The East Carolinian, April 19, 2005






4-14-05
www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 80 Number 77
TUESDAY
April 19, 200e
SGA candidates host debate


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Members of the ECU community present questions to the SGA candidates as the running candidates discussed their views of what they
thought would be best for ECU. Topics ranged from safety concerns on campus to concerns about increasing tuition costs.
Tyler Rankins shows his exhibit called "The Evolution of Rap" to
competition judges. Rankins advanced to the state competition.
ECU department
sponsors National
History Day
SGA President candidates collaborate among ECU students in Wright Plaza taking questions and hearing student concerns.
Candidates answer
student questions
EDEN SPENCER
STAFF WRITER
Numerous students and
staff members attended Monday
night's Student Government
Association debate as they lis-
tened to the running candidates
answer various pre-prepared and
random questions from audience
members.
The forum began by asking
questions to each presidential
candidate, focusing on their
goals and plans on carrying out
their goals.
M. Cole Jones, presidential
candidate running indepen-
dently for ticket two said he
plans to enhance the total stu-
dent experience. He said he felt
the SGA cabinet simply needs
enforcement and he plans to allo-
cate time to show students what
their SGA is accomplishing.
Daniel Spuller, presidential
candidate for ticket three said
his ticket has 25 reality based
key points set aside ranging from
campus safety to fighting the
tuition increases. Spuller said he
plans to accomplish these goals by
working with the ECU Crime Stop-
pers to better secure on-campus
areas, as well as off-campus areas
having a student attend Greenville
City Council meetings.
Terry Gore, presidential can-
didate for ticket four said he has
eight realistic goals that he would
like to focus on including campus
safety, parking and textbook use.
He said he plans to fulfill these
goals by working with adminis-
trators he has met during his time
as president of the student senate.
Gore said he plans to work to get
police officers patrolling ECU'S
campus on foot and bicycle more
visible to students. He said he also
plans to conduct a survey at the
end of each semester, for each
course, to evaluate the textbook
required for the class.
During the random question-
ing segment of the debate, Spuller
was asked in what way he would
provide a college friendly tuition
increase.
"Cutting jobs and hiking
tuition is just not the way to go
said Spuller.
Spuller said his ticket plans
to let students know they have a
voice by creating a voter educa-
tion program. He said the voter
education program will teach
students that officials in the state
legislature will continue to vote
for tuition increases if they are
continuously voted into office.
Jones was asked how he
planned to get students involved
with SGA. He said he planned
to be a president who is visible
to the student body. He said he
plans to conduct activities to
uplift and motivate students to
get involved with student gov-
ernment.
Gore was asked how he would
strive to improve himself if
elected into office - he said he
feels he can be overbearing and
would continue to work on this
issue within himself.
"I've learned that there are
times when I need to stop giving
advice and start asking ques-
tions said Gore.
During the audience-question-
ing segment of the forum each
presidential candidate said they
would work to become more
accessible to the student body if
elected.
Students who attended
showed positive reactions to the
debate and hope to see some
changes implemented next year
within the SGA.
Charles Owens, freshman
political science major said he
thought the most important issue
discussed was the visibility of
the SGA to the students. While
he said he thought the past
SGA made efforts in this area,
he said there is still room for
improvement.
Tiffany Mangum, junior
health services management
major agreed that SGA accessibil-
ity was the main issue of impor-
tance. She said it is necessary for
ECU students to know the SGA is
there and how to turn to them if
they have a concern they would
like to see addressed.
Students and SGA members
agreed the debate was a success.
"It went very well. We had a
large turn out said April Paul,
elections chair.
Paul said she is excited to see
so many people interested in the
issues taking place within SGA
and hopes each student will cast
a vote this week.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Local students battle for
state competition
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
ECU'S History Department
sponsored this year's National
History Day competition for edu-
cation district one last Friday.
The day included the junior
competition for grades six
through eight and the senior
competition for high school
students from local public and
private schools. This year's theme
was "Communication in History:
The Key to Understanding To
illustrate this theme, students
held exhibits covering various
topics from the telephone and
music to war propaganda and
the media.
Claire Pittman, lecturer with
the history department, said
the competition at ECU was the
biggest competition in the state
with 204 students participat-
ing in exhibits, performances,
documentaries and historical
papers. The different categories
allowed each student to choose
which area they felt they would
be most successful in, including
whether they excel in individual
or group work.
Harrison Home, sixth grade
student from CM. Eppes Middle
School, competed with an indi-
vidual exhibit that compared
propaganda from WWI and
WWII. He was a little nervous
about speaking with the judges
and said he learned about the
topic from past experiences,
movies and by reading a lot of
books.
Rebecca Stephenson, also a
o
First Place
Wlnnners:
Junior competition -
Alyssa Torres
Rebecca Stephenson
Sarah Lewis Peel
Courtney Canosa
Becca Morris
Danielle Hennessey
Parker Murphy
Tory Whltson
Ian Whltson
Philip Barefoot
Abbe Brooks
Allle Rawl
Senior competition -
Sid Aneja
Zach Sprau
ATolanl Aklnkuot
Mark Tafoya
Eric Warren
Mlchlko Theurer
Sr. Group Documentary:
Andrew Brown
Sharada Persaud
Llzzl Blaney
Chelsea Westbrook
Ginger Gooch
Alsha Saad
sixth grade student from CM.
Eppes, participated in the junior
individual performance category.
She performed a broadcast as she
thought Tokyo Rose, a female Jap-
anese broadcaster during WWII
who was said to have taunted
Allied forces, would have done.
Judges looked at histori-
cal quality of the projects,
relation to theme, clarity
of presentation and corn-
see HISTORY page A3
Cardinals fail to elect new pope
Black smoke billows from the
chimney of the Sistine Chapel.
VATICAN CITY (AP) � Black
smoke poured from the Sistine
Chapel's chimney Monday eve-
ning, signaling that the cardinals
sequestered inside for the first
papal conclave of the new millen-
nium failed to elect a new pope.
The black smoke emanating
shortly after 8 p.m. (2 p.m. EDT)
meant the 115 voting cardinal
"princes" of the church would
retire for the night and return to
the chapel Tuesday morning for
more balloting in their search for
a successor to Pope John Paul II.
If two morning ballots fail
to produce a pope, the cardinals
could hold two more votes Tues-
day afternoon.
Some 40,000 people who
packed St. Peter's Square to stare
at the stovepipe jutting from the
chapel roof shouted, "It's black
It's black and snapped photos
with their cell phones.
White smoke will tell the
world that the church's 265th
pontiff has been chosen to suc-
ceed John Paul, who died April
2 at age 84.
The cardinals, from six conti-
nents and representing 52 coun-
tries, began their secret delib-
erations late in the afternoon
after the ceremonial closing of
the massive doors of the chapel,
which is decorated with frescoes
by Michelangelo and wired with
electronic jamming devices to
thwart eavesdropping.
The excitement built as dark-
ness set in and pilgrims watched
close-ups of the chimney on giant
video screens in the square.
As the smoke began pouring
from the chimney, shouts of "e
bianco, e bianco - "It's white.
It's white - rippled through the
crowd. But the cries quickly gave
way to sighs of disappointment as
the smoke blackened.
"At first it seemed that we
had a new pope, so I had a lot of
emotions. But of course we didn't
really expect to have a pope on
the first day said Alessia Di Caro,
a 23-year-old university student.
There was initial confusion
when a Vatican Radio commen-
tator said, "It seems white as
the first puffs emerged from the
chimney. But as thick, darker
smoke followed, the station pro-
claimed it black.
"It looks like the stove wasn't
working well at first an announcer
joked a few minutes later.
Before shutting themselves
inside, German Cardinal Joseph
Ratzinger led his fellow cardi-
nals in reading aloud an oath of
secrecy. '
One by one, they then filed
up to a Book of the Gospels,
placed their right hands on it
and pronounced a second oath to
keep their sessions secret.
Ratzinger's admonition read,
in part: "In a particular way, we
promise and swear to observe
with the greatest fidelity and
with all persons, clerical or lay,
secrecy regarding everything
that in any way relates to the
election of the Roman Pontiff
and regarding what occurs in the
place of the election, directly or
indirectly related to the results
of the voting; we promise and
swear not to break this secret in
any way
Ratzinger - a powerful Vati-
can official often mentioned
as a leading candidate for pope
- began by reciting a prayer at the
palace. The cardinals chanted the
Litany of the Saints as they made
the short walk to the chapel, led
by altar servers carrying two
long, lit white candles and a
metal crucifix.
The steering committee discusses Issues related to improving retention rates during their meeting.
Steering committee to improve
retention, graduation rates
Members evaluate how
to make improvements
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
A new steering committee at
ECU, striving to make improve-
ments on retention and gradu-
ation rates is in the process of
looking at different factors that
affect those issues.
ECU loses approximately
22 - 24 percent of its students
in transition from their first to
second year. The committee is
in the process of finding the
primary reasons for this loss and
ways to make improvements.
"To some degree, all first year
students are at risk said Todd
Johnson, associate vice chancel-
lor of student life.
Johnson said many first year
students have not developed
main important life skill sets
that are important for making
it through college. Factors John-
son cited that play a part in this
included use of time, excessive
partying, when to say "no" and
general knowledge of safety.
The committee has been
working on addressing retention
rates based upon issues ranging
from the financial need of the
family, projected grade average
to race and the transition from
community colleges.
According to Tom Powell,
director of admissions, students
living in eastern North Carolina
have traditionally had higher
retention rates than students
living elsewhere. Studies have
further indicated that in-state
students not living in the eastern
part of the state have had slightly
higher retention rates than out-
of-state students. Out-of-state stu-
dents tend to come from families
who have higher incomes than
students in North Carolina.
Don Joyner, associate vice
chancellor for academic services,
see STEERING page A2
INSIDE I News: A2 I Comics: A5 I Opinion: A4 I Scene: Bl I Sports: B4






