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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 80 Number 68
TUESDAY
March 29, 2005
Ballard fills two vice
chancellor vacancies
Xflm fc-ir u
B B :jH
A woman demonstrates against the court decision to remove
Schiavo's feeding tube in Washington, D.C.
Terri Schiavo remains
deprived of food supply
Newly appointed provost and vice chancellor for academic affairs, Jim Smith, (right) thanked Chancellor Ballard and others within the
ECU community for their support and faith in taking on this position.
Smith, Mageean to play
major roles on campus
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
SENIOR WRITER ,
Chancellor Steve Ballard
announced the choices for two
vacant vice chancellorships at
a press conference March 24
further progressing in filling the
number of vacancies at ECU.
James Leroy Smith, interim
vice chancellor for academic
affairs, was appointed as provost
and vice chancellor of academic
affairs. Smith has been with ECU
for a number of years and was the
only candidate from ECU under
consideration for the position.
Deirdre Mageean was named
vice chancellor for research and
graduate studies. Mageean was
serving as president for research
and dean of the graduate school
at the University of Maine. She
was unable to attend the news
conference.
Ballard said the search pro-
cess led to the selection of two
qualified candidates and the
people interviewed were truly
excellent, giving ECU a superior
candidate pool to choose from.
"The quality of the campus
finalists says a lot about who we
ultimately chose in these posi-
tions and the contributions they
will continue to make at ECU
said Ballard.
"As chancellor, 1 could not be
happier with the final selections
Smith said he was happy to
continue working at ECU, a place
he described as special.
"It's a humbling moment for
me I promise I won't let you
down said Smith.
The driving force behind
Smith's acceptance of the posi-
tion was the students of ECU.
"The students are the main
reason why I am not only will-
ing, but excited to take this role
they are why we are here
Smith said.
Ballard said both Smith and
Mageean possessed the traits of
leaders, which aided the decision.
Smith said he would like to
look back five years from now
and sea progress from ECU.
Trr� position of provost and
vice chancellor for academic
affairs is one of the highest rank-
ing positions on campus and
includes the responsibilities of
shaping academic programs and
hiring processes.
The position has been vacant
see BALLARD page A2
Parking and Transportation Committee
discusses new policies, pressing issues
ECU parking officials and planners outline current parking Issues.
Developments
concerning parking a
pressing matter
CHRIS ADAMS
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Parking and Trans-
portation Committee met Thurs-
day to discuss new policies and
pressing issues for the current
semester and the upcoming fall
semester.
Several issues were discussed
during the course of the meeting.
ECU Parking and Transportation
Services is attempting to gain
approval from the ECU Board
of Trustees for a $5 medical pass
that would cover related fees and
prohibit students and faculty
from receiving a free pass for A
zone parking. The decision to
approve the fee has been deferred
by one month.
"We had IS votes cast, all
in favor with no opposition
said William Koch, director of
environmental health and safety
and chair of the ECU Parking and
Transportation Committee.
"We had a quorum and we
consider that a favorable vote
Other issues at hand included
parking privileges granted to state
owned and federal vehicles.
Kim Watkins, staff member in
the ECU College of Business, dis-
cussed an issue with parking in a
lot located on Fifth Street. Several
state-owned vans and vans used
by the Air Force ROTC are park-
ing in this lot and remaining
there for extended periods of
time for storage purposes.
"The biggest complaint we
see is that so many of these state
vans are occupying spaces that
otherwise we, who pay $288 a
year, could use said Watkins.
Watkins also pointed out that
these state-owned vans are park-
ing in the lot between Rawl and
Austin buildings on campus.
"It seems unfair that people
who pay for these spaces are not
able to park there Watkins said.
The problem stems from the
lack of adequate parking reserved
for state owned vehicles.
"The lot located at Fifth and
Jarvis is reserved for state owned
vehicles said Mike Van Derven,
director of parking and transpor-
tation services.
"Unfortunately, it does
& not accommodate all of them
jg therefore the Al zone was
: designed to accommodate the
requirements of not only faculty
and staff, but also state and gov-
1 ernment vehicles
It was decided that a letter
would be sent to departments
responsible for the parking of the
vans, informing them of another
lot specifically designed for long-
term storage.
Safety issues were discussed
concerning the high traffic of
students who are dropping off
and picking up their friends in
the lot between Rawl and Austin.
One accident has already been
reported in this location.
The sales dates for parking
permits to be used in the 200S
- 2006 school year have been
established. People who currently
hold permits in the Al and A3
zones are eligible for repurchase
from April 18 - 29. These two
zones are the only zones with
waiting lists. May 9 begins the
distribution of permits to those
currently on the waiting list for
zones Al and A3. May 16 will
begin the registration and pur-
chase process for all other zones
and those people who currently
do not hold a parking permit.
Vehicle registration will be
done entirely on Onestop this
year. A dilemma concerning
parking permits has risen due to
job reassignment. Staff and fac-
ulty, who have recently switched
offices, and are now in need of
an A3 parking permit are having
difficulty acquiring one due to
the extensive waiting list.
"Some people in very high up
positions have requested exemp-
tion from the waiting list and
have been denied Van Derven
said.
"There have been no excep-
tions
Also discussed was the poten-
tial rezoning of the Reade Street
area parking lots. The average
daily vacancy rate is 105 Bl park-
ing spaces and 110 B2 parking
spaces in this lot. The proposal
for rezoning involves convert-
ing the 25 B2 spaces located
at Fourth Street and Cotanche
Street to accommodate newly
leased property on Evans Street.
This conversion will take place
on May 9. Also, another proposal
involves converting the east side
of a lot located on Second Street
and Reade Street to B2 parking in
order to make room for resident
students during the upcoming
fall semester.
"We want to accommodate
the maximum amount of stu-
dents that we can Van Derven
said.
Many of these improvements
are a result of different manage-
ment styles than previous years.
"Parking and Transportation
Services is being managed better
than ever before Koch said.
"The campus is spreading out
and we want to better utilize the
available parking spaces
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
GREER
I Protestors attempt to
I change court decision
�NICKHENNE
� NEWS EDITOR
I
Terri Schiavo, who remains
living in her vegetative state
after being disconnected from
her feeding tube for more than
a week, remains cut off from her
nutrient supply in the midst of
various legal decisions underway
in deciding her fate.
Gary McCullough, spokes-
person for the Schiavo family,
offered an in depth look at his
views in the factors surround-
ing the case and why it is not
right to have Terri's feeding tube
removed.
"The family has been going
through a roller coaster of emo-
tions through the last few weeks
said McCullough.
He said the family has had
very little sleep as they are con-
stantly waiting to hear numerous
legal decisions being made and
they hope to hear Congress will
take action in the matter.
McCullough said he has been
asked by several news organiza-
tions and various people who
are involved in the case, "Why
couldn't her husband just allow
her family to take care of her?"
According to McCullough,
Michael Shiavo's response to this
question is Terri's family would
not follow her wishes. Michael
said he had a conversation with
Terri before she was in this veg-
etative state and he claims she
indicated to him that she would
not want to be kept alive if ever
in such a condition.
McCullough said he feels
Michael's claim that Terri at one
point in time did say this is not
credible.
"His recalling of the conver-
sation years after the fact is not
credible. It may be credible to
Judge Greer McCullough said.
"I've talked to Michael face
to face he's so bent on seeing
her dead
McCullough said heand many
others disapprove of the fact that
one judge has the final and ulti-
mate decision on this matter.
"It's a sad day in America when
one state judge's say is the last
say in this death without any
other judge reviewing the facts
of the case McCullough said.
With any typical death
penalty case, all of the facts of
the case are reviewed by addi-
tional judges who present their
opinions toward the matter
before a final decision is made.
McCullough said while this case
is not a death penalty case, it
does involve life and death and
should be given all of the same
thorough examination before
a final decision is made. He
said the judiciary branch of the
federal government should not
have power over the legislative
and executive branches, which
is what is happening in this
case. He said the family feels as
though the State Judge George W.
Greer, who made the decision to
have the feeding tube removed,
has basically told the president
"1 don't care what you think
"When those judges have
become supreme over the legis-
lative and executive branches,
that's a sign of problems to
come McCullough said.
McCullough said courts have
had other judges review Judge
Greer's procedures and then
claimed his procedures were cor-
rect, but no judge has reviewed
the facts surrounding the whole
circumstance.
ECU students showed dif-
fering opinions in regard to this
situation that has caught the
attention of most of America.
Benita Harper, junior com-
munity health major, said if she
were in Terri's condition, she
would not want to be kept alive
and she agrees with Judge Greer's
decision.
"Her husband who is now her
guardian wanted it removed
said Harper.
She said it is sincere for her
family to want her to be kept alive
but since there has been no prog-
see SCHIAVO page A2
If you were Terri Schiavo
would you want to be
kept alive?
MAURA RYAN
FRESHMAN NURSING
"No, I think it would
just be my time to pass
away. I would rather be
dead than a vegetable
CLIFTON PEELE
SENIOR PRE-HEALTH AND
HUMAN PERFORMANCE
"No, there is no
purpose in living in that
state
STEVE BIVENS
SOPHOMORE HISTORY
"No, I just wouldn't
want to live that way. But if
I were the parents I would
be doing the same thing
INSIDE I News: A2 I Comics: B6 I Opinion: A4 I Scene: A6 I Sports: Bl
V





