Web sites
of your favorite local bands to
see when they will be playing
in Greenville. It is always great
when you see a band you saw live
in Greenville release a single and
end up on MTV.
If you stop by some of the
open-mic nights at Ham's and
Scores, you may just get a glimpse
of the next big thing. Even if you
don't, you'll still have fun.
Don't forget to keep reading
TEC for more information about
local concerts, local bands and
up and coming talent. If you
have information about local
concerts, contact us.
77ms writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
OPEN 24 hours Fridays & Saturdays
COLLEGE NIGHT
EVERY TUESDAY & THURSDAY
50 OFF ENTREES
with drink purchase
and college ID
From 3 p.m. - 12 a.m.
� ����"������
EXPRESS30RS
ROMANCING YOUR ADDICTIONS
TOBACCO ACCESSORIES �ADULT NOVELTIES
EXOTIC CIGARETTES � T-SHIRTS
DANCEWEARLINGERIE
Rolling Papers � Glass Pipes � Loose Tobacco
Stickers � Blow-up Friends & Farm Animals � Incense
Body Piercing & Jewelry � Detox Solutions � Candles
Hair Dye � Adult Videos � Black Lights � Whipcream
Gag Gifts and a Bunch of Other Cool Stuff
Welcome Back Students!
Show Your Student ID And Get
13 OFF EVERYDAY!
205 E. 5th Street
GREENVILLE, NC
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
www.partylikehell.com
The Dixie Queen
.Seafood Ifernuwir fi � m,
Low hook: ruy-F� 1100 AM- 200 PM qu lIKfll ty
H Ts3r. Winttmue 756-2333 & Fmmwie 753-6363
Tiiour & Mini-Shrimp combo
maws wrm OT�ro m fwui no. sl��
. � fr? 9��� tf�00 KNr a�
So �0 (jip �sf,Foo� $N'r 8oo�
New for 2006
�Dragon
Special Blend
�Sessions
�DC Shoe
�Arbor
�686
� Cold As Ice
� Quicksilver
� Roxy
� Burton
�K-2
Bonfire
1 North Face
� Columbia � Salomon
GOrdOll'S Boll. Ski & Snowboard
207 E. Arlington Blvd. 756-1003
GET CAUGHT
READING.
Gaaaa Sigtvva Sigaa-
�� PRESENTS
THE 15TH AtWUAL
1 cPick-a-pirateE
ffovEMSER 4 at The Cave-rim
"Doors open at 8 "PJA
'A
Bid on toitr favorite guy at 9 ?a.
"PRlXrEETJS GO TO EASTETR SEALS) CEHEttRAL TAL8Y "ft
1
Spell
District 3
Neighbors working together VOTE!
to build a stronger city Tuesday, Nov. 8
I stand for:
Preserving our neighborhoods
Bringing people together to meet
the challenges our city faces
Ensuring that development is built
in harmony with the environment
and existing communities
Building a dynamic city center
Expanding parks and greenways
P.O. Box 2353 - Greenville, NC - 27836
252-321-3847 Larry@LanySpeU.com
www.LarrySpell.com
Plidfor by Nsifhbon �nd Frtend. for Uny Spell
$180
Per
Month
I his coupon good for
I 'm si Student and a Plasma Donor
I
S.7
2nd .Hid lih il.M.ih,in
Names: Jennifer
Majors: Nursing
Hobbies: Swimming & going to the beach
Why do 1 donate Plasma?
Extra spending money for the beach.
Earn up to $170mo. donating plasma in a friendly place.
DCI Biological of Greenville � 25Z-757-0171
2727 E.I0th Street � Down the Street from ECU � www.dciplasma.com
I
I -





11-3-05
11-3-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE B3
53-6363
CHEAT,
8000
06
end
s
t
ioard
103
You drank.
You danced.
You had
.tW
Free Pregnancy Tesls
I Call Carolina I'rpgnanry Center
I Greenville loration: (252) 7.)7-fl003
1845 JuNbs Hopkins Drive. Suite I!
I iii-I ri. H �iin I Sll,m
I www.r jrtilinaprrjnuitnrr nlrr.dry
IVasfciogtOB loraliitn: (252) 'HWIIIHI
24 boar hollinr: 1-800-395-IIELP
v
A-r
e!i
The Law Office of Daniel Hines Entzminger
Historically,
PntATCS
were known for
getting into trouble
(Especially around Halloween.)
Alcohol offenses? Drug charges? Traffic violations?
Help is just a phone call away.
2J2-754-8004
Daniel Hincs Entzminger, Attorney at Law
113 West Third Street (Across from the Courthouse)
Nationwide
A
1
milt
:nt
'S
jom
Get 2 Lines For $75mo.
AND bTART TOUrrTrH
At 7pm For Free
Motorola
V262
Nokia
6255 I
their price
119w
'Plus 10.56 Regulatory Coat Recovery Fee Limited-time offer.
Restrictions apply. New activation, 24-month contract and 120 activation
fee required Early termination fee applies. See store for details.
