The East Carolinian, September 27, 2005






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www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 9
TUESDAY
September 27, 2005
COAD provides first-year students with an opportunity to gain leadership as well as learn about the nuances of student life. Students can also give back to the community. (Photo from COAD Web site)
Students in COAD 1000 take initiative to help county
Chancellor's leadership
initiative takes effect
CHRIS MUNIER
NEWS EDITOR
Students enrolled in COAD
1000 spent last Saturday doing
community service at 24 sites
around Pitt County while gain-
ing valuable service and charac-
ter development skills.
COAD faculty members are
finding out more and more of
their students are coming to ECU
with service learning skills from
high school and are looking for
an opportunity to enhance them
while in college. COAD stands for
counselor and adult education.
This is a course targeted at first-
year students.
"We are looking at these stu-
dents as, 'Why can't we take that
initiative they have, bring it to the
college level and change it into ser-
vant leadership? said Stephen Gray
of ECU'S Ombudsman office.
Gray described servant lead-
ership as learning how to serve
and later use service skills to mold
leadership character.
Gray said this work is part of
Chancellor Steve Ballard's leader-
ship initiative.
Ballard told students at the
student convocation ECU will
be the leadership university in 10
years. Gray would like to see that
happen sooner.
"Why can't we start now?"
Gray said.
Gray is looking to do just that
with the COAD classes that have
gotten quite popular recently. It
started five years ago and at the time
there were only a couple of sections
which later grew to five or six, and
now there are almost SO sections of
COAD being taught this semester.
COAD is a department com-
prised of voluntary, adjunct
instructors who help students
learn how to be a college student
and become acquainted with
university life.
"If it was called anything, it would
be University 1000 Gray said.
Saturday students worked at
24 Pitt County sites for beau-
tification projects. Agencies
involved with this effort include
the Little Willy Center, Hope
Lodge, the human society and
the wildlife center.
"The majority of the sites are
dealing with the food shelter,
dealing with animal shelters
Gray said.
Gray is particularly impressed
by the way students and faculty
have donated their time to bene-
fit the community. Faculty mem-
bers do not get paid and they
not only donate their own time
to the cause, they get help from
their husbands and wives as well.
Also, it does not require endless
hours from students either. Col-
lectively, a group of 1,000 COAD
studentsfaculty can do the same
amount of work, two hours on
Saturday, as someone with a full-
time job does in a year.
"Withj the power of one
person, by donating two hours
of volunteer time Saturday, Sept.
24, we're providing equal to one
person working full time for a
year Gray said.
One thousand students
times two hours equals 2,000
hours. One person times 40
hours per week, times 50
weeks equals 2,000 hours.
This initiative ties into an
agenda for leadership develop-
ment called, "Pirates partnering
with Pitt Their motto for build-
see COAD page A2
Former presidents' relief work continues with progress
FORMER PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON
Bush, Clinton work in
unison to provide aid
CHRIS MUNIER
NEWS EDITOR
After Hurricane Katrina
struck the Gulf Coast, former U.S.
Presidents George H.W. Bush and
Bill Clinton joined forces to form
the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund,
an effort designed to help victims
of the deadly hurricane cope with
their tremendous losses.
The former chief executives
had launched an effort like this
after last year's deadly tsunami
disaster in Sri Lanka and Indone-
sia. Despite being former political
opponents in the 1992 presiden-
tial election, Bush and Clinton
have a record of cohesiveness
in their post-presidential years.
Their efforts garnered more than
$10 million dollars for victims in
Southeast Asia.
"They saw how effective they
could be on the local and national
scale, and it made sense said Jim
McGrath, Bush's spokesman.
This partnership is a hybrid
of the two foundations organized
by Bush and Clinton, the William
J. Clinton Foundation and the
Greater Houston Community
Foundation. Donations can be
made at their Web site, BushClin-
tonKatrinaFund.org.
Both presidents were disap-
pointed in the government's
response to the disaster.
"Our government failed those
people in the beginning, and I
take it now there is no dispute
about it. One hundred percent of
the people recognize that - that it
was a failure said Clinton.
Bush agreed with Clinton but
does not think his son should get
all the blame.
"He cannot listen to every
critic on the editorial page of the
New York Times said Bush.
As of Sept. 22, there was more
than $6 million in online dona-
fc tions from almost 40,000 donors,
2 and money is continuing to come
into the foundation. Another
$90 million came from large
corporations pledging support.
They raised $1 million after.the
first 24 hours. They have raised
the third highest total out of any
relief group.
"The American people have
once again shown their great
capacity to come to the aid of
those in need Clinton said.
The Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund
will continue indefinitely. The dis-
bursement of funds will be handled
by the organizations upon recom-
mendations by Bush and Clinton.
More than a dozen presiden-
tial libraries and organizations
have donated heavily to this
cause as well. Among the corpora-
tions and associations that have
contributed are Alltel, Wal-Mart,
The PGA, Freddie Mac, The Uni-
versity of Arkansas, Nike and the
Omnicom Group.
This fund has even managed
to gain the support of unlikely
supporters like the government of
Kazakhstan. After meeting with
Clinton, Kazakhstan President
Nursultan Nazarbayev agreed to
lend support.
With Hurricane Rita hitting
the Gulf Coast, there is a bigger
need than ever for private citizens
to help displaced people. Fortu-
nately, Hurricane Rita did not
devastate Texas the way Katrina
did to New Orleans.
Michael D. Brown, under
Secretary of Homeland Security
for Emergency Preparedness and
Response, said people should
focus on making monetary dona-
tions to victims.
"Cash donations are espe-
cially helpful to victims said
Brown.
"Donated money prevents,
too, the prohibitive cost of air or
sea transportation that donated
goods require
Of course, the Bush-Clinton
Katrina Fund is not alone in the
recovery movement. The Ameri-
can Red Cross, Salvation Army,
Mercy Corps and America's
Second Harvest are among other
groups accepting cash donations
for hurricane victims.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Alzheimer's Memory Walk
raises awareness, funds
for finding treatments
Alzheimer's walk on Oct. 1
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The Eastern North Carqlina
Chapter of the Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation annual Memory Walk for
Alzheimer's Disease will be held
in Greenville Oct. 1.
The walk is to raise funds
for Alzheimer's research and to
raise public awareness about the
disease. There are more than a
dozen walks scheduled for the
eastern part of the state in the
month of October.
This is the seventh year the
walk will be held in Greenville.
Last year, more than $22,000
was raised by the Greenville walk.
A goal of $25,000 is expected
this year.
"We've always been success-
ful in raising more than the pre-
vious year said Randy Jackson,
executive director of Carolina
House of Greenville.
Jackson is coordinating the
Greenville walk.
This year, organizers have
made an effort to get 100 local
businesses and companies to
donate $100 each. So far, there
have been 30 to 35 who have
signed up to participate. Jackson
is hoping more businesses will
take the opportunity to sign up in
the last week before the walk.
Walkers will gather in the
Greenville Town Common Sat-
urday morning. Registration will
begin at 8:30 a.m. and the walk
will begin at 9:30 a.m. Walkers
will then traverse the commons
about three times before wrap-
ping the event up around 11a.m.
with a closing by the mayor.
It is not too late for people to
get in on the walk and help out
in Alzheimer's research.
"Anyone not yet registered
is more than welcome to start a
team Jackson said.
If a person does not have a
team, they can participate as an
individual or may be assigned to
a team at the walk.
With the ECU football team
in town Oct. 1 for their game
against Southern Miss Jackson
is encouraging people to start
their day off right by helping
out a good cause before heading
over to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
to cheer on the Pirates.
The National Alzheimer's
Association began Memory Walk
in 1989. Since then, it has helped
raise more than $175 million and
has become the largest fund-
raising event in the nation for
Alzheimer's. Walks are held in
more than 600 communities
across America with the major-
ity of the events taking place in
September or October.
Alzheimer's is a brain dis-
order that gradually erodes the
mind's ability to make judgments
see FUND page A2
Helicopters scour Louisiana floodwaters, Texans stream home as Rita falls short of fears
Louisiana residents deal with even more flooding after Rita.
PERRY, La. (AP) � People
checking their hurricane-hit
homes and towns returned with
stories of flooding to the roof-
tops, coffins and refrigerators
bobbing in the water, and stilts
where their houses once stood.
Yet as the misery wrought
by Hurricane Rita came into
clearer view - particularly in
the marshy towns along the
Texas-Louisiana line - officials
credited the epic evacuation of
three million people for saving
countless lives.
"As bad as it could have been,
we came out of this in pretty
good shape said Texas Gov.
Rick Perry, who called the lack
of widespread fatalities "miracu-
lous By Sunday night, just two
deaths had been blamed directly
on Rita.
Authorities had trouble keep-
ing people from southern Loui-
siana from traveling through
floodwaters in their boats to
discover whether Rita wrecked
their homes and livelihoods.
"I've been through quite a
few of them, and we've never
had water like this said L.E.
Nix, whose home on the edge of
a bayou in Louisiana's Calcasieu
Parish was swamped with three
feet of water. "I had a little piece
of paradise, and now I guess it's
gone
Randy Roach, mayor of Lake
Charles, told CBS's "The Early
Show" on Monday that his hard-
hit seaport city of oil refineries
and casinos was being patrolled
by the National Guard and that
clean-up was underway.
"The good news is that the
water is going down, it's kind of
back in the banks of the lake and
our recovery process is well under
way he said. "The response
has been tremendous. I really
appreciate everything that the
federal government has done to
help us
In Houston, which was spared
the brunt of Rita, officials set up
a voluntary, staggered plan for
an "orderly migration" with dif-
ferent areas going home Sunday,
Monday and Tuesday to avoid the
massive gridlock that accompa
nled the exodus out.
By Sunday night, a seemingly
endless stream of charter buses,
cars and sport utility vehicles
clogged the southbound lanes of
Interstate 45 into Houston.
Coming on the heels of Hurri-
cane Katrina, where many chose
to ride out the storm with deadly
consequences, the news coming
from the aftermath of Rita was
for the most part positive.
Petrochemical plants that
supply a quarter of the nation's
gasoline suffered only a glancing
blow, with just one major plant
facing weeks of repairs.
The reflooding in New
Orleans from levee breaks was
isolated mostly to areas already
destroyed and deserted. And con-
trary to dire forecasts, Rita and its
heavy rains moved quickly north
instead of parking over the South
for days and dumping a predicted
25 inches of rain.
Along the central Louisiana
coastline, where Rita's heavy
rains and storm-surge flood-
ing pushed water up to nine
feet in homes and into fields
of sugarcane and rice, weary
evacuees slowly returned to see
the damage.
Staring at the ground, shoul-
ders stooped, clearly exhausted,
many came back with stories of
deer stuck on levees and cows
swimming through seawater
miles from the Gulf of Mexico.
"All I got now is my kids and
my motor home said Tracy
Savage, 33, whose house in rural
Vermilion Parish was four feet
underwater.
More than 100 boats gassed
up at an Abbeville car dealership
Sunday before venturing out
on search-and-rescue missions.
Helicopters helped with house-
to-house searches.
An estimated 1,000 people
were rescued in Vermilion Parish,
said Chief Sheriff's Deputy Kirk
Frith. About 50 people remained
on a 911 checklist, and Frith
said'authorities would prob-
ably conclude rescue operations
by Monday and begin damage
assessment.
Some bayou residents who
arrived with boats in hopes of
getting back into their property
were turned away by state offi-
cials, but many ignored warnings
to stay away.
"How are you going to stop
them from going to their home to
check on their dog or something
like that?" Frith asked.
In Cameron Parish, just across
the state line from Texas and in
the path of Rita's harshest winds,
fishing communities were reduced
to splinters, with concrete slabs
the only evidence that homes
once stood there. Debris was
strewn for miles by water or wind.
Holly Beach, a popular vacation
and fishing spot, was gone. Only
the stilts that held houses off the
ground remained.
A line of shrimp boats steamed
through an oil sheen to reach
Hackberry, only to find homes
and camps had been flattened.
In one area, there was a flooded
high school football field, its
bleachers and goal posts jutting
from what had become part of
the Gulf of Mexico.
"In Cameron, there's really
hardly anything left. Everything
is just obliterated said Louisiana
Gov. Kathleen Blanco, who has
asked the federal government
for $34 billion to aid in storm
recovery.
After a briefing with Blanco
in Baton Rouge, President Bush
said: "I know the people of this
state have been through a lot. We
ask for God's blessings on them
and their families
Just across the state line,
Texas' Perry toured the badly hit
refinery towns of Beaumont and
Port Arthur area by air Sunday.
"Look at that he said, point-
ing to a private aircraft hangar
with a roof that was half col-
lapsed and half strewn across
the surrounding field. "It looks
like a blender just went over the
top of it
Among the deaths attributed
to Rita was a person killed in
north-central Mississippi when
a tornado spawned by the hurri-
cane overturned a mobile home,
and an east Texas man struck by
a fallen tree. Two dozen evacuees
were killed before the storm hit in
a fatal bus fire near Dallas.
In the Houston area, John
Willy, the top elected official in
Brazoria County southwest of
see FLOOD page A2
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A8 I Opinion: A3 I Student Life: A41 Sports: A6
� - i