EWS
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
Announcements
AA Meetings
Alcoholics Anonymous meetings
will be held every Thursday at 11:30
a.m. In 14 Mendenhall Student
Center. For more information, call
760-500-8918.
SGA Annual Funding
SGA will hold funding seminars to
help student organizations learn
how to make money next week.
Two remaining seminars will be
March 29 at 8 p.m. in 1026 Bate
and March 30 at 7 p.m. In 1026
Bate. For more information, call
328-4726.
Songs for a New World
The school of theatre and dance
is holding this event March 29
at 8 p.m. In A.J. Fletcher Recital
Hall. Call 328-6851 for more
information.
2005 GPDSpecial
Olympics Golf
Tournament
The Greenville Police Department
is sponsoring this year's Special
Olympics Golt Tournament April 1
at Bradford Creek Golf Course in
Greenville. A 2005 Nissan Altima
will be offered as a prize for a
hole-ln-one on a designated hole
this year. For more information,
call 329-4357 or 329-4703.
Israel in Egypt
The Chamber Singers and Early
Music Ensemble will hold this
concert at St. Paul's Episcopal
Church April 1 - 2 at 7 p.m. Call
328-6851 for details.
Cops on Doughnut
Shops
ECU police will be on the roof
of the Krispy Kreme store 6 a.m.
- 6 p.m April 2. They will lower
buckets to collect donations
from passersby and will also be
inside serving customers and
talking to people about Special
Olympics and the Torch Run. The
ECU cheerleaders and PeeDee
the Pirate will be there and the
dipping station for kids will be
operating.
Youth Arts Festival
ECU will host Its first Youth Arts
Festival April 2 at the mall on main
campus. This is a day long event
including more than 100 visual
and performing artists. Children
will also have the opportunity
to create their own artwork. For
a schedule of events, visit ecu.
educs-adminfoundersday
youthartsfest.cfm.
Home Run
Habitat for Humanity of Pitt County
will be sponsoring the sixth annual
Home Run April 2 at the City
Hotel & Bistro In Greenville. The
Home Run is a major fundraiser
for Habitat for Humanity. Events
begin at 8 a.m. behind the hotel.
To-register or obtain additional
information, visit habitathomerun.
com or call 758-2947.
Greeks for Breast
Cancer Awareness
Sigma Omicron Epsilon is hosting
a breast cancer awareness
event April 6 noon - midnight
at Courtyard Tavern. Proceeds
from this event will go to the
Susan G. Koman Foundation.
Each Greek Organization gets 30
coupons to represent their group.
Any organization that needs
more than 30 coupons should
contact Sigma Omicron Epsilon
President Ericka S. Williams at
ew0309@mail.ecu.edu.
Choosing Child Care
Adult and Commuter Student
Services and Childhood
Development and Family
Relations with Sharon Ballard
will be available to discuss and
answer questions regarding
finding the right child care place
for you and your children April 5
at 6 p.m. in 2006 Bate. Childcare
and refreshments will be provided
at the event.
Want your event printed in TEC?
Please send your announcements
with date, time, location and
contact information to assista
ntnewseditor�theeastcar
olinian.com.
News Briefs
Local
Father of NC boy booked at Schlavo
demo says jail shaped views
CHARLOTTE, NC - The father of a 10-
year-old Kannapolis boy arrested for
trying to take a glass of water to Tern
Schiavo says the religious beliefs that
prompted his vigil outside the brain-
damaged woman's hospice were
shaped while serving time in jail.
Howard Scott Heldreth, 32, said his
views changed when he was 19 as
he spent months in an Ohio jail while
awaiting trial on rape and kidnapping
charges.
Heldreth was in jail for parts of
1992 and 1993, court records show.
He eventually pleaded guilty to
sexual battery and served time on
probation.
Until then, he said Saturday, he
believed strongly in evolution,
especially the Idea that the strong
naturally ruled over the weak.
"I basically agreed with everyone
trying to kill Terri Schlavo he said,
adding that he later accepted Christ
and turned his life around.
Heldreth on Saturday declined to
discuss the specifics of the incident
that led to his jail time. He has written
on a Web site that it happened at a
college party and involved a young
woman there.
The former Naperville, Fla resident
remains listed on the Florida
Department of Law Enforcement's sex
offender registry, but he's not registered
on North Carolina's. The North
Carolina registry applies to offenders
convicted on or after Jan. 1,1996.
Heldreth and his wife, Kathy, are
members of Operation Save America,
a group that opposes and protesls
against abortion and homosexuality.
Heldreth and his son, Josh, traveled
to Florida last week because they felt
strongly that Schlavo should be kept
alive, Kathy Heldreth said.
Josh Heldreth was charged with
trespassing after he tried to deliver
the water to Schiavo, who has gone
without food or water since March 18,
when her feeding tube was removed
by court order.
Landfill proposal divides
Camden County
SOUTH MILLS, NC - The prospect
of hosting one of the state's largest
landfills - which would accept trash
from as far away as Michigan and
New York - has divided Camden
County residents.
"A 300-foot pile of trash is going
to be hard to Ignore said Lars
Simonson, a Windsor lawyer who
represents a nearby landowner.
Supporters say that mound of trash
equals a pile of money.
The county would receive $1.5 million
to $3 million a year In fees, depending
on how much trash Is trucked in.
Supporters say property tax would
generate an additional $60,000 a year
and the county would save $200,000
a year on trash disposal.
The revenue would be significant in
a county with a budget of a scant
$8 million.
While supporters say the landfill will
be set back from the highway and
landscaped as a grassy slope, critics
say it will be the first thing travelers
see when they enter the county on
U.S. 17 from Virginia.
"You might as well say, 'Welcome to
Camden County, the land of the huge
mountain of trash Simonson said.
National
Judge to hear arguments on past
allegations against Jackson
SANTA MARIA, Calif. - Michael
Jackson is urging fans to pray for
him, and says he has faith that he
will be vindicated. But the focus may
soon shift to one of the key issues In
the case details of past allegations
against the singer.
Prosecutors say evidence of past
child molestation could corroborate
a claim from the current accuser, who
said he was molested at Jackson's
Neveriand Ranch in 2003.
But Jackson's defense team was
expected to argue that admitting past
evidence would be prejudicial to their
client and irrelevant. If it is allowed,
however, they will be prepared to
contend this case is similar to the
1993 allegations only because the
current accuser is a copycat looking
for a payoff.
The Issue was expected to be taken
up Monday.
"I gain strength from the fact that I
know I am innocent. None of these
stories are true Jackson told the
Rev. Jesse Jackson in an hour-long
Interview broadcast live over the
Internet on Sunday.
Declaring himself "completely
innocent the entertainer said
he believes he is the victim of a
conspiracy, although he declined to
elaborate, citing the court-imposed
gag order that prevents him from
discussing the ongoing trial in detail.
High court declines to clarify
scope of media protection
WASHINGTON - The Supreme
Court declined Monday to consider
whether journalists have constitutional
protections allowing them to safely
report defamatory comments made by
public figures, so long as the comments
are described In a neutral way.
Without comment, justices let stand
a state court ruling In favor of two
Parkesburg, Pa officials who sued
over a 1995 article In the Dally
Local News in West Chester, Pa.
As a result, journalists publishing in
Pennsylvania will need to scrutinize
public statements more closely for
truth or face potential liability.
The article described borough
Councilman William T Glenn Sr. as
"strongly Implying" council president
James B. Norton III and Mayor Alan
M. Wolfe to be "queers and child
molesters according to the state
ruling. The article described Norton
and Wolfe as denying the charges
and calling the comments "bizarre"
and "sad
A jury ordered Glenn to pay the
two men $17,500 in damages for
defamation but found that reporter
Tom Kennedy, then-editor William
Caufield and newspaper owner Troy
Publishing Co. were not liable, partly
because of the trial judge's instruction
on the so-called neutral reportage
privilege.
That privilege, recognized by some
state and federal courts, lets the press
convey a reputable public figure's
defamatory comment as long as it is
reported neutrally and accurately.
The Pennsylvania Supreme Court
disagreed, ruling that no such privilege
exists under U.S. or Pennsylvania
constitutions. It ordered a new trial
to decide the journalists' liability
under an "actual malice" standard
that asks whether the defamatory
statements were published with
reckless disregard for the truth.
International
Iraqi Interior minister warns
against demonstrations
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraq's interior
minister warned citizens Monday not
to hold protests, saying the gatherings
were an invitation for a large-scale
terrorist attack. His comments came
a day after government bodyguards
opened fire on a group of employees
demanding higher wages, killing one
person.
Interim Interior Minister Falah al-Naqib,
likely to be out of job once the new
government takes over, said the protest
was among "attempts to destabilize
the situation" in Iraq. He accused
the protesters of trying to enter the
office of Science and Technology
Minister Rashad Mandan Omar and
said the bodyguards were just doing
their job by protecting the official.
Haithem Jassim, one of three
people injured in the melee, said the
demonstrators were unarmed.
Iraqis elected a new parliament on
Jan. 30 in the first free elections in
50 years, but progress in forming
the new government has been slow.
Officials have acknowledged that it
has caused a gap In some services,
frustrating citizens.
But al-Naqib warned against future
protests, saying they are a perfect
target for insurgent bombings.
Parliament rejects referendum
for Gaza pullout
JERUSALEM - Parliament swept
aside another potential obstacle
Monday to Prime Minister Ariel
Sharon's plan to withdraw from the
Gaza Strip, overwhelmingly rejecting
a proposal for holding a national
referendum on the pullout.
Opponents of the withdrawal had
latched onto the plebiscite as a last-
ditch legislative effort to delay and
ultimately scuttle the withdrawal, set
for the summer. The defeat Monday
left withdrawal opponents with few
remaining options.
Approval of a referendum could have
brought down Sharon's government
and forced new elections. Sharon's
main coalition partner, the moderate
Labor Party, had warned it would
quit the coalition if a referendum
were approved. Labor is a staunch
supporter of the Gaza withdrawal.
In other developments, Israeli troops
arrested eight supporters of the
militant Islamic Jihad group In the
West Bank on suspicion they were
trying to build rockets. One soldier
was slightly hurt by an explosive
device thrown at troops during the
raid in the town of Jenln.
In the Gaza Strip, Palestinian
leader Mahmoud Abbas held
talks Sunday with leaders of
Islamic Jihad on the terms of the
participation of militant groups In
the PLO. Such participation was
agreed upon in principle In a meeting
between Abbas and opposition
factions earlier this month in Cairo.
Ballard from page A1 SChlSVO from page A1
for more than a year since the
reassignment of former provost
William Swart to a professorship.
Smith joined ECU in 1969 as
a faculty member in the depart-
ment of philosophy. He went
on to chair the department of
philosophy and ECU's Faculty
Senate and held a variety of other
key roles on campus before he
was appointed to the position of
provost and vice chancellor for
academic affairs.
Mageean will bring experi-
ence from the University of
Maine where she has served as an
instructor and researcher.
The search process for the
vacant positions involved inter-
views and public appearances
from a handful of finalists.
"We had an open and trans-
parent search involving our entire
community Ballard said.
Smith said his overall vision
for ECU is to create an atmo-
sphere where every member of
ECU works together toward the
progress of this institution.
"The ultimate vision here is
the collaborative one Smith said.
Smith said he thought the
search process was an excellent
experience and he is proud to
have been chosen from a field
of more than SO highly competi-
tive applicants. He said he felt,
among other things, it was his
long career at ECU that put him
within competition successful
with those people.
While Smith did not person-
ally meet the other candidates, he
reviewed their resumes and said
he thought they were Impressive,
well-accomplished candidates
and he is proud to have competed
successfully with them.
"The role of ECU as with any
public university is such that we
really do need to try to find the
best candidates. I'm honored and
humbled to think that so many
people apparently think that's
me Smith said.
He said a main factor that
made him stand out in the search
included his knowledge and com-
mitment within ECU in his quarter
of a century working at ECU serv-
ing in several successful positions.
Smith cited the main suc-
cesses of ECU include the compe-
tent faculty in terms of classroom
and priorities. Research, creative
activity and scholarship are
three attributes ECU'S faculty
understand the importance of
and apply to the classroom. Much
of the faculty allows student
Interaction.
Smith said the challenge is
maximizing the amount of infra-
structure for the research and still
provides a faculty who care and
show commitment tothe students.
Nick Henne contributed to this
article.
This writer can be contacted at
news9theeastcarolinian.com.
ress In her recovery for years, she
thinks cutting her food supply is
the appropriate thing to do.
"I'm not in favor of Michael
Schiavo I'm just trying to
think logically Harper said.
Alex Langley, graduate stu-
dent in recreation and leisure
studies, said he had a frieid who
was put in a similar condition
to that of Terri's when he was in
the ninth grade. His friend lived
in a similar vegetative state for
three years before passing away.
Langley said he is not sure if his
friend died on his own or if he
was allowed to die.
After Langley's friend did
pass away, he and the family were
able to much more effectively
move on in life and Langley in
some respect saw the benefits of
putting an end to the situation.
Freddy Locks, Aramark man-
ager for ECU Dining Services,
had a different perspective on
the situation.
Locks said he does not approve
of Terri being deprived of her food
supply because he is a person of
faith and he can find no credibil-
ity from the claim of Michael who
wants to see his wife dead.
"When you want someone
dead as bad as he does, 1 cannot
honor anything he says said
Locks.
He said he feels things like
this need to be put in writing
either at the time of a person's
marriage or before.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Madame B.
SPRING YOUR SPIRIT. FREE YOUR SOUL
WITH THE SHADES AND LOOKS OF
THIS REMARKABLE COLOUR COLLECTION.
pent April 8-9.
DO, ext. 210
Call for a makeup appoir
Belk Colonial Mall,
3-29-0:
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3-29-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
School of communication holds oratorical exhibition
Students to present
public speaking abilities
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The school of communi-
cation is sponsoring its third
oratorical exhibition Tuesday,
March 29 at 6:30 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
The exhibition is not a com-
petition but features students
from Communication 2410
and 2420 classes who stood
out during their class presenta-
tions.
"It's just our way of getting
some attention to students who
excel in the program that we've
devised said Pamela Hopkins,
instructor and coordinator of
speech classes, who is also chair
of the speech committee.
Hopkins said they thought
about holding auditions but
decided the process would work
best if teachers invited students
who did well in class. Students
who are chosen can then only
participate if they can attend all
rehearsals, where speech instruc-
tors critique their speeches in
order to prepare them and the
exhibition itself.
Ricardo Quintero, sopho-
more communication major,
was asked by Hopkins to
participate in the exhibition.
He said he hadn't given much
thought to it when Hopkins
first announced it to the class,
but after his first presentation,
Hopkins said she liked his orga-
nization and delivery.
"I was a little shocked at first
but honored she had asked me
personally said Quintero.
"It was definitely a
confidence booster. I agreed to
do it because I liked the challenge
and thought it would be good
recognition. I couldn't see myself
passing up this opportunity
The theme changes for each
exhibition. This semester stu-
dents will speak to the premise
"Speak Up: Change Tomorrow"
as well as incorporating some-
thing about Founders Day. The
speech must be 5 - 7 minutes
long and be either informative
or persuasive.
Quintero's speech will dis-
cuss how ECU students have
continued to fight for change.
"This speech will hopefully
educate students about ECU's
past and encourage them to
speak up and voice their opinions
in the future Quintero said.
Angel Jones was invited by
her former communication pro-
fessor.
"I will be speaking about
eating disorders, how the media
has affected their rate of occur-
rence and the outreach programs
ECU offers to combat them
said Jones.
Tracie Campbell, junior
in the child development and
family relations department,
said she wanted to get involved
in this exhibition because it is a
chance for the communication
department to show exactly what
they are capable of doing and it
is a wonderful experience for her
that will look nice on a resume.
"My speech is called
'Greenville's Glad Day' and is
about the history of ECU and
Greenville and their ability to
grow together said Campbell.
Tekyia Mozell, sophomore
community health major, said
her topic is "Asserting Your Voice
Through Volunteerism
"I've always been involved in
volunteer activities in my home-
town said Mozell.
"I was concerned when
I moved here that I did not
know which avenues to
explore for volunteer activities.
During a health class I became
aware of the volunteer services
department here at ECU
The school of communica-
tion hosts the event, but a stu-
dent does not have to major or
minor in the field to participate.
"We don't have a speech
major, but Communication 2420
or 2410 is required of almost
every student who comes to this
university so it seemed to us
that it needed to be spotlighted
Hopkins said.
In past exhibitions, approxi-
mately 300 - 400 people attended.
Depending on the teacher,
students may get extra credit
for going.
"It's worth it to me to give an
extra point on a grade if they see
it Hopkins said.
Hopkins said she thinks
attendees will get a lot from the
exhibition.
"I hope they see a beauti-
fully structured and beautifully
delivered speech and I hope they
see a reflection of everything
they're being taught in class
Hopkins said.
Even though the speakers
will not receive payment of
prizes, Hopkins thinks they still
get a lot out of the experience
including more self confidence.
"I think it's such a great expe-
rience Hopkins said.
"It's one thing to excel in a
class of 30 and speak to them,
the exhibition is another ball
game
Jones agreed saying she got
involved because she thought it
was a great opportunity.
"I had not done any public
speaking before I took my
communication class, at least
nothing on this scale. In the
past, I used to be very shy, but
my communication class was
the culmination of a project
I set myself to work past this
inhibition Jones said.
Most of the participants said
they do not feel nervous about
speaking to the large crowd.
"I have been in front of
crowds since I was a very small
child, so getting up in front of
people does not make me ner-
vous maybe a little anxious
Campbell said.
Mozell said she has been in
the public eye since a young age
as well.
"I have been doing public
speaking since I was a little girl
in churches and around the com-
munity Mozell said.
Five students will present
speeches tonight, but they have
had as many as eight. They
receive extra credit for doing
the speeches as well. The type of
extra credit varies by teacher.
This writer-can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
?
Exhibit
The school of communication's
oratorical exhibition, "Speak Up:
Change Tomorrow" will begin at
6:30 p.m. March 29 In Wright
Auditorium. The event Is free to the
public and will last approximately
one hour.
The following students will be
speaking at tonight's exhibition:
- Tracie Campbell
- Angel Jones
- Tekyia Mozell
- Ricardo Quintero
- Heather Selbert
Topics will range from using your
voice to making a change to the
media and eating disorders.
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OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFEU Editor in Chief
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
Our View
Supreme Court has too much
authority in Schiavo case
Terri Schiavo has for about a week and a
half now been cut from her feeding tube. The
clock is ticking for her death as various court
decisions are being made and various protes-
tors try to persuade Judge Greer to change
his decision about the removal of the feeding
tube.
This case, along with all death penalty cases,
involves the life or death of a human being
which is to be determined by just a few people.
As in all death penalty cases, the judge over-
seeing the specific case reviews all the facts
and circumstances of the person, then in many
cases will allow other judges to review the facts
also to see if they have the same opinions on
the matter to make sure they are making a
correct decision on whether or not to keep this
person alive.
In the Schiavo case - which is no a death I
penalty case, but as stated does involve life or
death to be determined by a few people - no
other judge other than Florida Judge Greer
looked over the facts underlying the case.
Other judges have examined Judge Greer's
court procedures in his decision to remove the
feeding tube, and have agreed that he followed
all of the correct procedural guidelines, but
no other judge has been offered to review all
of the circumstances surrounding the specific
case.
There has also been some resentment among
the legislative and executive branches of the
federal government on the decision of the
judge's decision, but Judge Greer has yet to
yield to the many valid opposing opinions
on the matter presented by millions of Ameri-
cans.
It is not right that the judicial branch of the
federal government (which only consists of one
state judge in this case) has supreme power
over the legislative and executive branches.
If this is allowed to go through, where will it
end? Will there be future cases of one branch
of government overriding the other two? The
federal government was designed and set up
by our founding fathers to prevent from any one
branch from becoming too powerful, which is
clearly what is happening in this case.
Quote from Republican memo:
the pro-life base will be exciteda great political issue
Our Staff
Amanda Q. Lingerfelt
Editor in Chief
Nick Henne Kristin Day
News Editor Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura
Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Alexander Marcinlak Dustln Jones
Web Editor Asst Web Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Kristin Murnane
Asst Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
Kltch Hines
Managing Editor
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" Is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edltortotheeastcarollnlan.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more '
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
Opinion Columnist
When will we finally learn to speak up?
All are responsible for
Schiavo's ultimate death
TONY MCKEE
STAFF WRITER
This past weekend millions of
people celebrated Easter by joyously
commemorating the Resurrection of
Jesus Christ.
This past weekend millions of
people celebrated Easter with egg
hunts, traditional dinners and time
with family.
This past weekend millions of
people observed Easter through hearts
and souls saddened by the slow, sen-
sationalized, judicially ordered and
enforced murder of Terri Schiavo. And
murder it was, or is (Schiavo is still alive
as I write this).
Michael Schiavo is guilty of Terri's
murder. Whether he was the cause of
Terri's initial collapse, as many believe,
may not be determined. Why he
decided to wait eight years and three
months after Terri's collapse in 1990
to "remember" that she told him she
would have wanted to die (in spite of
evidence to the contrary) may not be
determined. Whether the fact that he
is in an adulterous relationship and
has children by another women, while
refusing to divorce Terri, had anything
to do with his determination to kill
her may not be determined. If none
of this is ever determined to be true, it
doesn't matter. He Is guilty of murder-
ing Terri.
Circuit Court Judge George W. Greer
is guilty of Terri's murder. Whether it
is because of his initial decision in
2000 that Terri's feeding tube could be
removed doesn't matter. Whether it
was his stubborn refusal from that time
on to allow any new hearingsevidence
on Terri's behalf that could reverse his
initial ruling doesn't matter. Even
his being in contempt of Congress for
ignoring not only a subpoena for Terri
to appear before Congress but also
ignoring a law requiring a new hear-
ingtrial that would have kept Terri
alive doesn't matter. He is guilty of
murdering Terri.
Every member of the Florida
Supreme Court, the Second District
Court of Appeals and the United
States Supreme Court are guilty of
Tejri's murder. Whether their collective
refusal to overrule Judge Greer's actions
hastened Terri's death is irrelevant.
They, every single one of them, are
guilty of murdering Terri.
Governor Jeb Bush is guilty of
Terri's murder. It is inconsequential
whether hindsight shows that he was
either unaware he had the power to
save Terri andor was unwilling to do
so for whatever reason. He is guilty of
murdering Terri.
Congress and President Bush
are guilty of Terri's murder. It makes
no difference whether history shows
they had the power to save Terri's life
or not. They are guilty of murdering
Terri.
The reason that the actions of these
people, individually or collectively,
are immaterial is that while they are
undeniably guilty of murdering Terri,
they are not ultimately responsible. We
are. You, me, our parents, grandparents,
great-grandparents and on down the
line, we are all responsible for Terri's
murder.
Our culpability for Terri's murder
started long before she was born.
It started when the Supreme Court
decided to take upon itself a power
never granted to it - the power to decide
what is or isn't Constitutional. When
congress and the president allowed the
court to set itself up as the ultimate
authority, Terri's was doomed.
When the Supreme Court decided
that women had the "right" to kill their
babies, based upon a lie and fraudulent
legal argument, and we did nothing, we
condemned Terri to death.
When we stood silently as "abortion
rights" activists and judicial collabora-
tors perverted the definition of life to
the point that unborn human beings
are now useless blobs of tissue that
can be disposed of upon a whim, we
sentenced Terri to death.
Our hands were on Terri's feeding
tube as we uninterestedly watched the
growth of the "death with dignity" and
"end of life choices" groups espousing
killing the infirm and helpless in the
name of mercy.
We ripped the tube out of Terri's
stomach as we idly commented about
Dr. Kevorkian and the euthanasia laws
that were passed in our country.
We placed guards at Terri's hos-
pital door to ensure her murder was
completed when we did not complain
when doctors and "ethicists" stated that
people with severe mental and physical
handicaps should be put out of their (or
our) misery.
Because good people did nothing
while evil spread across the landscape,
as Terri exhales her last breath, we
need just look in the mirror to see her
murderers, for they are we.
To slightly change the great quote
by the Rev. Martin Neimoller:
"First they came for the
unborn, and I didn't speak up, because
I was born. Then they came for the
old and infirm, and I didn't speak
up, because I was young and healthy.
Then they came for the physically and
mentally handicapped, and I didn't
speak up, because I was neither. Then
they came for me, and by that time there
was no one left to speak up for me
When will you finally speak up?
In My Opinion
Bush's policy yields new optimism in Middle East
(KRT) � Two years after the inva-
sion of Iraq: A slice of time marked
by freeze-frame images and the end-
less words served up by the media, a
moment still overshadowed by Jan.
30, when millions of Iraqis raised
fingers marked with purple ink, and
suddenly the idea of Arab democracy
- utterly remote and unattainable for
so long - flashed into the realm of the
possible.
For all the mistakes and errors of
the post-Hussein era, the Iraqi election
- and its regional aftershocks - is the
hopeful harvest of President Bush's
decision to bring down Saddam Hus-
sein. A sampling of news-blips from the
last few weeks speaks for Itself:
A headline in London's The Indepen-
dent asks, "Was Bush Right After All?"
In New York magazine, columnist
Kurt Anderson glumly acknowledges,
"The people of this Bush-hating city
are being forced to grant the merest
possibility that Bush, despite his annoy-
ing manner and his administration's
awful hubris and dissembling and
incompetence concerning Iraq, just
might - might, possibly - have been
correct to invade, to occupy, and to
try to enable a democratically elected
government In Iraq
Syria's occupation of Lebanon sud-
denly looks wobbly. Egyptian President
Hosnl Mubarak says he will allow mul-
tiparty elections. Saudi Arabia permits
limited elections at the local level.
To varying degrees, these moves
were probably intended as mere ges-
tures. Yet they reveal deep apprehen-
sion. They reveal autocrats thrown back
on their heels.
"What's taken place in a number
of those countries is enormously
constructive a senator says on ABC
News. The speaker? Ted Kennedy, Mas-
sachusetts Democrat. "It's a reflection
the president has been involved he
added.
Sen. Joseph Lieberman, a Con-
necticut Democrat, tells The New York
Times, "Look, this moment in the
Middle East has the feel of Central and
Eastern Europe around the collapse of
the Berlin Wall
Strategypage.com, a Web site
focused on military matters, reports
that "Iraqi popular opinion has turned
against terrorism In a big way Strat-
egypage says the tipping point came
when Osama bin Laden named Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi "prince" of Iraq, a
move Iraqis interpreted as a Saudi order-
ing a Jordanian to kill Iraqis.
French President Jacques Chirac
joins President Bush in calling for
the withdrawal of Syrian troops from
Lebanon.
Sen. Hillary Clinton travels to Iraq
and says much of the country is "func-
tioning quite well
The peace movement, which learns
nothing and forgets nothing, marks the
anniversary of the Iraqi Invasion with
protests. But what are they protesting?
Democracy? The fall of Saddam Hus-
sein? If these people had had their way,
Hussein would still be in power: no
Iraqi election, no hopes for democracy
in the Middle East.
"How odd writes the columnist
Victor Davis Hanson, "that conserva-
tives, usually derided for their multi-
cultural insensitlvity and blinkered
approach to the world abroad, had far
more confidence in the Arab street
than did liberals at home and Euro-
elites who patronized Arabs as nice
others' who were "different' rather
than oppressed by murderous thugs In
the manner of Russians, Hungarians,
Bosnians, and Afghans
A New York Times editorial opines
that the "stains on the index fingers
of proud Iraqi voters have long faded
Many Iraqis, the paper says, are begin-
ning to feel disillusioned.
Really? Two days earlier, another
paper reported a recent survey of
Iraqis showing 62 percent believe their
country Is headed in the right direc-
tion, more than at any time since the
American invasion.
Monday, Times reporter John F.
Burns reports clear signs that the tide
may be turning against the insurgency:
"Despite some notable exceptions,
Insurgents are attacking in smaller
numbers, and with less intensity;
mortar attacks Into the Green Zone
have diminished sharply
Pirate Rant
The computer lab is not a
place for social hour. I hear group
discussions about girlfriends,
gang busts, basketball, tongue
rings, new clothes etc. That's all
interesting but not when students
are trying to finish assignments
on the computer.
Just call all your professors
"doctor I have never had some-
one get offended by giving them
a more proper title than they
deserve.
To President Bush: Stop inter-
fering with the judicial system.
Stick to the success of Iraq. Tune
into "The West Wing Maybe
you could learn a thing or two
about the presidency.
The kids who wear sweatbands
and wristbands to class really irri-
tate me. I don't know whether to
compare homework or ask for a
bounce pass. And oh, yeah, John
Deere hats suck.
Did you know eventually
California will break off and
become an island? And then it
will be it's own nation, Schwar-
zenegger, where poor English
and big muscles will rule and
determine all.
Who do you think would
win in a fight between President
Bush and the Incredible Hulk?
I think that the Hulk would
win, because he's powered by
gamma radiation and has a
larger vocabulary than the presi-
dent.
What's so bad about
drilling in Alaska? In about five
billion years the sun will burn
out and then AJaska will be
the last thing on the public's
mind.
How in the world did you get
into college not knowing what
to do in the rain to keep you and
your things dry? Buy one or two
things, an umbrella or a book
bag - it's your choice and they
both do their respective jobs
quite well.
To all you size twenties
and under: It's about time
that you paid the full figured
people a little more respect. You
fail to realize that if God wanted
all of us to be the same size he
would have created us all the
same.
Your mother wears topsid-
It is nice to know that ECU
wants us to park at Minges. It
would be even better if they
would stop being so cheap and
install a few more shelters at the
various bus stops. I do not enjoy
being forced to stand in the rain
uncovered while I wait for a bus.
To the wonderful young lady
that shared her umbrella and
good conversation with me, I say
"thanks
To the guy who takes his
shoes off in class: Well, that's
just disgusting. Keep them on so
we don't have to suffer any more
than we already do.
Have you ever heard a bird
fart?
Our congress has the
nerve to cancel their vaca-
tions and come back early to
keep a brain dead woman,
who is trapped in her body
alive, but gas costs an arm and
a leg, people can't afford health
insurance and our troops don't
have enough body armor. Has
Congress forgotten who pays the
bills around here? Here's what
I say to our Congress: Do your
jobs and fight for the lives of all
Americans.
Why are the things that
hurt me all four-letter words like
"test "exam" and "quiz?"
Note to self: It's raining
outside so I must put my drenched
raincoat in the seat beside
me so that the next person that
comes in the class can sit in a
wet seat.
The new Tender Crisp Bacon
Cheddar Ranch commercials for
Burger King are sheer marketing
genius. Long live Hootie!
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editor&theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.