LeW s
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
Announcements
Correction
The photo accompanying
the story "State mandates
Greenville bridge to undergo
replacement" that ran in the
April 14 issue of TEC is of the
wrong bridge. The bridge that
will be under construction is
located on 14th Street near
the intersection with Charles
Boulevard.
NAMI Meetings
The National Alliance for
the Mentally 111 chapter at ECU
welcomes all who have friends
or family who suffer from a
mental illness or those who
have an illness themselves to
their monthly meetings for
support and to work toward
erasing the stigma associated
with mental illnesses. NAMi
ECU meets the first Thurs-
day of every month at 6:30
p.m. in the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center, including
during semester breaks. For
more information, please call
Erick at 355-5217 or Olivia at
758-1294.
Percussion Players
The school of music is
holding this concert April 20
at A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall at
8 p.m. Call 328-4788 for more
information.
AA Meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous
meetings will be held every
Wednesday at noon in 242
Mendenhall Student Center
and Thursday at 11:30 a.m.
in 14 MSC. For more informa-
tion, call 760-500-8918.
Advance Care
Planning Clinic
The Health Ministries of
the Memorial Baptist Church
and the End of Life Care Coali-
tion of Eastern Carolina are
offering a free advanced care
planning clinic Wednesday,
April 20 from 6:30p.m. in the
church at 1510 SE Greenville
Blvd. An educational session
will be provided until 7 p.m.
and trained advanced care
planning will also be on site
until 8 p.m. to assist those
who have additional ques-
tions. Please call 847-0868 if
you have any further ques-
tions.
Summer Work Study
ECU students who are net
taking summer classes and
can work 40 hours each week
can participate in the work-
study program this summer.
First go to Student Financial
Aid in 250 Flanagan and pick
up a "Hiring Authorization
Form Then attend a brief
information session at Stu-
dent Professional Develop-
ment on the corner of Fifth
and I.m is Streets. Sessions
will be held April 20 from 2
- 2:30 p.m April 21 from 10
- 10:30 a.m April 22 from 10
-10:30 a.m. and April 25 from
11 - 11:30 a.m.
Barefoot on the Mall
ECU'S annual Barefoot on
the Mall event will be April
21. Come out and enjoy food,
music and fun.
Business After Hours
Join Greenville-Pitt
County Chamber of Com-
merce and members for an
evening of networking April
21 from 5:30 - 7 p.m. in Bai-
ley's Fine Jewelry. Spend your
time with other business pro-
fessionals as you enjoy great
food and exchange ideas.
For more information, call
752-4101.
Contra Dance
The ECU Folk and Coun-
try Dancers are sponsoring a
contra dance Friday, April 25
at the Willis Building at First
and Reade Streets. The begin-
ners' lesson begins at 7:30
p.m. and the contra dance will
be from 8 -10:30 p.m. Live,
old-time and Celtic music will
be provided by a string band.
Price of admission is $3 for
students, $5 for FASG mem-
bers and $8 for the general
public. This will be the last
contra dance of the school
year. For more information,
please call 752-7350.
News Briefs
Local
Skateboarder killed in accident,
officer dies while responding
BELMONT, NC � A teenage
skateboarder died this weekend
after being struck by a car and
an officer responding to the
call suffered a fatal heart attack,
authorities said.
Police said they don't intend
to charge the driver whose car
struck Trevor McKinzie Gray,
13, about 6:30 p.m. Saturday.
The driver wasn't exceeding the
25-mph speed limit, Belmont
Police Chief David James said. He
declined to name the driver.
Family members were mourn-
ing the sudden death of Trevor.
"He was looking forward to
his first prom. He went out and
bought a suit said Trevor's grand-
mother, Cindy Mullis. "He had a
nice suit, he wanted to impress
his girlfriend. He had a beauti-
ful smile and a heart of gold
Belmont Police Capt. Byron
D. Carpenter, 45, was responding
to the call to help Gray when he
slumped over the wheel from an
apparent heart attack, James said.
Carpenter waspronounced
dead at Gaston Memorial Hospi-
tal, James said.
"Byron loved his job, his
family and he loved serving Bel-
mont James said. "This is the
way he would have wanted to go
- serving others. He had a real
calling for his job. He was the
kind of officer that could handle
anything you gave him
Carpenter is survived by his
wife, Kelly Carpenter, and their two
children, Ben, 11, and Katie, 13.
Carpenter was the only cap-
tain on the force.
NC Judge to rule on
photos from camera phones
WRIGHTSV1LLE BEACH, NC
� A Superior Court judge must
decide whether law enforcement
officers overstepped when they
downloaded images from the cell
phone of a man accused of sexual
offense and secret peeping.
Wrightsville Beach police
charged Christopher R. Snow,
26, in July with second-degree
sexual offense and secret peep-
ing-photographic image.
The charges against Snow say
he attended a party with a female
co-worker, and they ended up on
the beach, where the woman lost
consciousness.
At that point, police said
Snow began improperly touching
the woman and taking photo-
graphs with the camera phone.
He was arrested after passers-by
called police.
Snow maintains his innocence,
lawyer Neil Weber said Friday.
Superior Court Judge W. Allen
Cobb Jr. could rule this week on
the motion to suppress evidence,
Assistant District Attorney Todd
Fennell said.
"In this case, the pictures are
one piece of evidence Fennell
said. "The pictures showed what
we contend is a sexual assault
Police received some Images
from Snow's carrier, Sprint, after
obtaining a search warrant, Fen-
nell said. The camera phone is
still being held as evidence.
Fennell said investigators
researched the issue but didn't
find any legal precedent.
"There's no case law pertain-
ing to getting information off a
cell phone he said.
The question of illegal search
and seizure as it pertains to
camera phones is one the judge
will have to decide, Weber said.
"1 think it's just a case where
the law has to catch up with the
technology he said.
� Snow remains free on
$10,000 bail.
National
Sex offender charged In
death of 13-year-old Florida girl
TAMPA, Fla. � A convicted
sex offender accused of murder-
ing a 13-year-old girl was ordered
held without bond Monday, and
a prosecutor said no decision had
been made on whether to seek
the death penalty.
David Onstott, 36, was
charged with first-degree murder
Sunday, a day after investigators
discovered Sarah Lunde's par-
tially clothed remains in a fish-
pond. She had vanished a week
earlier from her home in Ruskin.
Authorities said Onstott confessed
to killing her after an argument.
"You are talking about a
person who would murder a
child. Who knows what's in his
mind? " said Hillsborough County
Sheriff David Gee, adding that
Onstott "went to great effort to
keep her body from being discov-
ered He declined to offer details
of the confession.
Onstott didn't speak during
his first court appearance on the
murder charge Monday, when he
was ordered held without bond.
Prosecutor Mark Ober said there
was no decision yet on the death
penalty.
Onstott, who spent 5 12
years in prison after being con-
victed in 1995 of raping an adult
acquaintance, has been held
without bail since Tuesday on
unrelated charges. His attorney,
Pat Courtney, declined to com-
ment Sunday.
It was not immediately clear
when an autopsy was planned.
Sarah's relatives and members
of the First Apostolic Church
showed up in droves Sunday to
mourn the teenager's death. Her
young friends dropped to their
knees and wept, and church lead-
ers recalled how families would
make sure she had a ride to the
services each week.
Adobe to acquire
Macromedia In $3.4 billion deal
SAN JOSE, Calif. � Adobe
Systems Inc one of the world's
largest providers of document-
design software, will acquire
Macromedia in an all-stock trans-
action valued at approximately
$3.4 billion, the companies
announced Monday.
Under terms of the deal,
approved by the companies'
boards of directors, Macromedia
stockholders will receive 0.69
shares of Adobe common stock
for every share of their Macro-
media common stock. That will
result in Macromedia stockhold-
ers owning about 18 percent of
the combined company when
the deal closes.
The transaction, contin-
gent upon the approval of both
companies' stockholders, is
expected to be complete by the
fall. It also requires the approval
of federal regulators.
San Jose-based Adobe's soft-
ware includes the popular Acro-
bat and Photoshop programs.
San Francisco-based Macromedia
makes the Dreamweaver and
Flash web-deslgn software.
Combining the two busi-
nesses, the companies said, will
allow them to create more power-
ful software programs that can be
used across multiple operating sys-
tems, which should pave the way
for expansion into new markets.
International
Security forces And no
hostages In Iraqi town
MADAIN, Iraq � Iraqi secu-
rity forces, backed by U.S. mili-
tary, swept into a town south
of Baghdad at dawn Monday
but found no hostages despite
reports that Sunni militants had
kidnapped as many as 100
Shiites there.
Residents and Sunni clerics
said the reports had been grossly
exaggerated by government offi-
cials bent on re-establishing
control in the lawless region
the U.S. military has called the
"Triangle of Death" because it
has become a stronghold of the
Sunni insurgency.
Meanwhile, Iraq's most pow-
erful Shiite bloc wants former
leader Saddam Hussein put to
death if he is convicted of war
crimes by a special tribunal,
and if the interim president
won't sign the execution order,
he should resign, an alliance
spokesman told The Associated
Press on Monday.
"We feel he is a criminal.
He is the No. 1 criminal in the
world. He is a murderer said
Ali al-Dabagh, a lawmaker from
the Shiite clergy-led United Iraq
Alliance. "He deserves a trial,
and he should be subjected to the
law and the court. Whatever the
decision, everyone should follow
it, even if the president says he
cannot sign it
Iraqi President Jalal Tala-
bani told the British Broadcast-
ing Corp. on Monday that he
likely would abstain from
signing an execution order
because of his opposition to the
death penalty.
Sharon considers
delaying Gaza withdrawal
JERUSALEM � Prime Min-
ister Ariel Sharon is considering
delaying Israel's Gaza pullout by
three weeks at the recommenda-
tion of the plan's administrator,
who said settlers shouldn't be
moved during a Jewish mourning
period that marks the destruc-
tion of the biblical temples, an
official said.
Israeli officials cited reli-
gious sensitivities in the possible
delay, which would push back
the evacuation from late July to
mid-August.
But the government appears
to be unprepared for the opera-
tion, which involves uprooting
9,000 Jewish settlers from their
homes.
The pullout plan has been
beset by legislative delays, secu-
rity forces have yet to begin
training, and settlers who are
ready to leave are complaining
about red tape.
The withdrawal from Gaza
and four northern West Bank
settlements is currently sched-
uled to begin on July 25 and last
four weeks.
Yonatan Bassi, who heads
the administration responsible
for compensating and relocating
settlers slated for evacuation, rec-
ommended the delay at Sunday's
Cabinet meeting, said Bassi's
spokesman, Haim Altman.
Bassi raised the issue after "an
internal struggle and talking to
rabbis Altman said. Bassi, an
observant Jew, explained that
Jews are not allowed to move to a
new home during the Tisha B'Av
mourning period.
Steering rampaged7
said ECU is not the number one
choice of institutions for a number
of students when compared to
UNC Chapel Hill, which is often
the first choice of students.
This would suggest students
may come to ECU with inten-
tion of transferring elsewhere,
which would have an adverse
effect on ECU'S retention rates.
Another population of stu-
dents who ECU is at risk of losing
are the reconsidering students,
who are often at the sophomore
level, who find they cannot get
into the major of their choice.
The steering committee is work-
ing to find ways to accommodate
those students to reduce the risk
of losing them.
Another factor that would
positively impact ECU'S retention
rates is advising centers. ECU has
made efforts over the past several
years to improve advising, there-
fore leading students in the right
direction.
Powell said ECU puts more
attention currently on advising,
whereas in the past it may have
been the opposite.
COAD1000, a course offered to
incoming students which teaches
them various aspects about adjust-
ing to college life, has shown to
improve the retention rates among
students who take the class.
Jayne Geissler, director for
program development, is work-
ing to improve the COAD 1000
course. One of the main efforts
is making more students aware of
the course and its positive effects
at orientation.
"We thought it was an impor-
tant enough class, so that we will do
all that we can to make it available
to every student said Geissler.
"We'd like to do a lot of
marketing with COAD 1000 at
orientation
Making parents aware of
the course might also increase
the likelihood of the student
taking it.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Greenville holds annual festival
A group of women belly-danced during a performance at the International Festival held In
Greenville over the weekend. Members of the community came to the festival to try new foods,
buy merchandise common in different cultures and have their palms read.
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4-19-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
History ,mmeA, NASA in culture shock as first flight in two years nears
pliance with all the rules,
such as size requirements.
They also looked at visual
impact and creativity of the
displays. Judges included
members of ECU's His-
tory Department, the the-
atre department, Pitt Com-
munity College, the state
department of archives and
history, Joyner Library, the
school of education and some
retired professors.
"It's just a wonderful pro-
gram for young people who are
interested in history at an early
age and we hope many of them
will come to ECU and major in
history said Pittman.
Pittman said the goal of the
competition is for students to get
excited about history.
"The goal is also to give
them an opportunity to develop
research skills and to exercise
their creativity Pittman said.
Winners of this competition
will go to the state competition
April 30 at the Raleigh North
Carolina Museum of History.
The top three in each category
get to go to state. However,
the top five in exhibits will
go because there are so many
students competing in that
category.
Nationals will be held in June
at the University of Maryland.
Pittman said students from the
area have come close to winning
at nationals before and they're
proud of that.
"It's highly competitive
Pittman said.
Carl Swanson with the
department of history was
a judge during the competi-
tions. Before John A. Tilley, also
with the department of history,
gave out the awards, Swanson
commended the students for
their work.
"It looks to me that every
year the entries get better said
Swanson.
"We'd like to thank you for
making our jobs harder
Stephenson won first
place for her junior individ-
ual performance and Home
received third place for junior
individual exhibit.
The Pitt County Historical
Society also gave plaques to the
schools with first place winners.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.
Dr. Jon Clark, husband of space shuttle Columbia astronaut Laurel
Clark, poses near a sign honoring the seven astronauts killed.
SPACE CENTER, Houston
(AP) � In the years leading up
to the Columbia tragedy, the
habit of NASA managers was to
hammer employees into agree-
ment at meetings or get them
so exasperated they walked out,
creating a last-stand consensus.
It was just as brutal during
Columbia's doomed flight: Man-
agers dismissed engineers' con-
cerns about the now infamous
piece of foam insulation that flew
off and knocked a hole in the
shuttle's wing; they down played
the problem at meetings and,
from beginning to grisly end,
insisted nothing could be done.
What about after Colum-
bia? Has NASA's safety culture
changed since the spacecraft
and seven astronauts crashed
over Texas?
It depends on whom you
ask.
"Everything is about return
to flight and nothing is about
return to right return to the
right culture says Dr. Jon Clark,
a NASA neurologist who lost his
astronaut-wife aboard Colum-
bia.
"NASA is making solid prog-
ress notes the behavioral sci-
ence company hired to improve
the space agency's culture.
"We haven't really changed
the way we're doing business
and making decisions, so we're
headed down the same road
we've been on says former
space shuttle commander James
Wetherbee, who quit NASA out
of frustration in January.
"We've made great strides.
Now, it is one of those things that
you never reach perfection and
you've got to continue to work on
every day says deputy shuttle
program manager Wayne Hale,
who perhaps more than anybody
at NASA has confronted its long-
lived, deep-rooted culture.
Ask the seven astronauts who
will ride Discovery into orbit
next month, and the answers are
just as diverse.
Given all the polarizing
voices, one thing seems sure:
NASA remains in conflict over
cultural change as the first space
shuttle flight in more than two
years draws near.
Changing the space agency's
culture is no small matter.
When Columbia shattered
on its way home on Feb. 1, 2003,
a broken safety culture was
found to be as much to blame as
the gaping hole in the left wing,
caused by a chunk of flyaway
fuel-tank foam at liftoff.
Accident investigators chas-
tised NASA for reverting to the
same type of flawed management
that contributed to the Challenger
launch explosion 17 years earlier.
For Columbia, that meant
ignoring engineers' worries
about the potential damage
from the foam strike, fostering
an atmosphere in which these
same engineers were afraid to
speak up, and creating intense
schedule pressure for shuttle
flights to complete work on the
international space station.
NASA's "mea culpa" follow-
ing the report by the Columbia
Accident Investigation Board in
August 2003 was tepid in some
quarters - and still is - even
though Behavioral Science Tech-
nology Inc. of Ojai, Calif is
working to improve the space
agency's culture.
Clark, who was married to
Columbia astronaut Laurel Clark,
bristles when he hears culture
gurus and NASA leaders con-
stantly pointing out that change
takes time.
"Well, guess what? It never
changed after Challenger, so
the idea that you can't see these
changes quickly - therefore,
don't worry if you don't see
them - that's the wrong answer
Clark says.
Behavioral Science began its
transformation work at Johnson
Space Center, home to Mission
Control and the place where
most of the management mis-
takes were made during Colum-
bia's final voyage.
It's just now tackling cultural
issues at Kennedy Space Center
in Florida, where the shuttles
launch and land. Employees
wanted to put off the cultural
intervention until shuttle flights
resumed, saying they did not
want to be distracted or over-
loaded during this critical time.
But center director James Ken-
nedy warned, "We can't afford
not to do this
Cruise ship back in New York Harbor after struck by wave
The Norwegian Dawn is docked at Pier 88 in New York Monday,
April 18. The ship was damaged by a seven-story wave.
NEW YORK (AP) � Passen-
gers disembarking Monday from
a cruise ship that was struck by
a freak seven-story-high wave
said the stormy weather that
smashed windows and sent
furniture flying reminded them
of the Titanic.
The Norwegian Dawn arrived
with more than 2,000 passengers
still on board after some 300
others decided to leave the ship
early in Charleston, SC, and fly or
drive home. It docked on Manhat-
tan's West Side, near the floating
Intrepid Sea Air Space Museum.
The 965-fqt white ocean
liner was sailing back to New
York from the Bahamas on Sat-
urday when a storm pounded
the vessel with heavy seas,
including a rogue 70-foot wave.
The wave sent furniture sailing
through the air and knocked
hot tubs overboard. Some pas-
sengers slept in hallways in life
jackets.
Passenger Robert Clark said
he was trying not to be angry
about the cruise but had one
question: "Why would you go
through a storm?"
Clark, a New Yorker who dis-
embarked with his wife, Estelita
Villafane, and their 7-year-old
daughter, Myah, said the storm
"woke me up. We were going
back and forth, up and down.
And then 'boom
He said he ran into the cor-
ridor and found passengers from
flooded cabins who were wearing
life preservers.
"It looked like the Titanic
Clark said. "That was what was
going through my head
Norwegian Cruise Line said
the freak wave broke windows
in two different cabins.
It said 62 cabins were flooded
and four passengers had cuts
and bruises. The wave reached
as high as deck 10, company
spokeswoman Susan Robison
said Sunday.
The Norwegian Dawn docked
at Charleston for repairs and a
Coast Guard inspection before
continuing its voyage to New
York early Sunday.
Bill and Ellen Tesauro of
Wayne, NJ, said they went to
the ship's casino when the storm
started slamming the vessel.
"We figured it would take our
minds off this (and) that's when
the captain announced that
drinks are free all night Bill Tes-
auro told the Daily News of New
York. "But then there was another
horrendous slap on the water
The panicked couple returned
to their suite.
"A desk went flying across the
room Ellen Tesauro said. "And
a glass table toppled down, with
glasses and food on it
Stacy Maryland of Hamilton,
NJ, woke up to find shoes and maga-
zines floating in a foot of water.
"I thought I heard water
sloshing around, and then I woke
up and saw it, and it was surreal
she told the newspaper.
The cruise line said passen-
gers whose cabins were flooded
were flown home from Charles-
ton and the safety of the ship
"was in no way compromised by
this incident
Each passenger got a refund
of half the trip's cost and a
voucher for half the price of a
future cruise, Robison said.
The ship left New York
on April 10 with 2,500 pas-
sengers aboard. Robison said
about 300 passengers decided
not to return by ship from
Charleston. About 100 were
flown back to New York and
the rest made their own
arrangements, Robison said.
Bush visits S.C. Statehouse,
discusses Social Security
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President Bush delivers a speech on Social Security reform at the State House in Columbia, SC.
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or
call1-866-348-1377.
www.cox.com
COLUMBIA, SC (AP) � Presi-
dent Bush knew he could count
on a friendly audience at the
Statehouse when he stepped into
Republican-rich South Carolina
on Monday to rally support for
his plan for Social Security.
It was an unusual stop on
his 60-city, cross-country tour
to talk about the future of the
federal retirement system.
Bush, who has watched his
approval ratings drop during
the blitz, has been the center of
huge crowds in campaign-style
surroundings along his tour.
But in Columbia, he chose to
speak about 30 minutes to leg-
islators, Gov. Mark Sanford and
U.S. Sens. Lindsey Graham and
Jim DeMint, who for years have
pushed the private Social Secu-
rity accounts Bush wants.
Bush said it was the first
time he had addressed a state
legislature since he was governor
of Texas.
The government is making
promises it can't keep to future
generations, he said.
"There is a hole in the safety
net for younger Americans
Bush said. "There is no vault
holding your cash waiting for
you to retire
Why Bush chose the State-
house "would rank as somewhat
of a mystery said Francis Marion
University political scientist Neal
Thigpen. On the Social Security
stump, Bush's pattern has been
to campaign in swing states
where Republicans need to be
brought on board or Democrats
need to feel heat on the issue,
Thigpen said.
Bush had been expected to
make an announcement about
a possible appointment for
House Speaker David Wilkins,
R-Greenville. But no mention
was made during his speech.
Bush is facing an uphill
battle in his effort to persuade
the public that Social Security
change is needed and that pri-
vate retirement accounts should
be part of the solution.
Democrats argue that the
administration is proposing
to drastically alter the system
when more modest changes
would ensure the system's future
solvency.
"If we don't do something to
fix this system now, the students
graduating this spring from the
University of South Carolina
or, in deference to the Speaker,
Clemson (University) will spend
their entire careers paying Social
Security taxes only to see the
system go bankrupt a few years
before they retire Bush said.
Bush mingled with legisla-
tors, who clamored to get auto-
graphs on their House calendars,
and spent time shaking hands
with House Democrats.
As he passed, Rep. Gilda
Cobb-Hunter, D-Orangeburg,
said she told Bush she didn't
agree with his approach to fixing
Social Security.
Cobb-Hunter said Bush talks
about fiscal discipline, but that
doesn't mesh with what he's done
in Washington, "not when he's
run up the kind of deficit he has
Bush later came back and
kissed her on the cheek, bringing
a load of ribbing from her Legis-
lative Black Caucus colleagues.
Republicans hailed Bush's
remarks. "I think he showed
great leadership Wilkins said.
"The president is a great leader, I
think he exhibited it today
Blake Sanford, the governor's
six-year-old son, got the ride of
his young life as he accompa-
nied his dad and mom in Bush's
limousine from Columbia Met-
ropolitan Airport to the State-
house. The governor said he and
the president spent time talking
about Social Security, fitness
and farms.
K





OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328,6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor In Chief
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
Our View
Was Doherty ever a
potential candidate?
Former North Carolina coach Matt Doherty
recently accepted a head-coaching job at Flor-
ida Atlantic. Florida Atlantic plays in the Atlantic
Sun conference with teams like Gardner Webb,
Stetson, Campbell, Central Florida and others.
In the last three years, FAU has won 26 games.
They finished the 2004-2005 year 10-17 and
ninth in an 11-team conference.
We feel this begs the question, "If Doherty was
willing to accept a job at FAU, why on Earth did
we not hear more about him for the ECU job?"
Was Doherty ever really pursued by Terry Hol-
land and ECU'S athletic department? We heard
rumors during the coaching search, ranging
from Doherty buying a house in Greenville to
he wasn't a candidate for the job at all. The
funny thing is, the second rumor would be the
most ridiculous.
Doherty is a former national coach of the year
who has succeeded wherever he's been. He
led Notre Dame to a 22-15 year in 1999. Though
many Doherty-haters or avid Heels fans who
weren't supportive of him remember his 8-20
season with UNC in 2001-2002, they forget the
26-7 season and No. 1 ranking he took the team
to just a year before that infamous mark. He
also turned that 8-20 team into a 19-16 squad
just a year later, fighting through a plethora of
reports that Doherty and his players weren't
getting along, Rashad McCants' selfishness
and Sean May's soft play inside.
Not to mention his recruiting ability is outstand-
ing. Let's not forget the UNC team who won
the championship this past year, particularly
the starting five and key bench players David
Noel, Jawad Williams and Melvin Scott, were
all Doherty recruits.
However, instead of pursuing a proven winner
and an emotional guy who fans in Greenville
could grow to love, ECU takes an unproven
assistant who played under Holland back at
Virginia. We don't discredit Ricky Stokes, he has
excellent character, is a great recruiter and is
an extremely hard worker. But this recent FAU
hire should make the Pirate Nation question
whether Holland ever truly took a good look at
available candidates rather than going with his
own home recipe.
Our Staff
Amanda Q. Ungerfelt Editor in Chief
Nick Henne News EditorKristin Day Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Features EditorKristin Murnane Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo Sports EditorBrandon Hughes Asst Sports Editor
Nina Coefield Head Copy EditorRachel Landen Special Sections Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk Photo EditorHerb Sneed Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak Dustln Jones Web Editor Asst Web Editor
Jennifer Hobbs Production ManagerKltch Hines Managing Editor
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
Include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to editorCttieeastcarollnian.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC Is free, each additional
copy is $1
W IKK Off U FIRST PITCH
Opinion Columnist
Recapping recent news hypocrisies
Parents 'seeing red'
over red pens
TONYMCKEE
CONSERVATIVE CORNER
Well, it's that time of year again.
Spring is upon us. The weather is
warmer, the shorts are shorter, stress
levels are rapidly increasing the closer
we get to finals and this is TEC's last
week of publishing for the semester.
And what would that week be with-
out one more rant from your favorite
Conservl-Nazi?
I shall not disappoint.
Did you know that the color red
is slowly being "banned" from the
teacher's inventory? This nonsense
started, or at least gained attention,
in a Connecticut elementary school
recently. It seems some parents started
seeing red because of all the red marks
on their little darling's papers. They
told the school principal that it is too
stressful for the kiddees when the big,
bad, meanie teacher points out their
errors in red. The poor little things are
being psychologically scarred.
How is that for common sense rea-
soning? Instead of concentrating on
important matters, like helping their
children learn from their mistakes and
therefore reduce the amount of red on
their papers, these parents whine that
red ink is damaging to the ego. God
help us.
To be fair, this issue just came to
national attention in this school. The
assault on the color red apparently
began long ago. Purple has now become
the color of choice, so much so that the
top three pen makers have increased
production of purple pens to meet the
demands of politically correct educa-
tors nationwide.
According to Leatrice Eiseman,
a color specialist (with a background
in psychology) quoted by AP, teach-
ers may be favoring purple because of
the "element of the danger aspect
since they know that purple is just
blue and red mixed together. So all
you future, and current, indoctrinators
of youth who really want to scribble in
red, go ahead and stock up on purple.
The parents will never know the dif-
ference.
Now that this assault on red has
gone public, how long do you think
It will be before someone claims this
is just the systems' way of further dis-
criminating against American Indians?
Probably not long.
Next on today's agenda is an adjunct
to the Terri Schiavo episode. This is a
classic example of liberal hypocrisy
and contempt.
Early in March, in Key Largo,
Florida, while it was being decided if
Schiavo would live or be starved to
death, a group of SO - 70 dolphins
beached themselves. We all know what
happened to Schiavo. Let's find out
what happened to the dolphins.
Of the initial group that beached,
only 11 or so are still around. The rest
have passed from this mortal plane
and have gone to find Nemo in that big
ocean in the sky. This did not happen
because there was no lack of sympathy
or assistance though, at least according
to a recent CNN report on the matter.
That report lauded the efforts of
the hundreds of volunteers who have
rushed to aid the dolphins, providing
around the clock care in tanks to keep
them from drowning, hand feed-
ing them and yes, even tube feeding
them.
That's right, people are shoving
tubes into these creatures to feed them
and the people at CNN applaud their
efforts. This is the same CNN whose
reporters called Schiavo's supporters,
and other protesters, "fanatics" and
"zealots" because they knew it was
murder to remove her feeding tube.
Dolphins get more sympathy than a
human being.
Do you know what is odd about
this dolphin episode? Nobody asked
the dolphins why they beached them-
selves. By all standards, these are intel-
ligent creatures, capable of some high
level thinking. Some people have even
imbued them with human character-
istics. So why has nobody considered
that this group of dolphins could have
entered into a suicide pact, like Jim
Jones and his group in Guyana did?
What if the timing wasn't coinci-
dental? What if they deliberately chose
that time to beach themselves because
they simply wanted to "die with dig-
nity" like so many people advocated for
Schiavo and were just trying to show
their solidarity? Shouldn't we allow
them the same dignified death by star-
vation that Schiavo experienced?
Think about that. Those people
could be torturing those poor animals
by force feeding them and refusing to
honor their wishes to die. Their efforts
are honored while the efforts of people
to save a fellow human being are vili-
fied.
Welcome to Liberalism, American
style.
To end on a lighter note, for those
who believe there is no intelligent life
on this planet, you can now have mes-
sages beamed throughout the galaxy.
A new company, talkToAliens.com, is
taking orders to record messages for
$3.99 per minute and shoot them out to
space via a large dish in Connecticut.
"Beam me up Scotty
In My Opinion
New trend gaining popularity: Lobster Liberation
(KRT) � A crowd of well-wishers
recently gathered at Manomet Point
in Plymouth, Mass to see off a new
friend as he journeyed back home.
The traveler was a 15-pound lobster
named Donovan, on the final leg
of a nearly 1,000-mile trek. After spend-
ing weeks in a tank in a Potomac, Mil
seafood store, Donovan, estimated
to be between 35 and 40 years old, was
being returned to the Atlantic Ocean,
courtesy of a sympathetic customer
who shelled out $150 for his release
and an additional $100 to send him
home.
This is just the beginning. The trend
in lobster liberation will continue - and
it will expand to other sea animals. Fish
freedom is coming. All it takes is for one
person to say she's leaving fish in their
ocean homes and off the barbecue grill
- and for others to stop and really think
about her decision.
Donovan is not the first sea animal
to escape becoming someone's dinner.
In March, newspapers across the coun-
try reported on Bubba, a 22-pound lob-
ster who was saved from a fish market
and shipped to the Pittsburgh Zoo &
PPG Aquarium (where, sadly, he died
in quarantine). Last year, schoolchil-
dren in Port Angeles, Wash rescued
14-pound Hercules from a supermar-
ket tank and sent the lucky lobster to
Maine for release.
People for the Ethical Treatment of
Animals hears from so many concerned
shoppers who want to help after seeing
lobsters languishing in grocery store
tanks, we've set up a Web site with tips
on successful crustacean liberations.
Can crab crusaders be far behind? I
don't think so. As we learn more about
sea animals and how similar they are
to us in so many ways more and more
people are having trouble with the idea
of putting them on the table.
In March, newspaper science pages
were filled with stories about octopuses
playing charades in order to avoid
harm. Two little species of Indian
Ocean octopuses, one no bigger than
a walnut, were videotaped disguising
themselves as cocdnuts or clumps of
floating algae with six of their arms,
while walking away from danger, back-
wards, using the other two-discrediting
the theory that walking requires hard
bones and skeletal muscle.
Researchers are also debunking
some old fish stories about fish. We
now know that fish are smart. They
feel pain. They have complex social
structures and can recognize individual
"shoal" mates. Some fish gather infor-
mation by eavesdropping on others
and some use tools, such as the South
African fish who lay their eggs on leaves
and then carry them to safety. Fish even
like to play: Oscar fish will toss and
push ping pong balls floating on the
surface of their water.
A recent issue of the journal Fish
and Fisheries cited more than 500
research papers proving that fish are
clever, have Impressive long-term mem-
ories and sophisticated social structures
and can use tools. The introductory
chapter said fish are "steeped in social
intelligence, pursuing Machiavellian
strategies of manipulation, punishment
and reconciliation Sound like anyone
you know?
If you find the idea of eating Flip.
per (or Fido) hard to swallow, then
flounders should be off your plate, too.
Liberating old lobsters like Donovan is a
good first step, but let's extend our com-
passion to all sentient beings. The best
way to start is to stop eating them.
Pirate Rant
I hate to lump smokers and
conservative together but they
always manage to come up with
the dumbest rants humanly
possible.
Why is every book I need
at Joyner Library checked out
two weeks before my paper is
due?
First off, you ask questions
to kiss the teachers butt and
if you are asking questions to
annoy me that is sad. See you
in class.
Could all sunbathers please
take their activity to another
location? It is just too much for
my virgin eyes to handle.
The year 1985 called: Can
they have their flipped-up col-
lars back?
In my experience, when a
girl says she is looking for a
nice guy she really means: "I
want to fume about my last
boyfriend for a while, then hook
bark up with a guy who's just
like him
Things to look for in a man:
1) Look for a man who will wor-
ship you, 2) look for a man who
can make you laugh, 3) look for a
man who has a stable income and
4) make sure none of these three
guys ever meet each other.
There once was a girl named
Sue. She was born to embarrass
you. Sue had to dress up for her
8 a.m. class. Someone should
definitely push her in the grass.
Overachievers make me look
bad, so when they all die I will
be glad.
To all the boys who stare at
me when I strength train at the
Student Rec: I have a boyfriend
and he's bigger than you.
You get your "ole" changed.
I'll get my oil changed.
Things I Hate 1: People who
suffer from the inability to coher-
ently explain something. When
they realize their communicative
inferiority, they don't admit it.
Instead, they try to make you
look like the mental defective.
They say something such as "you
wouldn't understand" or "just
forget it
If you are not watching
"Arrested Development you
ought to be ashamed. And of
course, you'll all tune in when
Fox replaces it with "The World's
Sexiest Paraplegic Dogs with
Eating Disorders
I don't know what everyone's
problem with the Patriot Act Is.
Has it hurt you in any way? I
don't think so. I know it hasn't
hurt me, so shut up about some-
thing that you know nothing
about.
To the person who said they
could do a better job as president
than President Bush: He's doing
a great job, and if you actually
do a better job than him, I'll buy
you a soda.
I'd like to see the guys outside
sun bathing. It'd give us girls
something to stare at.
So the average GPA is a
3.3 at ECU? That's not a good
thing. According to the Princ-
eton Review it's also a third tier
school. When people make fun of
me for going to "Easy-U" I hate
to admit that they're right and
people are running around here
that easily got in with a 900 on
their SAT's (and that's not just
the athletes).
Congratulations to the Wom-
en's Rugby team on winning the
39th National Cherry Blossom
Tournament in Washington,
D.C. I'm glad that there is a con-
ference and tournament winning
team at ECU. Maybe the rugby
ladies should teach the football
team how to tackle.
So as a Northerner down here
in the South, I've noticed a few
things throughout my first year
here at ECU. Girls with accents
rule my world, sweet tea is the
bomb but beer in gas stations is
just weird.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editor@theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.





Page A5
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Cop's ID
6 Belgian border
city
10 Complexion woe
14 Hunter of stars
15 Sailor's hello
16 Bank deal
17 Large sailing
ship
19 Musical group
20 Coll. residence
21 Swiss canton
23 Homeless feline
27 Cyrus ll's
empire
28 Feathery
scarves
29 Fond duWl
31 Longhorn
32 University
treasurer
35 Trunk
37 Annex
38 Sweeper's
accessory
40 Na Na
43 Wandering calf
44 Original copy
46 Up and about
49 AMA members
51 Poi source
52 Brings up
54 Smiled coyly
57 Fixed attitude
59 Short-tailed,
diving bird
60 Pond growth
61 Limited in
perspective
66 Knish store
67 Melody
68 Funeral song
69 Yemeni port
70 Crystal gazer
71 Icy rain
1?3451;7891,�111213
1411
1718"
20�
23242526�"
282930�"
3233343536
373839404142
434445
464748�495051
5253�545556
5758�59
601�6?636465
66�168
6970"
�200 All rigMill. his reuna W serve�die d.iervicos. Inc.M1a06
DOWN
1 Ship's forward
section
2 Jackie's second
3 Noisy clamor
4 Isis or Minerva
5 Relish
6 Man or mandrill,
e.g.
7 Resistance unit
8 Coward of note
9 Maple product
10 Writer Moravia
11 Lacking
refinement
12 Nursemaid
13 Make beloved
18 Circle segment
22 Big name in
small planes
23 Swedish pop
group
24 Excessively
showy
25 Rendered fat
26 Ragged clothing
30 Fuzz person
33 Worships
34 Obvious toupee
36 Ewe's mate
39 Comic Caesar
40 Texaco
trademark
41 Present!
42 SS Alex
Rodriguez
43 Aloof contempt
45 Lettering device
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PRIVATE APARTMENTS CREATED FOR campus
INDEPENDENT STUDENTS WHO GET IT.
Live It
Love It
Clubhouse with large flat screen televisions
Game room with billiard, air hockey & foosball
Computer media center
Fitness Center
Swimming Pool with hot tub
Beach volleyball
Minutes from campus
On the ECU bus route
tai
Get It
252-758-6766
www.campus-pointe.com
Fully equipped kitchens (I.e. dishwasher, microwave, ft disposal)
Private bedrooms & Private baths
All utilities included except phone service
(J75mo electricity allowance2 bd. apt.) (J105mo electricity allowance3 bd. apt.)
Washer & Dryer included
High-speed Internet access included
Extended Basic Cable T.V. included
Individual 10 & 12 month leases available
Flexible payment options ?
campus
poinle-
orr campus puvate apaitmekts
irvErr uvriT err it.