WGEB8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
9-22-05
Accidents could again alter Chase results
(AP) � The knock on
NASCAR's new championship
format has always been that
all the attention will go to the
10 drivers racing for the title,
and the rest of the field will
be overlooked.
Kasey Kahne and Robby
Gordon changed that in the first
of the 10 Chase races with acts
of road rage. Kahne intention-
ally hit Kyle Busch and Gordon
threw his helmet at Michael
Waltrip, two instances that took
the focus off the Chase drivers
at New Hampshire International
Speedway.
Their actions took the focus
off winner Ryan Newman's
down-to-the wire battle with
Tony Stewart and overshadowed
Kurt Busch's devastating 3Sth-
place finish.
(Ires Bifflc, who is second in
the Nextel Cup standings, wasn't
impressed.
"We looked like a circus. The
NASCAR race at Loudon looked
like a cheap wrestling match to
me Biffle said. "1 don't think
it was good for us. Drama and
all that and excitement and
who is going to beat who and
seeing people's real personality
and people upset, that's going to
happen, but I think it was a little
excessive
Still, it made for good
television - something even
traditionalist Mark Martin
admits.
"My wife is a great indi-
cator she's not the biggest
fan in the world - but she said
that was the greatest race she'd
seen all year because of all that
stuff said Martin, seventh in
the Chase standings. "Be real
honest about it, the people love
that stuff
But intentional wrecks and
retaliation on the race track can
be dangerous to everyone, as well
as crippling to the 10 drivers in
the Chase for the championship.
It happened to Jeremy May-
field and Tony Stewart last year
in New Hampshire, when Gordon
wrecked Biffle as payback for con-
tact earlier in the race. Mayfield
and Stewart were caught in the
melee, and it ended their cham-
pionship hopes.
Neither recovered from those
poor finishes to contend for the
Nextel Cup title.
Although no Chase drivers
were effected in Sunday's road-
rage incidents, the risk of get-
. ting wrecked by a backmarker
will always be there for the title
contenders.
Stewart, the current points
leader, believes there is little that
can be done to eliminate that ele-
ment from the Chase.
"You still have 43 drivers
who want to win races he said.
"The guys who are outside of that
top 10, they still have sponsors
to impress, programs to get on
track, and for some, jobs to earn.
Other guys ust have something
to prove
Kurt Busch was the first
Chase driver to fall victim to an
accident when he wrecked with
Scott Riggs ust two laps into
Sunday's race. It dropped the
reigning Nextel Cup champion
to 10th in the Chase standings,
with a huge hole to climb out of
to win a second title.
Jimmie Johnson proved last
season that one bad finish doesn't
eliminate a driver from the title.
He fell 242 points behind Busch
last season, then won four of the
final six races to lose the cham-
pionship by eight points.
And Busch also had to over-
come a terrible race - he blew an
engine in the sixth Chase event
and finished 42nd, but still went
on to win the title.
Still, he knows he has little
room for error in the final nine
events that begin Sunday in
Dover, Del.
"We have to go and attack
each race for a win Busch said.
"We have to go to Dover and
expect to win and try to build
our points back up
That can be easier said than
done.
Newman had a poor start to
the Chase last season and never
climbed higher than seventh
in the standings. And Stewart
and Mayfield - the two drivers
caught in Robby Gordon's mess
last season - stalled out at sixth
and 10th. -
Mayfield is hoping to avoid
a similar fate this season,
and thinks NASCAR will do
its part to prevent any more
intentional accidents.
"I don't see it getting any
worse, because I'm sure at the
drivers meeting this week we're
going to hear a pretty powerful
voice tell us this isn't going to
continue on Mayfield said.
"We're going to have races where
everybody is going to get carried
away but I don't see it getting
too far out of hand
Get caught
reading.
c(
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This coupon good for
iin extra $5 on your
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Welcome Back Students!
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GREENVILLE, NC
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
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ORKMONT SQURR6 RPRRTM6NTS
F�flTUR�S:
� On-sile Management
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� Resident & Visitor Parking
�Adjacent to ECU Bus Stop
� Playground Area
�Baskelbal&Volleybai Courts
� Outdoor Swimming Pool
� Modern Electric Appliances:
Range,
Refrigerator,
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� Central Heating & Air
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ELTORO
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men's hair
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28C0 E. 10th St.
Eastgatc Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
helping people help
themselves.
Throughout our lives, we encounter many challenges. Conflicts in
relationships. Life transitions. Emotional crises. Educational and
career decisions. Physical illness and disability.
Rehabilitation counselors, substance abuse and mental health
counselors, and vocational evaluators are trained and committed
to providing the help and support to master the challenges of life.
With a degree in one of our three programs in REHABILITATION
STUDIES, you will be able to help people maximize their potential
and make positive changes in their lives!
BB
I MM KM IV
School of Allied Health Sciences
Dept. of Rehabilitation Studies
Belk Building, Room 312
252.328.4455
www.ecu.edurehb
September 18-26 is National Rehabilitation
Awareness Week
OPEN 24 hours Fridays & Saturdays
I WO

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COLLEGE NIGHT
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50 OFF ENTREES
with drink purchase
and college ID
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2 Bedroom, 1,5 Bath Townhomes
1212 Red Banks Rd. � Greenville, NC
252-756-4151
GRADUATION G
EXPO '05
n
December Gtads arc invited to a special Graduation Expo featuring a
vanety of vendors and campus departments. This is the first opportunity
for December graduates to pick up caps & gowns. Plus, students will find
odicr important information about commencement, student professional development, college j
loan repayment, alumni benefits and Pirate (lib; door pnes, giveaways, and mote!
Tuesday, September 27 & Wednesday, September 28:
IO00 a.m. - 3.00 p.m. & 5:00 pjn. - 7:00 p.m. O
Rear dining area of The Wright Place - Wright Building
�wVt Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores 9HERFF j�es
www.Jostens.com www.studentstores.ecu.edu www.herffjones.comcolle3e
Ttenfci to our tpontort
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
yri3ht Building � 328-6731 � 1 -877-499-TEXT






� ���
9-22-05
HI
P
es.
flicts in
rial and
health
imitted
)f life.
TATION
jtential
ion
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www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 81 Number 9
TUESDAY
September 27, 2005
COAD provides first-year students with an opportunity to gain leadership as well as learn about the nuances of student life. Students can also give back to the community. (Photo from COAD Web site)
Students in COAD 1000 take initiative to help county
Chancellor's leadership
initiative takes effect
CHRIS MUNIER
NEWS EDITOR
Students enrolled in COAD
1000 spent last Saturday doing
community service at 24 sites
around Pitt County while gain-
ing valuable service and charac-
ter development skills.
COAD faculty members are
finding out more and more of
their students are coming to ECU
with service learning skills from
high school and are looking for
an opportunity to enhance them
while in college. COAD stands for
counselor and adult education.
This is a course targeted at first-
year students.
"We are looking at these stu-
dents as, 'Why can't we take that
initiative they have, bring it to the
college level and change it into ser-
vant leadership? said Stephen Gray
of ECU's Ombudsman office.
Gray described servant lead-
ership as learning how to serve
and later use service skills to mold
leadership character.
Gray said this work is part of
Chancellor Steve Ballard's leader-
ship initiative.
Ballard told students at the
student convocation ECU will
be the leadership university in 10
years. Gray would like to see that
happen sooner.
"Why can't we start now?"
Gray said.
Gray is looking to do just that
with the COAD classes that have
gotten quite popular recently. It
started five years ago and at the time
there were only a couple of sections
which later grew to five or six, and
now there are almost 50 sections of
COAD being taught this semester.
COAD is a department com-
prised of voluntary, adjunct
instructors who help students
learn how to be a college student
and become acquainted with
university life.
"If it was called anything, it would
be University 1000 Gray said.
Saturday students worked at
24 Pitt County sites for beau-
tification projects. Agencies
involved with this effort include
the Little Willy Center, Hope
Lodge, the human society and
the wildlife center.
"The majority of the sites are
dealing with the food shelter,
dealing with animal shelters. .
Gray said.
Gray is particularly impressed
by the way students and faculty
have donated their time to bene-
fit the community. Faculty mem-
bers do not get paid and they
not only donate their own time
to the cause, they get help from
their husbands and wives as well.
Also, it does not require endless
hours from students either. Col-
lectively, a group of 1,000 COAD
studentsfaculty can do the same
amount of work, two hours on
Saturday, as someone with a full-
time job does in a year.
"With the power of one
person, by donating two hours
of volunteer time Saturday, Sept.
24, we're providing equal to one
person working full time for a
year Gray said.
One thousand students
times two hours equals 2,000
hours. One person times 40
hours per week, times 50
weeks equals 2,000 hours.
This initiative ties into an
agenda for leadership develop-
ment called, "Pirates partnering
with Pitt Their motto for build-
see COAD page A2
Former presidents' relief work continues with progress
FORMER PRESIDENT BILL CLINTON
Bush, Clinton work in
unison to provide aid
CHRIS MUNIER
NEWS EDITOR
After Hurricane Katrina
struck the Gulf Coast, former U.S.
Presidents George H.W. Bush and
Bill Clinton joined forces to form
the Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund,
an effort designed to help victims
of the deadly hurricane cope with
their tremendous losses.
The former chief executives
had launched an effort like this
after last year's deadly tsunami
disaster in Sri Lanka and Indone-
sia. Despite being former political
opponents in the 1992 presiden-
tial election, Bush and Clinton
have a record of cohesiveness
in their post-presidential years.
Their efforts garnered more than
$ 10 million dollars for victims in
Southeast Asia.
"They saw how effective they
could be on the local and national
scale, and it made sense said Jim
McGrath, Bush's spokesman.
This partnership is a hybrid
of the two foundations organized
by Bush and Clinton, the William
J. Clinton Foundation and the
Greater Houston Community
Foundation. Donations can be
made at their Web site, BushClin-
tonKatrinaFund.org.
Both presidents were disap-
pointed in the government's
response to the disaster.
"Our government failed those
people in the beginning, and I
take it now there is no dispute
about it. One hundred percent of
the people recognize that - that it
was a failure said Clinton.
Bush agreed with Clinton but
does not think his son should get
all the blame.
"He cannot listen to every
critic on the editorial page of the
New York Times said Bush.
As of Sept. 22, there was more
than $6 million in online dona-
�g tions from almost 40,000 donors,
and money is continuing to come
into the foundation. Another
$90 million came from large
corporations pledging support.
They raised $1 million after,the
first 24 hours. They have raised
the third highest total out of any
relief group.
"The American people have
once again shown their great
capacity to come to the aid of
those In need Clinton said.
The Bush-Clinton Katrina Fund
will continue indefinitely. The dis-
bursement of funds will be handled
by the organizations upon recom-
mendations by Bush and Clinton.
More than a dozen presiden-
tial libraries and organizations
have donated heavily to this
cause as well. Among the corpora-
tions and associations that have
contributed are Alltel, Wal-Mart,
The PGA, Freddie Mac, The Uni-
versity of Arkansas, Nike and the
Omnicom Group.
This fund has even managed
to gain the support of unlikely
supporters like the government of
Kazakhstan. After meeting with
Clinton, Kazakhstan President
Nursultan Nazarbayev agreed to
lend support.
With Hurricane Rita hitting
the Gulf Coast, there is a bigger
need than ever for private citizens
to help displaced people. Fortu-
nately, Hurricane Rita did not
devastate Texas the way Katrina
did to New Orleans.
Michael D. Brown, under
Secretary of Homeland Security
for Emergency Preparedness and
Response, said people should
focus on making monetary dona-
tions to victims.
"Cash donations are espe-
cially helpful to victims said
Brown.
"Donated money prevents,
too, the prohibitive cost of air or
sea transportation that donated
goods require
Of course, the Bush-Clinton
Katrina Fund is not alone in the
recovery movement. The Ameri-
can Red Cross, Salvation Army,
Mercy Corps and America's
Second Harvest are among other
groups accepting cash donations
for hurricane victims.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Alzheimer's Memory Walk
raises awareness, funds
for finding treatments
Alzheimer's walk on Oct. 1
ZACK HILL
STAFF WRITER
The Eastern North Carolina
Chapter of the Alzheimer's Asso-
ciation annual Memory Walk for
Alzheimer's Disease will be held
in Greenville Oct. 1.
The walk is to raise funds
for Alzheimer's research and to
raise public awareness about the
disease. There are more than a
dozen walks scheduled for the
eastern part of the state in the
month of October.
This is the seventh year the
walk will be held in Greenville.
Last year, more than $22,000
was raised by the Greenville walk.
A goal of $25,000 is expected
this year.
"We've always been success-
ful in raising more than the pre-
vious year said Randy Jackson,
executive director of Carolina
House of Greenville.
Jackson is coordinating the
Greenville walk.
This year, organizers have
made an effort to get 100 local
businesses and companies to
donate $100 each. So far, there
have been 30 to 35 who have
signed up to participate. Jackson
is hoping more businesses will
take the opportunity to sign up in
the last week before the walk.
Walkers will gather in the
Greenville Town Common Sat-
urday morning. Registration will
begin at 8:30 a.m. and the walk
will begin at 9:30 a.m. Walkers
will then traverse the commons
about three times before wrap-
ping the event up around 11 a.m.
with a closing by the mayor.
It is not too late for people to
get in on the walk and help out
in Alzheimer's research.
"Anyone not yet registered
is more than welcome to start a
team Jackson said.
If a person does not have a
team, they can participate as an
individual or may be assigned to
a team at the walk.
With the ECU football team
in town Oct. 1 for their game
against Southern Miss Jackson
is encouraging people to start
their day off right by helping
out a good cause before heading
over to Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
to cheer on the Pirates.
The National Alzheimer's
Association began Memory Walk
in 1989. Since then, it has helped
raise more than175 million and
has become the largest fund-
raising event in the nation for
Alzheimer's. Walks are held in
more than 600 communities
across America with the major-
ity of the events taking place in
September or October.
Alzheimer's is a brain dis-
order that gradually erodes the
mind's ability to make judgments
see FUND page A2
Helicopters scour Louisiana floodwaters, Texans stream home as Rita falls short of fears