Happy 98th Birthday, ECU!
'The East Carolinian' remembers the history
of our campus in celebration of founders week
Remembering ECUs
founders and leaders
Many students walk through
campus daily without any notion
of who the past leaders of ECU
were. Chances are however, that
you may have actually known
their names all along by taking
a class in one of the many build-
ings named after them. Regard-
less, ECU owes much to these
10 individuals during Founders
Week for they have been at the
helm of the university since 123
students first began classes Oct.
5, 1909.
ECU'S formal beginnings date
back to 1907 when East Carolina
Teachers Training School was
charted by an act of the North
Carolina General Assembly with
Robert Wright as the first presi-
dent. Wright remained the presi-
dent of East Carolina Teachers
College until his death in 1934,
serving nearly 25 years.
Leon Meadows became
Wright's successor the same year.
Meadows retired in 1944 with
ECTC boosting its enrollment
to more than 1,300 students.
Howard McGinnis briefly acted as
president from 1944-1946 as the
search for another president took
place. He is remembered for creat-
ing the division of field services
that first began to actively recruit
students to attend ECTC.
Dennis Cooke succeeded
McGinnis and barely served
a year in the post when he
resigned in 1947. After Cooke's
resignation the university
board of governors didn't
officially hire another president
until Leo Jenkins in 1960. Jen-
kins lead the university during
the political turmoil of the 1960s
and 1970s overseeing ECTC into
an actual university subsidized
by the state. Under Jenkins'
leadership as both president
and subsequent tenure as the
first chancellor, ECU doubled its
enrollment, as well as pursued a
vigorous campaign to construct
permanent facilities to house the
university's growing academic
programs.
Upon Jenkins' retirement
from the chancellorship in 1978,
ECU had undergone dramatic
changes that even included
the addition of a new medical
school. With Jenkins leaving the
university, a replacement was
found in a rather young aca-
demic named Thomas Brewer.
Compared to Jenkins, Brewer
had a relatively short-term last-
ing four years, but during this
time ECU'S administration grew
considerably.
A brief search took place
to find a new chancellor,
with the ultimate selection of
John Howell in 1982. Howell
witnessed ECU bestow its first
"M.D from the school of medi-
cine in 1983. Howell elected
to retire in 1987 when Richard
Eakin assumed the top-post lead-
ing ECU through a time of both
increased academic achievement
and growth. Eakin is known for
raising funds to add additional
buildings on campus while reno-
vating older ones.
Eakin announced his retire-
ment in 2000 as chancellor with
William Muse accepting the posi-
tion in, early 2001. Muse would
only serve for two years, citing
health concerns in his resigna-
tion. Bill Shelton served briefly
as the interim chancellor, but is
remembered for his energetic,
ambitious and extremely humble
personality.
With the announcement of
Steve Ballard, our current and
10th university leader, ECU has
grown substantially in size since
its doors officially opened to
students in 1909. ECU'S current
enrollment is more than 22,000
students.
� Matthew S. Herrmann
"The dreams of our founders g8jears ago are now a reality.
Celebrating ECU's birthday is a time to appreciate and
reflect on the hardships and triumphs that people made
in order to get us where we are today. The ECU Alumni
Association, ECU Ambassadors, the Student Union, 'The
East Carolinian' and the Student Government Association
have come together to share the significance of our 98th birthday
in a Birthday Bash today at 3 p.m. on the mall.
Hosting this event is the least we can do to honor our founders and
celebrate their accomplishments. We hope that as current ECU
students we can continue to help build the future of ECU.
The success of ECU is definitely something to celebrate. Coming to
ECU as a student has made my spirit, enthusiasm and love for the
university sky rocket. Every time I watch the football team run out
of the tunnel with Pirate fans cheering them on, I get goose bumps.
Every time I even hear the fight song, I feel pride for our university.
That is what I want every ECU student to experience. I hope that
every student will create their own unique, individual love and
spirit for the school. There is much more to ECU than the classroom
and it is the students of today who will secure the future of ECU by
f pushing it forward with spirit, love, and determination
� Rebekah Page, ECU Ambassadors
Cupola marks history and tradition
In the plaza between Joyner Library and Jarvis
Residence Hall sits one of ECU's most memorable
landmarks, the cupola. This landmark is a recre-
ation of the cupola that sat on top of the admin-
istration building built in 1909 later called Austin
Hall. Austin is one of the four original buildings on
campus. This building, which was named in honor
of professor Herbert E. Austin, housed classrooms,
an auditorium, a library and offices. In 1969, old
Austin was declared "structurally unsound" and
was ordered to be demolished. Before demolishing
the building, several faculty members successfully
raised $3,800 to preserve the cupola. Even though
enough money was raised, the cupola did not
survive the move. When trying to lift the cupola
off the building, it crumbled. In 1993, Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin announced plans to reconstruct
the cupola. The new structure would double the
size of the original cupola. Today, the reconstructed
cupola can be seen on the mall, which is also called
Cupola Plaza. Around the cupola is a brick walk-
way that features the names of more than 1,400
alumni donors. To purchase a brick and have your
name forever engraved on the ECU campus, call
252-328-9579.
� Kristen Farmer
From Buc to Pee Dee: ECU's mascot history