CLASSIFIEDS
Page A6
4-19-0!
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the TUESDAY edition
Friday at 4 p.m. for the WEDNESDAY edition
Monday at 4 p.m. for the THURSDAY edition
Ad must be received In person. We are located on
the second floor ot the Old Cafeteria Complex.
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Students (wvalid I.DJ-UP to 25 words.
Non-students-UP to 25 words
Each word over 25, add
.$2
For bold or all caps, add (perl
All ads must be prepaid. No refunds given.
-$4
-5c
.$1
FOR RENT
Apartment in Pirates Cove for
sublease. Preferably a girl. Utilities
included. Rent is $375, first month
free. Please contact me Allison at
757-617-3240.
Walk to campus, 3 bedrooms, 1 12
baths, hardwood floors, ceiling fans.
All kitchen appliances, washerdryer,
storage shed, attic, large frontback
yard, $650 00 per month. Available
August 1st. Meade Street, 341-
4608.
108 Stancil. Student Special I Walk to
Class. 3BR1BA Duplex. HW floors,
WD hookups, Pets allowed with
fee. Available first of May. $650
month. Call Kiel at 341-8331.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments, walking
distance to campus, WD conn
pets ok no weight limit, free water
and sewer. Call today for security
deposit special - 758-1921.
Spacious 2 & 3 Bedroom
Townhouses Full Basement Enclosed
Patio WD Hook-up ECU Bus Route
No Pets 752-7738 Available July 1st
and August 1st.
Now accepting applications for
summer and fall semesters at the
following locations: Captain's
Quarters, Sycamore Hill, and
University Terrace. Call Hearthside
Rentals at 355-2112.
One, Two, Three and Four Bedroom
houses walking distance from ECU
Pets OK Fenced Yard Central Heat A
C Call 531-5701 Available Summer
and Fall
Apartment for sublease May une
and uly. Fully Furnished with all
utilities included. Private bathroom
and washer and dryer. Call Lauren
at (919) 601-1488 for details.
2 Bedroom house for rent on Elm
Street between 4th and 5th Streets.
Really nice inside, washer and dryer
included, walk to campus. Great
house. Available une 1st for $650.
Call 341-8331
Walk to campus or ride campus
transit. Clean 3BR 1 BATH - Willow
St. (Beside Tar River Estates).
WD included, heatAC, ceiling
fans, hardwood floors, excellent
management. $625month. Call
(252)375-6447.
218 A Wyndham Circle 2 Bedroom 2
Bath Duplex Close to ECU Available
in June No Pets Call 252-714-1057 or
252-756-2778 $625 Monthly
Pirate's Cove; Four rooms, same unit
available for individual subleases:
May June July. $370allinclusive!Tons
of amenities! Willing to negotiate.
Call Elizabeth (252) 757-0328
Room for rent in Pirate's Place in four
bedroom flat. $200 per month plus
utilities. Call CaiUin at (252) 916-
9175 if interested.
Rent New Townhouse, 3 bdr, 2.5
bath in Dudleys Grant. Cable &
wshrdryer included. Huge patio.
Really Nice Place, $825 252-521-
7972 or bvh1116@mail.ecu.edu
3 BR, 3 BA, LR, Kitchen, Laundry with
WD. Dishwasher 1st floor, Patio,
Central heatair, lots of parking,
6 blocks from ECU, available May
2005, Brownlea Dr. Call 252-240-
1889.
Spacious 2 Si 3 bedroom duplexes,
walking distance to campus, pets
ok with fee, fireplace, limited
availability, call today for security
deposit special! 758-1921
For Rent - 2 bedroom 1 bath brick
duplex, central air, Stancil Drive.
Walking distance to ECU. $540
month. Pets OK w fee. Call 353-
2717
3 BR1 BA duplex for rent. Close to
campus with washerdryer, kitchen
appliances, and fenced back yard.
Pets ok. Available August 1, but
flexible with move in date and
deposit. $650 a month. Call Andrew
@ 752-6859.
Walk to Campus! 2 blocks! Central
HeatAir. Large bedrooms, washer
dryer hook up. High speed internet,
cable and alarm system all included.
j bedroom available immediately. 3
bedroom available August 1st Call
Mike 439-0285.
Pirates Cove Sublease: Three
bedrooms available for individual
subleases during May, June, and
ury. $375 all inclusive with lots of
amenities. Call (252) 758-1963 or
email kmi1221@mail.ecu.edu
Walk to Campus! 1 Bedroom Apt.
at Captain's Quarters Starting at
$375. Includes cable, water, and
sewer. Now accepting applications
for summer and fall semesters.
Hearthside Rentals, 355-2112.
Walk to Campus! 6 Bedrooms.
Central HeatAir. Very spacious
- about 3000 square feet of living
space. Living room with hardwood
floors, dining room, screened in
back porch, nice backyard, washer
dryer hookup. High speed internet,
cable and alarm system all included.
Available August 1st. Call Mike
439-0285.
Blocks to ECU, Prt
Leasing, Houses - All sizes,
Available May, June, July, k
August - Call 321-4712 OR
collegeuniversltyrentals.com
Very nice four bedroom house two
bath duplex, 113 Rotary St. Three
blocks from campus and downtown
$1000. Call 252-341-8331 May 1st
Near ECU 107-A Stancil Dr. 3 BR,
1 BA washerdryer, dishwasher,
refridgerator, stove, central HA.
ceiling fans. $600mo 252-717-
2858
Houses for rent. From 2 BR 1 BA to 5
BR 2 BA. From $650 to $1200. Also
1 BR apartments. Now accepting
applications for Fall 2005. Call 252-
353-5107 or email wallprop@cox.
net
3 Bedroom 2 12 Bath Townhome.
Spacious, 1 12 miles from ECU.
On Busline, Pool, AC, Dishwasher,
carpet, no pets. Available July 1st
Call 252-717-1028 or 910-358-5018
$650mo.
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, GD, central air
St heat, pool, ECU bus line, 6, 9
or 12 month leases. Pets allowed.
High speed internet available. Rent
includes water, sewer, & cable.
3 Bedroom 2 Bath University area.
Remodeled. All gas, washer dryer,
hardwood floors, parking. Very
nice. No Dogs $930 Available 61
752-3816
Blocks to Campus one, three, or
more bedroom houses. Fenced yards
Pets OK! Security Systems. Available
various times One bedroom Apts
too. Call 830-9502
3 Bedroom house for rent one block
from ECU. 804 Johnston Street
(next to 4th. St.) Everything is new;
new central air, new kitchen, new
appliances, new bathrooms, new
washer dryer, new dishwasher etc.
Super nice. $950 Call 341-8331.
ROOMMATE WANTED
Need a place for the summer? I need
someone to sublease my apartment.
11th Street, walk to campus, pet
friendly, hardwood floors. Rent
$287 12 utilities. 704-437-1842
adb0806d 1 @mail.ecu.edu
Roommates needed for next year
Lease starts June 1st. House is
located on 4th and Summit Rent
is only $280 per month. Please call
Anna (252) 258-1586 Thanks
FOR SALE
1996 Range Rover, Perfect
Condition. White, tan leather. 4X4.
New cost $62,000. Only $9800. AC
Sunroof 144K miles. Must see Rusty
717-1028.
2001 Jeep Grand Cherokee 4 Sale
Great Condition Slate Blue with
grey Interior Roof Rack, Towing
Package, Alloy Wheels, CD Player,
and much more. $69,000 Miles
$12,525 Negotiable Contact:
(724)288-0337
SERVICES
Disc Repair for Playstation, X-Box,
and all standard size disk media
90 of non-functioning discs caji
be restored to good condition.
Located in Poorman's Flea Market,
Highway 264 Between Greenville
and Washington, booth 29. Open
Saturday 11-2, Sunday 10-4. For
info call 252-412-1206 (cell) or 252-
792-2758
HELP WANTED
Want to work at the beach this
summer? Clawsons Restaurant
in Beaufort is seeking summer
employees for all positions.
Visit www.clawsonsrestaurant.
com for application. Callemail
Matt@clawsonsrestaurant.com EOE
252-728-2133 Great money for a
little commute to the beach!
The Green Room is Hiring! Make
Quick Cash! No experience
needed! Set you own schedule!
Will train. Contact us for more
info! (252)321-1219 or email:
shopgreenroom@yahoo.com
Need FTbut only haye PT
hours available? I am looking for
individuals to help me spread the
word about VOIP. Earn up front
ECU Plastic
Surgery
Dr. William Wooden
Dr. Richard Zcri
Call 252-744-5291
to schedule your
confidential consultation.
untnv. ecu. eduecuphysicians
Q
Member
AMERICAN SOCIETY Or
PIASTIC SURCKjNS. INC
THE BRODY SCHOOL of MEDICINE at EAST CAROLINA UNIVER;
money and residuals. Graduate with
a degree and an ever increasing
income stream. Get paid every
month for what you do today. Call
to learn more about this exciting
opportunity. 252-558-4284.
Tiara Too lewelry Colonial Mall Part-
Time Retail Sales Associate Day and
Night Hours Must be in Greenville
Year Round Apply in Person
Baby sitters needed come meet
some mothers in need of Babysitters.
Tentative open house Thursday May
5th at 6:30 pm Bring Resume and
References. Call to confirm 321-
8384 or 355-0510
Join the BBC - The Buffalo Brew
Crew, Buffalo Wild Wings is now
accepting applications for summer
part-time staffing for the following
departments - 2 Server, 2 Door.
Applications accepted 1-6 p.m.
dairy, 114 East 5th Street.
Work Hard, Play Hard, Change Lives!
Girls resident camp looking for
counselors, wranglers, lifeguards,
boating staff, crafts, nature, unit
leaders, business managers, and
health supervisor. $200-340week!
May 28-Aug 7. Free Housing! www.
keyauwee.com Contact (336) 861-
1198 or keyauwee@aol.com
We are currently accepting
applications for student office
assistant in the radio station at
ECU. This position is for the first
summer session only. Interested
students should be good in math
and attention to detail. Come
by the office in the basement of
Mendenhall Student Center for an
application: Deadline is April 20,
2005.
Food Delivery Drivers Wanted
for Restaurant Runners Part-time
and weekend availability required.
Reliable transportation a must. Call
756-5527 Between 2-5 and leave
message if necessary. Greenville
Residents only. Sorry no dorm
students.
Lifeguards, Swim Instructors and
Coaches. Greenville, Farmville,
Wilson, Goldsboro, Ayden, Atlantic
Beach. Call Bob, 714-0576.
Paid Democracy Internship: Help
continue the civil rights and voting
rights movements. Greenville and
Charlotte summer internships for
undergrads. Pays $2000. Contact:
www.democracy-nc.org or 888-
687-8683 xt. 16
Bartending! $250day potential.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. (800) 965-6520 ext.
202.
ECU prof, seeks experienced sitter(s)
for care or 3 boys at our house or
yours. 4 daysweek: 14m. &3yr. all
day; 4 12 yr, 11:45 pick-up (May),
all day (June). Rate competitive.
Valid driver's license & references
required. Contact: reidj@mail.ecu.
edu, 355-8710
Active Handicapped Male Needs
Personal Attendant 7-10 am M-F
and Every Other Weekend. Duties
Include Bathing, Dressing, etc. Call
756-9141
Need a job? We are looking for
responsible people to fill positions
for this summer and onward. Part
time positions are available for all
shifts. Food service experience is
desirable. Call Chris at the Tropical
Smoothie Cafe for an interview:
252-531-2996.
Attention College Students National
Company 80 years in business
now recruiting for Part-time work.
Opportunity for $300-500 per
week. Only hard workers need
apply. Call 756-3861 10-5p.m. only
for appointment.
Part-time Office Assistant
Receptionist needed. Basic
computer skills a must, experience
with Microsoft WordExcel and
Quickbooks a plus! Flexible hours.
252-758-8353
Spring Break 2006. Travel with STS,
America's 1 Student Tour Operator
to Jamaica, Cancun, Acapulco,
Bahamas, and Florida. Now hiring
on-campus reps. Call for group
discounts. InformationReservations
1 -800-648-4849 or www.ststravel.
com
Barefoot Bernie's Bar & Grill
located on the Outer Banks is now
hiring for ALL full and part time
positions. Competitive wages &
great work environment! Please
call 252-251-1008 or email resume
to heather@barefootbernies.com
You may also go to our website
at Barefootbernies.com for an
application.
Primrose School - Raleigh N.C.
is looking to hire qualified Child
Development graduates. Great
compensation package. Fax resume
to 919-329-2930 or call 919-329-
2929. EOE
Movie ExtrasModels Needed
Young Faces Needed to Fill a Variety
of Jobs! Candidates Needed for
Crowd and Background Scenes for
Local Productions. No Experience
Required All Looks Needed! Up to
$22 Hourly Call 1(800) 280-0177
Now for More info
Pitt-Greene Chem-Dry is hiring
part-time and full-time carpet
cleaning technicians. No experience
necessary. Flexible hours. Valid DL
and criminal background check
required. Call 758-8353.
round BiUilluy
Is linking for PACKAGE HANDLERS u. loud vans
and unload trailers for the AM shift hours 4 AM to
8AM. $7.30 hour, tuition assistance available after
30 days. Future career opportunities in management
possible. Applications can be tilled out at 2410
United Drive (near the aifualics center) Grrcnville.
FREE
� of poor maintenance response
� of unretumed phone calls
� of noisy neighbors
� of crawly critters
�of high utility bills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumpy personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units that were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
KastRate Village Apts.
3200 F Moseley Dr.
561-RaENT or 561-7679
www.piruuclcproperly
management oin
HIRING
NOW
I Need reliable,
I energetic people to
Sonltor crops from
ay througn August,
ust be 19 or have
! one year of college.
Learn to ID weeds,
Insects and other
I field conditions. We
train! Hourly Miles.
Mail or fax resume
to:
MCSI
FOB 370
CoveCllYNC, 28523
Fan: 252 637 2125
SITY
SPRING
"HewfanivdU: AG Jeans, Frankie B,
BCBC Clothing, To The Max,
Ella Moss, Seychelles, Kenzie, Fifi
1itft owt lieu JLocatiatt:
La Promenade Greenville (Behind Starbucks)
252.321.8864
Boutique
Monday - Saturday: 10 am to 9 pm
Sunday: 1 pm to 6 pm
Firewise tip: Landscaping with water-
retaining plants helps protect
your home from wildfire. Find other
useful tips at FlrewtM.org.
CAN YOU BE THERE FOR
YOUR OLDER PARENT
WITHOUT ACTUALLY
HAVING TO BE THERE?
One out of five adults finds
themselves as the designated
"caregiver" for a loved one who
can no longer manage alone. This
role can often snowball, weighing
heavily on you as you try to cope
with the demands of caregiving.
There may be services and
organizations right in your
parent's neighborhood that can
help when you're not around.
The outcome is better care for
your parent, and less anxiety
for you. Visit www.familycare
givingl01.org and discover
a world of support, answers and
advice - for both of you.
'iK,
Fknily
Caregiving
It's not ill up to you.
From the National Family
Caregivers Association and
the National Alliance for Caregiving
with the generous support of Eisai Inc.