� lltel
wireless
authorized agent
The Wireless Co.
425-G SE Greenville Blvd.
(in the CrCit Pizza shopping center)
Greenville � 353-7900
Chicago Style Pizza
Stromboli
Salads
Appetizers
Desserts
And More!
3 STREET
PIZZERIA
GHEENVIILE. NC
"Voted
best pizza
in Greenville"
Open 7 Days
a Week
We Deliver!
h
'1
Now Serving Late Night
Breakfast Tues-Sat 1AM - 4AM
SPECIALS
sun NFLSwilbtet
12 Appetizers
$4 60 oz. Pitcher
Mon Mon. Night Football
$1.50 23 oz Miller Light Draft
$1 Domestic Bottles
$8 All You Can Eat Wings
Wed DJ Charlie Mac
$1 Domestics
$1.50 House Hi-Balls
Discover .Master Card .Visa .American Express
752-BOLI (2654) Corner of 5th & Cotanche
u
Blitz
from page B1
The thing you will immedi-
ately notice upon plugging up
and playing "Blitz: The League"
is that the load times are long.
When preparing to play games,
loading profiles (which you have
to have one to play) can take a long
time, as can preparing for games.
Once you hit the game, however,
there is virtually no lag time.
The gameplay is a bit more
complex than the original "Blitz"
franchise, however it has not
gotten too difficult as some
"Madden" games can tend to
do. A new feature called "clash
mode" has been added where
you can get into a zone where
you hit dirtier, catch better and
your running and evading moves
are more pronounced. The mode
slows down the game "Matrix"
style and the things you do in
this mode earn you clash icons
to build up to an "unleash mode
In this mode you do gamebreak-
ing moves. On offense you make
spectacular catches, juke defend-
ers like they're standing still or
plow through them like a train.
On defense, unleash moves serve
a different, more sinister purpose.
If you land a dirty hit in unleash
mode, chances are high that you
will injure the player you hit.
The true triumph of "Blitz:
The League" is the pageantry,
spectacle, video and audio.
The hits are seamless and well-
planned, the environment is put
together in much detail and the
movie-style cuts are amazing.
The game will pause in certain
moments to show cut scenes on
the field where players gesture,
talk trash and intimidate the
opponent before the snap. Touch-
down and big play celebrations
are original and many will give
you a laugh. The injuries are truly
things to be witnessed, because
when you injure someone it cuts
to an X-ray and shows bones
breaking or snapping or outright
shattering. It makes a nice game
for friends to play together, espe-
cially sports junkies who like to
talk trash. The trash talk in this
game comes with the players.
"Blitz: The League" is not
your big brother's football game.
It is a whole other environment
where the eccentricities of the
"NFL Blitz" franchise have been
magnified 1,000 times and been
pumped up even more. It will
not be a good game for children,
especially young children. How-
ever, for those gamers craving a
little different game with a high
entertainment value between
"NCAA Football" and "Madden
NFL pick up "The League" and
play dirty with a devilish grin
on your face.
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@theeastcarolinian.com.
NSrfJS from page B1
Initially the duo is brimming
with confidence in their new
lives but that outlook is shattered
when their dorm is overtaken by
the Alpha Betas, Adams College's
jock fraternity and the two (along
with a handful of other outcasts)
are forced to live in the gym.
Rejected by all other
fraternities on campus, Louis,
Gilbert and their newfound
brothers-in-pocket protec-
tors decide to form their own
to try and wrestle the power
away from the Alpha Betas so that
nerd prosecution can finally end.
Revenge of the Nerds has a lot
going for it. First of all, its cast of
characters is second to none. I
can't think of a group of people
so overtly undesirable yet so
lovable. Dudley "Booger" Dawson
is a disgusting slob. Lamar Latrell
is overly effeminate. Harold
Wormser is a genius in his
early-teens who skipped high
school and went directly
to college.
It's great to see this cast of
misfits who have been written
off by the mainstream become
heroes. That's the really cool
social message to the film - you
don't have to be the quarterback
of the football team to be a
winner. It's also great because the
film was made long before the
age of political correctness and
no one had to tiptoe around their
differences and problems.
There are so many mem-
orable scenes and quotes in
Revenge of the Nerds that I wish
I could mention them all. I
love the panty raid scene. 1 love
when the nerds - excuse me, Tri-
Lams - pour liquid heat in the
Alpha-Beta's jock straps and
Takashi utters, "It's like salad I
love it when the Tri-Lams won
the javelin throw contest because
Wormser developed a javelin
that "compliments Lamar's limp-
wristed throwing style
Of the course, the ending
always brings a tear to my eye.
After the thrill of victory
(winning control of the Greek
council) the Tri-Lams taste
the agony of defeat when the
Alpha-Betas destroy their house.
Louis, Gilbert and the rest
of the Tri-lams go down to the
pep-rally to finallystandupto their
persecutors and give one of
the most moving speeches I
can think of.