u
T1
i

Test your ECU knowledge
1. ECU was established in
and called East Carolina
Teachers Training School.
A livewas the mascot from 1930 �
1931.
Each year, more than 8,000 ECU students contribute in excess of
hours of volunteer service to more than 100 community
health and human service organizations.
, creator of Scream, I Know What You Did Last Summer
' attended ECU.
restaurant
Pee Dee the Pirate is a beloved
mascot for Pirate fans everywhere.
However, Pee Dee as we know him
today is relatively new to ECU.
The men's athletic teams at
East Carolina Teachers College
in the 1930s used classical names
such as the Athenians and Olym-
pians and their mascot was a
wildcat. The men's football team
was known as the Teachers - how-
ever, the Pirate, a fiercer mascot
for the school, was adopted in
1934. Under the new name of the
Pirates, the team that had won
only two football games in their
first three seasons won three
out of six games the following
year. The pirate was a natural
choice based on the history of
North Carolina. The Outer Banks
afforded perfect hideouts for
pirates and the infamous pirate
Blackbeard (Edward Teach) had
homes on Ocracoke and nearby
Bath. In 1983 our Pirate mascot
was named Pee Dee for the Pee
Dee River, which originates in
Western North Carolina and runs
through South Carolina.
In addition to Pee Dee, there
have been three notable canine
mascots that would boost spirit
at home games and could be seen
playing on the campus mall. As
ECU students were returning
to campus in August of 1968,
a 50-pound Great Dane puppy
named Buc joined them. Over
the summer, the SGA held an
election that would give our
school its very first mascot. The
students voted on the Great
Dane as a symbol of strength,
speed and courage. As a beloved
member of our campus, Buc
inspired the fans and players
during two football seasons with
his presence at every home game.
When Buc wasn't standing tall
for our players on the sidelines,
students could visit him in his
running cage on the mall. Buc
died just three years later on July
4, 1961 after suffering from an
unknown illness.
Ten years later, ECU received
its second canine mascot. This
time the Pirates were accompa-
nied by a French Poodle named
Brandy. At football games, Brandy
would accompany the cheerlead-
ers on the sidelines. Although her
time as our mascot was brief, the
ECU Pirate blanket she adorned
was given to ECU as a gift
from Brandy's owner in the 1970s
and can be found in the univer-
sity archives.
Another previous mascot
was a German Sheppard named
Willie. Willie's owner, 21 year-old
Pat Elks, started working for ECU
in Austin during the summer of
1978. She and her husband lived
at the apartments at the end of
campus and ate lunch together
every afternoon. When her hus-
band would walk to campus for
lunch, he would bring Willie
with him to keep him company
before Pat got off for lunch.
He and Willie could be seen
playing Frisbee out on the mall
every afternoon. Willie became
a main stay on campus during
this time, his intelligence and
skill impressing everyone who
stopped to watch him perform
tricks. His mascot debut was at
the 1978 homecoming game
where Willie performed all of his
tricks for an entire stadium full of
fans. Willie continued to join the
Pirates at home football games for
the rest of the year, showing off
his tricks after touchdowns and
outstanding plays. Pat Elks, who
now works in the administrative
offices in Joyner Library, remem-
bers how Willie loved the stu-
dents and people of Greenville,
never missing a chance to take a
car ride around town and see the
sites. Willie died just a few years
after he was a mascot, but his
memory remains as the puppy
that never missed a toss.
� Elizabeth Schuler
Historical bell rings for ECU victory
6.
7.
8.
and "Dawson's Creek
James Maynard, founder of the
chain, attended ECU.
Chancellor Steven Ballard is ECU's.
Chancellor.
What year did the men's and women's Student Government
Associations merge?
was the first dormitory, which was
constructed in.
9. Thefamily of eastern North Carolina has given the ECU
School of Medicine $8 million to support research projects and
medical initiatives related to the medical school's service to
the region.
10. ECUwill celebrate its centennial in.
111907. awwcat 31100,000.41 Kevin Williamson. 51 Golden Cocral. 6110th 7)1943. SlJarvls. 1909.9l6rody. 1012007.
The Victory Bell sits atop a pedestal just west
of Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium. The bell is
an artifact from the US Navy acquired by ECU to
commemorate the service of students and gradu-
ates in World War II and the Korean War. Cast in
Philadelphia in 1855, the bell weighs 382 pounds
and measures 24 inches tall and 28 inches wide. It
was used aboard the USS Broome, a Navy destroyer
named after USMC Lieutenant John Lloyd Broome.
The USS Broome was commissioned on May 14,
1919, decommissioned in 1922, and then re-entered
service in 1930. It was used in World War II as an
escort for convoys on the Atlantic Ocean, and was
sold for scrap in 1946. The East Carolina College
Veterans Club wanted to obtain a bell to honor vet-
erans from ECTC who had served in World War II.
Due to a congressional law, the club was ineligible to
make such a transaction. In 1951, Congress donated
the bell. The Veteran's Club paid shipping costs
and the cost of a pillar, and during Homecoming
weekend In 1953, the bell was officially presented.
The marching band played, and the decision was
made to ring the bell after Pirate victories. Today,
the Victory Bell is used during military service
celebrations.
� Brian J. Monroe and Blaine M. Long
Special thanks to ECU Ambassadors for their help with this page.





OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFEU Editor In Chief
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
Our View
Supreme Court has too much
authority in Schiavo case
Terri Schiavo has for about a week and a
half now been cut from her feeding tube. The
clock is ticking for her death as various court
decisions are being made and various protes-
tors try to persuade Judge Greer to change
his decision about the removal of the feeding
tube.
This case, along with all death penalty cases,
involves the life or death of a human being
which is to be determined by just a few people.
As in all death penalty cases, the judge over-
seeing the specific case reviews all the facts
and circumstances of the person, then in many
cases will allow other judges to review the facts
also to see if they have the same opinions on
the matter to make sure they are making a
correct decision on whether or not to keep this
person alive.
In the Schiavo case - which is not a death
penalty case, but as stated does involve life or
death to be determined by a few people - no
other judge other than Florida Judge Greer
looked over the facts underlying the case.
Other judges have examined Judge Greer's
court procedures in his decision to remove the
feeding tube, and have agreed that he followed
all of the correct procedural guidelines, but
no other judge has been offered to review all
of the circumstances surrounding the specific
case.
There has also been some resentment among
the legislative and executive branches of the
federal government on the decision of the
judge's decision, but Judge Greer has yet to
yield to the many valid opposing opinions
on the matter presented by millions of Ameri-
cans.
It is not right that the judicial branch of the
federal government (which only consists of one
state judge in this case) has supreme power
over the legislative and executive branches.
If this is allowed to go through, where will it
end? Will there be future cases of one branch
of government overriding the other two? The
federal government was designed and set up
by our founding fathers to prevent from any one
branch from becoming too powerful, which is
clearly what is happening in this case.
Our Staff
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Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" Is the opinion of
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copy is $1.
Quote from Republican memo:
the pro-life base will be exciteda great political issue
Opinion Columnist
When will we finally learn to speak up?
All are responsible for
Schiavo's ultimate death
TONY MCKEE
STAFF WRITER
This past weekend millions of
people celebrated Easter by joyously
commemorating the Resurrection of
Jesus Christ.
This past weekend millions of
people celebrated Easter with egg
hunts, traditional dinners and time
with family.
This past weekend millions of
people observed Easter through hearts
and souls saddened by the slow, sen-
sationalized, judicially ordered and
enforced murder of Terri Schiavo. And
murder it was, or is (Schiavo is still alive
as I write this).
Michael Schiavo is guilty of Terri's
murder. Whether he was the cause of
Terri's initial collapse, as many believe,
may not be determined. Why he
decided to wait eight years and three
months after Terri's collapse in 1990
to "remember" that she told him she
would have wanted to die (in spite of
evidence to the contrary) may not be
determined. Whether the fact that he
is in an adulterous relationship and
has children by another women, while
refusing to divorce Terri, had anything
to do with his determination to kill
her may not be determined. If none
of this is ever determined to be true, it
doesn't matter. He is guilty of murder-
ing Terri.
Circuit Court Judge George W. Greer
is guilty of Terri's murder. Whether it
Is because of his initial decision in
2000 that Terri's feeding tube could be
removed doesn't matter. Whether it
was his stubborn refusal from that time
on to allow any new hearingsevidence
on Terri's behalf that could reverse his
initial ruling doesn't matter. Even
his being in contempt of Congress for
ignoring not only a subpoena for Terri
to appear before Congress but also
ignoring a law requiring a new hear-
ingtrial that would have kept Terri
alive doesn't matter. He is guilty of
murdering Terri.
Every member of the Florida
Supreme Court, the Second District
Court of Appeals and the United
States Supreme Court are guilty of
Tejri's murder. Whether their collective
refusal to overrule Judge Greer's actions
hastened Terri's death is irrelevant.
They, every single one of them, are
guilty of murdering Terri.
Governor Jeb Bush is guilty of
Terri's murder. It is inconsequential
whether hindsight shows that he was
either unaware he had the power to
save Terri andor was unwilling to do
so for whatever reason. He is guilty of
murdering Terri.
Congress and President Bush
are guilty of Terri's murder. It makes
no difference whether history shows
they had the power to save Terri's life
or not. They are guilty of murdering
Terri.
The reason that the actions of these
people, individually or collectively,
are immaterial is that while they are
undeniably guilty of murdering Terri,
they are not ultimately responsible. We
are. You, me, our parents, grandparents,
great-grandparents and on down the
line, we are all responsible for Terri's
murder.
Our culpability for Terri's murder
started long before she was born.
It started when the Supreme Court
decided to take upon itself a power
never granted to it - the power to decide
what is or isn't Constitutional. When
congress and the president allowed the
court to set itself up as the ultimate
authority, Terri's was doomed.
When the Supreme Court decided
that women had the "right" to kill their
babies, based upon a lie and fraudulent
legal argument, and we did nothing, we
condemned Terri to death.
When we stood silently as "abortion
rights" activists and judicial collabora-
tors perverted the definition of life to
the point that unborn human beings
are now useless blobs of tissue that
can be disposed of upon a whim, we
sentenced Terri to death.
Our hands were on Terri's feeding
tube as we uninterestedly watched the
growth of the "death with dignity" and
"end of life choices" groups espousing
killing the infirm and helpless in the
name of mercy.
We ripped the tube out of Terri's
stomach as we idly commented about
Dr. Kevorkian and the euthanasia laws
that were passed in our country.
We placed guards at Terri's hos-
pital door to ensure her murder was
completed when we did not complain
when doctors and "ethicists" stated that
people with severe mental and physical
handicaps should be put out of their (or
our) misery.
Because good people did nothing
while evil spread across the landscape,
as Terri exhales her last breath, we
need just look in the mirror to see her
murderers, for they are we.
To slightly change the great quote
by the Rev. Martin Neimoller:
"First they came for the
unborn, and I didn't speak up, because
I was born. Then they came for the
old and infirm, and I didn't speak
up, because I was young and healthy.
Then they came for the physically and
mentally handicapped, and I didn't
speak up, because I was neither. Then
they came for me, and by that time there
was no one left to speak up for me
When will you finally speak up?
In My Opinion
Bush's policy yields new optimism in Middle East
(KRT) � Two years after the inva-
sion of Iraq: A slice of time marked
by freeze-frame images and the end-
less words served up by the media, a
moment still overshadowed by Jan.
30, when millions of Iraqis raised
fingers marked with purple ink, and
suddenly the idea of Arab democracy
- utterly remote and unattainable for
so long - flashed into the realm of the
possible.
For all the mistakes and errors of
the post-Hussein era, the Iraqi election
- and its regional aftershocks - is the
hopeful harvest of President Bush's
decision to bring down Saddam Hus-
sein. A sampling of news-blips from the
last few weeks speaks for Itself:
A headline in London's The Indepen-
dent asks, "Was Bush Right After All?"
In New York magazine, columnist
Kurt Anderson glumly acknowledges,
"The people of this Bush-hating city
are being forced to grant the merest
possibility that Bush, despite his annoy-
ing manner and his administration's
awful hubris and dissembling and
incompetence concerning Iraq, just
might - might, possibly - have been
correct to invade, to occupy, and to
try to enable a democratically elected
government In Iraq
Syria's occupation of Lebanon sud-
denly looks wobbly. Egyptian President
Hosni Mubarak says he will allow mul-
tiparty elections. Saudi Arabia permits
limited elections at the local level.
To varying degrees, these moves
were probably intended as mere ges-
tures. Yet they reveal deep apprehen-
sion. They reveal autocrats thrown back
on their heels.
"What's taken place in a number
of those countries is enormously
constructive a senator says on ABC
News. The speaker? Ted Kennedy, Mas-
sachusetts Democrat. "It's a reflection
the president has been involved he
added.
Sen. Joseph Lieberman, a Con-
necticut Democrat, tells The New York
Times, "Look, this moment in the
Middle East has the feel of Central and
Eastern Europe around the collapse of
the Berlin Wall
Strategypage.com, a Web site
focused on military matters, reports
that "Iraqi popular opinion has turned
against terrorism in a big way Strat-
egypage says the tipping point came
when Osama bin Laden named Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi "prince" of Iraq, a
move Iraqis interpreted as a Saudi order-
ing a Jordanian to kill Iraqis.
French President Jacques Chirac
joins President Bush in calling for
the withdrawal of Syrian troops from
Lebanon.
Sen. Hillary Clinton travels to Iraq
and says much of the country is "func-
tioning quite well
The peace movement, which learns
nothing and forgets nothing, marks the
anniversary of the Iraqi invasion with
protests. But what are they protesting?
Democracy? The fall of Saddam Hus-
sein? If these people had had their way,
Hussein would still be in power: no
Iraqi election, no hopes for democracy
in the Middle East.
"How odd writes the columnist
Victor Davis Hanson, "that conserva-
tives, usually derided for their multi-
cultural insensltivlty and blinkered
approach to the world abroad, had far
more confidence in the Arab street
than did liberals at home and Euro-
elites who patronized Arabs as nice
others' who were different' rather
than oppressed by murderous thugs in
the manner of Russians, Hungarians,
Bosnians, and Afghans
A New York Times editorial opines
that the "stains on the index fingers
of proud Iraqi voters have long faded
Many Iraqis, the paper says, are begin-
ning to feel disillusioned.
Really? Two days earlier, another
paper reported a recent survey of
Iraqis showing 62 percent believe their
country is headed in the right direc-
tion, more than at any time since the
American invasion.
Monday, Times reporter John F.
Burns reports clear signs that the tide
may be turning against the insurgency:
"Despite some notable exceptions,
insurgents are attacking in smaller
numbers, and with less Intensity;
mortar attacks into the Green Zone
have diminished sharply
Pirate Rant
The computer lab is not a
place for social hour. I hear group
discussions about girlfriends,
gang busts, basketball, tongue
rings, new clothes etc. That's all
Interesting but not when students
are trying to finish assignments
on the computer.
Just call all your professors
"doctor I have never had some-
one get offended by giving them
a more proper title than they
deserve.
To President Bush: Stop inter-
fering with the judicial system.
Stick to the success of Iraq. Tune
into "The West Wing Maybe
you could learn a thing or two
about the presidency.
The kids who wear sweatbands
and wristbands to class really irri-
tate me. I don't know whether to
compare homework or ask for a
bounce pass. And oh, yeah, John
Deere hats suck.
Did you know eventually
California will break off and
become an island? And then it
will be it's own nation, Schwar-
zenegger, where poor English
and big muscles will rule and
determine all.
Who do you think would
win in a fight between President
Bush and the Incredible Hulk?
I think that the Hulk would
win, because he's powered by
gamma radiation and has a
larger vocabulary than the presi-
dent.
What's so bad about
drilling in Alaska? In about five
billion years the sun will burn
out and then AJaska will be
the last thing on the public's
mind.
How in the world did you get
into college not knowing what
to do in the rain to keep you and
your things dry? Buy one or two
things, an umbrella or a book
bag - it's your choice and they
both do their respective jobs
quite well.
To all you size twenties
and under: It's about time
that you paid the full figured
people a little more respect. You
fail to realize that if God wanted
all of us to be the same size he
would have created us all the
same.
Your mother wears topsid-
It is nice to know that ECU
wants us to park at Minges. It
would be even better if they
would stop being so cheap and
install a few more shelters at the
various bus stops. I do not enjoy
being forced to stand in the rain
uncovered while I wait for a bus.
To the wonderful young lady
that shared her umbrella and
good conversation with me, I say
"thanks
To the guy who takes his
shoes off in class: Well, that's
just disgusting. Keep them on so
we don't have to suffer any more
than we already do.
Have you ever heard a bird
fart?
Our congress has the
nerve to cancel their vaca-
tions and come back early to
keep a brain dead woman,
who is trapped in her body
alive, but gas costs an arm and
a leg, people can't afford health
insurance and our troops don't
have enough body armor. Has
Congress forgotten who pays the
bills around here? Here's what
I say to our Congress: Do your
jobs and fight for the lives of all
Americans.
Why are the things that
hurt me all four-letter words like
"test "exam" and "quiz?"
Note to self: It's raining
outside so I must put my drenched
raincoat in the seat beside
me so that the next person that
comes in the class can sit in a
wet seat.
The new Tender Crisp Bacon
Cheddar Ranch commercials for
Burger King are sheer marketing
genius. Long live Hootie!
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editort&theeastcarolmian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.