V W:
W. s
H 11 Vpr

Louisiana residents deal with even more flooding after Rita.
PERRY, La. (AP) � People
checking their hurricane-hit
homes and towns returned with
stories of flooding to the roof-
tops, coffins and refrigerators
bobbing in the water, and stilts
where their houses once stood.
Yet as the misery wrought
by Hurricane Rita came into
clearer view - particularly in
the marshy towns along the
Texas-Louisiana line - officials
credited the epic evacuation of
three million people for saving
countless lives.
"As bad as it could have been,
we came out of this in pretty
good shape said Texas Gov.
Rick Perry, who called the lack
of widespread fatalities "miracu-
lous By Sunday night, just two
deaths had been blamed directly
on Rita.
Authorities had trouble keep-
ing people from southern Loui-
siana from traveling through
floodwaters in their boats to
discover whether Rita wrecked
their homes and livelihoods.
"I've been through quite a
few of them, and we've never
had water like this said L.E.
Nix, whose home on the edge of
a bayou in Louisiana's Calcasieu
Parish was swamped with three
feet of water. "I had a little piece
of paradise, and now I guess it's
gone
Randy Roach, mayor of Lake
Charles, told CBS's "The Early
Show" on Monday that his hard-
hit seaport city of oil refineries
and casinos was being patrolled
by the National Guard and that
clean-up was underway.
"The good news is that the
water is going down, it's kind of
back in the banks of the lake and
our recovery process is well under
way he said. "The response
has been tremendous. I really
appreciate everything that the
federal government has done to
help us
a. In Houston, which was spared
the brunt of Rita, officials set up
a voluntary, staggered plan for
an "orderly migration" with dif-
ferent areas going home Sunday,
Monday and Tuesday to avoid the
massive gridlock that accompa
nied the exodus out.
By Sunday night, a seemingly
endless stream of charter buses,
cars and sport utility vehicles
clogged the southbound lanes of
Interstate 45 into Houston.
Coming on the heels of Hurri-
cane Katrina, where many chose
to ride out the storm with deadly
consequences, the news coming
from the aftermath of Rita was
for the most part positive.
Petrochemical plants that
supply a quarter of the nation's
gasoline suffered only a glancing
blow, with just one major plant
facing weeks of repairs.
The reflooding in New
Orleans from levee breaks was
isolated mostly to areas already
destroyed and deserted. And con-
trary to dire forecasts, Rita and its
heavy rains moved quickly north
instead of parking over the South
for days and dumping a predicted
25 inches of rain.
Along the central Louisiana
coastline, where Rita's heavy
rains and storm-surge flood-
ing pushed water up to nine
feet in homes and into fields
of sugarcane and rice, weary
evacuees slowly returned to see
the damage.
Staring at the ground, shoul-
ders stooped, clearly exhausted,
many came back with stories of
deer stuck on levees and cows
swimming through seawater
miles from the Gulf of Mexico.
"All I got now is my kids and
my motor home said Tracy
Savage, 33, whose house in rural
Vermilion Parish was four feet
underwater.
More than 100 boats gassed
up at an Abbeville car dealership
Sunday before venturing out
on search-and-rescue missions.
Helicopters helped with house-
to-house searches.
An estimated 1,000 people
were rescued in Vermilion Parish,
said Chief Sheriff's Deputy Kirk
Frith. About 50 people remained
on a 911 checklist, and Frith
said'authorities would prob-
ably conclude rescue operations
by Monday and begin damage
assessment.
Some bayou residents who
arrived with boats in hopes of
getting back into their property
were turned away by state offi-
cials, but many ignored warnings
to stay away.
"How are you going to stop
them from going to their home to
check on their dog or something
like that?" Frith asked.
In Cameron Parish, just across
the state line from Texas and in
the path of Rita's harshest winds,
fishing communities were reduced
to splinters, with concrete slabs
the only evidence that homes
once stood there. Debris was
strewn for miles by water or wind.
Holly Beach, a popular vacation
and fishing spot, was gone. Only
the stilts that held houses off the
ground remained.
A line of shrimp boats steamed
through an oil sheen to reach
Hackberry, only to find homes
and camps had been flattened.
In one area, there was a flooded
high school football field, its
bleachers and goal posts jutting
from what had become part of
the Gulf of Mexico.
"In Cameron, there's really
hardly anything left. Everything
is just obliterated said Louisiana
Gov. Kathleen Blanco, who has
asked the federal government
for $34 billion to aid in storm
recovery.
After a briefing with Blanco
in Baton Rouge, President Bush
said: "I know the people of this
state have been through a lot. We
ask for God's blessings on them
and their families
Just across the state line,
Texas' Perry toured the badly hit
refinery towns of Beaumont and
Port Arthur area by air Sunday.
"Look at that he said, point-
ing to a private aircraft hangar
with a roof that was half col-
lapsed and half strewn across
the surrounding field. "It looks
like a blender just went over the
top of it
Among the deaths attributed
to Rita was a person killed in
north-central Mississippi when
a tornado spawned by the hurri-
cane overturned a mobile home,
and an east Texas man struck by
a fallen tree. Two dozen evacuees
were killed before the storm hit in
a fatal bus fire near Dallas.
In the Houston area, John
Willy, the top elected official in
Brazoria County southwest of
see FLOOD page A2
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A8 I Opinion: A3 I Student Life: A41 Sports: A6
.





Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328,6366
CHRIS MUNIER News Editor
TUESDAY September 27, 2005
Announcements
Title: ECU Jarvls
Lecture
Event Start Date: Thursday, Oct.
13
Event End Date: Thursday, Oct.
13
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Where: Harvey Banquet Hall,
Minges Coliseum
Summary: Duke ethicist Stanley
Hauerwas will examine America's
love of longevity and fear of death
at ECU'S annual Jarvis Lecture on
Christianity and Culture series.
Details: Hauerwas will compare
American versus Christian views
on death and talk about why
Americans tend to put too many
expectations on physicians and
the medical profession.
Web site: ecu.edu
religionprogram
Contact: Calvin Mercer can be
reached at mercerc@mail.ecu.
edu or call 328-6121
Title: The Pajama
Game
Event Start Date: Thursday, Oct.
6
Event End Date: Thursday, Oct. 6
Time. 8 p.m.
Where: McGinnis Theatre
Summary: Ticket prices: General
Public - $17.50; Senior Citizens
and current ECU FacultyStaff
- $15; and YouthCurrent ECU
Student - $12 in advance, $17.50
at the door.
Details: Conditions at the
Sleep-Tite Pajama Factory are
anything but peaceful as sparks
fly between Sid Sorokin, the
new superintendent, and Babe
Williams, leader of the union
grievance committee. Their
stormy relationship comes to a
head when the workers strike
for a pay raise, setting off both a
conflict between management
and labor and a battle of the
sexes. Book by George Abbott
and Richard Bissell - Music and
Lyrics by Jerry Ross and Richard
Adler - based on 7 12 Cents by
Richard Bissell.
Web site: ecu.educs-studentlife
mcginnisplayhouse.cfm
Contact: 328-6829 or 1-800-
ECU-ARTS
Invitations: Ticket Required
Title: Think-in
- Technology Fair
Event Start Date: Wednesday,
Nov. 2
Event End Date: Wednesday,
Nov. 2
Timd: 10 a.m. - 2 p.m.
Where: Mendenhall Student
Center Great Rooms
Details: This Fall, Academic
Outreach and Information
Technology & Computing
Services (ITCS) will host Teaching
with Technology 2005: A Think-In
of Best Practices. This event will
provide faculty the opportunity
to share their expertise using
technology in both face-to-face
and distance education courses.
Faculty is invited to submit
proposals for laptop poster
sessions. The poster sessions
will be available from 10 a.m. - 2
p.m. and should include course
demonstrations that showcase
the use of technology. Faculty
and staff attendees will have the
opportunity to judge presentations
and a first prize will be awarded in
each category.
Web site: ecu.educs-acad
academicoutreachthink-in.cfm.
News Briefs
Local
State approves parole for prison
escapee who lived double life
WILMINGTON, NC (AP) - The state
has approved a two-year parole term
for a man who spent nearly 28 years
living under an assumed name. He
changed his name to hide his status
as an prison escapee.
Raymond Scully, who escaped from
Pender Correctional Institution in
1977, was arrested in March after a
traffic stop in Texas. He had lived
nearly three decades as law-abiding
Steve Johnson.
Scully, 53, received word this week
that he will be paroled Oct. 6 from
Pender Correctional Institution.
The decision by the North Carolina
Post-Release Supervision and Parole
Commission means Scully would be
free to leave the Wilmington area
upon completion of parole, which
couid be in one year if supervision is
terminated early.
Texas authorities have denied Scully's
request to return to their state and
have his parole overseen there.
"They take murderers and child
molesters and armed robbers
back. I don't know what they
think a guy with an expired
registration sticker will do Scully told
the Star News of Wilmington during
an interview at the medium-security
prison.
Scuiiy hopes to eventually resume
most aspects of his former life and
even return to being Steve Johnson.
His first residence after release will
be a shelter for homeless men in
Wilmington.
Scully, a Jacksonville native, was
convicted in 1975 in Onslow
County of possession with intent
to sell and deliver LSD, resulting
in a maximum prison term of
10 years. Scully served about
two years of the prison
sentence, becoming eligible for
parole in the process, when he
started worrying about his safety
after hearing another inmate had a
beef with him.
His first escape in May 1977 was
through a hole In the fence at Pender.
He was captured a few weeks later in
Brunswick County.
The next month he tried again. He
was one of several inmates on a bus
to Duplin Correctional Center for a
hearing regarding the first escape
when an inmate kicked out the back
door inside the prison yard.
Scully and three inmates bolted.
Scully managed to climb over a
fence and reach the safety of some
nearby woods. While the others were
captured, Scully began hitchhiking
and ended up in Arizona and
eventually got married and settled in
Austin, Texas, about 12 years ago.
Everything changed after the traffic
stop while Scully was on his way
home from work.
The officer ran a background check
in the federal criminal database, and
asked Scully if he had a scar on his
left arm. Police got the proof they
needed after fingerprinting Scully,
who did not oppose extradition to
North Carolina.
"In a way, I'm kind of glad this all
happened he said. "I was just living
in my little life, not thinking of anything
and this kind of opened my mind to
a lot of things.
"I question the system like you might
if you were younger. This kind of gave
me a second childhood in a weird
way. It opened my eyes
National
Survey: Retail gas prices drop 20
cents nationwide
CAMARILLO, Calif. (AP) - Gasoline
prices that reached all-time highs
in the wake of Hurricane Katrina fell
by an average of 20 cents a gallon
in the past two weeks as some Gulf
Coast refineries resumed production,
according to a nationwide survey.
The weighted average
price for all three grades
of gasoline was $2.84 a gallon on
Sept. 23, said Trilby Lundberg, who
publishes the semimonthly Lundberg
Survey of 7,000 gas stations. Self-
serve regular averaged $2.81 a gallon
nationwide. Mid-grade was pegged
at $2.91, while premium-grade was
at $3.01.
Decreased demand also played a role
in the decline, Lundberg said Sunday.
Sales were virtually nonexistent in
flooded and storm-ravaged areas like
New Orleans, while the price spike
prompted drivers in other parts of the
country to reduce consumption.
The survey was taken before Hurricane
Rita struck oil-producing Texas and
Louisiana on Saturday, causing far
less damage than had been feared.
Before Rita hit, 16 refineries in Texas
accounting for 2.3 million barrels
per day of capacity shut down and
evacuated crews.
"There will be some modest
disruption of supplies of gasoline
and other products said William
COAD from page A1 FlOOfJ from page A1
ing leadership is 3D - discover,
design and deliver. All of this is
centered on the plan of proving
to the community that ECU stu-
dents are active and care about
the vitality of Pitt County.
The projects of this program
also overlap into the "emerging
leaders" programs orchestrated
by Corey King, the assistant vice
chancellor for Student Experiences.
This program fulfills another key
component of Ballard's leadership
initiative - mentorship.
This writer can be contacted at
newi@theeaitcarolinian.com.
the city, said he would ignore
the state's staggered return plan.
"Our people are tired of the state's
plan! They have a plan too and
it's real simple. They plan to come
home when they want he said.
In New Orleans, the U.S.
Army Corps of Engineers moved
rocks and sandbags into the holes
that broke open in the Industrial
Canal levee as Rita closed in,
flooding the already devastated
Lower Ninth Ward. Workers
believe that once the breaches
are closed, the Ninth Ward can
be pumped dry in a week.
Mayor Ray Nagin immedi-
ately renewed his plan to allow
some residents to return to drier
parts of the city. Those areas
- including the once-raucous
French Quarter - could eventu-
ally support a population of
at least half of its pre-Katrina
population of about 500,000
residents.
t
COAD 1000
The objective of COAD 1000 Is to
assist freshmen In being successful
in their fiist year of college and
beyond. Topics covered In this
course Include understanding
the transition from high school to
college, student development and
motivation, goal-setting, learning
styles, memory development,
listening skills, note-taking skills,
study skills, test-taking skills,
communication, critical-thinking
skills, ECU academic rules and
regulations and career development
Issues.
COAD 1000 Is taught by academic
advisors and student life personnel
trained In understanding college
student development and the
academic and social issues
encountered by college students.
Freshmen who would like to add
COAD 1000 to their schedule may
do so by contacting their academic
advisor.
rlind from page A1
and reason, as well as destroying
memory. This may cause the
afflicted person to have changes
in personality. A person with
Alzheimer's may become more
anxious and suspicious, as well
as sometimes delusional with
hallucinations.
There is currently no cure for
Alzheimer's, although there are
certain treatments and modes
of care that can stave off the
ravaging effects of the disease
and enable the patient to enjoy
a higher quality of life for a
longer period of time before suc-
cumbing.
Registration is free, but par-
ticipants must sign a waiver.
Snacks and water will be provided
for participants.
Thii writer can be contacted at
newi@theeastcarolinian. com.
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Veno, an analyst at Cambridge
Energy Research Associates. "But I
don't think it's going to be as severe
a situation as Hurricane Katrina
Pump prices for self-serve climbed to
a record-high average of more than
$3 a gallon after Katrina severed oil
pipelines and damaged offshore
platforms in the Gulf.
Four refineries in Louisiana and
Mississippi whose output had been
more than 800,000 barrels per day
remain closed almost a month after
Katrina, and a significant amount of
oil and natural gas output has not
returned.
However, other refineries are back
online.
"Katrina damage remains a crimp on
gas supplies, but we've had a major
comeback by the oil industry since
she hit Lundberg said.
Among the stations included in the
survey, the lowest price for unleaded
regular was in Baton Rouge, La at
$2.57 a gallon. The highest was in
Honolulu at $3.23.
World
Al-Qaeda leader convicted
MADRID, Spain (AP) - A suspected
al-Qaeda cell leader was convicted
Monday of conspiring to commit
murder in connection with the Sept.
11 attacks in the United States, while
two other suspects were acquitted.
Imad Yarkas, the accused cell leader,
was sentenced to 27 years in prison.
The verdicts were read out at the
National Court in the conclusion of
Europe's biggest trial of al-Qaida
suspects.
Prosecutors had accused Yarkas, a
42-year-old Spaniard of Syrian origin,
of being an accomplice to murder
and requested a jail term of nearly
75,000 years - 25 years for each of
the nearly 3,000 people killed in the
suicide airliner attacks in 2001.
But in the end, he was convicted of
the lesser charge of conspiracy.
Yarkas had been charged with
arranging a meeting in the Tarragona
region of Spain in July 2001 at
which key Sept. 11 plotters - alleged
suicide pilot Mohamed Atta and
plot coordinator Ramzi Binsalshibh
- met to decide last-minute details,
including the date of the massacre.
Another suspect, Moroccan Driss
Chebli, was also alleged to have
helped set up the meeting. He was
acquitted on Monday of murder
charges but convicted of collaborating
with a terrorist group and sentenced
to six years.
The third suspect facing specific
Sept. 11 charges, Ghasoub al-Abrash
Ghalyoun, was acquitted Monday.
The Syrian-born Spaniard was
indicted over detailed video he shot
of the World Trade Center and other
landmarks during a trip to several U.S.
cities in 1997.
Judge Baltasar Garzon had said the
tapes were passed on to al-Qaida
and amounted to the genesis of
planning for the attacks on the U.S.
Ghalyoun said during the trial he shot
the tapes as an innocent tourist.
Ghalyoun was also acquitted of
charges of being a member of a
terrorist organization.
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O'NEILL