"Any of you that have ever felt
stepped on, left out, picked on,
put down, whether you think
you're a nerd or not, why don't
you just come down here and
join us. Okay? Come on Louis
tells the packed crowd.
And guess what? Everyone
comes down to join them because
deep down, everyone is a nerd.
That's powerful stuff, man.
In fact, 1 can't hear Queen's
We Are the Champions without
thinking of the band members
laying down their instruments
to join the Tri-lams on the field.
I love this movie. I can't explain
how funny this movie is either
because most of the jokes and
gags wouldn't make print.
Take my word for it - if you've
never seen Revenge of the Nerds,
you have to see it. It's the
funniest, most heart-warming
college movie ever. And yes,
I've seen Animal House, Back
to School and Old School.
In fact, I'm going to watch
Revenge of the Nerds now.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
llIC from page B1
move and keeps you interested
throughout. It's certainly not
anything poppy or repetitive, so
they've got some skills.
They might be music with
a message, but the message is
pretty hard to ignore because
even the things they say get lost
in the music. Buy it for the music
if not the messages.
There are so many groups
out there that use their music as
a political outlet and while this
may be one of them, the quality
of the music makes up for the fact
that they do this.
Grade: B
This writer can be reached at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
;
KING'S ROIUU RPRRTM6IN
U III IRC 5:
1 & 2 Bedroom Apartments
200 GO Verdant Dr. � Greenville, NC
252-752-3519
TESSIKm
� MB
Mil
�Cozy One 8cTwo BedroomOne Bath Units
�Free Water and Sewer
�Central Heat &. Air in Two Bedrooms
�Wall AC Unit & Baseboard Heat in One Bedroom
�WasherDryer Connections
�1st Floor Patio with Fence
�2nd Floor Front or Back Balcony
�Pets Allowed with Fee
�Energy Efficient
�On ECU Bus Route
PO Box 873 � 108 Brownlea Drive Suite A � Greenville, NC 27836-0873
phone (252) 758-1921 Ext. 60 � tax (252) 757-7722
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat By Appointment Only





SPORTS
Page B4 sports@tfieeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY November 3,2005
TEC Top 10: Week 6
potent Nittany Lions offense whose only blemish
is a two-point loss to Michigan. The Badgers have
been equally impressive on offense, but defense
is an issue. Wisconsin has allowed more than 24
points per contest, which is too much for a potential
Big 10 champion. That statistic, along with home
field advantage gives Penn State a big edge and a
32-23 win.
u vr
No. 5 Miami at No. 3 Virginia Tech
Miami could do the BCS a huge favor and rid
controversy from a muddled mess at the top of the
standings. The Hokies are a close third behind USC
and Texas in the latest rankings and a win over the
Hurricanes will give them evidence warranting a
national title appearance. Two of the top defenses
in the nation will be showcased on Saturday and
Miami's team speed should negate Marcus Vick's
agility for the Hokies. However, I think the two-
headed running attack of Mike Imoh and Cedric
Humes could wear down the Miami defense and
lead VT to a 17-13 win.
conclusion to his Hall of Fame legacy. Every game
the Packers win for the rest of the season will be
solely because of Favre. Green Bay has no running
game and little defense and that should equal a
27-13 Steelers win.
Philadelphia at Washington
The Redskins were completely dominated in
every phase of the game against the Giants last
Sunday, spoiling an Impressive 4-2 start. Wash-
ington seemed to be clicking on both offense and
defense before being crushed 38-0. At leastp they
return home on Sunday, albeit against Philadelphia,
who has issues of its own. The Eagles still aren't
running the ball with authority, but I think coach
Andy Reid is smart enough to figure out what his
team is lacking. Running back Brian Westbrook
will get more carries this week to lead Philly over
the Skins 23-21.
MANNING
An old rivalry renews in Foxboro
BRANDON HUGHES
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR

Georgia fell from the ranks of the unbeaten last
weekend against Florida with th absence of their
quarterback D.J. Shockley. It's unfortunate that a
minor injury may have cost the Bulldogs a poten-
tial national championship, but that's the nature
of college football. USC, Texas and Virginia Tech
comprise the top three of the latest BCS rankings
and the Hokies face a tough test hosting ACC foe
Miami this week.
A preview of the AFC Championship could be
in the cards on Monday night with undefeated
Indianapolis traveling to New England in the NFL.
Let's take a look at those key matchups, along with
a host of others in this edition of TEC Top 10.
Last week: 8-2
Season record: 29-21
Stanford at No. 1 USC
Stanford could be a bigger bump in the road
than originally anticipated for the Trojans' run to
the national championship. USC isn't untouchable
as Notre Dame revealed some weaknesses in their
armor and Stanford almost took down unbeaten
UCLA last week in a close 30-27 loss. The Trojans
must be careful not to look ahead to UCLA and take
care of business at hand. I think they do just that
in convincing fashion, 45-20.