bird
Happy 98th Birthday, ECU!
'The East Carolinian' remembers the history
of our campus in celebration of founders week
"The dreams of our founders $8jears ago are now a reality.
Celebrating ECU's birthday is a time to appreciate and
reflect on the hardships and triumphs that people made
in order to get us where we are today. The ECU Alumni
Association, ECU Ambassadors, the Student Union, 'The
East Carolinian' and the Student Government Association
have come together to share the significance of our 98th birthday
in a Birthday Bash today at 3 p.m. on the mall.
Hosting this event is the least we can do to honor our founders and
celebrate their accomplishments. We hope that as current ECU
students we can continue to help build the future of ECU.
The success of ECU is definitely something to celebrate. Coming to
ECU as a student has made my spirit, enthusiasm and love for the
university sky rocket. Every time I watch the football team run out
of the tunnel with Pirate fans cheering them on, I get goose bumps.
Every time I even hear the fight song, I feel pride for our university.
That is what I want every ECU student to experience. I hope that
every student will create their own unique, individual love and
spirit for the school. There is much more to ECU than the classroom
and it is the students of today who will secure the future of ECU by
y � pushing it forward with spirit, love, and determination
� Rebekah Page, ECU Ambassadors
Cupola marks history and tradition
Remembering ECU's
founders and leaders
Many students walk through
campus daily without any notion
of who the past leaders of ECU
were. Chances are however, that
you may have actually known
their names all along by taking
a class in one of the many build-
ings named after them. Regard-
less, ECU owes much to these
10 individuals during Founders
Week for they have been at the
helm of the university since 123
students first began classes Oct.
S, 1909.
ECU's formal beginnings date
back to 1907 when East Carolina
Teachers Training School was
charted by an act of the North
Carolina General Assembly with
Robert Wright as the first presi-
dent. Wright remained the presi-
dent of East Carolina Teachers
College until his death in 1934,
serving nearly 25 years.
Leon Meadows became
Wright's successor the same year.
Meadows retired in 1944 with
ECTC boosting its enrollment
to more than 1,300 students.
Howard McGinnis briefly acted as
president from 1944-1946 as the
search for another president took
place. He is remembered for creat-
ing the division of field services
that first began to actively recruit
students to attend ECTC.
Dennis Cooke succeeded
McGinnis and barely served
a year in the post when he
resigned in 1947. After Cooke's
resignation the university
board of governors didn't
officially hire another president
until Leo Jenkins in 1960. Jen-
kins lead the university during
the political turmoil of the 1960s
and 1970s overseeing ECTC into
an actual university subsidized
by the state. Under Jenkins'
leadership as both president
and subsequent tenure as the
first chancellor, ECU doubled its
enrollment, as well as pursued a
vigorous campaign to construct
permanent facilities to house the
university's growing academic
programs.
Upon Jenkins' retirement
from the chancellorship in 1978,
ECU had undergone dramatic
changes that even included
the addition of a new medical
school. With Jenkins leaving the
university, a replacement was
found in a rather young aca-
demic named Thomas Brewer.
Compared to Jenkins, Brewer
had a relatively short-term last-
ing four years, but during this
time ECU's administration grew
considerably.
A brief search took place
to find a new chancellor,
with the ultimate selection of
John Howell in 1982. Howell
witnessed ECU bestow its first
"M.D from the school of medi-
cine in 1983. Howell elected
to retire in 1987 when Richard
Eakin assumed the top-post lead-
ing ECU through a time of both
increased academic achievement
and growth. Eakin is known for
raising funds to add additional
buildings on campus while reno-
vating older ones.
Eakin announced his retire-
ment in 2000 as chancellor with
William Muse accepting the posi-
tion in. early 2001. Muse would
only serve for two years, citing
health concerns in his resigna-
tion. Bill Shelton served briefly
as the interim chancellor, but is
remembered for his energetic,
ambitious and extremely humble
personality.
With the announcement of
Steve Ballard, our current and
10th university leader, ECU has
grown substantially in size since
its doors officially opened to
students in 1909. ECU's current
enrollment is more than 22,000
students.
� Matthew S. Herrmann
In the plaza between Joyner Library and Jarvis
Residence Hall sits one of ECU's most memorable
landmarks, the cupola. This landmark is a recre-
ation of the cupola that sat on top of the admin-
istration building built in 1909 later called Austin
Hall. Austin is one of the four original buildings on
campus. This building, which was named in honor
of professor Herbert E. Austin, housed classrooms,
an auditorium, a library and offices. In 1969, old
Austin was declared "structurally unsound" and
was ordered to be demolished. Before demolishing
the building, several faculty members successfully
raised $3,800 to preserve the cupola. Even though
enough money was raised, the cupola did not
survive the move. When trying to lift the cupola
off the building, it crumbled. In 1993, Chancellor
Richard R. Eakin announced plans to reconstruct
the cupola. The new structure would double the
size of the original cupola. Today, the reconstructed
cupola can be seen on the mall, which is also called
Cupola Plaza. Around the cupola is a brick walk-
way that features the names of more than 1,400
alumni donors. To purchase a brick and have your
name forever engraved on the ECU campus, call
2S2-328-9S79.
� Kristen Farmer
From Buc to Pee Dee: ECU's mascot history
Test your ECU knowledge
1. ECU was established in
and called East Carolina
Teachers Training School.
A livewas the mascot from 1930 �
1931.
Pee Dee the Pirate is a beloved
mascot for Pirate fans everywhere.
However, Pee Dee as we know him
today is relatively new to ECU.
The men's athletic teams at
East Carolina Teachers College
in the 1930s used classical names
such as the Athenians and Olym-
pians and their mascot was a
wildcat. The men's football team
was known as the Teachers - how-
ever, the Pirate, a fiercer mascot
for the school, was adopted in
1934. Under the new name of the
Pirates, the team that had won
only two football games in their
first three seasons won three
out of six games the following
year. The pirate was a natural
choice based on the history of
North Carolina. The Outer Banks
afforded perfect hideouts for
pirates and the infamous pirate
Blackbeard (Edward Teach) had
homes on Ocracoke and nearby
Bath. In 1983 our Pirate mascot
was named Pee Dee for the Pee
Dee River, which originates in
Western North Carolina and runs
through South Carolina.
In addition to Pee Dee, there
have been three notable canine
mascots that would boost spirit
at home games and could be seen
playing on the campus mall. As
ECU students were returning
to campus in August of 1968,
a 50-pound Great Dane puppy
named Buc joined them. Over
the summer, the SGA held an
election that would give our
school its very first mascot. The
Each year, more than 8,000 ECU students contribute in excess of
hours of volunteer service to more than 100 community
health and human service organizations.
, creator of Scream, I Know What You Did Last Summer
' attended ECU.
restaurant
students voted on the Great
Dane as a symbol of strength,
speed and courage. As a beloved
member of our campus, Buc
inspired the fans and players
during two football seasons with
his presence at every home game.
When Buc wasn't standing tall
for our players on the sidelines,
students could visit him in his
running cage on the mall. Buc
died ust three years later on July
4, 1961 after suffering from an
unknown illness.
Ten years later, ECU received
its second canine mascot. This
time the Pirates were accompa-
nied by a French Poodle named
Brandy. At football games, Brandy
would accompany the cheerlead-
ers on the sidelines. Although her
time as our mascot was brief, the
ECU Pirate blanket she adorned
was given to ECU as a gift
from Brandy's owner in the 1970s
and can be found in the univer-
sity archives.
Another previous mascot
was a German Sheppard named
Willie. Willie's owner, 21 year-old
Pat Elks, started working for ECU
in Austin during the summer of
1978. She and her husband lived
at the apartments at the end of
campus and ate lunch together
every afternoon. When her hus-
band would walk to campus for
lunch, he would bring Willie
with him to keep him company
before Pat got off for lunch.
He and Willie could be seen
playing Frisbee out on the mall
every afternoon. Willie became
a main stay on campus during
this time, his intelligence and
skill impressing everyone who
stopped to watch him perform
tricks. His mascot debut was at
the 1978 homecoming game
where Willie performed all of his
tricks for an entire stadium full of
fans. Willie continued to oin the
Pirates at home football games for
the rest of the year, showing off
his tricks after touchdowns and
outstanding plays. Pat Elks, who
now works in the administrative
offices in Joyner Library, remem-
bers how Willie loved the stu-
dents and people of Greenville,
never missing a chance to take a
car ride around town and see the
sites. Willie died just a few years
after he was a mascot, but his
memory remains as the puppy
that never missed a toss.
� Elizabeth Schuler
Historical bell rings for ECU victory
6.
7.
8.
and "Dawson's Creek
James Maynard, founder of the
chain, attended ECU.
Chancellor Steven Ballard is ECU's.
. Chancellor.
What year did the men's and women's Student Government
Associations merge?
was the first dormitory, which was
constructed in.
9. The.
family of eastern North Carolina has given the ECU
School of Medicine $8 million to support research projects and
medical Initiatives related to the medical school's service to
the region.
10. ECU will celebrate its centennial in
The Victory Bell sits atop a pedestal just west
of Christenbury Memorial Gymnasium. The bell is
an artifact from the US Navy acquired by ECU to
commemorate the service of students and gradu-
ates in World War II and the Korean War. Cast in
Philadelphia in 1855, the bell weighs 382 pounds
and measures 24 inches tall and 28 inches wide. It
was used aboard the USS Broome, a Navy destroyer
named after USMC Lieutenant John Lloyd Broome.
The USS Broome was commissioned on May 14,
1919, decommissioned in 1922, and then re-entered
service in 1930. It was used in World War II as an
escort for convoys on the Atlantic Ocean, and was
sold for scrap in 1946. The East Carolina College
Veterans Club wanted to obtain a bell to honor vet-
erans from ECTC who had served in World War II.
Due to a congressional law, the club was ineligible to
make such a transaction. In 1951, Congress donated
the bell. The Veteran's Club paid shipping costs
and the cost of a pillar, and during Homecoming
weekend in 1953, the bell was officially presented.
The marching band played, and the decision was
made to ring the bell after Pirate victories. Today,
the Victory Bell is used during military service
celebrations.
� Brian J. Monroe and Blaine M. Long
1)1907. awwcat 31100.000 41 Kevin Williamson 51 GolOen Corral 6110th 711943 8IJaivk1909.9IBnx!y 1012007
Special thanks to ECU Ambassadors for their help with this page.