Page A3
edltor@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.9238
JENNIFER L HOBBS Editor In Chief
TUESDAY September 27, 2005
Our View
Tip your hat to Holtz, ECU
It is amazing the kind of difference one year, a
new Athletic Director and a revamped coaching
staff makes. Last year, the Gridiron Pirates went
into Morganton, W.Va. and got completely ham-
mered by the Mountaineers, 56-23. This year,
the Pirates brought a brand new coaching staff
and some new blood up to WVU and were a
couple successful red zone trips from getting
their first victory on Mountaineer turf.
Many were skeptical of Terry Holland's decision
to hire Skip Holtz in early December last year.
Any skepticism that is still lingering should be
thoroughly stomped on after this past week-
end.
The West Virginia game was truly a measuring
stick for how far along this team has come under
Holtz's new tutelage and you couldn't be much
happier with how they measured up Saturday.
There certainty were huge downsides (red zone
inefficiency, turnovers, poor pass protection),
but after considering all of that, a 20-15 defeat
is impressive.
The run defense finally looked legitimate. Partic-
ularly In the second half, the Pirates completely
shut down a very potent running attack. It's no
secret Rich Rodriguez and the Mountaineers
run the same game plan as the Demon Dea-
cons over in Wake Forest - they pound the ball
down your throat every single play. Last week,
the Pirates choked on that game plan. One
week later, they didnt like the taste so much
and spit it back in WVU's face.
Something to think about here also is how the
Pirates have played on the road so far this year,
not just in Morgantown. Although they came
out flat against Wake and could never quite dig
themselves out of the whole they were stuck in,
they showed a ton of heart during their come-
back bid in the second half.
In the previous two years, the Pirates didn't
look like a college football team on the road.
They didn't look like a football team period.
However, this year this team knows they have
a chance to win every single week, no matter
where they're playing.
This is a new team. It has more experience,
better talent and maybe most importantly an
entirely new attitude. Much of the credit for that
is due large in part to Holtz and company, so
tip your hat and get ready for what should be
two very exciting home games against Southern
Miss and Rice.
Our Staff
Jennifer L Hobbs
Editor in Chief
Chris Munier
News Editor
Alexander Marclnlak
Web Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk
Photo Editor
Kristin Murnane
Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
April Barnes
Asst Copy Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Edward McKim
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
252.328.9238
252.328.9143
252.328.9245
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edltor@theeastcarollnian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more informa-
tion. One copy of TEC is free, each additional copy is $1.
Opinion Columnist
Are environmentalists to blame for our lack of oil?
Empty wallet and gas tank?
Thank the environmentalists.
TONY MCKEE
CONSERVATIVE CORNER
Do you know that the deaths of
many of our fellow Americans can be
directly attributed to environmentalists
each and every year? Are you aware
that environmentalists are directly
responsible for keeping some people
locked in a seemingly inescapable cycle
of poverty? Are you also aware that
environmentalists are responsible for
more money being transferred to oil
producing, terrorist supporting Middle
Eastern nations than any other single
group?
For over 40 years, environmental-
ists have been at the forefront of a
movement that has blocked oil and
natural gas exploration and drilling.
They have blocked energy generating
expansion in the form of dams, new
construction of hydroelectric, geother-
mal, coal fired, gas fired and nuclear
powered electrical generating plants
and the expansion of the electrical grid
nationwide. They have even blocked
the placementbuilding of "alternative"
energy facilities in certain areas. Their
record is clear: any attempt to expand
our country's energy production will
be fought at every turn.
A few facts for your consideration:
There are proven reserves of oil
and natural gas in the Gulf of Mexico,
the Atlantic and the Pacific. There are
extensive oil reserves in the Alaska
National Wildlife Refuge. There is a
huge reserve of shale oil, equivalent to
or greater than the reserves of Saudi
Arabia, under several of our states.
Incidentally, this is the same type of
oil reserve that our Socialist Canadian
brethren have been reaping the benefits
of for years. There is an absolutely mas-
sive amount of coal in this country that
can be used for many purposes. The
existence of these reserves has been
public knowledge for decades. For just
as many decades, these reserves have
been the target of environmentalist
obstructionism and lawsuits to keep
anyone from making use of them. They
have been extremely effective.
The last refinery built in the U.S.
was in Louisiana in 1976. That is
almost 30 years without an expan-
sion of our refining capacity. No
new nuclear plants have been built
for approximately the same number
of years. Despite massive growth in
electrical demands in the Northeast,
the expansion of electrical generating
and delivery capabilities there has been
blocked repeatedly over the last 20 - 30
years. In even faster growing California,
there has been practically no increase
in electrical generating capacity in over
30 years.
Are you beginning to see a pattern
here? Let's relate these little tidbits to
current events, shall we?
California has had to resort to roll-
ing "brown-outs" during the summer
months to keep the grid from crashing
for decades. I remember them doing
that back in the late 1970s and early
1980s when I was there, and the prac-
tice is still prevalent. Not too many
years ago (and not for the first time)
Californians had to suffer through
rolling blackouts to keep the grid stable.
Just a few weeks ago it was reported
that California was once again enact-
ing these measures. Remember, no new
generating or distribution expansion,
courtesy of environmentalists.
Many of you remember the Great
East Coast Blackout a few years ago.
One station in the grid tripped out and
caused a cascade effect that left millions
of people in two countries without
power. We discovered that the system
had been at capacity for years, and that
there was no backup or fail safe in the
event of a problem. Again, thank the
environmentalists.
Nuclear power is such a reviled
subject among environmentalists that
any mention of it elicits howls of pro-
test and incomprehensible arguments.
Incomprehensible because the U.S. has
a little over 100 nuclear plants that
provides a small fraction of our power.
France, that Liberal sweetheart, has 59
plants that supply 75 percent of their
power needs. Little Japan by itself has
53. If they have been built safely there,
why are they being blocked here?
We hear and read stories every year
about how some old, poor, sick person
or group of people has died from the
heat or cold because they couldn't
afford to pay for oil, natural gas, or elec-
tricity. They can't afford them because
the price is too high. The price is too
high because the supply is low. The
supply is low because for 40 plus years
environmental obstructionists have
blocked exploration and progress. How
many people have died from exposure
as a direct result of environmentalist's
actions?
Here's a simple economic truth:
when demand for a commodity remains
the same or increases, and the supply
decreases or is intentionally, artificially
restricted, the more that commodity
will cost.
The economies of the world run
on electricity and fossil fuels. The cost
of almost everything we use, drink,
wear, eat, your college tuition, your
phone, your game system and even the
paycheck you receive depends on oil in
some way. If we cannot develop known
supplies of oil, or use some existing
alternatives such as coal and nuclear
power, the price of everything will
continue to increase. If the cost of basic
needs increases because we are being
forced to ignore available resources,
people with limited means (the poor)
will have to spend more just to survive
and will never be able to lift themselves
out of poverty.
When is enough too much? How
many more people have to die because
of environmentalist intransigence?
The next time you fill up your car,
the next time you can't go somewhere
because you can't afford the gas, the
next time your money doesn't go as
far as it did the month before, the next
time you read about someone dying
from exposure because they cannot
afford heat or AC, raise your eyes to the
sky and yell as loud as you can:
"Thank you, environmentalists
In My Opinion
Rita and U.S. energy supply: Comes yet another warning
(KRT) �Just as the oil industry was
beginning to recover from Hurricane
Katrina, Rita is threatening the Gulf
Coast, shutting down another set of
crucial oil rigs and refineries.
Mother Nature is unmasking the
vulnerability of the U.S. energy supply
and its potential to damage the econ-
omy and national security. The prob-
lem has been brewing for years, like a
slow-moving tropical storm. Washing-
ton needs to stop ignoring the signs and
change its supply-side myopia.
Hurricane Rita is likely to spike
gas prices again, possibly worse than
Katrina. Pump prices set a national
record on Sept. 5. Even more natural
gas and oil facilities are in harm's way
this time.
One-third of U.S. refining capacity
lies between Pascagoula, Miss and
Corpus Christi, Texas. Before Katrina
hit, U.S. refineries were running near
97 percent capacity. Supply is so tight
that even a small disruption - such as
the March explosion at a BP refinery in
Texas - can fluctuate prices.
Even if the Texas refineries don't
take a direct hit from Rita, they'll need
several days to power back up after the
precautionary shutdown, assuming
they have electricity.
Congress needs to ease this eco-
nomic rollercoaster by redirecting the
United States' energy future.
As usual, decision-makers see "more
oil" as the answer to U.S. energy woes.
They want to drill in Alaska's Arctic
National Wildlife Refuge or in deepwa-
ter offshore rigs.
Even if more crude became avail-
able - domestic or imported - U.S. refin-
eries would be hard-pressed to process
it. Although the industry has expanded
existing plants, no new refinery has
been built in 30 years, partly because
of regulatory hurdles and local siting
opposition. Congress should pass pend-
ing legislation to expedite permitting
and construction.
But new refineries will take years
to come online. In the meantime, con-
sumers need help cutting demand.
Ford Motor Cos announcement
Wednesday that it intends to offer
more gas-electric hybrid models is a
step in the right direction that other
car makers should follow.
However, Ford's hybrid goal -
250,000 by 2010 -simply matches what
Toyota expects to make this year. U.S.
automakers will need a bigger push to
abandon their gas-guzzler ways, just as
they did to add seat belts and air bags.
Congress should update fleet fuel-
economy standards, largely unchanged
since 1985. With existing technology
and without compromising safety,
automakers can do better than Presi-
dent Bush's feeble proposal to nudge
SUV gas mileage up 1.5 miles over a
few years.
Reps. Edward Markey, D-Mass and
Sherwood Boehlert, R-N.Y suggest a
gradual increase from 27.5 to 33 miles
per gallon over 10 years. That could
save 2.6 million barrels of oil a day
by 2025.
Consumers need to step up, too.
While demanding investigations into
price gouging and oil company profits,
Americans aren't conserving fuel by
reducing their driving miles.
The recent hurricanes are a harsh
lesson that America's energy habits
need to change - on a national and
individual level.
Pirate Rant
I graduated in May, got a job in
Raleigh. The News and Observer
doesn't have Pirate Rants. This sucks.
I want to commend the person from
Thursday's Pirate Rant who used the
term "black This person was cor-
rect, if you're not from Africa, you're
NOT African-American.
Everyone was thinking it, Wolf Blitzer
just had the balls to let it slip out.
To the group that sits on the steps
outside of Tyler and smokes all day
and night! DO SOMETHING WITH
YOUR LIFE! Get off your butt and
go walk around the block, we all
know you need it! Yes you, the girl
who stares at me when I'm walking
my girlfriend home at night! The
rule is you are not allowed to smoke
10-feet from the door.
Help! Its midnight I'm downtown
and I just realized I don't have my
sunglasses. What do I do? Sincerely,
Every frat guy on campus
When will the White House come
clean about the CIA leak that jeopar-
dized national security and put our
troops in danger? Fire Karl Rove. And
do some research Tony McKee.
I'm convinced that most conser-
vatives will never blame Bush for
anything! He's the perfect president
right? My gosh no one ever said
that Bush was responsible for Hur-
ricanes, or making people leave. But
he does have a "duty" to "respond"
when there is a state emergency!
1 dropped my phone in the toilet
what do I do?
To people that think they must
nap in order to get through the
day, or people that nap every day:
There are no naps in the working '
world, and some of us have to
make it through an entire day of
class with no nap, and then go to
work at night and come back to do
homework. Grow up some and get
some sleep at night.
I love how all ECU teachers relate
all classroom materials to alco-
hol and drugs. Gosh I love ECU.
It's the 1 Card, not the OneCard or
the OneStop Card.
TEC - where are your crossword
puzzles? They were here at the
beginning of the semester - did they
transfer to another university? Every
time I see a new edition of TEC, I
get excited, but I search through
its pages in vain. Please stop build-
ing me up, only to let me down.
Hey guy in my policy class that
always walks in and says "oh
$@ we have a quiz today?"
Why don't you look at the syl-
labus occasionally or drop out?
Roommates are just that - someone
to share a place with. So stop eating
my food!
Rugby is a fast-paced and brutal
sport. Add females and you have
a great way to spend a Saturday
afternoon. More people should
come out and watch these ladies in
action, their intensity and heart is
really something to see.
To the professors that keep students
"just one more minute" after class
is over, you're making us miss the
buses that only run every 30 min-
utes. So, in effect, you're wasting
an extra 31 minutes of our day,
not one minute. Please stop as
we have a life outside of your class
and things we need to get done.
To All: Stop being racist Youallsuck.
I didn't have to do a strip tease to
join a social group. So, I guess you
are right, Miss Sorority girl, we are
jealous of you.
To the professor that called stu-
dents monkeys the other day in a
pirate rant: You guys are the ones
that make us this crazy. We have
to release somehow.
Congratulations to Sara Spuller, the
new Junior Class President.
Jennifer Hobbs' "Random Column"
from last week was a refreshing
change from the "Our View" column.
Let's make that permanent.
To the girls at ECU - it must really
suck to be like everyone else. You
ALL look the same: fake blond hair,
same clothes, same shoes, etc. Why
don't you start being yourself?
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is an
anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editorstheeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right to
edit opinions for content and brevity.