T 19
Tennessee at No. 8 Notre Dame
The Volunteers finally fell from the top 25 rank-
ings with a loss to South Carolina last weekend and
their season got even rockier when their offensive
coordinator resigned earlier this week. Another loss
is on the horizon with Notre Dame looming on
their schedule. The Fighting Irish have BCS hopes
on the line and look for them to produce, taking
this game 28-16.
Chicago at New Orleans
The Bears received a gift win last week from
the hands of Lions' quarterback Jeff Garcia, who
tossed an interception to give Chicago an overtime
victory. Even more turnovers will come the Bears'
way when they face the Saints. Chicago boasts one
of the NFL's top defenses and that's good, because
20 points is an offensive explosion for this squad. I
predict fireworks with the Bears winning 21-10 on
their way to the playoffs.
EPSTEIN
o
N.C. State at No. 9 Florida State
The Wolfpack have struggled this season,
underachieving on their way to a 3-4 overall record.
An athletic defense hasn't been able to salvage a
disappointing offense, but coach Chuck Amato
has shuffled up his lineup. Marcus Stone has taken
over under center for Jay Davis and former J.H.Rose
standout Andre Brown rushed for 248 yards and
two touchdowns in his first start last week. Look for
Brown to continue breathing life into the Wolfpack
in what should be a close game against FSU. I like
the Seminoles to stay in the race for the ACC title
with a 27-20 win.
l
Indianapolis at New England
This game could be the most important
matchup of the 2005 NFL season. Check that, it
is without a doubt the most important. What this
clash between AFC rivals will do mentally for both
squads is tremendous. Indy quarterback Peyton
Manning and his undefeated Colts must get over
the hump that is the Patriots if they want to win
the Super Bowl. The Colts haven't performed well
in snowy New England, but this year they have
the defense to compete. The defending Super Bowl
champs won't back down and I'll take Tom Brady
and the Pats for my upset pick of the week. New
England wins 27-24 on a last second field goal.
w
Carolina at Tampa Bay
The Buccaneers host the Panthers in this key
NFC South matchup. Both teams come into the
game tied for first in the division with Atlanta and a
win here will go a long way for a playoff berth. Caro-
lina annihilated Minnesota last week while Tampa
Bay lost to the lowly 49ers. I think the Buccaneers'
post season hopes are done, especially with the
loss pf quarterback Brian Griese. The inexperienced
Chris Simms has taken over and his job will be to
keep the game close and that shouldn't be hard to
do with the Bins' defense. Carolina hands Tampa
Bay their first home defeat with a 23-12 victory
No. 14 Wisconsin at No. 10 Penn State
Penn State and Wisconsin were unlikely to
challenge for the Big 10 crown before the season
began, but that's exactly where they find them-
selves now. The teams will battle on Saturday for
what is essentially the championship game with
both teams sitting at 8-1. PSU quarterback Michael
Robinson has racked up 23 total touchdowns for a
Pittsburgh at Green Bay
Two of the NFL's most storied franchises meet on
Sunday and both are heading in opposite directions. � i
Ben Roethlisberger's career is just getting started I
while Brett Favre is winding down a disappointing Penn State celebrates against Purdue last week.
Paterno maintains long memory
on Wisconsin's questionable hits
(KRT) � A year ago, Joe Pater-
no's comments on the helmet-to-
helmet collision that sent quarterback
Michael Robinson to the hospital at
Wisconsin were just what you would
expect from the normally circum-
spect Penn State coach.
"I think all of you saw the game on
television and, if not, probably had a
chance to look it over Paterno said
of Erasmus James' hit a few days after
Penn State's 16-3 loss at Wisconsin. "1
think you can make your own deci-
sion on that
But on Tuesday, in discussing
Saturday's Big Ten Conference show-
down with the Badgers, Paterno was
uncharacteristically blunt about the
two blows by James that took out not
just Robinson but starter Zack Mills
in the first quarter.
"I hope the officials will make sure
that doesn't happen Paterno said
during his weekly teleconference. "One
or two of the shots last year were very
dubious as to whether they were legal
those were not insignificant
remarks, because if Paterno feels so
strongly that the hits were question-
able, you can be absolutely certain his
players do, too especially since Robin-
son is now the unquestioned leader of
the nation's lOth-ranked team.
James is in the NFL now, but the
legacy of his 2004 quarterback plun-
dering remains. That alone ought to
provide the Nittany Lions with ample
motivation heading into Saturday
afternoon's first-place matchup with a
Badgers team whose record 8-1 overall,
5-1 in the Big Ten mirrors their own
Protecting their quarterback who
took several hard shots against Purdue
on Saturday and who, along with 22
other seniors, will be playing his last
home game will be a priority.
"Wisconsin plays good, tough
football, and if you are going to play
in this league and you want to be a
quarterback, you have to bounce up
when somebody gives you a good
shot Paterno said, "and I think
Michael has done that.
"It's up to us to protect Michael.