�'
Page A6 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366
TIDUS
CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor
KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
Announcements:
Founders Week is March 28 - April
1. Events will be held each day
to celebrate ECU heritage and
history Campus Scene' Tuesday,
March 29 is featuring an article
about Founders Week and all of
the events.
Mary Ellen Wojtasiewicz, R.N
Ph.D ECU Research Assistant
Professor for the Department of
Medical Humanities at the Brody
School of Medicine will present
"The Hospital and Its Publics.
Constructing an Institutional
Image, 1900-1950" in 2E - 100
Brody as part of the Perspectives
Lecture Series Wednesday, March
30 at 12:30 p.m. The presentation
will explore the history of hospitals
and healthcare throughout the
first half of the 20th century.
Thursday, March 31 there will be
an Adult Education Research and
Practice Colloquium In the Edwin
W Monroe Conference Center to
highlight the educational, career
and research interests of students
in the Adult Education Masters
program in ECU'S College of
Education. The event will feature
posters and presentations
from students on topics such
as learning and development
models, program planning,
instructional strategies, training
and development, continuing
professional development,
diversity, literacy, health education
and community education. For
more information, contact Dr.
Vivian Mott at mottv@mall.ecu.
edu.
The first ever ECU youth-oriented
arts festival will be held Saturday,
April 2 from 10 a.m. - 4 p.m.
In the mall outside of Wright
Auditorium. The event will feature
local and regional performing
and visual artists. The event
is free and open to the public.
For more information, contact
Richard Tichich, the director at
tichich@rmail.ecu.edu.
Sunday, April 3 at 3 p.m. Cultural
Outreach is presenting "In Search
of the Albino" as part of their
Travel - Adventure Film Series.
The film will take you scouring
across North America in search
of some of the most rare albino
creatures in existence. Tickets are
$10-15. For more information call
328-4788.
Names In The News:
BAD TOM
Saving Private Ryan star Tom
Sizemore lashed out about
the latest developments in the
ongoing legal mess that has taken
over his life. He was sentenced to
17 months In jail and four months
In a residential drug rehab facility
for failing seven drug tests while
on probation for an 03 conviction
for beating ex-glrlfrlend Heidi
Flelss. But Sizemore, 43, won't
be going to jail anytime soon: He
is free pending his appeal in the
Fleiss case.
The actor, who also was
sentenced to further inpatient
drug treatment in a separate felony
methamphetamine-possession
case, said since he was free, he
had won a clear victory. Speaking
to the syndicated "Inside Edition
Sizemore denied ever hitting
Fleiss and had nothing but
derision for Los Angeles' Assistant
City Attorney Robert Cha, the
prosecutor in the domestic-
violence case, saying, "I despise
his guts Cha has stated that if the
actor does not stop doing drugs,
he will die. Sizemore told "Edition"
he was completely drug-free.
FANNING THE FLAMES
As publicity stunts go, the latest
from Bow Wow at least has a
cuteness factor to it: The 18-year-
old rapper, who dropped the "U"
from his moniker, Is asking all his
fans to send in a 30-second video
proving why they are his biggest
fan Big Wow himself will choose
the 10 best videos and will include
thern in the DVD to be released
with his next record, "Wanted
due out June 28. Anyone over 13
and in love with His Bowster, can
focus their entire being on the
task of eliciting some Big Wows
from Mr. Bow
AHOY, MATIESI
Jonathan Davis' new son will
want a parrot for his first birthday.
Davis, front man for rap-rock
outfit Kom, and his wife, ex-porn
star Deven Davis, have joined
the rarefied ranks of celebrities
who've endowed their babies
with strange and freakish names.
Newborn Pirate Howsmon Davis
recently joined Davis' crew. "I
can't describe how I'm feeling
right now Pirate's dad, who has
a 9-year-old son, Nathan, from a
previous relationship, writes on
his blog.
Founders Week celebrates ECU
Your schedule of events
TREVOR WORDEN
STAFF WRITER
Founders Week has found
ECU indeed. It has been 98 years
since the inception of ECU as a
small state-supported teaching
college. Our prestigious univer-
sity has grown immensely since
those beginning years into a
liberal arts state university. The
influence ECU has had on the
state of North Carolina and in
the nation is invaluable. The
number of new leaders ECU has
put out into the world has created
a reputation for our university.
ECU has created the reputation
for strong and competitive under-
graduate studies and an ever
growing graduate school.
During Founders Week all
of the accomplishments and
milestones we have crossed as a
university will be celebrated. This
is the week to show your school
spirit and show pride in calling
yourself a pirate. In order to cel-
ebrate, the administration has set
up a list of events to reminisce
and simply enjoy the strong pro-
gressions in different respected
fields that ECU continues to
make in our modern society.
A diverse assortment of events
has been scheduled, including
the annual procession from Sonic
Plaza to the Wright Auditorium
for the Founders Week convoca-
tion.
Monday, March 28 there was
a community leaders breakfast
held to initiate the week. Also,
Monday, March 28 was the chan-
cellor's forum on the arts. This
event featured different talents
showing their respected art in the
Jenkins building. Alsova faculty
recital was held in Fletcher Music
Hall entitled Contemporary
American Chamber Music. The
focus was on different faculty
members presenting selected
musical pieces. These faculty
members showed
the incomparable
talent we have here at the
university to shape our music
majors.
Tuesday, March 29 the school
of communication will be host-
ing the Third Annual Oratical
Exhibition, which is being pre-
sented in Wright Auditorium at
6:30 p.m. The theatre majors are
also participating in the celebra-
tion by putting on a produc-
tion in Fletcher Music Hall. The
production is titled, "Song for a
Whole New World and will be
presented at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, March 30 a
founders award luncheon will be
held in the Harvey Banquet Hall
in the Murphy Center at noon.
A registration of installation del-
egates will be held in the multi-
purpose room of Mendenhall
from 3 - 5 p.m. The art students
will also be busy hosting an Iron
Pour at 8 p.m. in the Jenkins
Building and a documentary
about iron pouring before the
presentation at 7 p.m. The Stu-
dent Ensemble Recital will be
held in the Fletcher Music Hall at
8 p.m. and will focus on classical
guitar pieces. Also Wednesday,
March 30, the Blu Moon Film
Festival will commence at 6 p.m.
in the Hendrix theatre.
Thursday, March 31 will
prove to be another big day for
Founders Week. The convocation
procession will be held focusing
on the installment of Chancellor
Ballard. Immediately after the
event a lunch on the mall will be
held and is open to all students,
faculty and staff. The music
students will hold yet another
recital presented by the faculty
in the Fletcher Music Hall. The
recital is entitled "A Program of
American Song and Broadway
Music" and will be held at 8
p.m. A Faculty Documentaries
and Film Exposition will be held
as well in the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center at 8 p.m.
To end the week, Friday, April
1, the chamber singers will pres-
ent Handel's, Israel in Egypt at St.
Paul's Episcopal Church at 7 p.m.
Admission to the event will be $5
for students, $8 for faculty and
$10 for the general public.
The week will be filled with
excitement and an assortment
of cultural events. This is the
week to be proud you can call
yourself a pirate, so be proud and
participate in the Founders Week
events to show your loyalty to
your school.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Blu Moon Film Festival
m! 1 i i i imm
Independent films at ECU
KACY THOMPSON
STAFF WRITER
The film festival will feature submissions from all over the country.
for the festival. Submissions
must be either on a DVD or
VHS and the short films can
be up to 20 minutes long. They
showcase all genres of films and
there are no entry fees. The new
deadline for submissions is April 10.
Blu Moon is about the art and
love for filmmaking. The entries
are not being judged, so it's not
a competition. Each short film is
being shown for appreciation and
the awareness of what students
can put their effort into. The fes-
tival allows students to show off
their work to their peers.
There will be a smaller
alumni festival for Founders
Week from 7 - 9 p.m. Wednes-
day, March 30 in the Hendrix
Theatre. This is directed more
toward faculty and alumni.
The actual Blu Moon film
festival will be held at 5 p.m.
Saturday, April 16 in the Hendrix
Theatre. It is free and refresh-
ments will be available. There
will be an after party from 8:30
- 11 p.m. at the Pirate Under-
ground with live music from The
Capulets and Narallis.
"I'm very excited about this
year's Blu Moon said Domi-
nique Womack, senior commu-
nication major.
Womack helped with getting
the bands for the after party, and
said that this would be her first
film festival.
For more information on the
Blu Moon Film Festival, you can
contact blumoonfilmfestlval(sy
ahoo.com or visit personal.ecu.
edumjh0912.
It's about time for ECU's Blu
Moon Independent Film Festival.
This year will be the third festival
that has been heldon ECU'scampus.
Blu Moon is put together for
students by students. The first
year, Jesse Strong, a former ECU
student from the school of com-
munication, made Blu Moon his
own project. His love for films
pushed him to create an event
that would be able to showcase
independent films that would
otherwise not be shown in east-
ern North Carolina.
For the first festival, Strong
was in charge and doing every-
thing on his own - planning it,
getting the films together and
presenting them. Strong said it
was too much for just one stu-
dent to handle, so there is now
a course offered in the school of
communication for planning and
helping out with Blu Moon.
"We want this year's film fes-
tival to be bigger than ever said
Faith Dover, the third Blu Moon
director. Dover said last year's
festival received submissions
from all over the world, and it
wasn't even promoted that much.
Blu Moon exhibits all kinds
of independent films. "We've
received submissions from
Chapel Hill, Wilmington and
even Florida Dover said.
They are still looking for more
student entries because they have
not had as many as they wanted
for the upcoming festival.
Anyone can submit a film
Habitat for Humanity sponsors an annual run which challenges the endurance and generosity of runners
Running to benefit local homeless
Habitat for Humanity home run road
race in Greenville
SARAH CAMPBELL
STAFF WRITER
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Have you ever imagined what your life would
be like without having a place to call home? Well,
for the miiions of people around the world who
are homeless, wondering is not an option because
they live the reality of this nightmare. This harsh
realization has led to the establishment of various
nonprofit organizations whose goals are to help
provide either temporary or permanent housing
to those in need.
One of these organizations is Habitat for
Humanity of Pitt County, Inc. Eliminating poverty
housing in Pitt County is the sole purpose of HFI1,
a nonprofit Christian-based organization. In order
to do so HFH partners with volunteers from within
the community and underprivileged deserving
families to build simple, yet adequate homes. Over
the past 14 years HFH has completed 44 homes in
Pitt County. However, in order to continue serving
the community HFH must organize several fund-
raisers throughout the year to earn money to cover
the cost of supplies.
In 2000 James Orr, a former ECU student had
the idea for the Home Run Road Race in order to
raise money as well as involvement in the commu-
nity. The Home Run has been a huge success netting
a total of $55,000 for HFH of Pitt County.
"The 2004 Home Run netted almost $16,000
and there were 300 entries registered said Pamela
tejk
HABITAT FOR HUMANITY YAV
OF PITT COUNTY t
HOME RUN
APRIL 2, 2005 - GREENVILLE, NC
Kesegi, HFH executive director.
It has quickly become Greenville's largest road
race. 6
This year the 200S Sixth Annual Home Run
Road Race will be held Saturday, April 2, at the
City Hotel & Bistro in Greenville on Greenville
Boulevard across the street from Wal-Mart and
totST s' eventstartsat8am-behindthe
The Road Race features a five kilometer race as
well as a one mile fun runwalk. The five-kilometer
uses a HaUast USATF certified course, which passes
through Westhaven subdivision and may be more
appealing to athletically inclined people The one
mile fun runwalk is more laid back and can easUy
be enioyed by children and adults of all ages In
order to ens tha( ,he js bj , �es
skates, mime skates, skateboards, scooters, pets and
see RACE page A7





3-29-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGt A7
The ECU Student Media Board invites
applications for the position of
GENERAL MANAGER,
WZMB91.3FM
GENERAL MANAGER
Expressions
EDITOR,
The East Carolinian
EDITOR,
The Rebel
for the 2005-06 academic year.
Applications are available in the Media Board office.
The deadline for submitting an application is
MONDAY, APRIL 4 AT 5 P.M.
For information, call the Media Board office at 328-6009.
Power of purple
Race
from page A6
WYNDHAM