I
I





tudent Life
�.
9-27-05
Page A4 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
TUESDAY September 27, 200�
Picks of the Week
Music:
Coheed & Cambria - Good J
I'm Burning Star IV, Volume
From Fear Through the Eyes of
Madness
If you think the album title is long, you'll
definitely get your money's worth with
the handful of six and seven minute
songs contained within Coheed's
latest release. This album is no
sophomore slump for these New York
rockers. With crazy time signatures,
talented guitar riffs and Claudio
Sanchez's recognizable voice, not
to mention a backing orchestra on a
few tracks, this album really delivers.
Enjoy banging your head to their
current single "Welcome Home" and
mellow out to "Always and Never
Movies:
'Happy Gllmore'
Watch as Happy Gilmore (Adam
Sandier) tries to raise money to buy his
Grandmother's repossessed house
back by becoming a professional
golfer. With the help of his coach,
Chubbs (Cart Weathers), Happy takes
on the best golfers of the PGA tour.
Funniest part of the movie - watch as
Happy and Bob Barker get into a fist
fight. The price is wrong Bob
Television:
'Boston Legal' Tuesday at 10 p.m.
ABC
Step into the office of Crane, Poole
& Schmidt for a second season
of justice and insanity. With an
Emmy winning cast of James Spader,
William Shatnerand Candace Bergen
you'll witness life behind the scenes
of the courtroom (however odd it may
be). Can law partner Shirley Schmidt
(Bergen) really bring order to the
office? Tune in to see.
Books:
'AH the President's Men' - Bob
Woodward and Carl Bernstein
An excellent book for all of you history
buffs out there. Travel back a few
decades into the life of Woodward
and Bernstein, two Washington Post
reporters who helped to uncover and
dig deeper into the Watergate scandal.
Read through their encounters with
"Deep Throat" and the adversity they
face trying to publish their revealing
articles. For those who have been
living under a rock, this is a true story.
Names In the News:
"DASTOr WEDDING
Yet another event we're destined to
remember for the rest of our lives: The
phenomenon that is Dashton was
made official Saturday night. Reports
are sketchy, but indicate that would
mean Ashton Kutcher, 27, must stop
calling Demi Moore, 42, "ma While
Dashton reps have not confirmed
any matrimony, both People mag
and Us Weekly say the couple's Los
Angeles-area wedding was attended
by about 100 of their friends. However,
for reasons unknown, the name of
only one such friend is so far known:
Lucy Liu. Family members included
Demi's ex Bruce Willis and their three
daughters. Ashton has become fast
friends with his stepdaughters, Rumer,
17 - Scout, 14 - and Tallulah, 11, who
refer to him as MOD, short for "My
Other Dad Ashton, best known for
his MTV prank fest, "Punk'd began
dating the "G.I. Jane" and "Striptease"
star in May 2003. This is his first foray
into married bliss and Demi's third.
(From 1980 to '84, she was married
to musician Freddie Moore.)
tIKE A VIRGIN
Steve Carell, who took his shtick from
Jon Stewart's "Daily Show" all the
way to the heights of the Hollywood
Hills and all in just one lifetime will
host the season premiere of NBC's
"Saturday Night Live" this weekend.
The "40-Year-Old Virgin" star will
share the glory with musical guest
Kanye West.
NOT SO BLESSED
Yep, it's true: "Sopranos" star Jamie-
Lynn DiScala, formerly Sigler, and
her hubby, A.J. DiScala, have split
up after two years of marriage. A.J.
confirms the news to the New York
Daily News, adding there may be
hope for reconciliation after all, but
as of now, "it's a separation A.J. said
rumors the couple were fighting over
his alleged drinking and gambling
transgressions are totally false.
RELIEF EFFORTS
As part of its New Yorker Festival,
New Yorker magazine sponsored
a concert Saturday night in the Big
Apple to benefit Hurricane Katrina
relief efforts. Event tickets cost from
$50 to $250 (all proceeds are to go
to the American Red Cross), and
afforded consumers of the arts a
smorgasbord of Nobel Pulitzer
Grammy- and Oscar-winning culture-
makers including zydeco music, Toni
Morrison, Lou Reed, Elvis Costello,
Kevin Kline, Richard Ford, Willem
Dafoe and Woody Allen.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing
Arts Series season opens with class
Dallas Brass is participating in the "Music in the Schools" project.
Dallas Brass at Wright
Auditorium
AMANDA WINAR
STAFF WHITER
Schoolwork and frequent
tests now loom over the heads
c? students and professors, a
sign that the fall semester is
well underway. Life can be over-
whelming at times, which is part
of the reason why Cultural Out-
reach Director Carol Woodruff
said, "It's time to get this show
on the road in reference to the
200S-2006 S. Rudolph Alexander
Performing Arts Series. Woodruff
has coordinated for some top
performances to grace Greenville
with their presence this upcom-
ing season, and should provide
an enjoyable outlet for anyone
who is stressed, overworked or
simply looking for a great time.
Dallas Brass, a well-known
brass sextet, will kick off the
series Wednesday, Sept. 28 at
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
The sextet features horn player
Chris Castellanos, who has
mixed tunes with talents like
Frank Sinatra, Wayne Newton
and Charlotte Church - trum-
pet players Charles Lazarus and
Brian Neal - tuba player and
founding member John Wasson
who acts as principal composer
and artistic director - trombone
player Michael Levine and per-
cussionist Walter White who
has performed throughout the
United States and Europe. The
sextet's musical performances
include pieces that stem from
folk, ragtime, Tin Pan Alley and
jazz. Woodruff said the perfor-
mance will be a lively and inter-
active tribute to American music
which includes their selections
of popular, patriotic and also
concert pieces.
Dallas Brass is also coming to
Greenville as part of the "Music
in the Schools" project, and
will lead a residency clinic for
100 selected Pitt County School
students during their stay in east-
Group members Charles Lazarus and Brian Neal play trumpets, John Wasson, group founder on the
tuba, Michael Lavine on trombone, Walter White with percussion and Chris Castellanos playing horns.
em North Carolina. The clinic
will not only enable students to
receive tips on how to become
better musicians, but they also
will learn a specialized breathing
technique specific to Dallas Brass,
and practice their set pieces with
the sextet.
"I am so excited about this
event. The students will be sit-
ting in the auditorium with their
instruments in their lap during
the performance. When Dallas
Brass has concluded, the students
will be invited on stage to do the
last selection with the sextet. It
should be a fun event for all ages
said Woodruff.
Dallas Brass says they designed
the project "to be a musical inspi-
ration for the students and their
families to help motivate
students to increase their musi-
cal involvement, practice harder,
strive to excel and to realize the
lifelong enjoyment and satisfac-
tion that being involved in music
can provide as was relayed by
an International Press Release.
The sextet has been around
since Levine founded it in 1983,
and has collaborated with the
Cincinnati Pops, New York Pops
and the Philly Pops. Dallas Brass
has performed in Carnegie Hall,
the John F. Kennedy Center in
Washington, DC and has toured
in Europe and the Far East.
The ensemble has released five
recordings, including Debut Dallas
Brass II, A Merry Christmas with
Brass, Windborne and Nutcracker.
"This is a great group to open
up our season with. They come
from a highly successful back-
ground, which shows through
see BRASS page A5
A day in life of: SGA President M. Cole Jones
M. Cole Jones handling
his presidential duties
TOMEKA STEELE
SENIOR WRITER
SGA President Jones finds ways to show his Pirate Pride everyday.
We never stop to think of all
the work the Student Govern-
ment Association does for the
student body. We merely go
about our day, attending classes,
hanging out in the mall never
thinking about what SGA truly
does for us.
M. Cole Jones is the 2005-
2006 SGA president. He was
the immediate past president of
Student Athlete Advisory Coun-
cil and is the Assistant District
Director of the North Carolina
chapters of Alpha Phi Alpha Fra-
ternity, Inc.
It must be a busy job being
SGA president and a student as
well. This was proven when it
took me two days just to get in
contact with this busy man. .
Jones has an overpowering goal
orientated presence and by just
speaking to him one can see he is
destined for great things. It's no
surprise that a day in his shoes is
hectic but fulfilling.
TEC: So Mr. Jones what is a
typical day like for you?
M. Cole Jones: A typical
day for me begins with preparing
myself for the activities of the
upcoming day. I have to always be
on my toes in case the schedule
changes. There are often times
emergency meetings and I have
to be alert and expect anything.
I have to be aware of everything
that's going on. I come into my
office three to four times a week
for two hours just to prepare for
events and meetings and do the
work of SGA. I have to prepare
forms and look at what needs
improvement on campus and
what needs to be implemented.
It's real work but I am excited
about my job as SGA president.
TEC: How do you manage
being a student and SGA
president and still have time
to engage in a social a life?
M. Cole Jones: Being SGA
president can be an overwhelm-
ing full-time job if I'm not care-
ful. The key to being a successful
president is ultimately having
excellent time management
skills. I am still a student. If I
didn't practice time manage-
ment I couldn't be an effective
president. I know I cannot do it
all. I have to weigh out the issues
and pick and choose where my
attention goes and what other
things can be delegated to other
officers of SGA.
TEC: So it's safe to say that
you are a pretty busy man?
M. Cole Jones: I am
extremely busy. I have to con-
stantly check myself and my
schedule in order to maintain a
relationship with my family and
my significant other. I have to
make sure I dedicate equal time
to them as much as I do to SGA.
Like I said, there's only so much I
can do. I focus on what's needed.
I focus on what's primary and
secondary but each student issue
is treated as an important issue.
TEC: Do you see any prob-
lems within SGA?
M. Cole Jones: In the past,
there have been problems with
effective transition of leadership.
It doesn't work if one school year
things are going toward one
direction and then the next term
of officers come in and start from
scratch all over again. That's not
the way to make progress. So
we've started to keep files and
document all the things we've
done this year so when new offi-
cers are elected they can have a
template, something concrete
to look at and follow. From this
they will be able to see where SGA
should go from that point.
TEC: As SGA president do
you have to attend at least one
see JONES page A5
Restaurant Review: Chico's Mexican Restaurant
The whole enchilada
EMILY JORDAN
STAFF WRITER
If you're craving Mexican
food with an American touch,
then Chico's is the place to go.
Located downtown on Cotanche
Street, It's just a hop, skip and a
jump from west campus. From
polio quesero to buffalo wings,
Chico's offers dishes for all tastes.
And you don't have to drain your
wallet for a good meal.
Upon entering the restaurant
you are immediately greeted by
the hostess and even servers
passing by. You have a choice
of three places that you may sit
- the bar, the patio or the main
dining room. The bar is a popular
hangout for college students as
the restaurant is near campus and
the downtown nightlife. They
offer various kinds of beers from
domestic to Mexican imports. If
you've never tried their margarl-
tas, make that a must next time
you visit Chico's, you won't regret
it. And of course you can order
just about any kind of liquor
drink you can think of. Specials
are offered daily. One thing to
be aware of is that Chico's is very
dedicated to not allowing under-
age drinking. Your ID will be
checked when you order a drink
and if the server or bartender has
a question about its authenticity,
they can refuse service.
Open seasonally, the patio
is a nice place to eat, relax and
get some fresh air. The main
dining room is a large room to
the right of the entrance and
the bar. It is a fairly large room
with a quasi-authentic Mexican
decor. The walls are adorned
with colorful murals depicting
Mexican themed scenes. Various
shaped piftatas hang from the
ceiling. Green plants fill in the
empty spaces, adding warmth to
the room. The lighting is not too
dark, nor too bright. And over a
hot plate of fajitas you can quietly
jam to oldies music. The overall
ambiance of the main dining
room is an inviting Mexican
themed American restaurant.
Each table is served with
complimentary chips and salsa
before you order your meal. The
menu is changed frequently
which helps the restaurant stay
exciting. A new menu will be
offered beginning Wednesday,
Sept. 28, and will feature some
new dishes as well as some of
their standard dishes, like faji-
tas. Their most popular dishes
are fajitas, polio quesero, que-
sadlllas and the taco salad. The
menu caters to a wide variety of
tastes. For the non-Mexican food
eaters, Chico's offers foods like
chicken fingers, buffalo wings,
salads, sandwiches and the best
cheeseburger's in Greenville. And
for the Mexican food enthusiasts,
you can choose from chicken,
beef, pork, seafood and vegetable
dishes. Their meal portions are
pretty large - some would call
EVI
t
s
�-t
Winnt
Thursd
see CHICO'S page 45 Chico's is a popular spot for students to hang out and enjoy a meal.
I