We have to do our job, and Wisconsin
is going to do their job, and they are
going to come. They are going to be
tough. They are not going to come in
there and say, "Hey, he's a sacred cow
Meanwhile, on the other side of
the ball, Penn State's defense will face
physical issues of its own. The Lions
will have todeal with the latest in a long
line of big, bruising Badgers tailbacks.
Brian Calhoun has rushed for
1,218 yards and 19 TDS. He has scored
five touchdowns in a game twice this
season, most recently in Wisconsin's
third consecutive victory, 41-24, at
Illinois on Saturday.
"Calhoun is one of the best backs
we've played against In a long time
said Paterno, returning to a more
familiar rhetorical form. "If he runs
for ISO or 160 yards, it will be a long
day. The thing about Calhoun that
Is so different than a lot of running
backs is that he is a great receiver
The Lions, however, have had
success shutting down big-reputation
running backs (remember Minneso-
ta's Laurence Maroney?). Their aver-
age per-game rushing yield of 103.7
yards is second best in the Big Ten.
Notes. Junior linebacker Paul
Posluszny acknowledged Tuesday that
he had given some thought to declar-
ing early for the NFL draft. "I think
Paul should stay Paterno said Asked
about the possibility that this might
be his last home game, too, the coach
said retirement was something he had
not thought about this season. "Do you
know something 1 don't know?" joked
Paterno, who has three years remaining
on a contract extension. "Did you talk
to our president? This will be the last
Penn State game for Wisconsin coach
Barry Alvarez. The Wisconsin coach is
stepping aside after this season, a devel-
opment that Paterno, a close friend, Is
not entirely displeased about. "I le kicked
our ears in most of the time Paterno
said. "That part I won't miss Paterno
not only lost two QBs and the game at
Wisconsin in 2004, he received the news
there that his son-in-law had been criti-
cally injured In a bicycle fall that day in
State College. "It's difficult for me to say
that, after SO years, it was the toughest
day that 1 ever had he said. "But it cer-
tainly was a very difficult day
Theo Epstein:
Decision was
personal, not
political
(AP) � Outgoing Red Sox general manager Theo
Epstein dismissed reports that a power struggle with
team president Larry Lucchino led him to walk
away from the organization this week.
The 31-year-old Epstein, whose career in
professional baseball started when Lucchino hired
him as an intern with the Baltimore Orioles 14
years ago, reportedly rejected the team's offer
of a $4.5 million, three-year extension that would
have more than quadrupled his previous salary.
"Larry and I like each other Epstein said
Wednesday in his first public comments since he
shocked Boston fans by walking away from the
bargaining table on Monday. "As with any other
working relationship there are complexities, there
are ups and downs
The decision to leave, he said, was a personal
one.
"This is a job you have to give your whole
heart and soul to he said. "In the end, after a long
period of reflection about myself and the program,
I decided I could no longer put my whole heart and
soul into it
Principal owner John Henry noted Lucchino's
absence from the news conference at Fenway
Park.
"He's been maligned and blamed for the situa-
tion for the last couple of days. I think that's wrong.
I think that's inaccurate he said.
"If you want to place blame for what happened
here, I'm responsible he added. "Never in my
wildest dream did I think this was ever going to
happen
Henry praised Epstein for his work during three
years as general manager.
"I've never seen anyone work harder than Theo
worked to try to make this organization successful
he said.
Media reports have circulated that Epstein left
because leaks about the negotiations convinced
him there was a breach of trust with Lucchino.
But Epstein said Wednesday that the two remained
close and that Lucchino gave him wide discretion
over baseball decisions.
"If there are reports of a power struggle or med-
dling on behalf of Larry, that really wasn't the case
he said. "Essentially, I felt like I had pretty much
a free hand to run the baseball operation the way
1 saw fit
Under Epstein, the Red Sox made the postseason
three years in a row for the first time in franchise
history, with the obvious highlight being the team's
2004 World Series win, Boston's first in 86 years.
"It was a time in my life I'll always look back on
with fond memories Epstein said.
Epstein's previous three-year deal expired at
the end of Monday, leaving the team without a
GM heading into the offseason. Negotiations with
free agents such as center fielder Johnny Damon
are on hold, trade talks will have to wait and the
business of assembling the 2006 team has been
interrupted by the Brookline native's stunning
decision to walk away from his dream job with his
hometown team.
The Red Sox need to plug holes in the starting
rotation and bullpen that led to a first-round playoff
sweep by the eventual World Series champion Chi-
cago White Sox. Manny Ramirez and David Wells
have reportedly asked to be traded; Epstein's chief
assistant, Josh Byrnes, is now the GM in Arizona;
the Red Sox trainer was let go; third-base coach
Dale Sveum decamped for Milwaukee.





11-3-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
I, 2005

Grantham mirrors success of his father
(AP) � The dirty-diapered
defender at the end of the hall
is Kenneth Grantham's most
difficult to outsmart.
He's rough and tough, sport-
ing a textbook four-point stance
and big noggin that all but
guarantee his future as a line-
man. Vyatt Grantham, just 11
months old, never lets his dad
pass by without a good tackle.