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YOU pick your roommate
You probably already own a computer
Multi-millionrec. center on campus
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Office located at: 104-D WYNDHAM CIRCLE call: 561 -7679
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Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2005
'Show your Pirate Pride'
MEREDITH STEWART
STAFF WRITER
Do you love the color purple
or at least know someone who
does? If so, then thepurplestore.
com is the best place to buy any-
thing and everything purple.
Owners Kim Raymoure and
Adam Sheridan understood the
frustration of finding products
of this loved color. In March
they launched the Web site.
With many people chiming
in with advice and comments,
they have been able to make
this every "purple lovers" dream
come true.
A question that many people
ask is, "why did you choose the
color purple?"
"Purple is a minority color
among the colors, but a fervently
loved minority said Raymoure.
It is a banner of power, inde-
pendence and irreverence. Every
ECU Pirate fan dressed in purple
from head-to-toe reminds their
rivals of the power of purple.
For those who buy a whole
pack of pens just to get the two
purple ones, or those who just
look good in this color, but have
a difficult time finding it in
stores, this is the perfect Web
site for you.
The Purple Store offers a wide
range of purple items such as
clothes, shoes, office and school
supplies, jewelry, home decor,
kitchen and bath appliances and
even cell phone accessories. This
is a lifestyle for true purple afi-
cionados. There are also purple
facts, recipes and a place for
people to submit their craziest
purple costumes. So Pirate fans,
when you dress up for baseball,
football or any other sport, be
sure to take pictures and send
them in.
"When we launched The
Purple Store, we hoped for suc-
cess while bracing ourselves for
a few critics calling it crazy said
Sheridan.
"People are loving it, shop-
ping at it and no one is calling
it crazy
New features and products
are added daily with literally
thousands of items available in
purple. Pirate fans are you look-
ing for a place to buy your purple
attire? The Purple Store is the
perfect place. They sell stuff for
schools with purple pride. ECU
things are available, along with
other schools.
The color purple was diffi-
cult to obtain and very difficult
to produce, making precious
and rare fabrics. It became the
royal color in many parts of the
world and is traditionally associ-
ated with royalty and wealth.
So come on Pirates, be proud
of our school color and show your
support by sporting Pirate Purple.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Got something
to say?
Send us your pirate rants!
Submit online at www.theeastcarolinian.com,
or e-mail editor@theeastcarolinian.com.
music players are banned during
the race.
After the races are over the
fun continues with a post-race
party, which includes door prizes,
an awards ceremony, music and
a pancake buffet breakfast at The
City Hotel & Bistro. Awards will
be given to the top three men
and women in various age groups
of the five kilometer race only.
However, only the top two baby
joggers and wheelchair racers will
be honored with awards.
Not interested in participat-
ing in the festivities, but still
want to help out? Commemo-
rative T-shirts will also be on
sale for $10. Volunteers are also
needed for the race as well as at
building sites and in the Habitat
Resale Store located on 402 W.
10th St. Tasks range from sort-
ing through donated items at the
store to painting at the building
sites. If you are interested in
volunteering at the store, call
329-8364 or if the building sites
sound like more your pace then
call 758-2947.
"There Is a great need for
volunteers to help with the race.
There will be volunteers out on
the race course, inside the City
Hotel helping with registration,
setting up the awards ceremony
and preparing for the after-race
pancake breakfast said Kesegi.
Contact Patti Tolmie, the Race
Volunteer Coordinator at 355-
3039 or ratolm@aol.com if you
are interested in lending a hand.
This year's Road Race has 41
sponsors including WITN-TV7,
Dimon International and Dapper
Dan's. The title sponsor for the
2005 Sixth Annual Home Run
Road Race is PCS Phosphate.
Entry fees for the five kilome-
ter are $10 in advance and $15
race day. For the one mile fun
runwalk the entry fees are $8 in
advance and12 race day. To find
out more information about the
race and download an entry form
visit habitathomerun.org. The
next fund-raiser will be an annual
barbecue luncheon held in Octo-
ber. The Habitat for Humanity
of Pitt County, Inc. Web site,
habitatpittco.org has a list of
various fund-raisers throughout
the year as well as informa-
tion about the organization.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Pirate 13th Annual BATTLE OFTHE BANDS
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Page B1 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
Brooks flirts with no-hitter
Ricky Brooks signs baseballs and other memorabilia for young fans at the game Saturday night. Brooks battled back after losing his no-hitter in the ninth by striking out the next batter and ending the game.
Pitcher's gem one of few
positives from weekend
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR WRITER
After dropping the first two
games of a three game series
against in-state rival Charlotte,
the ECU baseball team needed
something magical in game
three to feel like they salvaged
the series. Enter Ricky Brooks.
Brooks, who wasn't even sched-
uled to start, took full advantage
of the opportunity, tossing a
complete-game shutout, one in
which he had a no-hitter intact
for eight innings, before having
the no-no broken up on a ques-
tionable called hit off the bat of
Adam Willard with two outs in
the ninth, ultimately becoming
the 49ers only form of offense as
the Pirates routed Charlotte 6-0.
Willard's hit was a ground-
ball that glazed off the glove of
shortstop Dale Mollenhauer, not
allowing him to make a throw to
first. The crowd begged the home
scorekeeper to score the ball an
error, which would've been Mol-
lenhauer's fourth of the game, but
to no avail as the ball was scored a
hit, drawing enormous boos from
the Pirate faithful.
ECU Head Coach Randy
Mazey discussed the possibility
of overturning the call with game
officials as he was disgusted at the
original scoring, but refused to
comment on the situation.
Brooks however, wasn't as shy.
"I'm not mad, I probably
should've made a better pitch so he
couldn't have hit it said Brooks.
"It was still an awesome game
for me to be in
Although Mazey kept quiet
about the scoring situation on
the no-hitter, he was elated with
Brooks' performance.
"It was pretty obvious in
the first couple of innings that
Ricky had some good stuff going
tonight said Mazey.
"The guys get some energy off
that and 1 think that helped a lot
Struggle has been the name of
the game for Brooks since arriv-
ing at ECU a year ago, battling a
lack of consistency and injuries
that have haunted him in his
young career. But after Saturday
night's performance, things just
may be beginning to turn around
for the former 11th round draft
pick out of high school.
"I hadn't been throwing good
before, and then Tulane I did a
decent job until that last hit, so I
just carried it into the next games
with good bullpen, and came out
and threw like this today. It felt
good Brooks said.
A lot of Brooks' problems
on the mound before the last
couple of outings, were gener-
ated from the fact the sophomore
had become a one-pitch pitcher.
While the kid is known for the
pop on his fastball, reaching
lower to mid 1990s at times,
Brooks knows that one pitch will
get you no where at this level.
"Anyone in college baseball
can hit a fastball Brooks said.
"Coach has been working
with me on getting my slider
in for strikes and I had plenty
of those for strikes today. The
changeup was also key, because if
a guy is sitting on a fastball, and
you throw a changeup, there's no
way he's going to hit it
The Pirate offense helped
Brooks into his comfort by put-
ting up four runs in the first three
innings. Drew Costanzo was hit
by a pitch in the first, then moved
to second on a balk. Mark Mini-
cozzi then doubled to the gap in
left center, scoring Costanzo to
give ECU the 1-0 advantage.
� Held scoreless in the second,
the Diamond Bucs went back
to work in the third. After the
first two batters were retired,
Costanzo and Minicozzi both
drew walks. Mike Grace then
doubled to center, scoring both
runners. Freshman Ryan Peisel
singled home Grace to push the
lead to 4-0 before being caught
in a rundown between first and
second to end the inning.
Despite the quick start for the
Pirates, a scary moment occurred
in the first. Senior shortstop Billy
Richardson, the unspoken leader
of the Diamond Bucs, took a
swing in his first at-bat of the
game and injured his left wrist.
Mazey spoke after the game about
what might have happened to
Richardson in the at-bat.
"I'm not optimistic at all on
this one Mazey said.
"Kind of a freak thing what
happened to him, but I've seen it
happen before and I know what is
probably going to happen. When
the X-rays come back we'll know for
sure, but I have my suspicions
Mazey suspected that Rich-
ardson had fractured a bone
in his wrist called the Hamate
bone. X-Rays on Richardson's left
hand Monday afternoon con-
firmed Mazey's concern as they
revealed the fractured bone. The
injury is most common in ath-
letes, particularly golfers and
baseball players.
No official report has been
released with details of how
long Richardson will be sitting
out but the ECU Sports Informa-
tion Department confirmed the
injury late Monday afternoon.
Richardson is batting .423
this season with four home runs
and 26 RBI. His power numbers
are the best of his career, as he is
slugging .691 with eight doubles
and three triples. He leads the
Pirates in seven major offensive
categories, including total bases,
runs scored, stolen bases and hits.
He also hit for the cycle earlier this
year against Navy, as well as pitch-
ing a scoreless ninth in that game.
Richardson's replacement at
shortstop was Mollenhauer, who
was afore mentioned to have made
three errors in game three.
The Pirates dropped game one,
6-2, in 10inningsandgametwo,9-6.
ECU is now 14-9, 1-5 in Con-
ference USA. They will return to
action Wednesday, playing host
to the Camels of Campbell at
7 p.m. The Diamond Bucs will
then travel to Fort Worth, Texas,
to battle TCU in a conference
weekend series. The going doesn't
get any easier for the Pirates and
until they get fully healthy, the
next few weeks could be trying
times for a program that isn't
used to losing.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Richardson out with broken wrist bone
TONYZOPPO
SPORTS EDITOR
Head coach Randy
Mazey's suspicions about
Billy Richardson's injury from
Saturday have been validated,
as Richardson was diagnosed
Monday with a broken bone
in his left wrist. The part of
his wrist that is fractured is
called the Hamate bone. It
is a rough, triangular bone
with a hook-shaped process
that rests on the fourth and
fifth metacarpal bones, which
are basically the bones that
connects your fingers to your
wrist. Athletes, particularly
goiters and baseball players,
most commonly suffer a hair-
line fracture on the hooked
part of the hamate, which also
is a border for a canal made of
several ligaments that hold
the ulnar artery and nerve,
making it possible for nerve
damage if the bone is broken
badly enough. These fractures
are usually isolated within
the bone and wrist itself and
occur most often during a fall
while the wrist is outstretched
or while swinging a racquet,
club or bat.
Richardson most likely
suffered the Injury after he
took a cut and fouled off a
pitch In the first inning. The
senior shortstop grimaced
after he stepped out of the
box and was examined by
Mazey and some of the other
coaches.
Treatment for the injury
can go one of two ways. If the
fracture is caught soon enough,
which it may have been, the
wrist can be immobilized by
putting it in a cast. However,
in competitive baseball players,
immediate surgery is recom-
mended in order to prevent
a recurrence andor chronic
pain, and will also speed up the
recovery for the ball player.
While no report has come
out yet concerning the length
of time Richardson will be
forced to sit out, recovery
time for a hook fracture Is
normally six to eight weeks.
Lady Pirates sweep Houston over weekend
ne Lady rirau
Ladies move to 41-8
overall, 7-2 in C-USA
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
Coming off a sweep of UNC
Wilmington last week put the ECU
Softball team in the position they
wanted to be heading into confer-
ence play last weekend against
Houston. The Lady Pirates were
on a five-game winning streak
with confidence and momen-
tum on their side as they hosted
the Lady Cougars. ECU also had
something to prove after being
swept by Houston last season.
In game one of the three-
game series Houston came out
swinging, scoring four runs in
the first two innings. The Lady
Pirates were not down, but not
out, as they were able to respond
in the bottom of the third with
four runs of their own. Senior
Kate Manuse was credited with
putting the points on the board
with a grand-slam home run. ECU
was able to break the tie in the
fourth inning scoring three more
runs on their way to a 7-4 win.
Junior Brently Bridgeforth
picked up her 12th win of the
season and sophomore Keli Har-
rell picked up her fifth save of the
season in the victory.
In game two, ECU jumped
out to the early lead scoring
five runs in the bottom of the
first inning. The Lady Cougars
attempted to pull a comeback in
the top of the third, but ended
up only scoring three runs as
the Lady Pirates pulled out their
second win of the day 5-3.
Harrell picked up her 20th
win of the season pitching a com-
plete game, allowing four hits,
three runs and striking out four.
On the final day of play Hous-
ton got on the boards first with
one run in the top of the third.
The lead did not last for long
though, as an RBI by Manuse and
a two run blast by senior Mandi
Nichols, put the Lady Pirates
up by two in the bottom of the
inning. Houston scored one more
run in the sixth inning but it was
not enough as ECU went on to
complete the sweep winning the
final game 3-2.
ECU junior Stephanie Hayes
picked up her ninth win of the
season, pitching six innings
allowing only two runs and six
hits. Harrell pitched the final
inning picking up her sixth save
of the year. In addition, Nichols
claimed Conference USA co-hitter
of the week Monday afternoon.
With the weekend wins,
ECU has improved to 41-8 this
season, which includes a 7-2 C-
USA record. Wednesday, March
30, ECU travels to Raleigh to face
NC State (29-17). The Lady Pirates
then go on the road to face South
Florida this coming weekend in
their next conference series.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.





PAGEB2
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
3-29-05
3-29-
(
EC
aro

PL
Monday, MarCh 28 Community Day 7:00 P1-
7:30 ajn. Community Leaders Breakfast
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist Cluircli
Oil 252-752-4101 for ticket information.
IOOO ajn. Developmental Lecture
"BatJi, North Carolina: Celebrating 300 Years"
Hendnx Theatre in the Mendenli.il!
Student Center
2O0 p.m. Chancellors Forum on the Arts
Speight Auditorium in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center
3:30 pjm. Reception for the Annual
Undergraduate Exhibition
Wellington B. Gray Gallery in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center
8:00 pjn. Faculty Recital
Contemporary American dumber music
A J. Fletcher Recital Hall
Tuesday, March 29 stuJmtDy
2:00 p.m.
3:00 pjn.
6:30 pjn.
8:00
pjn.
Victory Bell Commemorative Service
Outside (.hnstenbury Memorial Gvm
ECU Student Birthday Celebration
ECU Mall on Main Campus
School of Communications Third
Annual Oratorical Exhibition
Wright Auditorium
Theatre Production Featuring
ECU Students
Songs for a Mw liorU
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
Wednesday, March 30 Sudan Day
Noon Founders Awards Luncheon0
Harvey Banquet Hall in die Murphy Center
300-5:00 p.m. Registration of Installation Delegates
Multipurpose Room. Mendenhall
Student Center
7:00 p.m.
800 pjn.
8:00 pjn.
Blu Moon Student Film Festival
Hendrix Theatre in the Mendenhall
Student Center
Iron Pour Documentary
Speight Auditorium in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center
Iron Pour
Jenkins Fine Arts Center
Student Ensemble Recital
Classical guitar
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
Thursday, March 31 Umvmity Day
7:30 ajn. Registration and Breakfast for
Institutional Delegates
Multipurpose Room. Mendenhall
Student Center �
9:15 ajn. Installation Processional Lineup
Mendenhall Student Center for platform
party and delegates
Sonic Plaza for faculty and staff
IOOO a.m. Founders Week Convocation and the
Installation of Chancellor Ballard
Wnght Auditorium
12:30 pjn. Lunch on the Mall
ECU Mall on Main Campus
2:00 p.m. Chancellors Installation Forum
"The Future of the Public University:
Serving Our Society"
Room 244. Mendenhall Student Center
2:30 pjn. Open House for Exhibition of Art by
ECU Faculty
Chancellor's Residence
4.O0 pjn. Topping-Out Ceremony for Nursing,
Allied Health Sciences, and Health
Sciences Library Building
Health Sciences Campus
Park at the Warren Life Sciences Building
for transportation to the site.
8:00 pjn. Faculty Recital
Program of American song and Broadway music
A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall
8:00 pjn. Faculty Documentaries
and Film Exposition
Speight Auditorium in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center
Friday, April 1 AlumniPatrons Day
Noon Grand Opening of the
West End Dining Facility
2:00-5:00 pjn. Registration of Alumni Classes
City Hotel and Bistro, Greenville
Installation Gala
Rock Springs Center
Chamber Singers
and Early Music Ensemble
Handel's Israel m Egmf
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
Call I-800-ECU-ARTS for ticket information.
Saturday, April 2 MmmhamsDy
I0.O0ajn2.O0 pjn.
Youth Arts Festival
ECU Mall on Main Campus
All events are free and open to the public units otherwise noted. Events dial require . �
at noted with Ml asterisk (�). For farther details on these events, including hckel and reser-
vation inloruiaaon, call the Office of Special Events at 252128-6447 or send c-niail to
spcculevenls(ajnail.ecu.edu unless otherwise noted.
Individuals requesting accommodation under the Aincnrans with Disabilities Act (ATM)
should call 252-328-6799 (vo,ctTTY) al least Ibny-t.gh, hours prior to die even '
V
6:30 p.m.
7O0 p.m.
Tomorrow starts here.
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY






3-29-05
3-29-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B3
i
gelterilicay
Fact Every campus in the UNC system, including ECU,
Is participating in this statewide project
sponsored by the Student government Association.
ECUS Goal: WO community service hours
around the campus and the city of Greenville
during the week of jr,
March 26-April 3 Tc
PS
Contact- Jon Massachi at 328-31121
704-650-9568 or email
JSM8512@mail.ecu.edu.
Place an ad in our classifieds
UNCGiCampus.com
SurfiriUSA
or just
Whether you're booeie-boarding in Baja, catching a wave on the Carolina coast,
ust hanging out by the pool, UNCG's Summer Session is
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Surf's Up this summer at UNCGiCampus.com.
UNCG Summer Session Online
Mayl8-July29
An affair to remember
2005 Elite Eight provides
magical moments
ROBERT LEONARD
SENIOR WRITER
We've all seen images of
Grant Hill inbounding the ball
against Kentucky in 1992. Chris-
tian Laettner caught his pass
near the foul line and hit a turn
around jumper to seal the win
in overtime. Just 24 hours before
this memorable moment in the
NCAA tournament, Michigan
defeated Ohio State in overtime.
Michigan would eventu-
ally fall 71-51 to Duke in the
national championship - over a
week later.
When we see video of
Laettner's jumper and Thomas
Hill standing on the sideline
crying in joy, we often forget that
this game came in the Regional
Final, more commonly called the
Elite Eight.
That March weekend in 1992
set a record for having two of its
four Regional Final games go into
overtime. It wasn't until this past
weekend's Elite Eight games that
we had ever seen anything close
to 1992.
The weekend started off with
four seed Louisville taking on
the seventh seeded West Virginia
Mountaineers Saturday after-
noon. Both teams had knocked
off powerhouses within their
region - Louisville defeated top
seeded Washington in the Sweet
16 and West Virginia took out
second seeded Wake Forest in the
second round.
West Virginia shot lights
out the entire game - they hit a
school record 18 threes on only
27 attempts. With the Moun-
taineers up by as many as 20
and leading by 13 at the half,
it looked as if WVU could start
packing their bags for St. Louis.
Looks can be deceiving.
Louisville was a determined
team in the second half, coming
out with intense defensive pres-
sure. The Cardinals battled back
as Larry O'Bannon and Taquan
Dean took over the game, com-
bining for nine three pointers
and 47 points (Dean's 23 all
came in the second half, due in
large part to his seven trifectas).
For much of the second half, it
seemed every time UL started
to put something together, West
Virginia would answer with yet
another hit from beyond the arc.
However, in the last five minutes
or so, Louisville started chip-
ping away at the lead. With 38
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seconds left in the second half,
O'Bannon scored to tie the game
at 77 apiece - the first tie since
the score read 3 - 3 early in the
first half.
Both teams missed shots at
the end of regulation and the
game headed into overtime. The
Cardinals carried their momen-
tum into the extra period and
ended up winning by eight,
even after star forward Francisco
Garcia fouled out. The victory
earned them the right to be
the first team in the Final Four.
Louisville's coach Rick Pitino is
no stranger to being there - The
Cardinals are his third different
team he has taken to the Final
Four, an NCAA record.
The nightcap provided what
looked like to be the best match
up of the weekend as Illinois,
number one seed in the Chi-
cago region and the number
one team in the country, was
set to take on third seeded
Arizona. Arizona, thanks to a
clutch jumper by sharpshooter
Salim Stoudamire with just
seconds left, defeated Okla-
homa State to keep their season
alive in their previous game.
The Wildcats simply looked
unbeatable against the Big Ten
champs in this one as their ath-
leticism, size and finesse inside
(Channing Frye) and ability to
hit from downtown knocked the
wind out of the Illini. Up 15 with
just four minutes to play, Arizona
looked destined to extend their
season. But as we saw earlier in
the day, no lead is safe in this
NCAA tournament.
Illinois quickly proved why
they are the top seed in the
tournament as they battled back
by finishing regulation on an
astounding 20-5 run, which
tied the teams at 80 and sent the
game into overtime. Just as in the
Louisville game, the team with
the push that forced overtime
carried an enormous amount
of energy into the extra five
minutes as the Illini fought their
way to a six-point lead by the
two-minute mark, due in large
part to a pair of Deron Williams'
three-pointers, unquestionably
the offensive catalyst for Illinois
in this contest. Arizona made
a late push as Hassan Adams
dropped in two lay-ups and a
free throw but eventually fell just
short, losing 90-89.
After an amazing day of
comebacks, the Elite Eight was
see ELITE page B4
Registration is open!
Summer Session 1 May 23 - June 28
Summer Session 2 July 5 - Aug. 10
Ten-Week Session May 23 - Aug. 10
With Summer Sessions at NC State, you have the flexibility of
attending day and evening classes. This summer, choose from
an array of over 900 undergraduate and graduate courses.
Web site: www.ncsu.edusummer
Toll free: (866) 294-9903
Local: (919)515-2265