C
9-27-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � FEATURES
PAGE A5
OPEN 24 hours Fridays & Saturdays
GhlCO S from page A4 BfdSS from page A4
I HO

TXiJLJL
COLLEGE NIGHT
EVERY TUESDAY & THURSDAY
50 OFF ENTREES
Fr
with drink purchase
and college ID
roro 3 p.m. - 12 a.m.
bbbhiMbV
C5ft.aHD OpertiNc
Total Kraz
Surf and Skate Shop
For your surf & skate needs and
more we have:
Decks
Wheels
Trucks
Bearings
Completes
Clothes
Swords & Knives
Surfboards(Arriving soon!)
Beach jewelry
Seashell earrings & necklaces
Stickers.etc.
STtDEMT'S fctCHVfe fc OFF
WlTvl Tjte cJD &. STUDEMT ID
OFTfeR. EXPIRE OCT. 31. 2oo5
them "truck-driver portions
meaning that you get more bang
for your buck. So don't let your
eyes order for your stomach.
The average dish price is
between six and eight dollars.
Guys you don't have to take on
a fifth job to take your girl out,
a couple can easily eat for under
30 dollars.
Chico's offers student spe-
cials as well. If you've hung on
to your U.B.E supersaver card,
you can get one free combina-
tion dish with the purchase of
one combination and any two
beverages. You can also get one
free appetizer with the purchase
of any appetizer and any two
beverages. Chico's also spon-
sors donations and giveaways
throughout the year.
The quality of service is
friendly, helpful, polite and
prompt. The quality of the
food is fresh, hot and tasty.
And with a sanitary rate of
96.S, you know that you can
trust the quality of Chico's.
Chico's of Greenville has
been in business for nearly 23
years and is owned locally. There
are also other Chico's locations
in Cary, Rocky Mount and Win-
terville, each of these being indi-
vidually owned as well.
A vital part of the downtown
restaurant scene, Chico's is a
great place for a quick bite to eat
or an enjoyable time at the bar
with friends without the hassle of
breaking your bank. So if you live
on central or west campus, it's
only a short hike to Chico's. And
for those of you that don't live on
campus, downtown is not that
far of a drive from anywhere in
Greenville. It's worth the trip.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
' ARE YOU x
their music. Their performances
are always full of high energy and
friendly banter with the audience
to keep it lively Woodruff said.
Now in its 43rd season, the
S. Rudolph Alexander Perform-
ing Arts Series presents a variety
of renowned performers during
this 2005-2006 season, includ-
ing Opera Verdi Europa's perfor-
mance of Verdi's Macbeth and the
dance company PilobolusToo.
Tickets for Dallas Brass are
now available at the Central
Ticket Office. Individual tickets
are $10 for students, $13 for
youth, $24 for faculty and staff
and $27 for the public. Groups of
15 or more may purchase tickets
at the following prices: $9 for
students, $13 for youth, $24 for
faculty and staff and $24 for the
public. Groups are awarded one
extra ticket for every 20 people.
Concert information is avail-
able at Ecuarts.com, or by calling
the Central Ticket Office at 328-
4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS. If you
are interested in buying tickets,
The Central Ticket Office is open
Monday-Friday from 9 a.m. - 6
p.m. and Saturday from 1 p.m. - 5
p.m. Additional information on g,
the Pitt County school project is ��
also available on the Web site. J
1
c
This writer can be contacted at o
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Dallas Brass tries to add new entertaining splashes of instrumental
genius to their show each year as they grow and change as a sextet.
Come by and check out
Greenville's newest Kraz!
2800 RIO St. Kastgate Plaza
NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOLD
V
www. sha reyourlif e org
1-800-355-SHARE
I CoaUton w Organ A IfcM Donated
J0n6S from page A4
of every student organization's
events?
M. Cple Jones: I try to
attend as many events as my
schedule allows but what we are
starting to do now is send SGA
representatives to at least one
meeting of every organization we
provide money and funding to
each year. That way the students
in those organizations can voice
their concerns directly to an SGA
representative. We are working
on getting that started.
TEC: What is the magic
formula to getting things done
within SGA?
M. Cole Jones: The key is to
have a strong relationship with
the SGA members and officers. To
get things done we have to have
a good relationship with one
another. I have to have a rapport
with every member. SGA was not
this way in the past and I think
it hurt the leadership. There are
always obstacles but I try not to
get discouraged and I pray.
TEC: So why did you want to
become SGA president?
M. Cole Jones: I decided to
run because there was a need for
a dynamic leader and that person
was me. The image of SGA was
deteriorating and it needed to be
brought back to a dignified state.
I feel that I have what it takes to
get things moving and get the
issues on campus solved.
TEC: How do you keep up
with the all the issues on campus
and all the student concerns?
M. Cole Jones: I have to
familiarize myself with all the
issues of the university. I have to
talk to students and I regularly
read The East Carolinian to find
out what are the common interest
and concerns of the students.
TEC: What is it that you want
students to know about you are
your position as SGA president?
M. Cole Jones: I want every-
one to understand that SGA is not
a dictatorship. Students have to
remember that we didn't ask to
do these jobs - we volunteered
our services to serve the needs
of the students. SGA officers and
I were sworn in to represent the
student body. It would be a dis-
service to do this paid job and
not serve the needs of the stu-
dents. At the end of the day, the
welfare of each student is what
really matters not those that are
in the positions of leadership.
Next time you are walking
around campus and see some
kind of helpful change, think
about how the hard work of SGA
helped to create it.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com
State Farm Student Sideline Pass
Sign up today and you
and a friend could win
tho opportunity to:
Run out of the tunnel
with the football team
Watch the game from
the sidelines
Receive a t-shirt
Receive Videoboard &
PA recognition
Winners will be chosen each
Thursday before a home game.
Mack Beale
Greenville, NC
252-756-7280
Mauri Evans
Washington, NC
252-946-5114
Bill McDonald
Greenville, NC
252-752-6680
Polly Piland
Greenville, NC
252-756-8886
Bernice Pitt
Tarboro, NC
252-823-3400
Barbara Shelly
Wilson, NC
252-291-4625