But then, Kenneth, a 38-year-old
football coach at Nash Central
High School, has never found a
good reason to avoid it.
So each night, wearing a
mixed aroma of laundry deter-
gent, locker room grime, grass
trimmings and line paint, Ken-
neth takes Wyatt's best shot
and falls to the ground. In no
time, his 3-year-old daughter
Darby piles on, starting a half-
hearted wrestling match in the
Granthams' Nashville home.
Shift back 35 years. Change
the place to Snow Hill. Change
our protagonist to a fresh-
faced coach named Spence
Grantham.
It's 1970 and Spence is only
at the beginning of his storied
career in Greene County. Time
being, he's at the junior high,
spending his days trying to push
football on kids in an Eastern
North Carolina region that is
plenty more interested in basket-
ball and baseball
But each night, Spence heads
home to find the grizzled tod-
dler at the end of the hall. The
kid is rough and he's tough, and
his noggin will later lead him to
a vagabond prep career in the
trenches.
He's 3-year-old Kenneth
Grantham, and he waits every
night for the door to swing open,
anticipating that reel-to-reel dad
of his to walk through so he can
show off his best shot.
Spence Grantham never
found a good reason to avoid
the hits and never missed the
ensuing wrestling match.
"That's how we'd greet each
other Spence said, his gray mus-
tache highlighting a face that has
been through more than three
decades of coaching.
Spence and Kenneth greet
each other differently today.
"Hey coach is more appropri-
ate.
In a situation that becomes
more perfect all the time, Ken-
neth is his dad's boss, Spence
is his son's most reliable baby
sitter, and a football family is as
entrenched in the game as ever.
"It's such a special and unique
situation Kenneth said, pushing
the team laundry through the
wash while Spence, Nash Cen-
tral's sagely receivers coach, sits
and enjoys life as an assistant.
There is no misunderstand-
ing on this coaching staff.
Spence Grantham has no illu-
sions of being the Bulldogs' head
coach. The 62-year-old says he
doesn't ever want that fact to be
mistaken.
"I didn't want to come in and
have him feel like I was taking
over said Spence, who joined
his son's staff in 2003 and has
been commuting from Snow Hill
ever since. "I'm not even sure
the administrators were too sure
about who was going to coach
here. I told my wife, 'They don't
know Kenneth very well, because
if they did, they knew who the
coach was I really tried to just
blend in
Spence took the job in only
his first year of retirement. His
final game at Greene Central
was a loss to Western Alamance
in the 2002 state playoffs a game
that wrapped up a 12-1 season,
Spence's finest as a head coach.
But with his mother-in-law
ailing, Spence and his wife
Kathy knew somebody needed
to be a caretaker. Since Spence
had a longer career Kathy raised
three boys, after all he chose to
stay home.
Spence couldn't sit long. He
and Kathy found somebody who
could care for Kathy's mother for
a few hours a day, and Spence
was off to Nash Central, where
his son was building a football
team.
Now, a year after his mother-
in-law died, Spence still does
what he loves, blending in along
the sideline on game nights. He
wears a headset, but rarely ven-
tures farther onto the field than
his son. Kenneth always stays in
the front, always has the loud-
est voice.
"It was a little awkward at
first Kenneth said. "Trying to
figure out if he would help out,
if he wanted to help out or did he
want to retire. Being my first job,
how much did I want him hang-
ing around my shoulder? But
he's been around long enough
to know how to avoid the pitfalls
and play his role
Spence doesn't want to drift
too far into the shadows. If he
learned anything in more than
20 years as Greene Central's head
coach, it's that assistant coaches
are invaluable.
"Just because I'm the old man
around here, I'm not just going
to sit around and not carry my
load Spence said.
During his 130-win career
as a head coach, Spence had one
assistant in particular who was
an important aid a 20-somethlng
named Kenneth Grantham. Ken-
neth coached Greene Central's
receivers, naturally, while he fin-
ished the last three years of his
college degree at East Carolina.
"I knew when my playing
days were over, I wanted to be
a coach said Kenneth, who
played a short career at Lenoir-
Rhyne before transferring to
ECU. "I know I did a lot of things
wrong early on. I probably ran off
some of his better players
see PREP page B6
QUIKSILVER BILLABONG VOLCOM RUSTY EZEKIEL FOX LOST
Jit
WQ'ZO.