RAGEB4
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
3-29-05
ElltC from page B3
only half over - there were still
two more spots in St. Louis wait-
ing to be filled.
The third regional final
matched up the top seeded North
Carolina and the sixth-seeded
Badgers. Wisconsin had arguably
the easiest road to the Elite Eight as
they took on an 11 seed, a 14 seed
and a 10 seed, avoiding potential
games with Kansas and UCONN.
The Tar Heels started off hot
in this one as Sean May and
Rashad McCants scored at will.
When point guard Raymond
Felton went out with a second
foul, head coach Roy Williams
decided to pull him to prevent
further foul trouble. Leading by
11 at the time, it seemed to be the
right move.
Wisconsin would prove
Williams wrong as they finished
the half on an 11-0 run, tying the !
game at 44 heading into the half.
The Tar Heels struggled to
start the second half as hot as the
first and trailed for the first time
since they were down 5-4. How-
ever, May's dominating play in
the paint (29 points, 11 boards)
and Felton's late free throws
sealed the deal for UNC.
The finale of the Elite Eight
matched up second-seeded Kentucky
and fifth-seeded Michigan State.
In a game that was close
throughout, Michigan State
held a slight edge as the contest
looked to come to a close. Ken-
tucky had the ball down 75 - 72
with about 15 seconds left. Some
teams in this situation try to get
a quick two-point bucket and
then immediately foul. If your
opponent misses a free throw,
you only need another two-point
field goal to tie instead of a three.
If they make both, then you are
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Deron Williams hits on one of his two three-point shots In overtime, giving Illinois an 88-84 lead
income tax
Preparation
still only down three. Wildcat
coach Tubby Smith didn't agree
as he went for the three.
With about six seconds left,
Kentucky fired from behind the
arc and missed. Kelenna Azu-
bulke of the Wildcats grabbed
the miss, dribbled out to the
three-point line and missed a
three of his own. After the second
best bounce you will ever see in
a basketball game, the ball car-
omed sharply off the front rim
and made its way out to three-
point line into the hands UK's
Patrick Sparks. Sparks, who had
missed the front end of a one and
one earlier that could have tied
the game, double clutched and
fired the ball up as time expired.
The ball took the number one
best bounce you will ever see
in a basketball game, as it flut-
tered up off the side rim, landed
gently, rolled around and fell
through the hoop. It must have
been the longest two seconds of
Kentucky's collective lives.
After a five-minute debate of
whether Sparks' foot was on the
line, which would end the game
in a 75-74 loss for the 'Cats, the
bucket was ruled good and a third
overtime in four games began.
After four-plus minutes in the
extra period, Kentucky's Azu-
buike had an opportunity for the
last shot. However, he was unable
to get an open look immediately,
dribbled around to the right wing
and wasn't even ready to pull
up for any kind of jump shot as
the buzzer sounded. Azubuike's
mental error propelled the game
into a second OT.
Michigan State stepped up
on the defensive end of the floor
in double overtime, allowing
seven points while scoring 13,
effectively ending the game, Ken-
tucky's season and the best week-
end of basketball you will ever see.
After watching four games,
it's amazing to think the worst of
these was the UNC and Wiscon-
sin match-up. The three overtime
games set a NCAA record for most
games finishing in OT during the
Elite Eight.
This weekend showed the
true magic of college athletics
and the NCAA tournament - no
one gives up and everyone is in It
for one reasons - pure love of the
game. We saw it in 1992 and we
saw it four times this weekend.
The writer can be contacted at
sports�theeastcarolinian. com.
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3-29-05
THE EAST CAROUNIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
Where will you be?
Get Started.
Get Ahead.
Live.
East Carolina University
Summer School 2005
Registration begins March 28
Contact Your Adviser





k
M & & feHi
Page B6
TUESDAY March 29, 2005
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the TUESDAY edition
Friday at 4 p.m. for the WEDNESDAY edition
Monday at 4 p.m. for the THURSDAY edition
Ad must be received In person. We are located on
the second floor of the Old Cafeteria Complex
Students (wvalld I.DJ-UP to 25 words.
Non-students-UP to 25 words
Each word over 25, add
For bold or all caps, add (per)
All ads must be pre-pald. No refunds given.
.$2
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FOR RENT
Now accepting applications for
summer and fall semesters at the
following locations: Captain's
Quarters, Sycamore Hill, and
University Terrace. Call Hearthside
Rentals at 355-2112.
Walk to Campus! 1 Bedroom Apt.
at Captain's Quarters Starting at
$375. Includes cable, water, and
sewer. Now accepting applications
for summer and fall semesters.
Hearthside Rentals, 355-2112.
1 needed for great apartment on
5th Street across from enkins.
S340month. Half of utilities
cable. Spacious, fully furnished,
cable internet, hardwood floors,
2br1 bath. Edward (919) 815-
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1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
walking distance to campus,
WD conn pets ok no weight
limit, free water and sewer. Call
today for security deposit special
- 758-1921.
Need a place for the summer?
Sublease a brand new University
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including utilities. Fully furnished
with water, sewer, and bus. Call
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Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015 1&2 BR
apts, dishwasher, CD, centrai air
& heat, pool, ECU bus line, 6, 9
or 12 month leases. Pets allowed.
High speed internet available. Rent
includes water, sewer, fit cable.
Rent Special through 33105 for
2 BRs - $99 1st month rent with
12 month lease.
3, 4, and 5 Bedroom houses $750
to $1,200 permo. 1 Bedroom
apartments $350 to $375 includes
utilities. Call Frank @ (252) 353-5107
Houses for rent. Close to campus.
Leases starting June, uly, and
August. Call 252-725-5458, 329-
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Elkin Ridge Townhome for rent
in quiet cul-de-sac. 1.5 baths,
fenced patio, gas logs. $650 rent
$650 deposit. Call 756-5896 or
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Walk to campus, 3 bedrooms,
1 12 baths, hardwood floors,
ceiling fans. All kitchen appliances,
washerdryer, storage shed, attic,
large frontback yard, $650.00
per month. Available August 1st.
Meade Street, 341-4608.
Walk to campus and downtown!
2 Bedroom, 1 Bath duplex- newly
renovated, hardwood floors, new
kitchen appliances, very nice.
Call Adam 412-8973. Only $425
Total Rent
Walk to Campus! 1-2 blocks!
Central HeatAir. Large bedrooms,
washerdryer hook up. High speed
internet, cable and alarm system
all included. 3 bedroom available
April 1st. 5 bedroom available une
1st. 5, 4 and 2 bedroom available
Aug 1st. Call Mike 439-0285.
One, Two, Three and Four
Bedroom houses walking distance
from ECU Pets OK Fenced Yard
Central Heat AC Call 531-5701
Available Summer and Fall
Blocks to ECU, Pre Leasing,
Houses - All sizes, Available
May, June, July, b August
- Call 321 4712 OR
collegeunlversltyrentals.com
3 BR3 BA condo - University
Terrace $975month includes
WasherDryer, WaterSewage, on
ECU bus route. Very clean! Call
Theresa at 752-9387.
One, two, three and four bedroom
houses, duplexes, and apartments.
All within four blocks of campus.
Pet friendly! Reasonable rates, short
leases available. Call 830-9502.
Walk to campus or ride campus
transit. Clean 3BR1 BATH-Willow
St. (Beside Tar River Estates).
WD included, heatAC, ceiling
fans, hardwood floors, excellent
management. $625month. Call
(252)375-6447.
ROOMMATE WANTED
Looking for someone to take over
lease in Pirates Place Apartments.
Extra large bedroom in 3 BR 3
BA. $295 mo. utility, cable, and
internet. Available in May. Call
(336) 339-7673.
Female Roommate Needed:
duplex, walking distance to ECU.
Pets welcome. Rent $287 half
utilities, cell: 704-437-1842 or
email : adb0806d1 �mail.ecu.
edu
FOR SALE
1997 Volvo 850 Series Station
Wagon Loaded Power Sunroof
Leather Interior Keyless Remote
Michelin Tires Beautiful Car Silver
in Color NADA $10,500 Sale for
$8500 Call 756-5100 ohn
SERVICES
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Hinged fasteners
6 Torn ticket
10 Fixed charge
14 Bandleader
Shaw
15 Biblical weed
16 Track shape
17 Rich, creamy
dressing
19 PoetTeasdale
20 Seasonal song
21 Bring before the
bar
23 Canal or
channel
27 Hollered
28 Lotion ingredient
29 Gangster's rod
31 Swollen, fluid-
filled sacs
32 Reseal a
package
35 Pitcher's bag
37 Lair
38 Chewy candy
40 Lout
43 Italian salami
44 Bank employee
46 Ballplayer
Guerrero
49 Mining product
51 Ireland
52 Playwright
Eugene
54 Provide
restitution for
57 Public disgrace
59 Big rig
60 Pulled apart
61 Classes
66 Toledo's lake
67 Wickedness
68 Add up
69 Ownership
paper
70 Dupes
71 Access
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Bad actor
Coach
Parseghian
Porker's pad
Early resident
Madrid mister
German POW
camp
Mai
cocktail
8 Celestial bear
9 Hollywood Noah
10 Nobel Prize
winner Yalow
11 Is of use
12 Bull's-eye
13 African
antelopes
18 Unused
22 Cook's formula
23 Bond of
Hollywood
24 Away from the
wind
25 Hamlet
26 Square-sail
support
30 Rocky pinnacle
33 Ancient
34 Play on words
36 Drunkard
39 Bovine comment
40 Medley
41 Dynamic intro?
42 Barney's
Bedrock buddy
43 Smiled broadly
45 Shackle
Solutions
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46 Assigned
47 Additional
performance
48 Sweetie
50 Art supporters
53 Brogan binders
55 Beer barrel
56 Overact
58 Volcanic output
62 Gratuity
63 Addams Family
cousin
64 Corn serving
65 Cunning
YTB travel and cruises. Serving
all your travel and event needs:
air, lodging, cruises, car rentals,
etc. Book online at www.
takempawaytravelbiz.com or call
804-272-8121
HELP WANTED
Food Delivery Drivers and Office
Help Wanted for Restaurant
Runners Part-time Position. Some
lunch time (11a-2p) MWF and
weekend availability required.
Reliable transportation a must.
Call 756-5527 Between 2-5
and leave message if necessary.
Greenville residents only. Sorry
no dorm students.
Work Hard, Play Hard, Change
Lives! Girls resident camp looking
for counselors, wranglers,
lifeguards, boating staff, crafts,
nature, unit leaders, business
managers, and health supervisor.
$200-340week! May 28-Aug 7.
Free Housing! www.keyauwee.
com Contact (336) 861-1198 or
keyau wee@aol .com
Lifeguard, swim instructors and
coaches. Greenville, Farmville,
Wilson, Ayden, Atlantic Beach.
Call Bob, 714-0576.
Spend the Summer on the Outer
Banks! Steamers Shellfish To Go,
an upscale gourmet take-out
restaurant, in Corolla NC has
two positions open for summer
employment. Pay commensurate
with experience - housing
available. Please contact Linda
at 252-453-3305 or via email at
shellfishtogo@earthlink.net.
Now Hiring On-Campus
Representatives CampusFundraiser
is hiring out-going students for on-
campus spokesperson positions.
$15 to $25 per hour plus bonuses.
Modeling, acting or customer service
experience helpful but not required.
Visit http:www.campusfundraiser.
comcr.asp to apply.
Tiara Too Jewelry Colonial Mall Part-
Time Retail Sales Associate Day and
Night Hours Must be in Greenville
Year Round Apply in Person
Do you need a good job? The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents for
the ECU Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make your own
schedule. If interested, visit our
website at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Primrose School - Raleigh N.C.
is looking to hire qualified Child
Development graduates. Great
compensation package. Fax
resume to 919-329-2930 or call
919-329-2929. EOE
Active Handicapped Male Needs
Personal Attendant 7-10 am M-F
and Every Other Weekend. Duties
Include Bathing, Dressing, etc.
Call 756-9141
Attention College Students
National Company 80 years in
business now recruiting for Part-
time work. Opportunity for $300-
500 per week. Only hard workers
need apply. Call 756-3861 10-
5p.m. only for appointment.
Need FTbut only have PT
hours available? I am looking
for individuals to help me spread
the word about VOIP. Earn
up front money and residuals.
Graduate with a degree and an
ever increasing income stream.
Get paid every month for what
you do today. Call to learn more
about this exciting opportunity.
252-558-4284.
Bartender's and Karaoke DJ's
needed for local Pub. Some
experience preferred. Shifts are
noon to 6:00pm and 6:00pm till
closing. Must be at least 19 years
of age or older. Please call for an
interview, 902-6814.
Bartending! $250day potential.
No experience necessary. Training
provided. (800) 965-6520 ext.
202.
500 Summer Jobs, 50 Camps,
You Choose! Northeast, USA.
AthleticCreative counselors
coaches needed; Sports,
Water, Art; Apply on-line www.
summercampemployment.com
Carolyn@summercampemploym
ent.com 1-800-443-6428
GREEK PERSONALS
Alpha Omicron Pi would like to
thank Zeta Tau Alpha for coming
to our dinner! We had fun and
hope to do it again!
NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOLD
YOUR FAMILY.
www.shareyouriffe.org
1-80O355-SHARE
19 Comton on Oman Tlw Oonmon

FREE
� of poor maintenance response
� of unretumed phone calls
� of noisy neighbors
�of crawly critters
� of high utility bills
� of ECU parking hassles
' of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumpy personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units that were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
' of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
Eastgate Village Apts.
3200 F Moseley Dr.
561-RENT or 561-7679
www. pinnacleproperty
managi'iiti-iiUon.
round mmmim
Is looking R� PACKAGE HANDLERS to load vans
ami unload trailers for the AM shift hours 4 AM to
8AM. J7S0 hour, tuition assistance available alter
30 days. Future career opportunities in munugement
possible Applications can be filled out at 2410
United Drive (near die aqualics center) Grrcnville.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 29, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 29, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1809
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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