")
te
Page A6 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328,6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY September 27, 2005
Carolina trims four
from roster as season nears
The Carolina Hurricanes trimmed
their roster Monday by sending
four players to its minor-league
affiliate in Lowell. Defenseman
Bruno St. Jacques and forwards
Colin Forbes, Dave Gove and
Gordie Dwyer joined the Lowell
Lock Monsters of the American
Hockey League as the team
began training camp Monday.
The moves leave Carolina with
26 players on their roster as they
prepare this week for their final
two preseason games. Carolina
opens the regular season Oct. 5
at Tampa Bay. St. Jacques had
two goals and 12 assists in 68
games last season with Lowell.
He played in 35 games with
Carolina in 2003-04 after making
the team out of training camp.
Forbes was Lowell's third-highest
scorer last year with 27 goals
and 37 assists in 76 games. He
has played in 302 NHL games
with Philadelphia, Tampa Bay,
the New York Rangers, Ottawa
and Washington, collecting 33
goals, 28 assists and 211 penalty
minutes. Gove had 13 goals
and 18 assists last season with
Providence of the AHL. Dwyer
had two goals, seven assists and
a team-high 183 penalty minutes
last year with Lowell. He has five
assists and 394 penalty minutes
in 108 NHL games.
Bills lose Spikes for
season
Buffalo Bills Pro Bowl linebacker
Takeo Spikes will miss the
rest of the season with a torn
right Achilles' tendon. The Bills
announced the news Monday
a day after Spikes was hurt in a
22-16 loss to Atlanta. The injury
is a significant blow to a veteran
defense being counted on to
relieve the pressure on first-year
starting quarterback J.P Losman.
Angelo Crowell will replace Spikes.
Buffalo's defense has struggled
even with Spikes healthy, allowing
a combined 721 yards in its past
two games, including a 19-3 loss
at Tampa Bay on Sept 18. Spikes
was hurt in the second quarter
pressuring quarterback Michael
Vick. It's unclear what happened
on the play, but Spikes was left
lying face down on the field a
few feet in front of Vick, who had
overthrown receiver Roddy White.
Spikes slammed his helmet to
the ground when he rolled over
and then grimaced as he tried to
kneel. He required help getting to
the sideline, unable to place much
weight on his right foot. He was in
tears when he was carted to the
training room.
Bolllnger to start for Jets
Third-string quarterback Brooks
Bollinger is expected to start
for the New York Jets against
Baltimore after both starter Chad
Pennington and backup Jay
Fiedler injured their shoulders
Sunday Pennington and Fiedler
were scheduled to undergo
MRI exams Monday, but coach
Herman Edwards said the results
wouldn't be known until today.
Pennington, who had offseason
surgery to repair a torn rotator
cuff in his right shoulder, was
sacked on consecutive plays
during the Jets' first series of
the second half of their 26-20
overtime loss to Jacksonville.
On third-and-11, Pennington was
taken down by Bobby McCray
and the quarterback fumbled
for the second straight down
and recovered, but his shoulder
was injured on the play. Fiedler
came in, but was hit while
completing a 16-yard pass to
Justin McCareins - his sixth play
in place of Pennington - with
13:09 left in the fourth quarter.
Pennington came back to lead
the Jets on two scoring drives,
both capped by field goals, but
clearly was hurting. Bollinger, in
his third season with the Jets out
of Wisconsin, has appeared in just
one NFL game, last year against
Arizona. He replaced an injured
Quincy Carter in the Jets' 13-3 win
and was 5-of-9 for 60 yards.
Wizards second-rounder
Blatche shot In carjacking
Washington Wizards rookie
forward Andray Blatche was shot
during an attempted carjacking
and remained hospitalized on
Monday. Blatche's mother, Angela
Oliver, told the Post-Standard of
Syracuse, New York that her 19-
year-old son was shot once in the
chest while riding in a car near his
home in Alexandria, Virginia but
that the bullet did not hit any vital
organs. He is being treated at Inova
Fairfax Hospital, in Fairfax Virginia.
Pirates come up short in Morgantown
Gridiron Bucs run out of
time in fourth quarter
ERIC QILMORE
SENIOR WRITER
On paper, West Virginia was
supposed to embarrass ECU with
their lethal running attack. But
when time expired, the Moun-
taineers barely survived their
own embarrassment.
The Pirates' upset bid came
up just short in a 20-15 loss to
WVU in Morgantown, W. Va. on
Saturday afternoon. Luckily for
WVU, ECU only notched nine
points out of their first four trips
inside their red zone
"It's frustrating said first-
year Head Coach Skip Holtz.
"It's disappointing. It's pain-
ful to be where we are right now
with our 1-2 record. In the
locker room after the game, there
wasn't a lot of smiles. We've got
to a point where we can close
the door. We had our opportu-
nities
Trailing by five with less than
four minutes remaining, ECU
had chances two drives to take
the lead. On the first drive, ECU
went three-and-out pinned deep
in their territory. The Pirates (1-2)
were given another chance when
the defense stopped WVU (4-0)
on a fourth-and-short with 20
seconds remaining. With no time
outs, quarterback James Pinkney
couldn't advance the ball past the
ECU 46. The junior was sacked as
time expired.
Chances are the one thing
ECU hasn't had many times in
the previous two seasons. In
the 2004 season opener against
WVU, Kay-Jay Harris set a Big
East record for single-game rush-
ing with 337 yards.
But on Saturday, ECU stifled
WVU's renowned running attack
for only 127 yards, a 280 yard
improvement from Wake Forest.
Chris Moore tormented WVU
for 12 tackles including three
for loss.
"We moved our defensive line
around a bit Holtz said.
"I was pleased with the way
we played defensively
Touting the No. 1 pass defense
coming into the game, ECU
picked off three WVU passes.
Cornerbacks Erode Jean and
Kasey Ross notched their first
interceptions of the season.
Safety Zach Baker is second in
the nation with three picks in
three games.
Early on, WVU had the upper
hand. After a Pinkney fumble on
the opening possession, WVU
quarterback Adam Bednarik hit
Darius Reynaud on a 15-yard
strike. After the teams traded pos-
sessions, a special teams blunder
proved costly.
Antonio Lewis returned a
Ryan Dougherty punt 76 yards
in the second quarter. It was the
second straight year that a Moun-
taineer had returned a punt on
ECU for 76 yards. It was also the
third straight game that a special
teams mistake had directly led to
opponent's points.
"We have to sure some things
up Holtz said.
"We have to sit down and
look at one our personnel and
two, our scheme
Wake stretched their lead to
20-3 when backup quarterback
Pat White hit Brandon Myles for
10-yards on a post route. The 11-
play drive in the second quarter
was the last time WVU would
score.
ECU kicker Robert Lee con-
tinued his perfect streafc on the
season with 22, 25 and 35-yard
field goals. Lee is 6-of-6 on field
goals and 7-of-7 on PATs.
"Offensively, there were a lot
of good things Holtz said.
"Unfortunately, we didn't do
them all at the same time
Pinkney was pulled for a series
in the second quarter in favor of
backup Kort Shankweiler. Pinkney
finished 20-of-33 for 204 yards.
The Delray Beach, Fla. native
often found his favorite receiver,
but missed check-down reads.
"James is in his fourth offense
in four years Holtz said.
"We've got to get him to
develop fundamentally with his
speed and his mind in his read
progressions going from one to
the other. He didn't have one of
his stronger days
Pinkney passed often to Aun-
drae Allison, who continued his
assault on opposing defenses.
Allison finished with 10 catches
for 123 yards and a touchdown.
Currently, the junior wideout
is No. 2 nationally in receiving
yards averaging 148 yards per
game.
ECU will try to bounce bay
when they open conference play
against Southern Mississippi (1-1)
inside Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium on
Oct. 1 at 6 p.m. The second home
game will mark High School
Band Day and Military Apprecia-
tion Day.
"We continue to be a work in
progress the first-year coach said.
"When we can put our offense
together against Wake Forest,
our defense together against
West Virginia and our special
teams together from Duke, we're
going to be a heck of a football
team
a
This writer can be contacted at "
sports@theeas tcarolinian.com.
Chris Johnson is stopped for no gain by West Virginia defensive back Eric Wicks.
Lady Pirates win physical battle with St. Joe's Diratpc f jnht to -
tie at High Point
The Lady Pirates will have a double dose of C-USA opponents this weekend against Rice and UH.
Women's Soccer improves to 4-6, will
start C-USA play this week
JOSH FERNANDEZ
STAFF WRITER
It could have been the ninety-degree tem-
perature. It also could have been the tough loss
last week against Furman. But for two teams that
have never even met on the field, there was a fire
burning in both the St. Joseph's Hawks (4-5-1) and
the ECU Lady Pirates (4-6) soccer teams.
What started off as a typical match soon trans-
formed into a battle when a Hawks' penalty occurred
close to the St. Joe's goal. A free kick by ECU forward
Allison Howell ended up in the box and was imme-
diately put in the net by midfielder Jami Dickerson.
"Ali (Howell) and our other outside midfield-
ers did a great job finding players for goal oppor-
tunities said Dickerson.
"We wanted to beat them with fitness as well
as physicality. I think we did both of those well
today in the game
After the first blood was drawn, St.joe's began
to collapse. Momentum was in ECU'S favor as the
Lady Pirates managed to keep the ball on the St.
Joe's side of the field for most of the game.
"Especially at the end of the first half, we could
tell that St.joe's was wearing down Dickerson said.
But before then first half came to a close, team
captain Rachel Hils got tangled up with Hawks
goal keeper Andie Hinshaw. This resulted in a foul
on Hinshaw and a Lady Pirate penalty kick. Fresh-
man Madison Keller did the honors and hammered
it home for the second ECU goal of the game.
The third and final Lady Pirate goal saw the
duo of Dickerson and Howell connect once again
in the 63rd minute, as Dickerson tallied her
second goal of the afternoon, putting ECU at an
imposing three-goal lead.
The physical play continued as players on
both squads were throwing their bodies around
like they were in the NCAA national champion-
ship match, giving all their effort for a victory.
"There is chemistry all over the field and that is
making a big difference in our games Dickerson said.
"We plan to keep this up as we head into
Conference USA play
St. Joes did manage to get on the board with
only two minutes remaining as junior Kaiti
McCaffrey put one by freshman goal keeper
Amber Campbell. However, the goal was over-
shadowed by the dominating performance put
on by the Lady Pirates.
"There is so much young talent on this team.
Every game, each player is continuing to improve
said all-time ECU goal-scorer Meghan McCallion.
"As you can see, everyone on the team is
capable of scoring, whether (she's) a defender,
midfielder or forward
The Lady Pirates head to Houston this
weekend to begin C-USA play, first facing Rice
on Sept. 30, and then Houston on Oct. 2. They
will be back in Greenville to face second-place
Memphis on Oct. 7.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
SID - ECU senior Calvin
Simon netted a pair of goals
Saturday night as the Pirates
and High Point battled to a 3-3
double overtime tie at Albion
Millis Stadium.
ECU (0-6-1) scored the first
goal of the match when Matt
Kowaleski (Richmond, Va.)
caught the deflection off Panther
goalkeeper Adam Ross to put the
Pirates up 1-0.
High Point (0-4-3) soon
answered the Pirates' goal in
the form of Dan Haywood who
bounced a direct free kick off
of an ECU defender to knot the
game at 1-1.
The Panthers pulled ahead,
2-1, in the 20th minute when
Chris Archer passed the ball to
Haywood who then broke away
from the defender to set up Cole
Atkins for goal.
In the 26th minute Simon
(Wilmington, NC) found the
back of the net off of an assist
from David Levine (Charlotte,
NC) who passed the ball over
the line of HPU defenders to
pull the Pirates even and set the
score at 2-2.
HPU's Josh Windley quickly
retaliated with a goal in the 27th
minute when he connected with
a corner kick from Atkins to send q
the Panthers into the half with
a 3-2 lead.
The second half only saw oe
goal when in the 51st minute
ECU'S Levine once again found
Simon who sent the ball into
the back of the net and set the
score at 3-3.
ECU'S Chris Hicks recorded
four saves in 110 minutes of play
in goal.
"I thought that we really
competed hard and played well
SIMON
said Interim Head Coach Chadj
I lalverson. "This was an intense
high pressure game for both
teams. Now we have to turn our
focus to conference play and get
ready for South Carolina
The Pirates will open Con-
ference USA play Sunday, Oct 2
at 1 p.m. when they host South
Carolina in Bunting Field.
Advance tickets t
on subscription a
ol student must a





9-27-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
PAGE A7
ECU tops UTEP In C-USA Opener, 3-1
December Grads, you're invited to a special Graduation Expo featuring
sales representatives and displays from a variety of vendors and campus
departments. This is also the first opportunity for December graduates
to pick up caps & gowns. Plus, you'll.find other important information
about commencement and student loan repayment, meet with representa-
tives from Student Professional Development, Registrar's Office, Rec
Center, Pirate Club, and the ECU Alumni Association.
All December graduates are encouraged to attend, visit the information
tables, register for some great door prizes, and pick up a FREE GIFT.
And, be sure to sign the "Class of 2005" banner to be used at future events!
TODAY!
10:00 ajn. - 3:00 pjn. & 5:00 pjn. - 7:00 p.m.
Rear dining area of The Wright Place - Wright Building
"rRLL GIFT for Deetmbtt graduates while supplies last, compliments of Dowdy Student Store!
Abo note: some information tables will not be available during evening hours.
7 his is the perfect time to meet with anithonzed ECU ring representative to order your class ring. The official
university commencement announcements are available at ECU-Dowelv Student Store now and during the
Graduation Expo. You may also order personalized invitations, thank you notes, diploma frames, and other
graduation items through the ECU-Dowdy Student Store, located in the Wright Building.
Thanks to our sponsors.
fastens)
www.jostens.com
Heidi Krug sets for one of her teammates.
SID - Heidi Krug tied a career-high with 66
assists and Pam Ferris led the offensive attack with
22 kills as ECU defeated UTEP, 3-1, in the Pirates'
Conference USA opener at Memorial Gym. The
Pirates, who have now won four straight, won the
first two games 30-26, the Miners won a close battle
in the third game, 34-22, before ECU sealed the
victory with a 35-33 win in the fourth game.
With the win, ECU improves to 7-4 overall
and 1-0 in C-USA play while UTEP drops to 0-2 in
conference play and 10-4 overall.
Krug matched her career-high in assists just over
a week after she set the mark against Charleston
Southern in a 3-1 win at the Enterprise Rent-A-Car
Volleyball Classic in Spartanburg, SC Sept. 19. With
her 66 assists on the match, Krug has reached the
60-dig mark on four different occasions this season.
Ferris came one kill short of tying her career-high
of 23 kills that she set in the season opener at home
against William & Mary. In addition to Ferris, three
other Pirates recorded double-digit kills with Jaime
Bevan, Erica Wilson and Mignon Dubenion all tal-
lying 14 on the day. Dubenion also came within a
kill of tying her career-best kill mark that she set
on two occasions last season.
Ferris, Katie Jannusch and Trish Monroe all
finished with 12 digs to lead the Pirate defense
that finished with 69 digs to UTEP's 52. With her
22 kills and 12 digs, Ferris now has seven double-
doubles this season and four in as many matches.
Bevan picked up six block assists to lead ECU's
defensive effort at the net while Dubenion picked
up a solo block and four block assists of her own.
Kari Stacey led UTEP with 20 kills while Brooke
Peugh and Christie Murphy contributed for the
Miners with 19 and 13 kills respectively. Setter
Jaymie Swift tallied 52 assists while Brittany Stow-
ers led the UTEP defense with 19 digs. Peugh and
Heather Brisnahan each picked up four block assists
to lead the Minors.
ECU will remain on the road this week with
a match at Campbell, Tuesday, Sept. 27 at 7 p.m.
before facing C-USA foe Marshall twice next week-
end. The Pirates will play in Huntington against
the Thundering Herd on Friday, Sept. 30 at 7 p.m.
before finally returning home after a 12-match
road trip to host Marshall in Minges Coliseum
Sunday, Oct. 2 at 1 p.m.
FBI investigating racist hate mail
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores a��
www.studentstores.ecu.edu www.herffj0nes.comcolle9e
Wright Building � 328-6731 � 1-877-499-TEXT
School Rings inidnntion Announcements
(AP) � Yankees star Derek
Jeter has received a threatening
letter reportedly warning him
to stop dating white women or
"he'll be shot or set on fire
FBI special agent Scott
Wilson, speaking by phone
from Cleveland, confirmed the
bureau's probe Monday, saying
"we have an ongoing open inves-
tigation into racially threatening
letters to Jeter and others across
the country He declined to
comment further.
The New York Police Depart-
ment has also investigated the
matter.
The Daily News reported
Monday that the hate mail to
the Yankees' 31-year-old cap-
tain called him a "traitor to his
race" for dating white women. It
warned him "to stop or he'll be
shot or set on fire the News said.
The Daily News reported that
others received similar threats,
including U.S. Supreme Court
Justice Clarence Thomas, Miami
Dolphins defensive lineman
Jason Taylor, and the parents of
tennis star James Blake.
Jeter, picked by People maga-
zine as one of the world's most
eligible bachelors, has been
linked with models, singers,
actresses and athletes of various
racial and ethnic backgrounds in
New York's gossip columns. His
mother is white and his father
is black.
The NYPD's hate crimes unit
recently completed a four-month
investigation into the letter to
Jeter - mailed to Yankee Stadium
earlier this season, according
to Detective Brian Sessa. The
department has not made public
the investigation's outcome.
Join us for
West End Dining's
Grand Op
8 RM. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM In 200 brief years, Americans have created more
original music forms than any other nation or culture. Dallas Brass brings you the
"best of" in an exuberant showcase of folk, ragtime, Tin Pan Alley, jazz, concert
music, and more. Lighthearted narration and audience participation promise a
lively performance for all ages. As an added bonus approximately 100 middle
and high school band students will join the ensemble in a rousing grand finale.
FOR INFORMATION OR TICKETS CALL 252.328.4788, VTTY 252.328.4736,
OR 1.800.ECU.ARTS M-F 9A.M6RM SAT 1RM5RM. WWW.ECUARTS.COM
Advance tickets $27 Public, 124 ECU FacultrStatt. $13 Youth. $10 ECU Students. All tickets at the door $27. Available
on subscription at a Public average tickat price of $21. ECU 1 Card required at show tor student-priced tickets. Guest
ot student must attend with student. Discount may not apply to non-tee-payinr. student. Group rates available
I iir, ml nd pmgnm mmi un-ktip.
fit
EAST
CAHOMNA
UNIVERSITY
(?&-)
:riday, Septemoer
4:7upm -�pmJj
To celebrate this special event, ECU
Campus Dining is presenting their first
special event of the school year -
Gran Noche de Fiesta.
www.ecu.edudining