rf-Jk 3Uuts
Greenvi
PREMIE
Surf&Sk
uwrM�Ti
I f'
SELEi
XLOTHINi
ELEl
SHOES &
UP FLOf
ffi@ ����&� 3mo
� 4 PRICED CLOTHING OlFRi
V EXP 11.30.05 A
One coupon per visit
pi La Promenade Shopping Center 321-4884
CIRCA INDEPENDENT DC ELEMENT HURLEY O'NEILL
0AKM0NT SQUAR6 APARTM6NTS
2 Bedroom, 1,5 Bath Townhomes
1212 Red Banks Rd. � Greenville, NC
252-756-4151
t
F�RTUR�S:
� On-site Management
& Maintenance
� On-site Laundry Facilities
� Resident & Visitor Parking
� Adjacent to ECU Bus Stop
� Playground Area
� Basketball & Volleybal! Courts
� Outdoor Swimming Pool
� Modern Electric Appliances:
Range,
Refrigerator,
Dishwasher &
Garbage Disposal
� Central Heating & Air
� Free Water, Sewer &
Basic Cable
� Cemented Patios
WYNDHAM
DO THE MATH AND
Those "all inclusive" Apts
$325-385 per monthperson
3 or 4 bedrooms
Roommate matchingjust like the
dorms
Computer room onsite
Fitness center
Utilities includedusually only a
limited allowance

Cable included
$357 average rental price
per person per month
SAVE OR NOT
Wyndham Court
$225 per person (Downstairs $237.50 per person
2 bedroom apts.
YOU pick your roommate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
paid for by your ECU tuition
energy efficient- average utility bill
is onfy $90 T

Cable Included
$270 average rental price
per person per month
Total savings $2088 per year
Now Includes Free Cable &
Discounted Wireless Broadband
Office located at: 104-D WYNDHAM CIRCLE call: 561 -7679
www.pinnaclepropertymanagement.com
Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2005





PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
11-3-05
Two-time Luge medalists set for
another, maybe last Olympic push
PfBP from page 65
The duo of Brian Martin and Mark Grimmette are hoping to bring home their first Olympic gold medal.
(AP) � They could have
retired from luge years ago, taken
better-paying career paths and
done so the greatest American
doubles team ever.
"But It's fun Brian Martin
said. "So why shouldn't we keep
doing it? We're having a good
time
Fun isn't the lone reason.
One goal still drives Martin
and his longtime teammate,
Mark Grimmette an Olympic
gold medal that has evaded
their reach twice, by a fraction
of a second each time. So this
weekend, the duo begins another
season with hopes it will end atop
an Olympic podium in Turin,
Italy, in February.
Among their 59 international
medals are a bronze medal from
the 1998 Games in Nagano, and
a silver claimed at Salt Lake City
four years ago. No luge doubles
team has ever taken a bronze
to silver to gold progression in
Olympic history, yet Grimmette
and Martin believe such a story-
book scenario is possible.
"If someone asked me about
training for four Olympics, I
don't think I would have been
able to look that far ahead Grim-
mette said. "But it's been great.
One of the reasons why Brian
and I have done this as long as we
have is this sport is a lot of fun.
When it's going right, we have a
confidence that is unshakable
Grimmette, 34, and Martin,
31, will be among the doubles
favorites this World Cup season,
which starts Friday in Sigulda,
Latvia. The top American team
won bronze on the Sigulda track
last year, and finished fourth in
the season-long standings not
far behind overall champions
Christian Oberstolz and Patrick
Uruber of Italy.
There's eight World Cup races,
including a December swing
through Calgary and Lake Placid
that separates two European
stints on the schedule.
Yet almost all of Grimmette
and Martin's focus is already on
the season's final race in Turin.
"I can't believe it's been four
years. It seems like yesterday
Martin said recently while train-
ing at USA Luge's Lake Placid
complex.
"I'm proud of the fact we won
an Olympic silver medal. Do 1
look back and think about what
it would have been like to win
gold? Of course
During the past two Winter
Olympics, the second- and third-
place doubles luge spots were
filled by American sliders. But no
American luger has ever captured
Olympic gold.
At Nagano in 1998, Grim-
mette and Martin kissed bronze
medals, finishing 0.112 sec-
onds behind the gold winning
German duo of Stefan Krausse
and Jan Behrendt. Four years
later, Grimmette and Martin
finished 0.134 seconds behind
another set of German gold
medalists, Patric-Fritz Leitner and
Alexander Resch.
Barely a day has passed since
without the duo wondering how
they could have been a tiny bit
faster.
"They're both driven by want-
ing to hear the national anthem
USA Luge director Ron Rossi said.
"I've watched them and their
behavior. They've had a number
of bronze medal finishes in the
worlds, and they're very frus-
trated by that. The 3-2-1 Olympic
progression matters to them
Come and join us for an afternoon of I FIlCTSC tl VG
and JVl �t(j IT3 L JVC activities focusing on
Peace
Tne Dances of Universal Peace are simple
Circle dances set to live music and SSCPCd
hraSCS from many different Spiritual traditions
throughout tne world. No previous dance or musical experience is
necessary. The MOVementS & SongS
are drawn from overT'OO dances that include themes of
Peace, Healine& Celebration of Life.
Sundau, November &h
StudcntCcntcrZ-n
m � TREE!
Grimmette and Martin have
come a long way from a very
humble beginning. When they
first teamed up, they worked odd
jobs like painting the trim on
Rossi's house and driving a bev-
erage cart around a golf course
(ust to scrounge enough cash to
get them through the World Cup
season.