4-19-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A7
APARTMENT COMMUNITY
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Individual Lease State-of-the-art
Program Fitness Center
No Security Deposit
limited tyace awxilaMc fan fait
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� JF-I
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COIXEGEFARK
252.752.9995
3305 E. 10th St. fcW � w.wwww 0n ECU Bus RouTE
www.collegeparkweb.com





4-19-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A8
��
Get it all in the Fall at
Go all inclusive as low as
Sign a lease
and receive a
Best Buy
Gift Card!
"Resort Style living with all the amenities you can dream ofts
PARK
University Manor � www.collegeparkweb.com
3535 E. 10th St. � Greenville, NC 27858
758-5551
Open House & Free Food!
Stop by and see why
University Suites is the
best off-campus Student Housing Community available!
FREE COOKOUT EVERY THURSDAY, 2:00 p.m - 7:00 p.m.
� First Month's
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�SuMF HRU MM appiy.Caii iorwtaiis.
Stop by and see our new
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Enjoy FREE FOOD.
Watch our BIG Screen
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Free Tanning!
Our Floorplans are unliki
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Extra Large Brick Patio
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University Suites
551-3800
www.uim ersitysuites.net






A8
ESDAY April 19, 2005
Announcements:
American Red Cross
Some of the best gifts in life have
no price tags, give the gift of life.
Donate blood Tuesday, April 19 at
700 Cromwell Drive. Call 758-1140.
Sponsored by Team Blue.
Barefoot on the Mall
Barefoot on mall will be held
Thursday, April 21 from 12-6 p.m.
Clubs and student organizations
join forces to make their causes
known and have fun with inflatable
games, music and dancing.
Minority Student Ball
The fourth Annual Minority Student
Ball will take place in the Murphy
Center April 23 at 8 p.m. Tickets
are $10 for singles and $15 for
couples. Contact Brldgette Joye
at bjj0123@mail.ecu.edu for more
information.
Indie Concert
Indie band Mae will be performing
at the Mendenhall Brickyard,
Sunday, April 24 at 2 p.m.
0DB Listening Session
There will be a listening session
for ODB's first album since
his death April 26 at 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall. This event will honor
ODB in the respectful manner that
is deserved.
Names In the news:
Eminem's Court Win
A Michigan state appeals court threw
out a lawsu it by a former schoolmate
of Eminem who accused the Detroit
rapper of portraying him in a false
light In the song "Brain Damage"
Friday.DeAngelo Bailey, a sanitation
worker, admits he picked on Marshall
Mathers III 'who got all grew up as
Eminem in school. But he says the
most he did to that very slim and
quite shady cat was to shove him
and give him a little bump, and
that he most definitely did not bang
Marshall's head on a urinal or choke
him, as the colorful, if baroque, "Brain
Damage" claims. The court upheld
a Macomb County judge's 2003
decision to dismiss the suit saying
Em's lyrics, which have him singing
that his "whole brain fell out" were
not Intended to be taken literally.
'Star Wars The Ticket
George Lucas' much-anticipated
mega-blockbuster-to-be, "Star
Wars: Episode III Revenge of the
Slth won't open until May 19,
but you can buy tickets now. The
AMC Theatres chain is offering
advance sales for show times as
early as the very first one at 12:01
a.m. Thursday morning, May 19.
Tickets can be bought at box
offices or online at moviewatcher.
comstarwars.
Pom Star's Squlrmlsh
Pom star Jenna Jameson, whos been
making inroads into mainstream
culture with her best-selling bio,
"How to Make Love Like a Pom
Star is suing her publisher, Regan
Media, run by trendsetting power
editor Judith Regan. The quarrel is
over profits from a planned reality
show by the A&E cable channel
about Jameson's day-to-day life.
Jameson says Regan has no right
to profit from the A&E deal since the
TV negotiations happened before her
book contract Regan is countersuing,
claiming that Jameson's contract
gives Regan media exclusive rights
to negotiate any TV deals. Reps from
Regan and Jameson did not reply
to calls from the Associated Press
seeking comment
Gotti to the Stage
That elegant and talented lady
who heads the classic "nukelar"
household on A&Es reality show
"Growing Up Gotti" is making the
jump from reality to stage and for
a musical, no less. Victoria Gotti
is set to make her theatrical debut
in the Off-Broadway "We're Still
Hot" at the theater at St. Luke's
in New York. Gotti, a 41-year-old
mother of three, shared a poignant
memory with the Associated Press:
"I remember when I was In the fifth
or sixth grade, doing the school play
and trying out for the talent show
she said. "It was upsetting to
me, because I was always an
introverted kid, and I got up
there and always bombed
The show, in which Gotti plays
one of four 50lsh women
reunited for their 35th high
school reunion, opens April 30.
No Truer Love
Guess Ellen DeGeneres really
has found the right gal. Former
"Ally McBeal" star Portia De Rossi
has removed a tattoo on her ring
finger with the initials of her
ex-gktfriend that used to be Ringo
Starr's stepdaughter, Francesca
Gregorini to show her true devotion
to DeGeneres. De Rossi said: "Im
not saying it's anything I regret
doing, because I don't but it just
doesn't make any sense now
T cool for Snses
Band Info
The nationally renown bands:
Devon
Citizen Cope
Little Brother
Battle of the Bands winner:
The Capulets
Who, what,
when, where?
FREE for students
Barefoot on the Mall
Thursday, April 21
12 p.m. - 5 p.m.
Between Jarvls and
Joyner Library
Crowds are offered many exciting games at various student organization booths. Students participate In one of the many inflatable activities that Barefoot offers.
Barefoot 2005
SCOTTY WILLIAMS
STAFF WRITER
Thursday, April 21, four days before the last official
day of classes, ECU students will put down the books and
pull out the picnic blankets. Pants will be rolled up and
the grass mall area of campus will be filled up with ECU
students who just want to relax and have a little fun and
the Student Union will give it to them. Barefoot on the
Mall will return for the 26th time from noon - 6 p.m.
Thursday in front of the central campus dorms.
The theme this year is "ECU Gets Twisted" and as
usual the event will bring an array of musical acts and
fun novelties. Inflatable games and novelty amusements
like vertical bungee and boxing will be back from previ-
ous years. Thirty student organizations will be involved
in the event, from all over campus. The event is all about
having fun before exams and students will be able to
play games, win prizes and get some food in a laid back
atmosphere.
The fun at the event is larger than life, literally.
Huge blow-up novelties dot the landscape, and there are
games all over the place for people to enjoy. It's another
opportunity for many little-known student organiza-
tions to get noticed and give away stuff. Often student
organizations are popular at Barefoot if they're giving
away something especially good.
The performers at Barefoot aren't your typical
crooners, either. Big-name bands such as Jason Mraz,
John Mayer, Widespread Panic, Edwin McCain (with a
band at the time) and Weekend Excursion have taken
the stage at Barefoot before hitting it big, so the event
promises to showcase what's hot in music. This year will
be no exception, as a host of up-and-coming groups are
set to take the stage.
The opening act at noon will be The Capulets, win-
ners of this year's Battle of the Bands. Devon Sproule, a
folk singersongwriter, will follow at 12:30 p.m. Devon
has been a national performer since the age of 16 and
has toured with bands like Guster, David Gray and the
Dave Matthews Band. The mid-lining group is Little
Brother, a North Carolina based hip-hop trio. Citizen
Cope, an urban blues songwriter whose album "The
Clarence Greenwood Recording" was chosen as one
of the best of 2004 by NPR, will be the headliner act.
Between acts, Wellness Education will sponsor a side
stage where spoken word competitions and step shows
will fill the breaks between performances with a theme
of HIVAIDS awareness.
If you're a freshman or have never experienced
Barefoot on the Mall before, you are in for a very spe-
cial treat.
"Come out, bring a blanket and some friends, and
just relax said Katie Daniel, a senior theater major.
Daniel has been involved with Barefoot for three
years, this year serving as the Barefoot committee chair.
Daniel's major advice to students is to get in line early for
giveaways because lines get very long by the middle of
the afternoon, and you can get in line more than once
if you don't win the first time around.
"Bring a blanket to sit on and some water to drink,
walk around and get free giveaways and have a photo
keychain picture taken. Bring your dog if you have
one, but put him on a leash. Everyone always has a
good time
If you have a class during the day Thursday, don't
fret. The event is six hours long to give everyone time
to get out and enjoy the day, or stay all day if you're in
the mood to kick back.
One of the greatest things about Barefoot is the
overall theme. With the end of classes and the crunch
of final exams just around the corner, the event lets
everyone take a few hours off and enjoy the spring and
enjoy a free afternoon of quality music. There's always
a lot to take home, too.
Whether you go to blow off some steam, listen to
some good music, hang out with friends or take home
some freebies, throw your books on the floor and go
enjoy an ECU tradition that promises to rock your
socks off.
This writer can be contacted at features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Citizen Cope plays ECU'S Barefoot on the Mall
Hear what he has to say
KRISTIN MURNANE
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Artists have been mixing
musical genres for decades and
rap and rock have certainly
crossed paths before, but Citi-
zen Cope brings a breath of
fresh air to this particular field.
Cope, a.k.a. Clarence Green-
wood, mixes of rap, rock, blues
and funk is all perfectly blended
In his 2004 release The Clarence
Greenwood Recordings. The first
single off the album, "Bullet and
a Target" has been in regular
rotation on rock stations across
the country, and his new single,
"Son's Gonna Rise is featured
in a commercial for Pontiac.
This Washington D.C. native is
coming to ECU this week to play
for our annual Barefoot on the
Mall event. I was fortu-
nate enough to interview Cope,
and we talked about everything
from politics to underwear.
TEC: Where do you get your
inspirations? What inspires you
to write music?
Citizen Cope: I guess life
and the people I meet and the
situations I've been in and the
music I've heard.
TEC: I know you've worked
with Carlos Santana, how did
it feel working with such a
legend?
CC: Oh it was great. Carlos is
a real ambassador for peace and
love, and so anytime you get a
chance to work with somebody
like that it's a great opportu-
nity.
TEC: The second song on
your latest CD, "Pablo Picasso to
my understanding, is about a
man who
falls in love with a woman in a
mural. Is that autobiographical?
Where did the idea for that song
come from?
CC: Well, I made the music
for it and just got into one of
those zones. Music is weird like
that. Sometimes it just happens
within the context of being in
the mode of writing the song. But
yeah, that's what it turned out to
be about. Any song you write as
a certain aspect of yourself into
it. In retrospect, I guess it's just
dealing with the idea of delusion
in a lot of ways.
TEC: What is the biggest
misconception that people have
about you and your music?
CC: I don't think there's a
widespread misconception really.
I think that people who don't get
it, just don't get it.
TEC: You're like a
one-man band, playing
guitar, keyboard and
drums, in addition
to providing vocals.
What is your favor-
ite instrument to
Clarence Greenwood puts his personal style into all of his music.
play?
CC: The guitar. I use the
instrument as a tool for writing.
I'm not, by any means, a prodigy
and I'm not fluent In any par-
ticular instrument. People like
Carlos Santana arid Coltrane,
now they can play. I'm more of
a writer who tools around with
the rhythm of it.
TEC: Who are your heroes?
CC: I don't know if I have
any heroes. I've been inspired
see COPE page B2





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
4-19-05
u0p6 from page B1
Citizen Cope will be sharing their u: tigue style with ECU at Barefoot.
by the lives of people like Martin
Luther King, Malcom X and
Mahatma Ghandi, they're people
who understood non-violent
approaches as well as standing for
what they believed in. There are a
lot of people out there who have
done really good things.
TEC: What is your favorite
song to perform?
CC: I like all of them for dif-
ferent reasons.
TEC: What do you do during
your downtime? How do you
relax?
CC: 1 just usually kick back.
When you're on tour there's not
a lot of downtime, but when I'm
off tour 1 just kick back, have
some good company and a good
meal.
TEC: What other CD's are
you listening to right now?
CC: I was listening to some
Prince the other day, some old
Prince records. There's just a
whole bunch of stuff 1 listen to.
TEC: Are there any under-
ground bands that we might not
have heard of that you'd recom-
mend?
CC: I like that group Ele-
fant.
TEC: Do you remember your
first gig and what it was like?
CC: Oh man. It was cool. I
think I opened up for Tricky for
my first gig, back in like 1996 I
want to say.
TEC: If you weren't a musi-
cian, what do you think you'd
be doing?
CC: I'd probably be a novelist
or a writer.
TEC: How do you feel about
file sharing and downloading?
Do you think it hurts music or do
you think it can help to promote
bands?
CC: It has an effect on both, it
does both things. It's called shar-
ing you know. I wish I could get
in a cab and get out and not pay
and say, "Thanks for sharing I
love the aspect that it gets music
out there. I've always felt like just
getting the music out there is the
most important thing and if it's
good, people are going to hear
it. It's better for the record com-
panies to have more music out
there. Their crisis is dealing with
the fact that they haven't been
able to develop certain artists and
that radio has become so power-
ful, that they've let it become
more powerful than them. So I
don't think their problem lies
with downloading and things
like that. I mean Dark Side of
the Moon probably still sells like
half a million records a year, and
there's no cost in that for them.
They don't have to promote it,
because it sells itself. There's a
lot of money out there not just
in record sales.
TEC: What do you think
about everything going down
in the world today? Do you have
any distinct opinions on the
war, government, politics or just
society in general?
CC: I feel like until mankind
can evolve into more peaceful
approaches that it puts itself at
risk of inevitably putting itself at
doom. Technology is moving so
fast and evolving so quickly and
we have these infrastructures set
up in so many different parts of
the world. And in other parts of
the world, they don't necessarily
live like that, so there's a clash.
So what happens is that we've
got to start thinking on more
of a humankind level. They say
that war's always been there
but all this technology has not
always been there. People have
to start evolving their thoughts
more than, "oh a person did that
wrong and now they have to
right that wrong through vio-
lence. You just have to sit back
and not fight the course and just
kind of observe what you see and
how you see it and try to be as
good on a personal level as you
can possibly be.
TEC: One last question for
you, and I'm sure all the other
ladies out there want to know
this, but do you wear boxers or
briefs?
CC: Boxers definitely.
This writer can be
contacted at featur
es�theeastcaroli
nian.com.
(�odd To Toyfa.
e� a & f cdrollnd university
APRIL ���3. c�OOEj
noon unfll Q:OOpm
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Enjoy a wide array of stress busting activities from 10 minute massages, aerobic
workouts, yoga, meditation, study skills, exam preparation to stress management
workshops (reflexology, aromatherapy, acupressure) from 1pm-5pm. Grab a free
cup of gourmet coffee at our outdoors Cafe Bistro (Mendenhall patio) from
5pm-7pm. FREE Bowling and Billards from 6pm-8pm at the Outer Limitz. Don't miss
the COMIC RELEASE COOKOUT featuring your favorite grilled foods and a
performance by the TRANSACTORS (improvisational comedy troupe from Raleigh)
from 6pm-9pm. Sign-up for the 10 minute massages starts at noon. Sponsored by
Partners in Campus Life (PiCL) and Student Government Association.
Note: For those on the meal plan, enjoy a
free meal at the MIDNIGHT BREAKFAST
sponsored by Campus Dining at Todd and
West End Dining Halls from 10pm 1am.
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Monday - Wednesday, May 2 - 4
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4-19-05
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(s, aerobic
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE B3
Creativity through Blu Moon Film Festival
Independent films on
campus
KACY THOMPSON
STAFF WRITER
The third annual Blu Moon
Independent Film Festival was
held at 5 p.m. Saturday, April 16,
in the Hendrix Theater. There
were 22 films shown - half of
which were by ECU students or
alumni, and the other half were
films accepted from directors
outside the university.
"The quality of the films were
really good said Jamie Mauldin,
a senior communication major.
Mauldin, who helped orga-
nize this year's festival, also said
they received more entries this
year than they have in the past.
"We had a wide variety of
films sent in this year said
Faith Dover, this year's Blu Moon
director.
Dover, a senior communica-
tion major, was pleased with
how many ECU students sent in
films to participate in the festival.
Dover was also one of the direc-
tors. Her provocative short film
was titled Unfortunate Affairs.
The Blu Moon committee
members were satisfied with the
turnout of this year's festival.
The genres ranged from
comedy, drama, suspense, politi-
cal and religious topics. The types
of films varied, as well. There
were music videos, commercials
and documentaries.
A few of the more unusual
films shown at the festival were
Hide and Seek by Christopher
Romano and Sandamation by
San Sicaf. Hide and Seek was an
animation about robots, and
Sandamation showed incredible
sand art being made. However,
neither of these films was from
ECU students.
"Even though it was from out
of state, I really liked Sandama-
tion said senior communication
major Ilene Schwartz. She also
commented on how the audi-
ence was bigger than they had
expected.
"There was an awesome turn-
out this year said Christina
Guerry, a senior communication
major. Guerry is a member of
the Blu Moon committee, and
also one of the directors that
submitted a film. She directed a
music video for the song "Where
is My Mind" by The Pixies. Many
people after the festival were talk-
ing about how this was one of
their favorite films at the event.
"The music video for 'Where
is My Mind' was my favorite
said Shawn Lamons, a senior
communication major.
Lamons was another one of
the organizers for Blu Moon.
"I liked the story idea that
went along with the song and it
was edited really well Lamons
said.
Another out of state director
that sent in a film was Georg
Koszulinski. He directed Future
X, which was the second film
shown of the night. It was one of
the more serious films of the eve-
ning that spoke about death and
schizophrenia. Koszulinski had
a very unique style of presenting
his scenes throughout the film.
He used editing effects to show
the emotions that the character
was going through.
Two of the other music videos
that were shown in this year's
festival were both for Train.
ECU students directed them.
One of the music videos was for
"Wilmington" by Travis Meany.
The other Train video was for
the song "Mississippi" by Benji
Waters.
"I was nervous when it came
time for my film said Benji
Waters, a senior communica-
tion major. Waters was nervous
because it was the first time his
work would be shown for an
actual audience.
"At the same time, I was
excited because it's probably the
only time I'll ever see any of my
work on the big screen said
Waters.
Waters also worked on one of
the documentaries in the festival
along with Katie Graham and
Michelle Jelinek. Live Music in
Small Town America was especially
interesting to people involved in
Greenville's local music scene.
Their film showed local bands
playing at Peasants, one of the
clubs downtown.
Another film that was famil-
iar for students was Black Elvis
directed by ECU student, Josiah
Owen. It followed the man that
has been deemed Black Elvis. He
is often seen carrying a beat up
guitar walking around down-
town.
There were two rather contro-
versial films that were shown at
the festival that were sent in from
outside of the university. Lincoln
vs. Bush, a film showing the
standpoints of Lincoln and Bush
if they had ran against each other
for office in the last election was
directed by Pat Battistini.
The other more discordant
film was Outtakes of the Christ
directed by Andrew Goldenburg.
This film was meant to be fun
and showed the outtakes of the
movie, Passion of the Christ.
SGA
SPRING ELECTIONS
ONLINE VOTING
FOR
EXECUTIVE OFFICE
(President, Vice President, Treasurer, and Secretary)
POLLS OPEN
APRIL 19 AT 9:00 AM
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Other films shown that were
not from ECU included Six Ft. Six
directed by Graham Ball, who
put together conversations from
three payphones. The Secret Life of
Clowns was by William Mullins
and Jennifer Goodman. This film
was about clowns becoming less
popular and not being able to get
jobs. Sir Josh by Chris Hite was a
humorous film about a boy and
his bond with his grandparents'
car. Lume by Jeff Zuehlke fol-
lowed-the band, Lume. The last
film to be shown was Touching, a
provocative short film directed
by Jim McQuaid.
As for the other ECU entries
that were shown at the festival,
there was one entitled East Caro-
lina PSA. This was the first piece
shown and it was directed by
Amanda Johnson. Scott Taube
directed No Trade Refused, which
was a short comedy about trading
in children as if they were used
cars. The Destino Film by Sean
Hunter had fantastic production
skills behind it. Last year's Blu
Moon director, Ashley Mangum,
directed 8mg. R.J. Spaulding
directed Of Suits, Ties and Errant
Limbs which was about a zombie
at a job interview. The Marley
Fund was about feline leukemia
directed by Jessica Garrett.
There was also an after party
held for the Blu Moon Film
Festival in the Pirate Under-
ground. Narallis from Rocky
Mount played first. The Capulets,
the winner of this year's Battle of
the Bands, also'performed.
Look out for the names of
the directors from this year's Blu
Moon. They could be great direc-
tors one day. It's not too soon to
be getting your ideas ready for
next year's festival.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
0
Annual Blu
Moon Film
Festival
On April 16,5 p.m. this Independent
film festival showcased students
with a love of film.
Students from across the state
participated.
22 films were shown.
ft
&
Independant films from students were showcased at the annual event in Hendrix Theatre, April 16.
THE EAST CAROLS
uauJfuiiiy
Position
torSu
Muerti
Representati
Do you enjoy
meeting new
people?
Looking tor a great aMition
to your resume? �
If you answered yes to
these questions, then we
want to tak to you! -iifLv�

Please calf 328-2000
lor more information






"1
4-19-0
Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
Pirates pick up first sweep of season
Mills
Ricky Brooks started the Pirates' series with Louisville on the right foot with his left arm, tossing a complete game and allowing just one run on nine hits with nine strikeouts.
ECU picks up crucial
victories in Louisville
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Behind a brilliant game,
one pitching performance from
Ricky Brooks and an offensive
explosion in games two and
three, ECU baseball swept a three
game series from Louisville in
front of record crowds, as the
Cardinals opened their brand
new Jim Patterson Stadium.
The Pirates took the three con-
tests 4-1,9-8 and 11-6 respectively.
Cardinals' fans poured in by
the thousands Friday to watch
game one under the lights. Their
previous season high for atten-
dance was against bitter in-state
rival Kentucky, when they drew
just over a 1,000 people. The
announced attendance of 3,213
for game one between ECU and
Louisville set a record for the
largest crowd to ever watch a
Cardinals game.
Brooks made sure the only
people to have a positive experi-
ence opening the new stadium
were his Pirates as he recorded
his second complete game of the
season, giving up only one run
on nine hits, while striking out
nine. The sophomore, who has
been on fire as of late, did not
give up a walk.
All the runs in the contest
were scored in the fourth inning.
With one out in the ECU half
of the fourth, Adam Witter drew
a walk. Jake Smith then singled
to short, bringing up Costanzo,
who then drove in Witter with
a single to centerfield. Freshman
Ryan Peisel singled to right field
to load the bases, which were
quickly cleared when Brett Lind-
gren stroked the gap in center to
give the Pirates a 4-0 lead.
The Cardinals only run came
in the fourth when J.T. La Fountain
scored on a Logan Johnson double.
Brooks improved to 3-2 on
the season. Costanzo, who went
tin I with a RBI and a run
scored, led the Diamond Bucs
offensively. Lindgren, who deliv-
ered the huge blow in the fourth,
was l-for-2 with three RBI.
The Pirates scored five times
with two outs in the first to begin
game two, then held off a scrappy
Louisville team that refused to
quit, and won 9-8.
Starting everything off was
Mike Grace, who walked with
two outs in the first. Witter then
singled to put runners on the cor-
ners. After a passed ball allowed
Grace to score and Witter to move
to second, the catcher botched a
throw back to the pitcher allow-
ing Witter to take third and ulti-
mately scored to give the Pirates
a 2-0 lead. Smith stepped to the
plate and doubled, then scored
on the next play when Peisel sin-
gled to left. Peisel scooted home
on a Dale Mollenhauer double,
increasing the Pirate advantage to
4-0. Finally, Mollenhauer scored
when Harrison Eldridge delivered
ECU's third double of the inning
for a 5-0 lead.
Freshman starter T.J. Hose
did a decent job of keeping the
Cardinals at bay throughout the
contest, pitching seven innings,
giving up seven hits and three
earned runs, while striking out
six. It was the four unearned runs
the Pirate defense surrendered
however, that kept Louisville in
the game and began to pay big
dividends as they put together
a furious rally in the bottom of
the eighth.
After a single and a hit batter
to begin the inning, sophomore
Mike Flye relieved Hose. Flye
never recorded an out, giving up
two hits, a walk and three runs
- two of which were on Hose's
line - to allow Louisville to close
within one run at 9-8. Randy
Mazey opted to bring in Scott
Andrews, which proved to be
the right choice as Andrews got
a strike out and a line out to end
the threat.
After giving up a double to
Isaiah Howes to begin the ninth,
Andrews settled down to retire
the final three batters, two by way
of strikeout, to end the game and
pick up his first save of the season.
Witter led the Pirates at the
plate with a career high of four
hits, one of which was his third
home run of the season. The lefty
had three runs scored and a RBI.
Smith added three hits and Peisel
had two RBI in a winning effort.
Game three starter P.J. Con-
nelly, who hadn't pitched more
than three innings in each of
his last three starts, found simi-
lar trouble again Sunday, going
just 1.1 innings. The southpaw
gave up four runs on three hits
and a walk. He didn't strike out
a batter. Luckily for him, the
Pirates scored in every inning
except for the seventh en route
to a 11-6 victory.
Flye was called on once again,
but made sure game three would
not be a repeat of two, as he
pitched 6.1 innings of fantastic
relief, giving up just two runs on
six hits and striking out eight.
Louisville led 4-3 after two
complete innings, but that
advantage quickly dissipated as
the Pirates scored six runs in the
next four innings, highlighted
by a two run homer from Witter
in the fourth, to take control of
the game.
Witter finished the game
see BASEBALL page B5
Panthers'
Mills dies
at 45
(AP) � Sam Mills, an under-
sized linebacker who became
a Pro Bowl player with New
Orleans and Carolina and was
later an assistant coach for the
Panthers, died Monday after
fighting cancer for nearly two
years, the Panthers said. He was
I 45.
f Mills, who was diagnosed
x with cancer of the small intestine
g in August 2003 but continued
I to coach Carolina's linebackers
between chemotherapy treat-
ments, died at his home.
"Sam was one of the finest
people you will ever meet. You
would never know that he was a
player who made Pro Bowls and
had all this attention because he
treated everybody the same no
matter who they were Carolina
general manager Marty Hurney
said.
"He never had a bad thing
to say about anybody and had a
great ability to laugh at himself.
"He was the type of guy you
want your kids to grow up to be
A five-time Pro Bowl selec-
tion, Mills spent the final three
seasons of his 12-year NFL career
with the Panthers, beginning with
their inaugural season in 1995.
There is a statue of him out-
side Bank of America Stadium
and he is the only player in
the team's Hall of Honor. Mike
McCormack, Carolina's first
team president, is the only other
inductee in the Hall.
Mills spent his first nine NFL
seasons with the New Orleans
Saints, following three seasons
in the United States Football
see MILLS page 85
Open letter from
Terry Holland
SID � Possibly the great-
est barrier to success facing
ECU athletics right now is our
own self-image. New coaches
always speak to the difficulty
of changing a "losing cul-
ture" among the athletes of
a particular team. However,
many schools are finding that
the "losing culture" phenom-
enon can spread like a wildfire
through the whole fan base
due to the Internet and other
media coverage of rumors and
half-truths.
At this time in our history,
a good part of the Pirate Nation
is willing to believe that every
dumb thing anyone can dream
up about how ECU Athletics
operates has to be true. Fortu-
nately, most of our competitors
fight the same battles daily but
we will never catch up to our
competition if we persist in doing
business in the same way they
are forced to do their business.
Our competition for stu-
dents, recruits, media cover-
age, etc will always be fhe
SEC, ACC and Big East schools
within our geographic' area.
The lowest athletic budgets at
those schools are already at $30
million-plus. Since our budget
is18 million, the Pirate Nation
has no choice but to become a
better TEAM than our competi-
tors. We simply do not have the
luxury of believing that we can
not win against these odds or
that ANY of our teammates
are not doing their very best to
win and build our programs.
Becoming a TEAM is hard
work and requires a great deal
of old-fashioned "faith" that
what the mind can conceive,
the body can achieve. Given
the intense competitive envi-
ronment in athletics today, we
simply can not afford to believe
that we can "talk" our way into
the BCS picture by joining
another conference or what-
ever. Anything that happens
to us will have to be EARNED
by becoming a more effective
team than out competitors.
That will require the support
of every single member of the
Pirate Nation working toward
a common goal.
Eighteen million dollar
budgets can not compete effec-
tively against S30 million bud-
gets as long as any percentage
of our work day has to be spent
tracking down and dispelling
rumors or half-truths. The fol-
lowing e-mail is an example of
how easily panicked we, the
Pirate Nation, have become.
However, it is not the e-mail
itself that is the problem - we
must all first acknowledge
that every single one of us has
participated to one degree or
another In such speculation
and secondly, that if we persist
in doing so, we are dooming
our own program to medioc-
rity at best.
Gentlemen,
I attended the Spring Game
this past Saturday with a few
former football letter winners.
Among them were Brian Rimpf
Leonard Henry, David Garrard,
etc. I thought the turnout, the
festivities, etc. were great. I was
however "very" disappointed to
learn that there were many foot-
ball recruits there, yet they never
got to mingle with any of the NFL
alums that we have here at ECU. 1
feel very strongly that there should
have been a time that David,
Leonard, etc should have been
put in the area of these recruits,
see LETTER page Be
Lady Pirates hit mark with sweep of Louisville
ECU rises to second in
C-USA with 50th win
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
Last season the ECU Softball
team was outscored away at
Louisville 20-2 in part of a three-
game sweep inflicted on the Lady
Pirates. This season the outcome
turned out to be much different
as ECU went on to face their No. 1
ranked Conference USA rival.
Offense was key for ECU in
game one of the three-game series
with the Lady Cardinals. Senior
Kate Manuse started off the scor-
ing in the bottom of the second
with a soloshot. ECU was then
able to extend the lead to 4-0 in
the bottom of the next inning off
the bats of seniors Mandi Nichols
and Manuse. Louisville managed
to score two runs in the top of the
fourth and fifth, but it was not
enough as ECU won 6-2.
The win knocked Louisville
out of first place In the C-USA
standings and pulled ECU closer
to second place.
In the second game of the
afternoon, sophomore pitcher
Keli I l.i11rll took the mound for
the Lady Pirates and performed
well, allowing only four hits in
the complete game shutout, 1-0.
The only run of the game
. came off the bat of freshman Beth
Nolan, who hit a home run in the
bottom of the second.
The win gave Harrell her 23rd
of the year.
"I was executing, hitting
spots and finding a way to let
my defense work for me and my
defense was great said Harrell.
Now that two games were
already won, the Lady Pirates
were tied for second place in C-
USA with Louisville. They were
also only one win away from
their 50th win of the season and
the 1,000th win in school history
heading into their third and final
game against the Lady Cardinals
Mandl Nichols was one of two Lady Pirates with a hit against UL on Saturday as ECU won 1-0.
the following day.
Harrell once again took the
mound for ECU for the third
game collecting her 28th com-
plete game of the season and
striking out 10 as ECU completed
the sweep with a 4-1 victory.
Manuse drove in two runs in the
win including her 13th home run of
the season in the bottom of the first.
Pirates' coach Tracey Kee was
very pleased with her team's per-
formance during the series and
picking up the milestone victories.
"This win was extremely
special, the 50th, the 1,000th,
the fact that it was a sweep in the
conference said Kee.
"We knew as a team what
we wanted to accomplish. I just
reminded the kids, a lot of great
ball players have come through
here and laid the foundation for
them and they are doing a great
job carrying the torch
With solo possession of
second place ECU now looks
forward to their next goal, taking
out the first place C-USA team,
DePaul. The Lady Pirates are
scheduled to face DePaul away
next weekend.
Although the team is having
great success, Kee insists they
must keep modest in order to
reach their goal at the end of the
season, the C-USA Tournament.
"We can't change, we have
to keep being that team that is
fighting to get to that conference
tournament Kee said.
"Obviously we have a lot of
confidence right now, but we are
going to approach every game like
it's the last game of the season
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.






4-19-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
1119, 2005
ers'
dies
ills, an under-
who became
er with New
ilina and was
coach for the
4onday after
ir nearly two
s said. He was
is diagnosed
11i.il I intestine
ut continued
's linebackers
tierapy treat-
tiome.
of the finest
rei meet. You
that he was a
'ro Bowls and
on because he
the same no
ere Carolina
4arty Hurney
a bad thing
kI and had a
;h at himself.
De of guy you
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a Bowl selec-
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iar NFL career
eginningwith
ison in 199S.
e of him out-
rica Stadium
ly player in
Honor. Mike
olina's first
he only other
11.
irst nine NFL
New Orleans
hree seasons
ites Football
-LS page 85
an 1-0.
im is having
insists they
in order to
ie end of the
burnament.
ge, we have
team that is
t conference
id.
lave a lot of
v, but we are
;ry game like
the season
ontacted at
linian.com.
sail,
lota Phi Theta Fraternity r
Wellness Education present w
HIVAIDS PREVENTION �
EX PQ&
April 21" 12-5pm-
@ Barefoot on th&Mall
? GAMES
& PRIZES
Spoken Word V"
Competition 4
& Step Show
Baseball from page B4
2-for-4 with four RBIs and two
runs scored. But it was Peisel
who stole the show at the plate,
reaching base in all five appear-
ances, including a career high
four hits, the biggest being a
home run in ninth to seal the
deal for the Bucs. The freshman
finished with two RBIs and three
runs scored.
The Pirates have now won
five straight conference games
and are just three games back
for third in the Conference USA
standings. Questions about the
likelihood of postseason play
have now turned into questions
about ECU's chances to host a
NCAA regional for the second
straight year.
The Bucs will begin to
answer those questions Tuesday,
when they make up a game
that was rained out a week ago
against No. 7 North Carolina.
ECU will then play the second
of their eight-game home stand
Wednesday, when they take on NC
State for the third time this season.
Two conference series
are approaching in the next
couple of weekends, with
Memphis coming in this week-
end and Cincinnati the next.
The Pirates will have a great
opportunity to run their con-
ference win streak to 11 games,
which will likely propel them
into the third spot in the confer-
ence standings.
This team is getting hot at
the right time, and with the
timely return of some key
players, ECU willbeaforcetobe reck-
oned with come postseason time.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
MHIS from page B4
League. He finished his career
with 1,319 tackles while starting
173 of 181 games.
1 Ie joined the Panthers' coach-
ing staff upon his retirement.
Mills was an undersized
linebacker out of Montclair (N.I.)
State who tried and failed several
times to catch on with NFL and
Canadian Football League teams.
He gave professional football one
last shot when the USFL debuted
in 1983.
Every day, Stars coach Jim
Mora asked his assistants who the
best player on the field was Eve! J
day, they told him "Sam Mills
"I don't need a S-9 line-
backer Mora kepi saying.
Mills ended up as one of
Mora's favorite players and when
Mora went to the Saints alter the
USFL's demise, he brought Mills
with him.
A day in the life of an official
A side of sports few
acknowledge
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
"S
FREE-v v
STUFF!
for more information
call 252-328-6794

$
"Individuals requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities
Act (ADA) should contact the Department lor Disability Support Services at
least 48 hours prior to the event at (252) 328-6799 voice(2S2)328-0899 IIV
Sport officials. At times
people love them, at times
people hate them. It is this love-
hate relationship that keep fans
involved in sports, whether it
be to boo at a close call or cheer
for a call in favor of their team.
Without officials, games would
lack a certain spark to capture
fan's attention. 1 mean how fun
would a game be without anyone
to enforce the rules?
It is part of this aspect of an
official's job that first caught
hold of my interest. I always
recognized the importance of
an official's job. Who else would
grant the timeouts, determine
whose foot the ball went out of
bounds on or stand as a media-
tor between athletes as tempers
are flaring?
1 always knew ECU had an
official's program through the
Student Recreation Center for
intramural sports, but I was
always hesitant to go to the offi-
cial clinics. Not until the begin-
ning of my junior year when I
was short on cash and looking
for a job, did I finally decided to
try a clinic out. 1 figured if I did
not like the clinic, 1 would not
return for any others.
The day finally came in early
September for the official's flag
football clinics. I headed to the
meeting room on the second
floor of the SRC and opened the
door to what seemed to be at
least SO potential officials sitting
around a table waiting for the
meeting to begin.
Brian Weingartz, coordina-
tor of intramural Sports, intro-
duced himself to the crowd to
begin the clinic. Weingartz wel-
comed everyone to the clinic, the
returning veteran officials and
the potential rookies. He then
touched on a point that I was
reminded of at every clinic I went
to throughout the year.
"If you are in it for the money,
this might not be the best job for
you said Weingartz.
He explained how rookie
officials would only get paid
$5.35 an hour. I could tell from
the beginning this was unat-
tractive to a group of the people
in the room.
Todd Riddick, assistant direc-
tor of intramural Sports, stepped
up to talk next about some of
the expectations of officials and
some of the rules. Both Riddick
and Weingartz seemed somewhat
laid back and easy to work with.
This was one reason 1 decided to
come back to the next clinic the
following day, despite being told
of the low pay. I figured low pay
was better than no pay at all.
In the second clinic, the
number of potential officials
seemed to dwindle down by 10.
Perhaps it was the low pay that
scared the students off, or maybe
they just realized officiating
was not for them. Either way I
was ready to get into the rules
of flag football as all officials
were placed into groups and
moved from station to station
on the back two basketball courts
reviewing different rules and
aspects at each station. This was
the format for all of the clinics 1
went to during the year.
At the third and final clinic I
was expecting some sort of writ-
ten test to evaluate what we had
learned in the last three days,
but to my surprise there was
none. After rotating stations we
signed up for a preview game the
following week, picked up a rule-
book and our uniform. Instead of
taking a test it was decided the
best way for us to learn how to
officiate was to get on the field
and actually perform.
A preview game was more
like a preseason game for both
officials and intramural teams
as they get ready for the season.
Though nervous, 1 was ready to
step on to the field and.see what
I could do.
David Gaskins, associate
director of programs at the SRC,
see OFFICIAL page B6
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,
4-19-05
Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY ZOPPO Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY April 19, 2005
Pirates pick up first sweep of season
1�
Mills
Ricky Brooks started the Pirates' series with Louisville on the right foot with his left arm, tossing a complete game and allowing just one run on nine hits with nine strikeouts.
ECU picks up crucial
victories in Louisville
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
Behind a brilliant game,
one pitching performance from
Ricky Brooks and an offensive
explosion in games two and
three, ECU baseball swept a three
game series from Louisville in
front of record crowds, as the
Cardinals opened their brand
new Jim Patterson Stadium.
The Pirates took the three con-
tests 4-1,9-8and 11-6 respectively.
Cardinals' fans poured in by
the thousands Friday to watch
game one under the lights. Their
previous season high for atten-
dance was against bitter in-state
rival Kentucky, when they drew
just over a 1,000 people. The
announced attendance of 3,213
for game one between ECU and
Louisville set a record for the
largest crowd to ever watch a
Cardinals game.
Brooks made sure the only
people to have a positive experi-
ence opening the new stadium
were his Pirates as he recorded
his second complete game of the
season, giving up only one run
on nine hits, while striking out
nine. The sophomore, who has
been on fire as of late, did not
give up a walk.
All the runs in the contest
were scored in the fourth inning.
With one out in the ECU half
of the fourth, Adam Witter drew
a walk. Jake Smith then singled
to short, bringing up Costanzo,
who then drove in Witter with
a single to centerfield. Freshman
Ryan Peisel singled to right field
to load the bases, which were
quickly cleared when Brett Lind-
gren stroked the gap in center to
give the Pirates a 4-0 lead.
The Cardinals only run came
in the fourth when J.T. LaFountain
scored on a Logan Johnson double.
Brooks improved to 3-2 on
the season. Costanzo, who went
2-for-4 with a RBI and a run
scored, led the Diamond Bucs
offensively. Lindgren, who deliv-
ered the huge blow in the fourth,
was l-for-2 with three RBI.
The Pirates scored five times
with two outs in the first to begin
game two, then held off a scrappy
Louisville team that refused to
quit, and won 9-8.
Starting everything off was
Mike Grace, who walked with
two outs in the first. Witter then
singled to put runners on the cor-
ners. After a passed ball allowed
Grace to score and Witter to move
to second, the catcher botched a
throw back to the pitcher allow-
ing Witter to take third and ulti-
mately scored to give the Pirates
a 2-0 lead. Smith stepped to the
plate and doubled, then scored
on the next play when Peisel sin-
gled to left. Peisel scooted home
on a Dale Mollenhauer double,
increasing the Pirate advantage to
4-0. Finally, Mollenhauer scored
when Harrison Eldridge delivered
ECU'S third double of the inning
for a 5-0 lead.
Freshman starter T.J. Hose
did a decent job of keeping the
Cardinals at bay throughout the
contest, pitching seven innings,
giving up seven hits and three
earned runs, while striking out
six. It was the four unearned runs
the Pirate defense surrendered
however, that kept Louisville in
the game and began to pay big
dividends as they put together
a furious rally in the bottom of
the eighth.
After a single and a hit batter
to begin the inning, sophomore
Mike Flye relieved Hose. Flye
never recorded an out, giving up
two hits, a walk and three runs
- two of which were on Hose's
line - to allow Louisville to close
within one run at 9-8. Randy
Mazey opted to bring in Scott
Andrews, which proved to be
the right choice as Andrews got
a strike out and a line out to end
the threat.
After giving up a double to
Isaiah Howes to begin the ninth,
Andrews settled down to retire
the final three batters, two by way
of strikeout, to end the game and
pick up his first save of the season.
Witter led the Pirates at the
plate with a career high of four
hits, one of which was his third
home run of the season. The lefty
had three runs scored and a RBI.
Smith added three hits and Peisel
had two RBI in a winning effort.
Game three starter P.J. Con-
nelly, who hadn't pitched more
than three innings in each of
his last three starts, found simi-
lar trouble again Sunday, going
just 1.1 innings. The southpaw
gave up four runs on three hits
and a walk. He didn't strike out
a batter. Luckily for him, the
Pirates scored in every inning
except for the seventh en route
to a 11-6 victory.
Flye was called on once again,
but made sure game three would
not be a repeat of two, as he
pitched 6.1 innings of fantastic
relief, giving up just two runs on
six hits and striking out eight.
Louisville led 4-3 after two
complete innings, but that
advantage quickly dissipated as
the Pirates scored six runs in the
next four innings, highlighted
by a two run homer from Witter
in the fourth, to take control of
the game.
Witter finished the game
see BASEBALL page 85
Panthers'
Mills dies
at 45
(AP) � Sam Mills, an under-
sized linebacker who became
a Pro Bowl player with New
Orleans and Carolina and was
later an assistant coach for the
Panthers, died Monday after
fighting cancer for nearly two
years, the Panthers said. He was
45.
Mills, who was diagnosed
with cancer of the small intestine
in August 2003 but continued
to coach Carolina's linebackers
between chemotherapy treat-
ments, died at his home.
"Sam was one of the finest
people you will ever meet. You
would never know that he was a
player who made Pro Bowls and
had all this attention because he
treated everybody the same no
matter who they were Carolina
general manager Marty Hurney
said.
"He never had a bad thing
to say about anybody and had a
great ability to laugh at himself.
"He was the type of guy you
want your kids to grow up to be
A five-time Pro Bowl selec-
tion, Mills spent the final three
seasons of his 12-year NFL career
with the Panthers, beginning with
their inaugural season in 1995.
There is a statue of him out-
side Bank of America Stadium
and he is the only player in
the team's Hall of Honor. Mike
McCormack, Carolina's first
team president, is the only other
inductee in the Hall.
Mills spent his first nine NFL
seasons with the New Orleans
Saints, following three seasons
in the United States Football
see MILLS page B5
Open letter from
Terry Holland
SID � Possibly the great-
est barrier to success facing
ECU athletics right now is our
own self-image. New coaches
always speak to the difficulty
of changing a "losing cul-
ture" among the athletes of
a particular team. However,
many schools are finding that
the "losing culture" phenom-
enon can spread like a wildfire-
through the whole fan base
due to the Internet and other
media coverage of rumors and
half-truths.
At this time in our history,
a good part of the Pirate Nation
is willing to believe that every
dumb thing anyone can dream
up about how ECU Athletics
operates has to be true. Fortu-
nately, most of our competitors
fight the same battles daily but
we will never catch up to our
competition if we persist in doing
business in the same way they
are forced to do their business.
Our competition for stu-
dents, recruits, media cover-
age, etc will always be the
SEC, ACC and Big East schools
within our geographic' area.
The lowest athletic budgets at
those schools are already at30
million-plus. Since our budget
is $18 million, the Pirate Nation
has no choice but to become a
better TEAM than our competi-
tors. We simply do not have the
luxury of believing that we can
not win against these odds or
that ANY of our teammates
are not doing their very best to
win and build our programs.
Becoming a TEAM is hard
work and requires a great deal
of old-fashioned "faith" that
what the mind can conceive,
the body can achieve. Given
the intense competitive envi-
ronment in athletics today, we
simply can not afford to believe
that we can "talk" our way into
the BCS picture by joining
another conference or what-
ever. Anything that happens
to us will have to be EARNED
by becoming a more effective
team than our competitors.
That will require the support
of every single member of the
Pirate Nation working toward
a common goal.
Eighteen million dollar
budgets can not compete effec-
tively against $30 million bud-
gets as long as any percentage
of our work day has to be spent
tracking down and dispelling
rumors or half-truths. The fol-
lowing e-mail is an example of
how easily panicked we, the
Pirate Nation, have become.
However, it is not the e-mail
itself that is the problem - we
must all first acknowledge
that every single one of us has
participated to one degree or
another in such speculation
and secondly, that if we persist
in doing so, we are dooming
our own program to medioc-
rity at best.
Gentlemen,
I attended the Spring Game
this past Saturday with a few
former football letter winners.
Among them were Brian Rimpf
Leonard Henry, David Garrard,
etc. I thought the turnout, the
festivities, etc. were great. I was
however "very" disappointed to
learn that there were many foot-
ball recruits there, yet they ncwr
got to mingle with any of the NFL
alums that we have here at ECU. I
feel very strongly that there should
have been a time that David,
Leonard, etc should have been
put in the area of these recruits,
see LETTER page B8
Lady Pirates hit mark with sweep of Louisville
ECU rises to second in
C-USA with 50th win
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
Last season the ECU softball
team was outscored away at
Louisville 20-2 in part of a three-
game sweep inflicted on the Lady
Pirates. This season the outcome
turned out to be much different
as ECU went on to face their No. 1
ranked Conference USA rival.
Offense was key for ECU in
game one of the three-game series
with the Lady Cardinals. Senior
Kate Manuse started off the scor-
ing in the bottom of the second
with a solo shot. ECU was then
able to extend the lead to 4-0 in
the bottom of the next inning off
the bats of seniors Mandi Nichols
and Manuse. Louisville managed
to score two runs in the top of the
fourth and fifth, but it was not
enough as ECU won 6-2.
The win knocked Louisville
out of first place in the C-USA
standings and pulled ECU closer
to second place.
In the second game of the
afternoon, sophomore pitcher
Keli Harrell took the mound for
the Lady Pirates and performed
well, allowing only four hits in
the complete game shutout, 1-0.
The only run of the game
came off the bat of freshman Beth
Nolan, who hit a home run in the
bottom of the second.
The win gave Harrell her 23rd
of the year.
"1 was executing, hitting
spots and finding a way to let
my defense work for me and my
defense was great said Harrell.
Now that two games were
already won, the Lady Pirates
were tied for second place in C-
USA with Louisville. They were
also only one win away from
their 50th win of the season and
the 1,000th win in school history
heading into their third and final
game against the Lady Cardinals
Mandi Nichols was one of two Lady Pirates with a hit against UL on Saturday as ECU won 1-0.
the following day.
Harrell once again took the
mound for ECU for the third
game collecting her 28th com-
plete game of the season and
striking out 10 as ECU completed
the sweep with a 4-1 victory.
Manuse drove in two runs in the
win including her 13th home run of
the season in the bottom of the first.
Pirates' coach Tracey Kee was
very pleased with her team's per-
formance during the series and
picking up the milestone victories.
"This win was extremely
special, the 50th, the 1,000th,
the fact that it was a sweep in the
conference said Kee.
"We knew as a team what
we wanted to accomplish. I just
reminded the kids, a lot of great
ball players have come through
here and laid the foundation for
them and they are doing a great
job carrying the torch
With solo possession of
second place ECU now looks
forward to their next goal, taking
out the first place C-USA team,
DePaul. The Lady Pirates are
scheduled to face DePaul away
next weekend.
Although the team is having
great success, Kee insists they
must keep modest in order to
reach their goal at the end of the
season, the C-USA Tournament.
"We can't change, we have
to keep being that team that Is
fighting to get to that conference
tournament Kee said.
"Obviously we have a lot of
confidence right now, but we are
going to approach every game like
it's the last game of the season
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
I
Lt






ril 19,2005
ers'
dies
ills, an under-
who became
er with New
ilina and was
coach for the
Monday after
or nearly two
s said. He was
as diagnosed
small intestine
ut continued
is linebackers
herapy treat-
home.
of the finest
ver meet. You
' that he was a
Pro Bowls and
on because he
� the same no
?ere Carolina
vlarty Hurney
1 a bad thing
uly and had a
gh at himself,
pe of guy you
;row up to be
o Bowl selec-
he final three
ear NFL career
eginningwith
ason in 1995.
le of him out-
;rica Stadium
lly player in
Honor. Mike
rolina's first
he only other
11.
first nine NFL
New Orleans
three seasons
ates Football
LLS page 85
ville
an 1-0.
�m is having
insists they
in order to
teend of the
burnament.
ge, we have
team that is
t conference
id.
lave a lot of
v, but we are
sry game like
the season
ontacted at
linian.com.
4-19-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
AveAA
lota Phi Theta Fraternity&
Wellness Education present

HIVAIDS PREVENTION A
tXPO
April 21" 12-5pm
@ Barefoot on theJVIall
? GAMES
& PRIZES
Spoken Word V
Competition
& Stop Show
FREE- �l
STUFF! tlk
Baseball from page B4
2-for-4 with four RBIs and two
runs scored. But it was Peisel
who stole the show at the plate,
reaching base in all five appear-
ances, including a career high
four hits, the biggest being a
home run in ninth to seal the
deal for the Bucs. The freshman
finished with two RBIs and three
runs scored.
The Pirates have now won
five straight conference games
and are just three games back
for third in the Conference USA
standings. Questions about the
likelihood of postseason play
have now turned into questions
about ECU's chances to host a
NCAA regional for the second
straight year.
The Bucs will begin to
answer those questions Tuesday,
when they make up a game
that was rained out a week ago
against No. 7 North Carolina.
ECU will then play the second
of their eight-game home stand
Wednesday, when they take on NC
State for the third time this season.
Two conference series
are approaching in the next
couple of weekends, with
Memphis coming in this week-
end and Cincinnati the next.
The Pirates will have a great
opportunity to run their con-
ference win streak to 11 games,
which will likely propel them
into the third spot in the confer-
ence standings.
This team is getting hot at
the right time, and with the
timely return of some key
players, ECU willbeaforcetobereck-
oned with come postseason time.
This writer can be contacted at
sport5@theeastcarolinian.com.
MHIS from page B4
League, lie finished his career
with 1,319 tackles while starting
173 of 181 games.
1 le joined the Panthers' coach-
ing staff upon his retirement.
Mills was an undersized
linebacker out of Montclair (N.J.)
State who tried and failed several
times to catch on with NFL and
Canadian Football League teams.
He gave professional football one
last shot when the USFL debuted
in 1983.
Every day, Stars coach im
Mora asked his assistants who the
best player on the field was Eva J
day, they told him "Sam Mills
"I don't need a 5-9 line-
backer Mora kept saying.
Mills ended up as one of
Mora's favorite players and when
Mora went to the Saints after the
USFL's demise, he brought Mills
with him.
$37
A day in the life of an official
A side of sports few
acknowledge
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
for more information
call 252-328-6794 J
J(�2.

least 4S hours prior to the event al (252) .i2N-67�� voice(252)328-0899 TTY'
Sport officials. At times
people love them, at times
people hate them. It is this love-
hate relationship that keep fans
involved in sports, whether it
be to boo at a close call or cheer
for a call in favor of their team.
Without officials, games would
lack a certain spark to capture
fan's attention. I mean how fun
would a game be without anyone
to enforce the rules?
It is part of this aspect of an
official's job that first caught
hold of my interest. I always
recognized the importance of
an official's job. Who else would
grant the timeouts, determine
whose foot the ball went out of
bounds on or stand as a media-
tor between athletes as tempers
are flaring?
I always knew ECU had an
official's program through the
Student Recreation Center for
intramural sports, but I was
always hesitant to go to the offi-
cial clinics. Not until the begin-
ning of my junior year when 1
was short on cash and looking
for a job, did I finally decided to
try a clinic out. 1 figured if 1 did
not like the clinic, I would not
return for any others.
The day finally came in early
September for the official's flag
football clinics. I headed to the
meeting room on the second
floor of the SRC and opened the
door to what seemed to be at
least 50 potential officials sitting
around a table waiting for the
meeting to begin.
Brian Weingartz, coordina-
tor of intramural Sports, intro-
duced himself to the crowd to
begin the clinic. Weingartz wel-
comed everyone to the clinic, the
returning veteran officials and
the potential rookies. He then
touched on a point that I was
remindedof at every clinic I went
to throughout the year.
"If you are in it for the money,
this might not be the best job for
you said Weingartz.
He explained how rookie
officials would only get paid
$5.35 an hour. I could tell from
the beginning this was unat-
tractive to a group of the people
in the room.
Todd Riddick, assistant direc-
tor of intramural Sports, stepped
up to talk next about some of
the expectations of officials and
some of the rules. Both Riddick
and Weingartz seemed somewhat
laid back and easy to work with.
This was one reason I decided to
come back to the next clinic the
following day, despite being told
of the low pay. I figured low pay
was better than no pay at all.
In the second clinic, the
number of potential officials
seemed to dwindle down by 10.
Perhaps it was the low pay that
scared the students off, or maybe
they just realized officiating
was not for them. Either way I
was ready to get into the rules
of flag football as all officials
were placed into groups and
moved from station to station
on the back two basketball courts
reviewing different rules and
aspects at each station. This was
the format for all of the clinics I
went to during the year.
At the third and final clinic I
was expecting some sort of writ-
ten test to evaluate what we had
learned in the last three days,
but to my surprise there was
none. After rotating stations we
signed up for a preview game the
following week, picked up a rule-
book and oiu uniform. Instead of
taking a test it was decided the
best way for us to learn how to
officiate was to get on the field
and actually perform.
A preview game was more
like a preseason game for both
officials and intramural teams
as they get ready lor the season.
Though nervous, I was ready to
step on to the field and.see what
I could do.
David liaskins, associate
director of programs at the SRC,
see OFFICIAL page B6
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
4-19-05
4-19-05
Official
from page 85
and Weingartz were at the sides
of the field offering constructive
criticism to all officials as the pre-
view went on. They were patient
and did not yell, but instead just
told me what 1 was doing wrong
and how to improve myself. I
then took what they said to heart
and made the improvements they
said 1 needed to make.
The flag football season rolled
on and I felt like I continued to
get better and better, partly from
Weingartz always on the side of
the field monitoring the official's
actions and also in part to just my
drive to get better.
Just like in all athletic events
there were player protests. Numer-
ous times throughout the season
players challenged the authorities
of the officials, whether it was
because they felt one of us made
a bad call, or just because they
did not like us from the begin-
ning. My experience handling
with conflict was increased as
often times I would find players
in my face complaining about
calls.
One thing players do not
realize as I dealt with them is
the fact I cannot see the whole
field or court at once. Officials
are often assigned to a certain
section of the field or court and
when something occurs outside
of it, chances are I probably did
not see the call.
It is amazing how many stu-
dents playing intramural sports
would contest, complain and
sometimes even fight to get a
call the way they want. I never
realized how much teams would
go on to strive for the coveted
"Intramural Champions T-shirt"
and bragging rights.
I realized all conflict was
indeed part of the job as I
Colon Cj
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enjoyed working intramural flag
football and eventually went
on to working soccer, basketball
and Softball. I thank Weingartz,
Riddick, Gaskinsand other veteran
officials for making my job a plea-
surable one throughout the year.
As for players participating
in intramural sports remember
officials will always make calls
you do not agree with, no matter
what sport or league you play. As
for intramurals it is not like offi-
cials officiate because it is on the
fast track to being a millionaire,
they are doing it simply because
that is what they love to do. If
players feel they could make a
better call themselves, the next
official's clinic starts in the fall
- they are invited to show us what
they got.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
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4-19-05
4-19-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B7
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Offering Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
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Sophomore tailback Chris Johnson is tackled by a swarm of Pirates in the first quarter.
Pirates dawn new era with spring
scrimmage Saturday afternoon
Coaching staff, new
players gain valuable
experience
ERIC GILMORE
SENIOR WRITER
As two squads comprised
of ECU players grinded against
each other in Saturday's Purple
Gold scrimmage, Skip Holtz was
nowhere to be seen. An eagle
perched over his domain in the
press box, Holtz assessed his
team.
"Especially as I watched it
from upstairs, there were a lot
ofgreat individual performances
out there said Holtz.
"Overall, I'm pleased with
the effort and attitude, and as
long as they keep coming out
here and working hard, then we
can take this film and learn from
it and get better
Forced to abort the tra-
dition two-team make-up,
Holtz separated his team into
an ECU squad (the starting
offense and reserve defense)
and a Pirates squad (the starting
defense and reserve offense).
The reserve defense assisted the
ECU squad to a 28-10 victory.
Local product and current
first-string quarterback Davon
Drew persevere through arm
tendonitis to lead the ECU squad
on two scoring drives. On the
first series, Drew connected with
JUCO transfer Aundrae Alli-
son on a simple bubble screen,
which Allison turned into a 30-
yard touchdown. Entering the
endzone for the first time in an
ECU uniform, Allison perfected
a front-flip.
"It was a once-in-a-lifetime
experience said Allison, who
led all receivers with five catches
for 94 yards.
"Me coming out of JUCO, I
just wanted to do a little some-
thing different for my first touch-
down on the Division I level. I
just wanted to please the crowd.
The crowd wanted to see a little
showboating
However, Holtz had different
ideas 6f Allison's touchdown.
"I told the coaches to go
get him Holtz said after the
scrimmage.
"We don't do that here. 1
made a point of that in the locker
room. He knew it as soon as he
did it. I like that he was out here
having fun, but we won't see that
in the fall. Either that or you
won't see him
Drew finished completing
14-of-30 passes totaling 138
yards while also scampering for
26 yards on the ground. Drew,
who was questionable coming
into the scrimmage, played
the entire four quarters. While
making decent reads in the
first-half, Drew struggled in the
second.
"I thought he played very
well early Holtz said.
"He was playing within the
system. He was making good
reads and controlling the ball.
He started hanging his arm a
little bit. But he fought through
it and kept playing. I thought
he played well early but kind of
regressed as he went along, but a
lot of that was probably the pain
in his arm
Free safety Zach Baker, who
led ECU with five interceptions
a season ago, extended the lead
to 14-0 when he returned Kort
Shankweiler's heave 75 yards.
Baker, a Third-team All-Confer-
ence USA in 2004, has been del-
egated to second-string behind
rising sophomore Pierre Parker.
Second-string quarterback
see NEW ERA page B8
KING'S ROW
APARTMENTS
GO Verdant Dr.752-3519
� 1 & 2 Bedrooms, 1 Bath
� Central Heat & Air
� Free Water Services
� nsite anagement
� nsite aintenance
� o ets
� Fully Carpeted
� ini Blinds
� All Appliances Furnished
� Laundry Facility & ool
� Basketball Court
� ECU Bus Service
NOW LEASING
�Spacious Two BedroomOne Bath Units
�Free Water and Sewer
�Central Heat & Air
�WasherDryer Connections
�Dishwasher
�Ceiling Fan
'Each Unit has a Patio or Balcony
'Pets Allowed with Fee
�Energy Efficient
Cozy One & Two BedroomOne Bath Units
�Free Water and Sewer
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�Wall AC Unit &. Baseboard Heat in One Bedroom
�WasherDryer Connections
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PAGE B8
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
4-19-05
Letter
from page B4
Si. I.uik's
l'lilltll I'll Ulll
to talk football, life in the NFL,
and on why they should come to
ECU. I stood on the sideline with
these guys in disbelief that something
like that wasn't arranged. I turned
around and saw our "recruits" sitting
on the edge of that stadium. What-
ever happened to star treatment? I
bet UNC recruits met Julius Peppers,
dreg Ellis, etc. NC State recruits
met Philip Rivers, Tory Holt, etc. I
know this is not a violation of NCAA
rules and I know that David Canard
would have been more than happy to
spend moment with an ECU ifcruit.
If I were a recruit, that would make
my whole trip. I am just disappointed
that I have to point tins out to a
Terry Holland and a Skip Holtz. I
want this program to take off, and
missing the little things like this is
not helping.
Coach Holtz has already
written this gentleman asking
for information on other schools
allowing contacts between their
alumni and prospects since such
contact would be a blatant NCAA
violation. In fact, on normal
game days ECU has to put up a
partition on the Murphy Center
patio to separate the alumni
function in Harvey Hall from
the recruiting meal in Jones Hall
to insure that there is no contact
between alumni and recruits.
The lesson to be learned from
this misunderstanding is that we
do not have the luxury of behav-
ing like the fans of some of our
competitors. We simply have to
be better, tougher and more loyal
than those fans If we want to beat
them. That is what we are asking
of the coaches and athletes who
have chosen to fight these battles
for ECU. At times we are essen-
tially asking these coaches and
players to start a locomotive
with a D Cell battery and they
will therefore need every Pirate
pushing in the same direction to
get the job done.
No one here is asking for
blind loyalty - we have all put
our butts and our reputations on
the line for ECU and expect to be
held accountable for our actions
(or lack thereof). But we must
be judged on some longer term
expectation than that inspired
by the panic that too many of
the Pirate Nation have embraced
at this time in our history.
Each of us must be willing
to sing off the same page (loudly
and preferably in harmony) "IF IT
IS TO BE, IT IS UP TO ME That
is what being a winning team is
all about.
TERRY HOLLAND
SPRING FLING
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Aundrae Allison scored the first touchdown of the scrimmage.
Kort Shankweiler tossed for 177
yards on 14-of-30 passing. The
son of offensive coordinator
Steve Shankweiler spent most of
his afternoon trying to avoid the
opposing pass rush.
Patrick Pinkney, injured most
of spring practice also took snaps
with the second-team squad.
Pinkney, fresh off of shoulder
surgery donned a bright yellow
jersey to signify that the defense
was not allowed to make contact.
The Fayetteville native still man-
aged to lead the Pirates' ground-
attack with 41 yards on just four
carries. Despite playing from
behind in the fourth quarter,
Pinkney managed to complete
12-of-21 for 59 yards.
Chris Johnson led all rushers
with 71 yards on 16 attempts.
k Johnson, more toned than a
� season ago notched a 2-yard
a touchdown run in the third quar-
? ter. Perennial practice player and
2 crowd favorite Edwin Burke also
& impressed, running for a tough
34 yards on 11 carries.
Defensively, senior lead-
ers Richard Koonce and Jamar
Flournoy led the Pirates' squad
after adjusting positions from
2004. Koonce, now in his natural
linebacker position, joined now-
strong safety Jamar Flournoy
with 10 tackles. Redshirt fresh-
man Jarrett Wiggins notched
eight tackles.
Travis Williams led the ECU
squad with seven solo tackles.
Williams, familiar to the endzone
as a punt returned scooped up
Will Bland's fumble and burned
93 yards for a touchdown to seal
the game.
While Holtz was happy with
the amount of repetitions and
experience for his younger players,
he understands where his team is
heading into summer workouts.
"But we're a long way away
from playing a game Holtz said.
"We turn the ball over, we
have way too many penalties,
we do things to shoot ourselves
in the foot
This writer can be contacted at
sports�theeastcarolinian. com.
THE FUN BEGINS AT 5:30 A.M. WBREAKFAST
YARD SALE 6:30 A.M.
BAKE SALE AND BAZAAR 8:00 A.M.
BAR-B-Q CHICKEN LUNCH 11:00 A.M. TILL 1:00 P.M.
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Clothing and accessories
Jewelry, shoes, hats, scarves
Coats, umbrellas
Canned food, boxed food
Old cell phones & chargers
Fans, small appliances
Cups, utensils or dishes
Furniture (such as chairs,
lofts or futonsl
� Lamps
Clothes hangers
Picture frames
Please doni be gross.
Underwear, nighties,
and opened food or
halrcare products
are not on our list
to donate to charities.
BEFOREYOU
UI and hmfo pour
APRIL18-MAY6
Collection Boxes In
Residence Halls
APRIL 25-MAY 5
Look for Give a Go Collection
Trailers on College Hill and at
the West End neighborhood!
itwMc � Dtafc W tt karoo
items. Ml ttM EGO MMNII MMlMNNNl
Center: 328-2735.
I
M. IT
Benefiting Habitat tor Humanity Resale Store, Family Violence Program (My
Sister s Closet and C3s), Food Bank ol North Carolina, and the Real Crisis Center
UNCGiCarnpus.com
SurfiriUSA
Whether you re booeie-boarding in Baja, catching a wave on the Carolina coast,
or just hanging out by the pool, UNCG's Summer Session is as close as your computer.
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UNCG Summer Session Online
Mayl8-July29
l
I
o I
81


Title
The East Carolinian, April 19, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 19, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1818
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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