Page A8
LAK

) s
TUESDAY September 27,2005
FOR RENT
2 and 3 bedroom townhouses
available now with 1.5 to 2.5 baths,
full basement, enclosed patio, WD
Hook-ups, plenty of storage, 1800
sq. ft ECU bus route, No Pets,
752-7738.
Three Bedroom House Near
Campus $700.00 Two Bedroom
Duplex Near Campus $450.00 One
Room Efficiency Apt. Near Campus
$230.00 714-4875
For Rent 3BDR 2BA Plus Bonus
Room, Deck, Pets OK, 4 Blocks From
ECU Avail. Now $275 Per BDR Per
Month. Call 258-1810.
1st month free 2 Bedroom Duplex
Apt. located @1011 -A Brownlea Dr.
Pets ok w Deposit $595.00 month
Call 355-3248 or 714-9099
Female wanted to move into 3
bedroom townhouse at Lakeview
- Spring Forest Rd. $325month plus
13 of utilities. Cable and internet
included. Contact Shannon @ 252-
258-1328.
Two bedroom condo $500. Short
leases available. Pets OK, DW,
fireplace, WD hookup, 1.5 baths.
Available immediately. Very clean.
Call 830-9502.
For Rent - Dockside a 3BR 2BA
townhouse with Cathedral ceiling,
close to campus. $900mo. - Call
Carrett 252-258-0366
For rent: Twin Oaks townhouse,
2 BR, 1 12 bath, end unit on ECU
campus bus route. Patio, pool, WD
hook-up. $555 per month. Call 864-
982-2459 or 919-498-0520.
Walk to Campus i BR 1
Bath Duplex $650month
Includes wd, New appliances,
New carpet, celling fans in
bedrooms. Lawn maintenance
Included. Call 375 6447 to
Fireplace, Enclosed Patio, Private
End Unit, Large Yard, AC, Quiet
Neighborhood, ECU Busline,
No Pets, Deposit (Negotiable),
References. ($725Month) 756-
5222
Save your gas money for more
important things. Sign a 1 year lease
and receive 1 2 off first month's rent
at Georgetowne Apts on Cotanche,
across from ECU's Rec. Center.
757-0079
Amazing new apartment in Holly
Glen complex near PCMH! Only
one year old! $550WD, high speed
internet, water St sewer included.
Pet fee paid! 336-688-3667 Come
see it today!
One two Brs. on-site management
maintenance Central heat air 6,9,12
month leases Water Cable included
ECU bus Wireless Internet pets
dishwasher disposals pool laundry
(252) 758-4015
ROOMMATE WANTED
Female subleaser needed. Great
house, can walk -to campus. Rent
$233 13 utilities per month!
WasherDryer, Large Bar. Call Liz
252-258-5393 to view. Available
Now!
FOR SALE
Stoves, Refrigerators, WasherDryer.
Good cond. $200 for set. Will
separate. Also do repairs. Call 902-
9996, 902-4322, 355-9997.
SERVICES
Townhouse, 3 Bedroom, 2.5
Baths, Full Kitchen, WasherDryer,
Money for College The Army is
currently offering sizable bonuses
of up to $20,000. In addition to the
cash bonuses, you may qualify for
up to $70,000 for college through
the Montgomery Gl Bill and Army
College Fund. Or you could pay
back up to $65,000 of qualifying
student loans through the Army's
Loan Repayment Program. To find
out more, call 919-756-9695.
HELP WANTED
Need assistance with school work
for children ages 12 & 8. Must
have 3.2 GPA, non-smoker w
transportation. Needed afternoons,
early evenings and some weekends.
Call 752-1572.
Bartenders Wanted! $250day
potential. No experience necessary.
Training provided. Call (800) 965-
6520 ext. 202
Afternoon help needed at local
doctor's office. Must be dependable
and have good people skills. Call
756-6111.
Food Delivery Drivers wanted
for Restaurant Runners. Part-time
positions 100-200week. Perfect
for college students Some lunch
time (11a-2p) M-F and weekend
availability required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere in
Greenville when not on a delivery.
Reliable transportation a must. Call
551-3279 between 2-5 only. Sorry
Greenville Residents only.
Charlotte Orientation! CFI Pays
Practical Miles! Effective 120105
$0.05 NE Bonus Pay! Average 2004
Solo Earnings $49,950! Top Solo:
$70,526! XM Service Provided Class
A CDL Required Student Grads
Start at $0.26 Potential 1st Year
Income $42,000! 1-800-CFI-DRIVE
(800-234-3748) www.cfidrive.com
Seeking graphic designer with web
skills. Duties encompass designing
magazine and newspaper ads, as
well as web and other computer
artwork. Qualified applicants only.
Will consider part-time position for
college student. Send resume to
employment@intandem.com
Energetic and friendly individual
wanted to join a cosmetic
enhancing division of an established
dental practice. Must be spirited,
professional, outgoing. Flexible
afternoons and evenings preferred.
The ECU Media Board
welcomes applications for
Bit sniDiir
IIPllSilTiTIll
The board is seeking fulltime students interested in serving as the day student repre-
sentative on the Media Board, the 11-person board which governs the media at ECU.
The day student representative is one of nine students on the board
and is expected to attend a late afternoon meeting monthly.
For information, contact: ECU Media Board Office
205 A Self Help Center
301 S.Evans Street
Greenville, NC 27858
328-9200
Applications due Friday, October 7th at 5p.m.
rrwti Road
. nncroft Shopping Center
next to BEST BUY
(252) 321-1200
Computer
headaches?
Need parts?
Intrex has your
� Hundreds of Parts in Stock
� Networking Supplies
� Cables & Accessories
m &
� Customized PCs & Servers
� Customized Laptops
� Repairs & Upgrades
�u �
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� 9 North Carolina Locations
� 17 Years in Business
INTRGC
Computers Mode Simple
SPRING
BREAK!
Bahamas Party
n i � i�
Cruise $299
Cancun $559
Acapulco $629
iamaki, Nasuu, Panama City, Dayton From179!
RtfogniitdTtmei fof Etrwci1 C ampul Rept Needed'
SpringBreakTrav8l.com
1800-678-6386
H80
Per
Month
I Ins coupon ;iiuil For
an extra 5 on your
2nd mil till iliiii.ilii.il
Call 252-752-1572 for interview.
Get Practical! CFIPractical
Route Miles Effective 12105!
W. Memphis Orientation! $0.05
NE Bonus Pay! Average 2004
Solo Earnings $49,950! Top Solo:
$70,526! XM Service Provided Class
A CDL Required Student Crads
Start at $0.26 Potential 1st Year
Income $42,000! 1-800-CFI-DRIVE
(800-234-3748) www.cfidrive.com
OTHER
Sigma Alpha Lambda, a National
Leadership and Honors Organization
with over 50 chapters across the
country, is seeking motivated
students to assist in starting a local
chapter (3.0 CPA Required). Contact
Rob Miner, Director of Chapter
Development at rminer@salhonors.
org
Bahamas Spring Break Celebrity
Cruise! 5 Days From $299! Includes
Meals, Taxes, Entry To Exclusive
MTVu Events, Beach Parties With
Celebrities As Seen on Real World,
Road Rules! On Campus Reps
Needed! www.SpringBreakTravel.
com 1-800-678-6386
1 Spring Break Website! Low
prices guaranteed. Free Meals &
Free Drinks. Book 11 people, get
12th trip free! Group discounts for
6 www.SpringBreakDiscounts.
com or www.LeisureTours.com or
800-838-8202.
Spring Break 2006. Travel with
STS, America's 1 Student Tour
Operator to Jamaica, Cancun,
Acapulco, Bahamas, and
Florida. Now hiring on campus
reps. Call for group discounts.
InformationReservations
1 800 648 4849 or WWW.
ststravel.com.
Cancun, Acapulco, Jamaica From
$499! Travel With America's Largest
& Ethics Award Winning Spring
Break Company! Fly Scheduled
Airlines, Free Meals, Drinks, Biggest
Celebrity Parties! On-Campus
Marketing Reps Needed! www.
SpringBreakTravel.com 1-800-
678-6386
Spring Break - Early Booking
Specials - Free Meals & Drinks -
$50 Deposit - 800-234-7007 www.
endlesssummertours.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
40 Days of Purpose Bible Study.
Discover God's five main purposes
for your life. Starts Sunday, Sept.
25 at 9 AM sharp. Other small
group meeting times available.
Call office for details. Winterville
Baptist Church. Corner of Church
and Cooper Streets Winterville
756-5955 email: wintervillebaptist
�earthlink.net
ART.
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For more information about the
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.EHIIHW
WYNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom
Energy Efficient � Kitchen Appliances.
Washer & Dryer Hookups � Central Air& Heat.
OnECUBn "
Pets OK With
EASTGATE VILLAGE
uIIkiih (tt
X
2 Bedroom
Fi
Washer & Dryer Hookups � Central Air & Heat.
On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance
Pets OK With Deposit � Nightly security patrols.
BRADFORD CREEK
3Bedr
Country Clu
On Bradford Creek Golf Course.
Approximately 1,350 Sq.ft.
Fully Equipped Kitchens � Washer & Dryer.
Pets OK With Deposit � Covered
II
Iai4
DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
3 Bedroom And 2.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & r
Pets OK With Deposit � Covered Par

561-7679
(� Drive
Greenville, NC 27858
ftofessionalty managed k
clet
RIYERWALK
3 Bedroom
Kitchen Applian
Washer & Dryer � Central Air & Heat.
Covered Parking.
No Pets Allo'�
WWW.PINNACLEPROPERTYMANAGEMENTXOM
Offering Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
Convenient To ECU, Pitt Community College & The Medical District

I'm a Student and a Plasma Donor
Names: Jennifer
Majors: Nursing
Hobbies: Swimming & going to the beach
Why do I donate Plasma?
Extra spending money for the beach.
Earn up to $170mo. donating plasma in a friendly place.
DCI Biological of Greenville � 252-757-0171
2727 E.lOth Street � Down the Street from ECU � www.dciplasma.com
www.lntrex.com


Title
The East Carolinian, September 27, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1838
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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