But they both know the end
of their time atop the sled is
looming.
Neither will say if 2005-06
will be their final season; in fact,
Grimmette and Martin winners
of 10 World Cup events, three
overall World Cup champion-
ships and four world champion-
ship bronze medals said they
don't plan to discuss it with one
another until after the Olym-
pics.
"It's such an incredible feeling
to win an Olympic medal, no
matter what color it is, that I'm
definitely proud of what I've done
already Grimmette said. "If it
doesn't work out in Italy, I've got
World Cup medals, I've got the
world championship medals and
two Olympic medals. No matter
what, that's pretty good
Kenneth used that experi-
ence as a springboard. When he
graduated from ECU, he took an
assistant job at Camden County,
where he spent about a decade
coaching under Scott Jones.
So by 2002, when he became
Nash Central's first football
coach, Kenneth was a blend
of several influential coaches.
Not the least of which was his
father.
"He's evolved into his own
style, his own coach Spence
said.
"Coaching is just an eternal
evolution anyway. It's constantly
changing He's got his own per-
sonality, and I admire what he's
done and what he's doing
The younger, toddler Ken-
neth the one that delivered the
late-night tackles instead of
taking them rarely woke up to
the sounds of Saturday morning
cartoons. Instead, while other
kids had the Road Runner's
"beep-beep Kenneth had the
"click-click-click" of the film
projector as his dad watched
film.
"I grew up riding the bus over
to the middle school or the high
school practices and hanging
out round the field houses and
rummaging through the lockers
a. at the end of school trying to
find pencils and paper Kenneth
said. "That was the way I thought
life was
It was the same for Kenneth's
younger brothers. Paul Grantham
is now a media relations employee
at Duke and Brian Grantham is a
high school basketball coach
in Hawaii. All three played for
Spence at Greene Central.
The trio of boys always made
the house interesting enough
for Spence to blow his even-tem-
pered personality on occasion.
One New Year's Day, Kenneth cut
the cable trying to put a basket-
ball goal in the ground, spoiling
Spence's plan of watching college
football bowl games.
Another time, Kenneth
ignited a fight around a birth-
day cake and wound up breaking
an antique table that belonged
to his great-grandmother. But
the cable was restored. And the
antique table?
"It's patched up; we still have
it Spence said.
Added Kenneth: "Yeah, they're
good at patching things up
No reason to panic. Ever.
The Granthams are a peaceful
bunch by nature. Kenneth rarely
erupts in a tirade, even after the
most trying of losses which the
Bulldogs have endured several
times in an up-and-down 4-5
season this year.
Perhaps, though, that's
because he knows what awaits
him: 3-year-old Darby sprints out
of the stands and onto the field
after each game, her only goal to
make, that teeth-rattling impact
with her dad's leg.
"That's become a ritual for
her Kenneth's wife, Roberta,
said. "She looks forward to
that
Who wouldn't be at ease?
Aside from having his two chil-
dren and wife at each game, Ken-
neth always has his in-laws, who
drive up from Fayetteville, and
mother Kathy. And, of course,
his father.
All have the football bug.
Even Darby, who spends her Sat-
urdays with Kenneth at the foot-
ball field doing maintenance.
"We really are a lucky family
Roberta said.
Spence handles the baby-
sitting on Wednesdays while
Roberta works as a part-time
preschool instructor at Nashville
Methodist Church. She takes
Darby with her. Spence gets
Wyatt.
For about six hours, Spence
plays his grandson the Notre
Dame fight song, pitches him
the football, shouts "Touchdown,
Wyatt and runs through some
plays.
One play Tackle Daddy After
Practice seems to register espe-
cially well in the Grantham
family. Spence, for one, wants
to make sure Wyatt can have his
licks on Kenneth.
"What goes around Spence
said, "comes around
ECU Student Experienced. IVrrK)reinionnationcall52d-f5.
8 RM. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM Never before seen in America, the Munich
Symphony Orchestra makes its US debut under the baton of acclaimed
conductor and piano soloist Philippe Entremont.
Carl Maria von Weber's Overture to Oberon, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart's Piano
Concerto No. 21 in C Major, K 467, and Johannes Brahms' Symphony No. 2 in D
Major, Op. 73 are the evening's planned repertoire.
FOR INFORMATION OR TICKETS CALL 252.328.4788, VTTY 252.328.4736,
OR 1.800.ECU.ARTS M-F 9A.M6RM SAT 1RM5RM. WWW.ECUARTS.COM
Advance tickets: MO Public. (31 �CU FicultyStitt, $19 Youth. S10 ECU Students All tickets al the door WO. ECU 1
Cirdt required it show for student-priced tickets. Guest ol student must attend with student. Discount may not apply
to nonlee-payini students. Group rates available. DISCOUNT TICKETS ARE STILL AVAILABLE ON SUBSCRIPTION
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
in 't-nitain tut-leii to t-twnKc.
(?&)


Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1853
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy