The East Carolinian, February 10, 2005






OAH WYLE
s hit show ER
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www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 80 Number 53 THURSDAY February 10, 2005
What do you think
about the tuition
increase?
ECU faculty, students respond to
BOT's proposed tuition increase
SARAGIRMUS
SOPHOMORE NURSING
MAJOR
"If I have to pay more
tuition, I should get a bigger
scholarship andor financial
aid
CARA MCGRATH
JUNIOR PHYSICAL THERAPY
MAJOR
"It is going to make it
harder for people to stay in.
Out of state tuition is high
enough
UNC System students met in Raleigh last week to protest the proposed tuition increases and speak with state officials.
DAVEGALIETTI
FRESHMAN UNDECLARED
"It's not a big deal. My par-
ents pay tuition anyway
Students concerned
over growing expense
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
SENIOR WRITER
Students show mixed reactions to the
tuition increase, recently passed by the
ECU Board of Trustees, which would to
go into effect in the fall semester of 2005.
The money allocated from student
tuition would primarily be used to
strengthen ECU'S salary competitive-
ness while also providing money for
need-based financial aid and improved
academic advising.
The North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors is currently in the process of evalu-
ating all of the tuition increase proposals
of the UNC system schools and will make
the final decision during their meeting in
March. If passed, the increase could affect
ECU and other UNC system students.
ECU students pay a number of expenses,
ranging from books for classes to general
living expenses, which would, in many cases,
make increased tuition an extra burden that
could prove difficult to manage.
"I know I can't afford more you
can't get a job in Greenville said Charity
Hilton, junior sociology major.
Hilton said she pays for her college
education through student loans and is
not looking forward to paying off a high
amount of debt when she receives her
degree and any more would just be adding
to the strain.
"It's going to be real hard to pay it off
right aft,er I graduate it's hard to get a
job nowadays Hilton said.
Shigeo Yamaguchi, international stud-
ies graduate student, said students already
have studying and social lives to worry
about and increasing the cost of their
education is adding another worry.
"Students should not have to be con-
cerned with that said Yamaguchi.
However, Yamaguchi's permanent
residence is outside of North Carolina so
tuition is already costly.
"I'm an out of statel student, so I pay
a lot either way Yamaguchi said.
With the majority of the proposed
see STUDENTS page A2
ECU faculty shows
mixed reactions
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
SENIOR WRITER
A proposed tuition increase for
ECU students would be spent primar-
ily on working toward achieving a
projected goal of increasing faculty
salaries to the 80th percentile when
compared to ECU's peer institutions.
The North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors has set this target with the intention
of retaining current faculty and easing the
process of recruitment.
ECU faculty salaries are currently in
the SO - 55th percentile range when com-
pared with peer institutions, which has
led to this effort to generate additional
money to offer a more competitive pay.
The increase was approved in a Decem-
ber meeting of ECU'S Board of Trustees and
awaits final approval from the North Caro-
lina Board of Governors, which will decide
on the matter in a March meeting.
If passed, 60 percent of the extra
money allocated through the raised
cost would go toward making faculty
salaries more competitive, with the
rest going toward need-based financial
aid and improved academic advising.
� Lilla Holsey, graduate director for busi-
ness, career and technical education at
ECU, said she thinks the quality of ECU's
faculty warrants the extra money.
"I definitely think that we have the
quality of professors at-ECU to warrant
our salaries being equal to that of other
universities said Holsey.
Holsey said raising student tuition to
elevate ECU'S ability to compete is seem-
ingly a justified option of the state.
"The state of North Carolina
does contribute so much to our stu-
dents' education Holsey said.
When deciding who to accept offers of
employment from, Holsey said professors
are no different than anyone else and pay
is an issue.
"I think with cost of living as it is, that
professors, like anyone else in our society,
have to weigh varying factors when they
see FACULTY page A2
Duffy to speak at conference
Event meant to help
educators in areas of
literacy and reading
LAUREN DONOVAN
STAFF WRITER ,
� The ECU College of
Education Department
of Curriculum and
Instruction is sponsor-
ing the 23rd annual
Mary Louis Statton
ReadingLanguage Arts
conference.
The event is taking
place Friday, from 8 a.m.
- 3:30 p.m. at the Greenville
Hilton.
Gerald Duffy, recently named
William E. Moran distinguished
professor of reading and literacy
at the University of North Caro-
lina at Greensboro, will speak at
the conference, providing educa-
tors professional development in
the area of literacy and related
areas of education.
The conference honors Mary
Louis Statton, Professor Emeritus,
who passed away in 2002. Since
her death, members of her family
such as Lois Stanton Langston,
Michael Langston, Beverly Staton
Stocks and Judge Wil-
liam L. Stocks have
made contributions for
the conference.
Lanette Moret is the
co-director of the 200S
MLS conference.
"We are very appre-
ciative to the family
members who have
set up an endowment to
make sure the conference goes on
in her name said Moret.
Moret got involved in the
conference back in 199S and
said it has grown over the years.
Hundreds of educators from the
kindergarten level through col-
lege are expected to attend the
event.
DUFFY
Duffy is also a Professor Emer-
itus at Michigan State University,
where he served for 25 years as a
faculty member. His research has
utilized both quantitative and
qualitative designs in studying
effective reading strategy instruc-
tion and teacher development.
His accomplishments make him
an honored guest at this year's
conference.
"I'm looking forward to
attending the conference said
Duffy.
"I'm new at UNC-G, but I
have heard good things about
the conference and colleagues
have come back with only great
things to say
Duffy is excited to speak with
educators of the area, and his
hope is they will be able to take
things back to the classroom.
"I want to be able to help
teachers and give them ways to
reach out and truly make a dif-
ference in the lives and educa-
tions of their students, especially
those who are falling through the
cracks Duffy said.
In addition to the keynote
speaker of this event, there are 18
other concurrent sessions being
offered to the teachers along with
an author's luncheon.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
ft Registration
Registration still open and
further Information can be found
at coe.ecu.edureadlngmls
marylois.
The event Is taking place at the
Greenville Hilton Friday, Feb. 11
from 8 a.m. - 3:30 p.m. and Is
free for full time students.
Students sit in Wrig
aza to provide information for the
upcoming Vagina Monologue events.
Vagina Monologues'
shows this weekend
ECU recognizes Sexual Responsibility Week
Healthy Pirates take
different approach to
sex education
AMBER PAYNE
STAFF WRITER
With the upcoming Valen-
tine's Day holiday, the Healthy
Pirates are hosting the annual
Sexual Responsibility Week from
Feb. 14 -18 in an attempt to prop-
erly educate students of issues
surrounding sex.
Activities and games will be
set up in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center Brickyard Tuesday
�Thursday from 11 a.m. - 1 p.m.
iames include Wheel of Health,
Family Feud and an STD Fear
Factor "goo pot The goal of the
games is to educate students on
issues concerning all aspects of
relationships in an entertaining
manner. Messages within the
activities will have factual infor-
mation about date rape, assault,
STD's and unwanted pregnancy.
"I want students to know that
there's more to sexual responsibil-
ity than safe sex said Tywanna
Jeffries, assistant director for
wellness education.
"Students have a general
knowledge, but there is much
more information that they
could know. Sometimes it can get
put on the back burner
She said students commonly
think of safe sex as condom use
only but there are other impor-
tant forms such as abstinence and
effective communication with
their partner that are important.
An estimated 25 percent of all
college students throughout the
United States are infected with
an STD, the most common being
Chlamyida, Gonorrhea and HPV.
ECU is believed to be in line with
that statistic.
Students have shown positive
reactions to the upcoming week of
events and hope to learn from them.
"The event is a great idea
because sometimes you get so
caught up in life that you forget to
stop and think about factors such
as STD's said Jamie Woodward,
hospitality management major.
Today, 51 percent of all preg-
nancies are accidental and absti-
nence is the only 100 percent
form of protection.
In past years, ECU students
have been very appreciative of
the week because of the variety
of information offered through
the entertaining methods.
The week is chosen to fall
around the Valentine's Day
holiday to help people think
about the relationships they are
currently in or may get involved
with in a healthy manner.
Jeffries said fostering good
relationships Is an optimal
goal of the week and she hopes
students receive that message.
She also said It's OK for students
not to be in a relationship.
"It starts with yourself and
your values and being able to
communicate to people around
you and people you love said
Georgia Childs, assistant director
for peer health.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Campaign to address
domestic violence
LAUREN DONOVAN
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Women's Studies
Program, Voice and the Stu-
dent Involvement Team are
presenting a production of
Eve Ensler's Vagina Monologues
Friday.
The Vagina Monologues is a
play that brings together voices of
women from all over the world.
Women of different races, reli-
gions and social statuses come
together to voice the feelings
of joy, pain, love and fear they
experienced as a result of vio-
lence and abuse. Local women
act out monologues of females
who shared stories of sexuality
and abuse.
This play is part of a
Valentine's Day college campaign
to stop violence against women.
It is a celebration of women to
raise awareness and envision a
world without violence. All the
proceeds from this celebration
f 'Vagina
� Monologues'
The programs take place Friday
and Saturday at 8 p.m. in the
Wright Auditorium.
Tickets are available through
ECU Central Ticket Office, or call
1-800-ECU-ARTS or visit ecuarts.
com for more Information.
Proceeds benefit Family Violence
Program of Pitt County
go to benefit the Family Violence
Program of Pitt County.
The play is based on more
than 200 interviews of women
from around the world. These
women discuss issues such
as body image, relationships,
sexuality and self esteem. Many
of the actors are ECU students.
Many of the issues discussed
see MONOLOGUES page A6
INSIDE I News: A2 I Comics: A7 I Opinion: A4 I Living: Bl I Sports: B4





2-10-05
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY February 10, 2005
Campus News News Briefs
Brody Sends Treats to
Selected Valentines
Brody students who are raising
money to go to Kenya will deliver
pies, cakes, cupcakes and cookies
to your loved ones. E-mail your
order to cle0824@mail.ecu.edu.
You can also make donations
to their trip through the Medical
Foundation at The Brody School
of Medicine. Rease write "Africa
Trip" in the memo section.
Black History Month Speaker
A public lecture will be held in
honor of Black History Month at
the Willis Building Auditorium Feb.
10 at 7 pm. The event is sponsored
by ECU'S GeoClub, Department of
Geology and Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center. The featured
speaker is Jonathan Tllove, a
race and immigration reporter
with the Newhouse News Service,
a two-time National Headliner
Award winner and author of the
2003 Random House book Along
Martin Luther King: Travels on
Black America's Main Streets.
For more Information, call Derek
Alderman at 328-4013.
Massage Clinic
The ECU physical therapy
students are holding a massage
clinic Feb. 10 from 5 - 9 p.m. In
the Belk Allied Health Building.
Come get a massage for only
$5 for 10 minutes, $10 for 20
minutes and $15 for 30 minutes.
No appointments are necessary,
but if you would like to make one,
contact cmf0625@mall.ecu.edu.
HOSA Meeting
Health Occupations Students
of America will hold an Interest
meeting Thursday, Feb. 10 in 221
Mendenhall at 4 p.m. HOSA is
open to all health related majors.
Bowling League
The Outer Limitz Classic Bowling
League will meet in Mendenhall
Student Center Feb. 10 at 7 p.m.
Registration forms are available in
the Outer Umitz Bowling Center.
BINGO
The Student Union Spectrum
Committee is sponsoring
Bingo Feb. 10 at 9:30 p.m. In
the Mendenhall Student Center
cafeteria. The game is free, and
you could win cash prizes.
Japanese Cultural Day
Food, refreshments, origami
and other special activities are
planned in honor of Japanese
Cultural Day Feb. 11 from 3 - 5
p.m. in the International House.
This event is free and sponsored
by the International Students
Association.
Jazz At Night
Listen to the cool tunes of the ECU
Jazz Ensemble Feb. 11 at 8 p.m.
in the Mendenhall Great Rooms
sponsored by the Student Union
Spectrum Committee. Get your
tickets now at the Central Ticket
Office.
NAACP Founders Week
This week is NAACP Founders
Week. Various nightly activities
include ethnic food tasting, open-
mic social, "Legacies Nearly
Forgotten" and volunteering with
local service agencies.
Contra Dance
The ECU Folk and Country
Dancers are sponsoring a contra
dance Saturday, Feb. 12 at the
Willis Building. A potluck supper
will begin at 6 p.m a concert
starts at 7 p.m beginners lesson
at 7:30 p.m. and the contra dance
from 8 -10:30 p.m. Live, old-time
and Celtic music by a string band
will be performed. The cost Is $3
for students, $5 for members and
$8 for the general public. Call
752-7350 for details.
The Vagina Monologues
The annual production of Eve
Ensler's The Vagina Monologues
will be Feb. 11 - 12 at 8 p.m. In
Wright Auditorium. This year, the
ECU V-DayVagna Monologues
event is being co-sponsored by
the women's studies department,
the student organization VO.I.C.E.
and the Student Involvement
Team. Tickets are $8 in advance
for students, $10 for students
at the door, $12 for the general
public in advance and $15 for the
general public at the door. You
can purchase tickets by calling
1-800-ECU-ARTS or online at
ecuartscom. The proceeds will
benefit local charities that help
abused women.
Local
President Bush
to visit on Thursday
RALEIGH, NC - President Bush will
visit North Carolina this week to
promote his Social Security plan.
The president is scheduled to appear
Thursday morning at a town hall
meeting in Raleigh's BTI Center. It will
be his first trip here since attending a
re-election fund-raiser in July.
Bush has been traveling the country
to push his plan to allow younger
workers to invest a portion of their
Social Security taxes in private
accounts.
U.S. Rep. Bob Etheridge, D-NC, said
he hoped Bush "will level with the
people of North Carolina" during
the visit
"I hope that he will tell them that
Social Security does face a long-term
problem, but that his privatization
plan does nothing to address that
problem said Etheridge.
In addition, several opponents of
privatization, led by state Rep. Jennifer
Weiss, chair of the state House
Aging Committee, scheduled a news
conference Wednesday to release
data on the impact of Bush's plan.
Opponents also scheduled a protest
for Thursday morning outside the
BTI Center.
NC newspaper sues
sheriff over access to 911 calls
WINSTON-SALEM, NC - A Winston-
Salem newspaper claims In a
lawsuit that Forsyth County Sheriff
Bill Schatzman has violated public
records law by refusing to release
the contents of 911 calls.
The lawsuit asks that Schatzman
be ordered to make the information
public'
The Winston-Salem Journal sent
Schatzman a letter Nov. 15 requesting
tapes or transcripts of all 911 calls and
radio communications by deputies
made Nov. 11 between 6 p.m. and
10 p.m.
Denny C. Booth is accused of killing
three of his former neighbors that
evening near Kernersville before
being shot and injured himself by Cpl.
Jeremy Rowley of the sheriffs office.
Rowley was also shot.
Public records laws in North Carolina
say the contents of 911 calls and
other emergency communications of
law-enforcement agencies - with the
exception of information that would
identify the caller - are public records.
The law also requires the guardian
of such public records to allow
them to be examined as promptly
as possible.
Carl Crothers, the newspaper's
executive editor, said the newspaper
requests 911 tapes and radio
communications to evaluate the
performance of the sheriffs office in
responding to incidents. The tapes
and communications can provide
information about response time,
calls for backup and what officers
said during the response to an
incident.
National
Mohawk-wearing
Idaho teen survives scalping
BOISE, Idaho - A member of a punk
clique scalped another member
apparently as punishment for her
disrespectful behavior toward women,
police said. The victim, a 16-year-old
girl whose hair was cut in a mohawk,
survived.
Authorities are searching for Marianne
Dahle, 26, who allegedly tied the teen
up and used a 4-inch knife to cut
away the crown and back portion
of her scalp. A felony arrest warrant
accuses Dahle of aggravated battery,
which carries a maximum sentence
of 14 years.
Dahle was visiting Kirkham Hot
Springs in central Idaho with the
girl and a friend when the attack
occurred Jan. 18. The teen spent
two weeks in the hospital and Is now
recovering at home. Authorities did
not release the girl's name, though
she identified herself as Sheila to
Boise TV station KTVB.
"When I say this gal was scalped,
she was truly scalped said Bill
Braddock, chief deputy of Boise
County. "The top of her head, her hair,
was completely cut off. The motive, as
near as we've been told by witnesses,
was retaliation for acting in a way
that the adult perceived as being
offensive to women as a gender
Braddock said the victim, Dahle
and another teenage girl who
witnessed the attack were long-term
acquaintances who belonged to the
same clique. The victim's mohawk
haircut may have played a role in the
assault, he said.
"In their punk group, wearing a
mohawk is a sign of being a punker,
and according to their creed if you
disrespect women you are not
allowed to wear a mohawk he said.
"But I don't think the victim had any
idea in the world she was going to
be scalped
Carry Fiorina steps down
as chairman, CEO of Hewlett
SAN FRANCISCO - Carly Fiorina
has stepped down as chairman
and chief executive of Hewlett-
Packard Co. in a surprise move at
the company she tried to transform
from a printer business into a broad-
based technology giant, the company
announced Wednesday. HP shares
surged 11 percent.
In a statement, Fiorina, one of
corporate America's highest ranking
female executives, cited differences
Students
from page A1
increase slated to go toward making
ECU faculty salaries competitive
with other universities, junior
nursing major, Sarah Mclean, ques-
tioned why more would not be used
toward student related causes.
"1 think it's a little unnecessary
I think they should offer more
to the students said Mclean.
Ashley Moody, English
graduate student who plans to
be a professor in the future, is in
a unique situation as a student,
paying her own way through
ECU by working.
Moody said she understands
both sides of the issue, currently
facing a proposed hike in tuition
as a student, but also acknowledg-
ing that when she is a professor a
significant salary would certainly
be a desire.
"I'm on both sides of the
fence said Moody.
"But I think it is very tough
for the students to have to
bear the load just to become
productive citizens
Moody said she does not feel
it is necessary to raise student
tuition, and certain changes
could be made with the way tax
dollars are spent or the university
budget is divided to make ECU
faculty salaries competitive.
While Moody is not necessar-
ily sold on the proposed tuition
increase, she says she will do
what is necessary to make it
through her time at ECU.
"You have to deal with it if
you want the success later on in
life Moody said.
"If tuition goes up, I'll make
it work
Thh writer can be contacted at
news�theeastcarolinian. com.
Alpha Phi holds charity drive
Alpha Phi sorority is holding their annual "Heart Throb" fundraiser and are collecting
donations from ECU fraternities. Proceeds go to the Alpha Phi foundation which
will benefit cardiac care. Anyone is eligible to make donations to help the cause
and Alpha Phi is also in the process of collecting funds from outside companies.
Looking for something?
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with the board over executing its
strategy and suggested she was fired.
"While I regret the board and I have
differences about how to execute HP's
strategy, I respect their decision said
Fiorina, 50. "HP Is a great company,
and I wish all the people of HP much
success in the future
The board of directors of Palo Alto-
based HP named Robert P. Wayman,
its chief financial officer, as interim
chief executive and said it will seek
a permanent replacement HP named
director Patricia C. Dunn as non-
executive chairman.
HP shares rose $2.22 to $22.36 In
premarket trading.
The announcement came after recent
reports suggested the HP board
of directors had discussed shifting
some day-to-day responsibilities
to other executives in an effort
to improve the technology giant's
performance.
In recent months, she has been the
target of Intensifying criticism from
technology analysts and the media
for her ambitious diversification
strategy - an attempt to change HP
from a relatively marginal company
that focused on printers and ink
into a Silicon Valley consulting and
computing powerhouse.
International
Blalr apologizes to men wrongly
convicted of 1974 IRA bombings
LONDON - British Prime Minister
Tony Blair issued a public apology
Wednesday to members of two
families whose wrongful imprisonment
for IRA bombings three decades ago
was dramatized in the film In the
Name of the Father.
Members of the Conlon and Maguire
families were jailed In connection with
Irish Republican Army bombings in
Guildford and Woolwich in England in
1974. The attacks killed seven people
and injured more than 100.
Eleven people convicted in
connection with the attacks were
subsequently acquitted, and the case
is regarded as one of Britain's biggest
miscarriages of justice.
"I am very sorry that they were subject
to such an ordeal and Injustice Blair
said in a statement. The Guildford
and Woolwich bombings killed
seven people and injured over 100.
Their loss, the loss suffered by their
families, will never go away. But it
serves no one for the wrong people
to be convicted for such an awful
crime
Washington seeking to
oust head of U.N. nuclear agency
VIENNA, Austria - The United States
is seeking backing from allies In a
possible bid to oust the head of the
U.N. nuclear watchdog agency at a
meeting later this month, diplomats
and Western government officials
said Wednesday.
During the same Feb. 28 meeting
of the International Atomic Energy
Agency, Washington also will increase
the pressure on Iran for allegedly
trying to make nuclear weapons, the
officials told The Associated Press.
Washington considers IAEA head
Mohammed ElBaradei too soft on
Iran and its alleged plans to make
nuclear arms and the International
community ineffective in dealing with
the same perceived threat.
No U.S. comment was available
for Washington's strategies for the
upcoming IAEA board of governors
meeting.
But several diplomats and government
officials from IAEA member countries
dismissed recent reports that the
United States had given up attempts
to unseat ElBaradei because of lack
of support from other countries.
Faculty
from page A1
consider employment Holsey
said.
"Thus, it can be tempting to
consider salary when making deci-
sions about where one will work
Paul Franda, assistant professor
in the department of political sci-
ence, said any professor would be
lying if they claimed salary did not
matter, but he still would like to see
the burden shifted off the students.
"I would like to see tuition kept
as low as possible said Francia.
"Tuitions at most universities
are obscenely high
Francia said cost of living
should be taken into account
when looking at the issue of com-
petitive salary, but he looked at it
in a different light.
"I'd rather make $50,000 in
Greenville than $60,000 in New
York Francia said.
Todd Blake Finley, assistant
professor of English, said salary is
without question a major factor
in recruiting and retaining fac-
ulty, but ECU students should not
have to carry the load.
"I don't think we should do
it on the backs of the students
who are having a hard time just
paying to eat said Finley.
"The burden should be placed
on taxpayers also on businesses
in our community who receive
large tax breaks to come here
Finley said competitive salary
is a necessity for ECU because of
the location of the university.
"Even though ECU is a great
place to live, I don't think that is
wildly recognized by professors
who are looking for employ-
ment Finley said.
A problem, Finley said, of
not paying competitive salaries
is it can lead to a high turnover
rate, which in turn can be costly
for the university. In order to
replace lost faculty members,
there are prices to pay for the
interview and mentoring pro-
cesses involved.
"I think the solution is higher
pay and keeping people here
Finley said.
Thii writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Be heard!
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2-10-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING
yu iKvbOtMfti
DATE TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1S,2005
TIME 7:00 PM
LOCATION HENDRIX THEATER
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ARRIVE EARLY! SEATING IS FIRST COME, FIRST 8ERVEI
Brody students raise
money for trip to Kenya
Students serve spaghetti to raise funds for a trip to Kenya.
Group holds spaghetti
dinner to work in
foreign clinics
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
A group of medical students
and their advisor held a spaghetti
dinner Wednesday night in order
to raise money for an upcoming
trip to Kenya.
The students cooked and
served spaghetti with marinara
or meat sauce, bread and dessert
buffet-style.
Benjamin Gersh, third year
medical student, said while in
Kenya they would be seeing
about 400 - 500 people daily to
treat infectious diseases like HIV
and malaria and work with prob-
lems rarely seen in the United
States like malnutrition and
dehydration. The clinics would
be free to the people of Kenya.
"I don't even know what to
expect said Gersh.
"It's something we all feel
like we need to do and we want
to do. Some people there have
probably never seen a doctor
Courtney Edgar, third year
medical student, said they will
also try to do some research
while they are in the country and
when they return, they will hold
presentations to show what they
did and what they learned.
Dr. Thomas Kerkering is their
advisor for the trip and will go
with the students. He is a spe-
cialist in infectious diseases and
is teaching the students about
the diseases they will see in
weekly seminars. He described it
as didactic teaching on tropical
diseases and treatment of malnu-
trition and dehydration.
Kerkering said he worked
overseas many times in clinics
since 1979, when he worked at
theTai-Cambodia border. He just
came back from working in the
tsunami area about a week ago
and he also worked in the Kuwait
area after the first Persian war.
He said he has worked with the
Christian Children's Foundation
for years and was a health advisor
when he was at a medical college
in Virginia.
This trip will not be the first
time Kerkering has taken medi-
cal students overseas. He said he
already took two different groups
to Kenya but has not worked with
Brody students yet. Kerkering
said from his experience, these
trips are very educational for the
students.
"It really increases their
physical diagnostic skills said
Kerkering
"They learn how to take
care of patients with fewer
resources
Gersh said he's excited to go
because he has never been over-
seas. He said some people don't
see a need to go across the globe
when people need help in the
United States, but he feels this is
more charitable.
"I'm doing this to give back
to the world and hopefully it will
give me a learning experience
Gersh said.
"And there's an adventure
to it too
Edgar said the trip is a once-
in-a-lifetime opportunity for
medical students to see diseases
and processes like in Kenya. She
said tuberculosis and HIV are in
the late stages over there, which
is something they would never
see in America. GI parasites are
also a problem not experienced
in the United States because of
good sanitation.
"It's definitely a really good
educational experience Edgar
said.
"It's a different realm of
medical education over there
Edgar, Gersh and Kerkering
said the trip would also give
the students an insight into the
Kenyan culture, which they would
not otherwise be exposed to.
Gersh said he thinks they
will receive partial credit for
their required primary care
hours at Brody and Kerkering
said they would get some credit
as an elective.
"I think it's good Brody is
going to do this Kerkering
said.
Kerkering said right now
there are five students who want
to go, but he would like to take
10. He said students have to be
willing to go, but they should be
signed up so they can take all the
classes and do the fundraising.
Edgar said the trip is planned
for this July and it will cost about
$3,000 - 4,000 per person. This
covers their plane trip, room
and board and transportation to
different clinics in the country.
She said the Christian Children's
Foundation is setting up the clin-
ics, but they are not giving them
any money to go there.
Gersh said they will also be
holding a bake sale for Valen-
tine's Day and deliver the food
and do something in March.
They are also doing a campaign
to track down donors with the
help of the Brody Foundation.
They are still waiting to
hear if any sponsors will donate
money.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
chievement a Milestone a Celebration
suxi?- .an
Attention Graduates!
Don't Miss the
GRADUATION EXPO!
You're invited to a special Graduation Expo featuring
sales representatives and displays from a variety of ven-
dors and campus departments. This is also the first
opportunity for May grads to pick up caps & gowns.
Plus, you'll find other important information about
commencement, student loan repayment, alumni bene-
fits, Pirate Club, and more! All May graduates are
encouraged to attend, visit the information tables, register for some great door prizes,
and pick up a FREE GIFT. And, be sure to sign die "Class of 2005" banner to
be used at future alumni events
Tuesday, February 22 & Wednesday, February 23:
10:00 ajn. - 3:00 pan. & 5:00 pan. - 7:00 pan.
Thursday, February 24: 10:00 aan. - 3:00 pan.
Rear area of The Wright Place Dining Spot � Wright Building
"FREE GIr 1 fur May graduates while supplies but. compliments of Dowdy Student Store! Also note: some information tables will not be
available during evening hours.
This is the perfect time to meet with an authorized ECU ring representative to order your class ring. The official uni-
versity commencement announcements are available at ECU-Dowdy Student Store now and during the Graduation
Expo. You may also order personalized invitations, thank you notes, diploma frames, and other
graduation items through the ECU-Dowdy Student Store, located in the Wright Building.
Thanks to our sponsor
tostens
n
o
N
O
O
Ci
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores �herffjones
www.jostens.com www.studentstores.ecu.edu www.herffjones.comcollege
Wright Building � 328-6731 � 1-877-499-TEXT
Caps & Gowns ! School Rings ! Graduation Announcements Diploma Frames
Report news students need to know. foc
Accepting applications for STAFF WRITERS
Leam Investigative reporting skills
Must have at least a 2.0 GPA
Apply at our office located on ttie 2nd Hour ot ttie Student Publications Building pt rail 3?B-6366.
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0I.WlU W:
2-10-05
Page A4
editor@theeastcarollnian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor in Chief
THURSDAY February 10, 2005
Our View
Who does banning same sex
marriage actually protect?
In last week's State of the Union Address, Presi-
dent George W. Bush said he is still pushing
for an amendment to the Constitution to ban
same sex marriages.
Currently, laws have been passed by 33 dif-
ferent state legislatures banning marriage
between same sex couples. Five more states
have had laws approved by voters in ballot
initiatives banning same sex marriage.
It seems the whole country is against the idea
of same sex marriage, but we can't help but ask,
"why?" Who will it hurt by legalizing such marriages?
Christopher Ott of the Progressive Media Proj-
ect notes the only argument against legalization
of gay marriage is to protect the sanctity of mar-
riage. But who exactly does this protect?
"Early in our country's history, ensuring freedom
of religion didn't devalue anyone else's faith.
Ending slavery and segregation didn't devalue
anyone else's citizenship Allowing women to
vote didn't devalue the electoral process. And
allowing gay and lesbian couples to marry
doesn't devalue anything, either wrote Ott in
a recent column.
The U.S. Constitution should help protect all of
its citizens, regardless of their sexual orienta-
tion. If the proposed amendment is passed, it
will segregate a portion of U.S. citizens, denying
them basic rights.
Ott notes, "Do they really think long-term
couples should be denied the right to make
medical or end-of-life decisions, which married
couples take for granted? Do they really think
that kids should be denied health coverage by
one parent's health insurance because the law
treats them as strangers? Do they really think
it's fair for gay and lesbian people to pay the
same taxes as everyone else, but to be denied
the hundreds of rights, benefits and protections
of marriage? Do they really think that a gay and
lesbian couple that has been together for 50
years does not deserve the protections that
non-gay newlyweds enjoy from day one?"
In our history, equality has never been an easily
attainable goal. However TEC hopes that our
government can be responsible in making a
decision that grants rights to all of its citizens,
not just the majority.
�0
MQRe 0233331 ffiffiEB
FRoMThe CHRISTIAN RIGHT MORALITY ELITE
DAFFY DUCK
Our Staff
Amanda Q. Ungerfelt
Editor in Chief
Nick Henne
News Editor
Kristin Day
Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Kristin Murnane
Features Editor Asst Features Editor
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefield
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marciniak Dustin Jones
Web Editor Asst. Web Editor
Jennifer Hobbs Kltch Hines
Production Manager Managing Editor
Newsroom
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252.328.6366
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Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is th6 opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edltor@theeastcarolinlan.com or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353 Call 252-328-6366 for more
information. One copy of TEC is free, each additional
copy is $1.
Opinion Columnist
Evolutionary theory takes a beating
Darwin goes on
the defensive
PETER KALAJlAN
UNABASHED DARWINIST
In the summer of 1925, a young,
idealistic Tennessee schoolteacher by
the name of John Scopes decided that
he was going to challenge a Tennes-
see law which banned the teaching of
Darwin's Theory of Evolution in public
schools. The children would receive
their education from the Bible, as was
proper, and no uppity young teacher
was going to corrupt their minds with
tales about how humans are related to
apes. John Scopes, with every inten-
tion of being arrested for his crime
(he invited a number of observers so
there would be no doubt of his guilt),
was the first in a long line of educators
and concerned parents to abhor the
idea of God and the Bible and religious
fundamentalism entering the sphere of
public education. Scopes was eventu-
ally found guilty, but the argument he
started has persisted to this day, and
still, 80 years later, persons of faith are
still putting their best foot forward in
the ongoing struggle to poison public
education with the faith-based concept
of Creationism.
This is America. All you parents
out there, you have the absolute right,
as the bringers of life, to educate your
children in whatever way you see fit.
Send them to Seminary, send them to
Catholic school, wherever, but under-
stand - public school is just that, public.
There are dozens of active, established
religious doctrines out there, and as
any grammar school teacher will tell
you, we simply do not have the time
to teach them all. So, as is only fair,
we must not teach any. We teach our
children science and mathematics,
educate them on the great literary
heroes of history, and on the events
that have shaped their world. In the
spirit of concealment, a new school
of thought has emerged regarding the
origins of man and the course which
humans have taken from our earliest
days. Known as "intelligent design
the theory is both science and religion.
As an open critique of evolution, the
proponents of this new pseudo-science
believe that the world must have been
created by someort of intelligent, sen-
tient being. They site the complexity of
matter and the overabundance of life,
maintaining that nothing so complex
could have developed on its own over
time, as Darwin asserts, but must have
been created by an "intelligence
Now, for all you reasonable people
out there, the next logical question is,
of course, what sort of intelligence?
And that, my friends, is the kicker. The
proponents of this new concept do not
know, nor are they willing to field a
guess, but they are certain of one thing:
The theory of evolution is just that, a
theory, and therefore when our chil-
dren are taught the intricacies of natu-
ral selection and universal common
descent (the idea that all life can be
traced back to the same primordial life
forms which crawled from the ocean
millions of years ago), they should also
be taught the alternative: Creationism.
Leaving the question of what the "intel-
ligence" is in intelligent design open,
is a blatant attempt to imply that since
we do not know the answer, it must be
God. And not just any God, either. Not
Allah, not Yahweh, but the God of the
Bible. It is an attempt to fool people
into thinking that "intelligent design"
has some actual basis in science, when
in fact it is merely Creationism by
another name. Just because 50 percent
of Americans believe that God created
the universe in six days does not neces-
sarily make it so.
The school board of Cobb County,
Georgia has recently taken a major step
toward Biblical education in public
schools. Since no judge in America
would stand for the elimination of
evolutionary education, the board
members of Cobb County had a novel
idea. Instead of coming right out and
saying the God created the world and
all of that business about finches and
natural selection is blasphemous non-
sense, they chose a far more insidious
method. They planted the seeds of
doubt. The new Cobb County biology
textbooks, with their atheistic pas-
sages about Darwin and his genius,
were plastered with large stickers on
the outside cover which stated, "Evo-
lution is a theory, not a fact and
should be approached with an open
mind, studied carefully and critically
considered
Sounds relatively innocent, right?
But if there are only two options avail-
able to children about the creation of
the world and the evolution of man,
and parents and teachers unite to say
that one of them is not really a fact,
then what option do kids have? To
shield themselves from the realities of
the world with the protective cloak of
religious scripture? Lucky for all you
atheists out there, the Georgia Supreme
Court has deemed the stickers uncon-
stitutional and ordered their removal
from all textbooks.
I, personally, do not know Darwin
was 100 percent correct in his hypoth-
esis. Maybe he was not. But I do know
that Darwin provided detailed evidence
and actual, tangible proof that his theo-
ries were accurate, and unfortunately
for the religious right, there is but one
text which can be sited to reinforce the
theory of Creationism - the Bible. And
I think it is fair to say that particular
document has gone through its fair
share of debunking through the gen-
erations.
If next week, in some remote desert
corner of Israel, Biblical Archeologists
discovered documentation as old as the
Bible which stated unequivocally that
the Moon was made of green cheese,
or that there is a giant, flying shrimp
named Carl constantly orbiting the
Earth and making decisions on behalf
of the people, will we start teaching
that, too? If you want your kids not to
be subjected to evolutionary theory,
send them to a parochial school,
because in America, in public schools,
we should teach science, not religion.
This type of scientific censorship in
the name of Biblical accuracy and
the human unwillingness to believe
that we are related, very closely, to
Chimpanzees, has no place in our
schools. Children receive enough
religious indoctrination away from
the school setting - there is no reason
to bring Creationism into the folds of
public education.
In My Opinion
Rev. Al Sharpton's campaign goes to the birds
(KRT) � No matter how chickens
die, they are going to end up between
his teeth and those of so many people
who listen to Al Sharpton's new civil
rights campaign for the precooked life-
style of chickens - "the gospel bird as
one of my preacher friends designates
this menu staple.
Sharpton has joined with People
for the Ethical Treatment of Animals to
demand that KFC give chickens more
space to live in, no growth hormones
and a drug-aided unconsciousness
before the final slaughter.
One pal of mine, Dawn, fell out of
bed laughing when she heard about Al's
latest crusade. "Stop the bull and order
me a 10-piece said another friend,
John the Baptist.
It seems Sharpton Is casting about
for an identity. He's already tried acting
turns on TV shows like "My Wife and
Kids" and "Boston Legal" and hosted
"Saturday Night Live This from a man
who once took to serious talk shows as
a voice for moral values from a black,
left-of-center perspective.
Poverty, Social Security, the Iraq
war, AIDS in Africa and failing schools
in New York City apparently aren't
challenging enough. The reverend has
taken on chickens - not, mind you,
opposing their place on the dinner
table or in the fast-food takeout con-
tainer, but their treatment before they
get there.
"I'm calling on people to boycott
KFC until they adopt animal welfare
systems recommended by PETA and
until they stop the worst abuses of the
birds says the Rev in a new video and
Internet ad campaign.
He adds: "PETA wants KFC to stop
thinking they know more than God
and to allow birds to grow the way
chickens are meant to grow
He's winning raves among some in
the animal-rights movement.
"Any decent person wants to elimi-
nate any suffering says Dan Mathews,
a spokesman for PETA who met Al at an
MTV party in Miami.
Black political movements such
as the Southern Christian Leadership
Conference and the National Associa-
tion for the Advancement of Colored
People are in flux, and black churches
all around New York are looking for
leadership. But Sharpton is marching
for chickens' rights.
While Al pursues the rubber-
chicken circuit politically and
the baked, smothered and fried chicken
circuit otherwise, let's look at the
real question: Reverend, is this
merely another clever shakedown of
the corporate America that keeps
you fine, fit and fiddling while Rome
burns?
Pirate Rant
I wish more people were nicer
to one another.
Dogs are so trendy right now
- everyone has one. Are people
that insecure?
1 ride a red scooter on campus.
I'm really sorry if I almost hit
you, but don't worry, I'm taking
driver's education this semester.
People who created "Support
Our Troops" stickers should have
a new edition with "Support Our
Corpses
So what is up with all the
flirting if you have a girlfriend?
When did my class become
an open discussion for my pro-
fessor to talk about whatever is
on his mind for an hour and 15
minutes?
My rant is: the only good part
of TEC is the freakin' Pirate Rant
section.
Why do guys think that when
they join a frat, they are suddenly
hotter and are P-I-M-P's? Last
time I checked, you look the same
as before you were in one.
It's really annoying when
your boyfriend and friends
have a lot of money and
they don't understand why
you cant just send your parents
your credit card bill. Some of
us even have to pay for tuition
and, believe it or not, don't
own a four hundred dollar
sweater.
If you know your roommate
wears Uggs and skirts, you don't
have to like it, but don't put an
enlarged version of the Pirate
Rant about how stupid it is to
wear them together up in your
room.
I'm sick of having to kick my
roommate's boyfriend out every
five minutes when I have to take
a shower, nap, change or want
some space. Why does he spend
the night in our room every night
and giggle for five hours when he
has his own room in the same
dorm?
Baseball season is here.
Finally, a sport we're good at.
"Southern gentlemen"
of ECU: If you're dating a girl,
take her on a date (for those of
you who don't know what that
is, pick up a dictionary). Don't
let her buy her own drinks when
you are out at a bar (at least
offer). And don't have it on your
Facebook profile that you are
single. We know you aren't really
Southern gentlemen but humor
us a little.
Why would you spend $350
(or more) on an Apple iPod
now when you could wait six
more months and pay $150.
And how come people are going
so crazy over Apple? They act
like MP3 players are the newest
hot stuff. MP3 players have
been around since 1998, people.
Come on people Apple is dead.
Accept it.
1 hate it when people look
at me like 1 have a second head
when I tell them I'm taking
the stairs. Sorry if I'm not lazy
or don't want to be fat and die
early.
Why is it when someone
asks you your GPA and you
tell them it wasn't so good,
they ask you what it was? It's
none of your freaking business.
If I wanted to tell you, I would
have.
Why do guys think they
have permission to stare at you
at the gym, especially if you are
just in a shirt and shorts? We
know you're going to look, but
put your tongue back in your
mouth and don't make us feel
uncomfortable.
I don't know about every-
one else at this school, but I go
to ECU - not NC State, UNC
or any other university. To quote
an earlier article, "Don't wear
that crap on my campus So
why don't you represent where
you go, not where you couldn't
get in.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editoKa'theeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
c
i
For





10, 2005
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2-10-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
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PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
2-10-05
Monologues
from page A1
in the play are issues women on
the ECU college campus deal
with every day.
The title of the play has
brought alwut some obvious con-
troversy. Why would a writer enti-
tle her play, Vagina Mntialogucs?
Dianne DeGroot, producer of
the Vagina Monologues said there
was a very simple explanation.
"If the play were entitled
Women's Voice's, then who would
care and who would talk about it?
By using the word vagina, people
stop and ask themselves what it
could be about. The word is used
as a physical representation of
abuse and a metaphor for the way
a woman's mind, body and spirit
are abused said DeGroot.
Though some may be turned
off initially by the blunt nature
of the title aid subject matter,
those who leave the play usually
have a similar reaction.
Lynn Tuthill, Greenville
resident who has seen the play
the past two years, was initially
turned off.
"I'm just a sweet country girl
and throughout most of my life,
the word vagina was not in my
vocabulary. The first time I saw
the play it was very interesting. I
laughed and I cried. It touched on
every single emotion, and most
of all, 1 left no longer ashamed of
the word vagina said Tuthill.
Many who have seen the play
have the same first reactions,
which is one of the many reasons
it has gotten such praise over the
past few years.
The program is not solely
geared for women. Many men
would be able to relate to them,
as they are the stories of their
wives, girlfriends, sisters and
mothers. It is a secret view into
the mind of a woman and also
the perfect date for the guy who
truly wants to impress his girl.
Tarama Shusterman,
Greenville resident said she
attended the sessions for the first
time last year and found the pre-
sentation hilarious and moving.
"It's a combination of funny
stories about women and also
horror stories about women in
our world said Shusterman.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
V
Algebra Trigonometry Calculus. They'll Take You Where You Want "lb Go.
Math is Power.
Call 1-800- 97NACME or visit wwvw.matriispowecorg
National Action Council For Minorities In Engineering

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252-977-0120
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429 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE NC 278S8
' 252-758-SK1N
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� Central Heat St Air
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Featuring:
Free Cable TV
Free Water & Sewer
Pets Allowed With Fee
Alrlmba Wireless Available
Sparkling Swimming pool
Professional On-Slte Management m some units
24-hour Emergency
Maintenance
Laundry Center
On ECU Bus Route
WasherDryer Connections
Spacious Floor Plans
Stratford Arms
T S
4800
lle, NC 27858
You drank.
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1900 S. Charl
Free Pregnancy Tests
I Call (irulina Prepaary Onler
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fashiBgtoB location: (252) 946-8040
21 hour hotline: I-S00-395-HELP
So close to
Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium, even we
stand up for the
National Anthem!
Greenville's Best Pizza Since 1991
' - � '��
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STREET
PIZZERIA
GREENVILLE, NC
NASCAR
12 price appetizers
$4 any pitcher
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Students Welcome
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NO
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NEARLY EVERYTHING!
Call or visit us on the web at
www.sandcastleresortv.com





CLASSIF
(?
Page A7
THURSDAY February 10,2005
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the TUESDAY edition
Friday at 4 p.m. for the WEDNESDAY edition
Monday at 4 p.m. for the THURSDAY edition
Ad must be received In person. We are located on
the second floor of the Old Cafeteria Complex
CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Students (wvalid I.DJ-UP to 25 words.
Non-students-UP to 25 words
Each word over 25, add
For bold or all caps, add (per)
All ads must be pre-paid. No refunds given.
.$2
.$4
-5C
.$1
1 y 2, �C 3 BR AptS (Garden, Flats & Townhouses)
Townhouses - Free Heat!
FOR RENT
Tired of walking? Searching
for a parking space? 10
Parking spaces for lease
@ RingCold Towers (right
beside the Recreation Center)
call 252-752-2865 for info.
1, 2, & 3 bedroom
apartments for rent: Beech
Street, Woodcliff, Cotanche
Street, Eastgate, Forest
Acres, Park Village. ECU bus
stop. For more information
call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209
or visit our web-site www.
wainrightproperties.com
3 Bedroom House for rent
one block from ECU. 804
Johnston Street (next to 4th
St.) Everything is new; new
central air, new kitchen, new
appliances, new bathrooms,
new washer dryer, new
dishwasher etc. Super nice.
$950 Call 341-8331.
Gladiolus, jasmine and
Peony Gardens: 1, 2, and
3 bedrooms. Located on
East Tenth Street close to
ECU. For more information
call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209
or visit our web-site www.
wainrightproperties.com
College Town Row
Wyndham Court: 2 bedroom
duplexes for rent. Close
to ECU. Pet allowed with
fee. For more information
call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209
or visit our web-site www.
wainrightproperties.com
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015
1&2 BR apts, dishwasher,
GD, central air & heat,
pool, ECU bus line, 9 or 12
month leases. Pets allowed.
High speed internet
available. Rent includes
water, sewer, St cable.
Now Pre-Leasing: 1, 2,
and 3 bedrooms located
near campus. Beech Street,
ICannon Court, Cedar
Court, College Town Row,
Eastgate, Gladiolus, Jasmine,
Park Village and Woodcliff.
For more information
call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209
or visit our web-site www.
wainrightproperties.com
One, two, three and four
bedroom houses, duplexes,
and apartments. All within
four blocks of campus. Pet
friendly! Reasonable rates,
short leases available. Call
830-9502.
1 & 2 bedroom apartments,
walking distance to
campus, WD conn pets
ok no weight limit, free
water and sewer. Call today
for security deposit special
- 758-1921.
Large 3-4 Bedroom duplex
two blocks from ECU.
113 Rotary Ave. Large
bedrooms and closets, new
central ac, new carpet.
$1000 341-8331
Cannon Court Cedar
Court: 2 bedroom 1.5 bath
townhouses for rent. ECU bus
stop. For more information
call Wainright Property
Management 756-6209
or visit our web-site www.
wainrightproperties.com
1 bedroom apartment in
house for rent one block
from ECU. 750 E. 4th Street.
Renovated inside and really
nice. $300 641-8331.
ROOMMATE WANTED
Roommate wanted A.S.A.P. I
Two minute walk from
campus 4 BR House Elm
Street pet friendly $330 per
month 14 Bills Call 757-
3823 336-456-0595
Sitters needed for much loved
16 mo baby. Light housework.
Requirements: patience,
love, good work ethic and
references. 355-4454.
1 needed for great
apartment on 5th Street
across from Jenkins.
$340month. Half of
utilitiescable. Spacious,
fully furnished, cable
internet, hardwood floors,
2br1bath. Edward: (919)
815-0002.
FOR SALE
ECU Pirates Salute cannon
- 2 were built and the other
is in my cannon collection.
For sale, Best offer. 215-
651-3478.
SERVICES
Spring Break 2005-
Travel with STS.
America's 1 Student
Tour Operator to
Jamaica, Cancun,
Acapulco, Bahamas and
Florida. Now hiring
on-campus reps. Call
for group discounts.
I n f o rmatlon
Reservations 1-800-
648-4849 or www.
ststravel .com.
HELP WANTED
Fun Summer jobs in the
Outer Banks. Steamers
Shellfish To Go is looking
for employees for summer
jobs at the beach. We
need cashiers, cooks, and
expeditors. Housing is
available. Call Linda at
757-576-9655 or by email
shellfishtogo@msn.com
Bartending! $250day
potential. No experience
necessary. Training
provided.(800)965-6520
ext. 202.
Hey Graduates! Hot 103.7
ana Eagle 94 is looking
for account executives
to market advertising in
Greenville and surrounding
areas. Great benefits,
unlimited income. Call Tori
Gray at 252-672-5900 Ext.
203 to set up interview.
Do you need a good job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring
students to contact alumni
and parents for the ECU
Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make
your own schedule. If
interested, visit our website
at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Food Delivery Drivers
wanted for Restaurant
Runners Part time positions
100 to 200 per week. Some
lunch time (11a-2p) M-F
and weekend availability
required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere
in Greenville when not
on a delivery. Reliable
transportation a must. Call
756-5527 between 2-5 only.
Sorry no dorm students and
Greenville Residents only.
Therapist (Full-Time)
Liberty Network of Child
and Family Services Inc. is
seeking licensed therapists
(provisional considered)
to join our dynamic team
(Pitt County). Prefer clinical
experience in providing
therapy in the office,
community, andor home
setting to children and
their families with MH
DDSA diagnosis. Medicaid
documentation experience
a plus. Must have the
ability to relate well to
others, to work in a fast
paced environment and to
function as a part of a team.
Exc. salary & benefits. Send
resume and cover letter to
Staff Recruitment, Liberty
Network 2317-B Executive
Circle Greenville, NC 27834
or fax 252-752-4949.
Greenville Recreation
& Parks Department is
recruiting part-time youth
soccer coaches for the
indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess a
good knowledge of soccer
skills and have the ability
and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young
RINGGQLDTOvVERS
STiipRNT CONDOMINIUMS
Just visiting for the weekend?
Or maybe for a weeK? Come and stay in our Fully
Furnished executive 2 bath, 2 bedroom (4 beds)
livingkitchen condo for just a small fee!
635 Cotanche Street, No. 900
Greenville, NC 27858
(252)752-2865
people ages 3-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are
from 3:30 pm to 9 pm,
Monday-Friday with some
weekend coaching. Flexible
hours according to class
schedules. This program
will run from March 7 to
mid May. Salaries start at
$6.25 per hour. Apply at the
City of Greenville, Human
Resources Department,
201 Martin L. King Jr. Dr
Greenville NC 27834. For
more information, please
contact the Athletic Office
at 329-4550, Monday
through Friday, 10 am
until 7 pm.
GREEK PERSONALS
Who's your Alpha Phi Heart
Throb? Vote for your favorite
Valentine's hunk at the Heart
Throb booth on Feb. 8-Feb.
10 in front of the Wright
Place. All money will be
donated to the Alpha Phi
Foundation, which supports
Cardiac Care!
Valentine's Alert: Sigma
Sigma Sigma will be selling
Valentines at Wright Place
all week from 11-3. We
will deliver them on the
14th for you. Its a great
for sisters, friends, and
couples! Find a Sigma to
send a Valentine!
OTHER
Money For College The
Army is currently offering
sizeable bonuses of up to
$20000. In addition to the
cash bonuses, you may
qualify for up to $70,000
for college through the
Montgomery Gl Bill and
Army College Fund. Or
you could pay back up
to $65,000 of qualifying
student loans through the
Army's Loan Repayment
Program. To find our more,
call 919-756-9695
Spring Break 2005 Only 6
weeks left Lowest Prices
Biggest Parties Earn 2
Free Trips Exclusive with
Sun Splash Tours www.
sunsplashtours.com 1-800-
426-7710
1 Spring Break Vacations!
Cancun, Jamaica, Acapulco,
Bahamas, & Florida. Best
Parties, Best Hotels, Best
Prices! Group Discounts,
Organizers Travel
Free! Space is limited!
Book now and save! 1-
800-234-7007 www.
endlesssummertours.com
Free Up to $100 play
poker online at site www.
partypoker.com play for
real or for play money use
bonus code ecupoker to
activate bonus Good Luck!
SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.carolinaskysports.com

FREE
� of poor maintenance response
� of unretumcd phone calls
� of noisy neighbors
�of crawly criiicrs
�of high utility hills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumpy personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units that were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
Eastgate Village Apts.
3200 F Moseley Dr.
561-RENT or 561-7679
www. pinnaclepro pert y
management .com
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothii
I lanclmailc Silver cwelr &: More.
752-1750
801 Dickinson Avenue
Uptown Greenville
STOREWIDE SALE
SELECTED ITEMS!
in �
R T M E N T S
m-
TV�
�i I
VARIED FLOORPLANS � FULLY EQUIPPED KITCHENS � ON ECU 8 GREENVILLE BUS LINES
WALK-IN CLOSETS � CABLE TV INCLUDED � 3 SWIMMING POOLS � ON-SITE MANAGEMENT
24 HR. EMERGENCY MAINTENANCE � LAUNDRY FACILITIES � DOGS 6 CATS ACCEPTED
"J '�
� r r
252.752.5100
www.eastbrookvillagegreen.com � ebvg(s nowait.n
204 Eastbrook Drive, Greenville, NC. 27SSK
2 Dudes
By Aaron Warner
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6 School dance
10 Untidy person
14 Saint-Nazaire's
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15 Start again from
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16 Latin farewell
17 Jots
18 Tel-Jaffa
19 Yeats'land
20 New York
borough
23 Zenith
26 Sports letters
27 Seine, e.g.
28 Pride signal
29 Xenon or neon
30 Old coot
34 Buttons of
Hollywood
35 Part of GTE
36 Sot's shakes
37 Birthday number
38 Gardner of films
39 Feeling poorly
40 Have a meal
41 A-Team member
42 Tasty tuber
.43 Faux
44 Money player
45 Speller's test
46 Falls as ice
48 Practical joke
49 Stays idle
50 Extinct bird
51 Mine output
52 Ensemble
53 NASA craft
58 First-class
59 Senior golfer
Irwin
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64 Memorization
method
65 Constantly
66 Lubricate again
67 Pub pints
68 Tennis divisions
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9 1967 Michael
Rennie movie
10 Gracefully
slender
11 Tomb raider
Croft
12 Lena or Ken
13 Curve in the
road
21 Frank McCourt's
Pulitzer Prize
winner
22 Takes care of
23 Displays
24 Contemporary
25 " Butterfly"
31 Neighbor of
Zimbabwe
32 White herons
33 Send back to
the labs
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stealth
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54 Car or typing
follower
55 Poker pot
starter
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57 Enticement
61 Portable bed
62 Fabrication
63 Urban railways





PAGEA8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
2-10-05
LoveLines
Congratulations Preston
and Jen! It's about time!
Happy First Valentine's
Day. Keep it safe. Love
ya both!
The Healthy PIRATES
wish everyone a safe
and Happy Valentine's
Day! join us for Sexual
Responsibility Week on
February 15-17 in front
of Wright Place.
Day. Love, Stank
Dee, Just wanted to say
Happy Valentine's Day
and that I love you very
much, your Stinky butt-
Shanna
Kevin my love, Happy
Valentines Day! I love
you, ya know Love
always, Anna
gift, my best friend and
my love. Forever yours,
Shawnie
Happy Valentine's Day
Craig. Every day I look
forward to coming home
�nd seeing you. I love
you so much. Kristen
Dianne, I love you so
much. You will always be
my beautiful Valentine. I
hope you are smiling
ricjht now. Forever yours,
your husband. Matt
Megan and Jessica,
rharti s foi U�in) the !�si
room mat ("Ad friends
anyi Tie ouBpver want.
( harlie's V's keep it
real. Love, Hannah
Armand, You are an
amazing person. I love
you. Thank you for being
my best friend. Happy
Valentine's Day Boo. All
my love, Stephanie.
Mark, With love and
patienceSnothing is
impossible. Happy
Valentine's Day! Love,
Jenny
Justin, Since the day you
came into my life, you
made me realize that we
were born to fly. Thanks
for making me smile!
Harlie
To our jenny; We love
6u and hope you have
a wonderful Valentines
day. We will see you in
a week. Love, Momma
and Norm

Kristen, You ie sweeter
than a thousand cow
tails. Can I be your Sugar
Daddy this Valentine's
Day? Love you forever,
J a key-Poo
Dearest Christa, Since the
day we've met, you've
changed my life forever.
You are my sweetest
Thank you Kristen for
the great days and even
greater nights.
Theresa S. You make me
the happiest guy at ECU
every single day, and
now everyone knows.
I love you with all my
heart! Love, Don S.
Sweetie Petutie, Over
6 years and still going
strong. Here's to love,
friendship and much
more to come. I love you
more all the time.
Gotta luv all my ladies
of the ECU Women's
Rugby Team! BustaBust,
BlingBlou, Boo, MelB,
Ambeu, Aluv, Nikki, CatP,
Casey, B&P, .Aladdin's,
Jasmin, Jacql, Bev, and
Olin of course Thanks
for an Already GREAT
and successful season
LUV, your gump.
Greta, You are "MJ
amazing and beautiful.
Happy Valentine's Day
Love, Dan
To the ladies of MIDG
30103022 you make
going to class worth
while. Now bring us
some CANDY to class
Love the guys of MIDG
30103022
This is only the beginning.
Mi amor. I love you very
much. Happy Artificial
Holiday. Love, Pete
frfse your sieDttoe sfcitog
Tony, Happy Valentine's
Dayl I am glad that this
is the third one I get to
spend with you! Love
always, Loren
Gordon's Golf & Ski
Ron, Happy Valentine's
Day to my love! I wish
I could do more but you
Bw what's up! I love
Sul Happy Valentine's
207 E. Arlington Blvd.
756-1003
We're Makinf Love
Our Theme of the Day! Ole!
Valentines Day! Monday, Feb. 14th
FIESTA FAJITAS for DOS! $18.99
Shrimp, Chicken, & beef cooked with onions and
bell peppers sizlin' on a HOT skillet!
MMMMM! You're gonna love it! Served with warm
tortillas, homemade guacamole. pico dc gallo, beans
AND a Homemade Fried Ice Cream to share!
Gulp of Mexico! $6.95
Our Famous 46oz. Lime Margarita big enough
to share! Made W ith our Special Love Potion,
TEQUILA!
Ueside Pitt Community College
43MMS
AND Downtown Greenville
757-1666
Wishing you a $
Happy Valentine's Day
4 Mtec
Just in time for Valentine's Day
30 off of all Jones and Mitchell8
and Champion�apparel
for women
and 25
off all
ECU
gifts.
Slop Dowdy, $tudvt�St(jW offiaatfy
foettstdEastGu-o&kamerciuuUsi! ��l�l Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wright Building � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
252.328.6731 � 1.877.499.TEXT
Valentine's sale and specials valid Feb. 7-14, 2005. Discounted "3lfts" includes all ECU logo imprinted merchandise,
not including apparel, except as listed. Prior purchases excluded. No other discounts apply.
Store Hours
Monday-Thursday: 7:30a.m. to7:00p.m.
Friday:7:30 am to 5:00 p.m.
Saturday:11:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Know Yourself. Love Yourself. Protect Yourself.
Sexual Responsibility Week
February 14-18
Join the ECU Healthy PIRATES to
celebrate Sexual Responsibility Week
with the following activities:
Tuesday, February 15
10:30am�1:30pm, Wright Plaza
Contraception and Abstinence Education
Wednesday, February 16
10:30am�1:30pm, Wright Plaza
STD Fear Factor and Wheel of Health
Thursday, February 17
10:30am�1:30pm, Wright Plaza
"Be a Smartie How to Have a Healthy Relationship
Thursday, February 17
"Family Feud Special Edition: Battle of the Sexes"
You may even be a contestant!
7:00pm, Science and Technology Building, Room C309
The first 150 people in the door can receive a "Safer Sex Kit"
Brought to you by:
The ECU Healthy PIRATES and liveliness Education
For more information about these events, call 328-6794
ndrviduals requesting accommodation under the Americans vtth Disabilities Act (ADA) should contact Ine Department
for Disability Suoport Services at least 48 hours prior to the event al 1252)328-67 8-0899 FTY






2-10-05
y
c

iwdy
zs
torsi
u.edu
idise,
Living
Page B1 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY February 10, 2005
Local concerts
Suburban Idiot - The musical will
be held at the House of Blues in
Myrtle Beach, SC Feb. 11 at 7 p.m.
This show is free with the doors
opening at 6 p.m.
Hoobastank will be playing at the
House of Blues in Myrtle Beach,
SC Feb 16 at 8 p.m. Door opens
at 7 p.m. and tickets range from
$1750-19.50.
Rascal Flatts featuring Blake
Shelton will be at the Colonial
Center in Columbia, SC Saturday,
Feb. 19. The show starts at 8
p.m.
Jimmy Buffet will be at the
Charlotte Coliseum Wednesday,
Feb. 23.
Universoul Circus will be
performing at the Alltel Pavilion
in Raleigh, Tuesday, March 8 -13
at 7:30 p.m.
Elvis Costello and The Imposters
will be at the Grady Cole Center
in Charlotte March 8.
The Eagles will be performing at
the RBC Center in Raleigh March
11 at 8 p.m.
Reba McEntire and Brad Paisley
will be In Raleigh Sunday, April
17. The location has yet to be
announced.
An! DIFranco will be at the Carolina
Theatre in Greensboro April 23.
Kenny Chesney will be at the
Colonial Center in Columbia, SC
Saturday, April 30.
Recipes
Loaded Oatmeal Cookies
12 cup (1 stick) butter, softened
12 cup vegetable shortening
1 12 cups packed light brown
sugar
2 eggs
12 cup buttermilk
1 34 cups all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon baking soda
12 teaspoon salt
1 teaspoon baking powder
1 teaspoon ground ginger
1 teaspoon freshly ground
nutmeg
1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
14 teaspoon ground cloves
12 teaspoon ground allspice
2 12 cups quick-cooking
oatmeal
1 cup raisins
1 12 cups chopped walnuts
1 teaspoon pure vanilla extract
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Grease one or more cookie
sheets. Using an electric mixer,
cream together butter, shortening
and sugar in a bowl until fluffy.
Add eggs and beat until mixture
Is light In color. Add buttermilk. Sift
together flour, baking soda, salt,
baking powder, ginger, nutmeg,
cinnamon, cloves and allspice
- stir Into creamed mixture. Fold
In oatmeal, raisins, walnuts and
vanilla, blending well. Drop by
rounded teaspoons onto cookie
sheet. Bake for 12 -15 minutes.
Parmlglano and Herb Chicken
Tenders
Olive oil, for frying
1 12 pounds chicken breast
tenders
Salt and pepper
1 cup all-purpose flour
2 large eggs, beaten with 14
cup water
Breading:
2 cups Italian bread crumbs
1 cup shredded Parmesan
6 sprigs or stems fresh thyme
leaves, stripped and chopped, 2
to 3 tablespoons jl
6 sprigs fresh rosemary leaves,
finely chopped, 3 tablespoons
2 handfuls chopped flat-leaf �
parsley leaves
4 cloves game, finely chopped
1 teaspoon crushed red pepper
Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.
Place a nonstick cookie sheet
in oven with a tin foil liper. Heat
12-lneh oil In a large nonstick
sktdet or frying pan over medium
to medium high heat. Place flour
in a shallow dish. Beat eggs with
water in a second dish along side
the flour. In a third dish, combine
the breading ingredients. Coat
chicken in flour, then egg, then
bread and cheese mixture. Cook
chicken until deeply golden on
each side, 3 - 4 minutes. Transfer
to cookie sheet In preheated
oven and finish off for another
5 minutes cooking time. Cook
chicken 5 - 6 tenders at a time In
a single layer, adding additional
oil if necessary.
Recipes from foodtv.com.
Vfettoe's. D&y
Trying to find true
love in cyberspace
This couple can share their love simply by holding hands when walking from class to class.
MEREDITH STEWART
STAFF WRITER M
Valentine's Day is right
around the corner. Picking that
perfect gift and planning the
special night Is a very difficult
task. You don't want to give the
expected or tf you have been with
someone for a while, you don't
want to give the same gift. Girls
think about doing something a
little different this year - give
a guy a rose. Cologne, clothes
and candy,are all things that
seem to betfbutine. Instead, how
about a homemade card stuffed
with "love coupons" followed
by a special candle light dinner
cooked by you.
"Last Valentine's Day my
girlfriend made me dinner and
then we got in the hot tub that
was surrounded by candles said
Jon Hudson, sophomore.
Does your guy like to have
"guys night?" If so, then a poker
set would be an ideal gift. Most
guys have DVDs and video games
on their minds. So instead of
fussing about how much time he
spends staring at the television
screen playing his favorite games,
just suck it up and buy him the
new "Grand Theft Auto "Need
for Speed 2" or "Mercenary they
are probably on your guy's list.
Try making a gift basket
filled with things like his favorite
candy, a framed photo of the two
of you, a stuffed animal and any
other small things you know he
likes. Doing this really shows you
put time, thought and effort Into
his gift and any decent guy will
appreciate that.
"This year my boyfriend is
going to be really surprised when
he sees his car and realizes that I
had a new stereo system that he's
been wanting installed said an
anonymous junior who would
prefer not to disclose her name in
case her boyfriend is reading.
For all those clueless girls out
there, these suggestions should
help spark a few ideas, but what
about all of those clueless guys
out there?
Not allguys are clueless - some
are genuinely sweet and thought-
ful. Although it may seem very
habitual, roses are essential for a
girl on Valentine's Day. And guys,
if you think cards are insignifi-
cant and you usually don't give
one, well Valentine's Day should
definitely be an exception, even a
little note inside wouldn't be too
much to ask.
"Last Valentine's Day my
boyfriend bought a card and cut
out a picture of us and taped it in
see VALENTINE page B2
Internet provides
alternative dating
KATHERINE DAY
STAFF WRITER
With more than 60S mil-
lion users having access to the
Internet, many of us rely on it
for our daily routine. Whether
it's for work, renting movies or
buying groceries, the Internet has
helped in simplifying many of
our hassles. One hassle is finding
a relationship.
There are millions of single
men and women living in the
United States. After getting tired
of the bar scene and having to
deal with all the 'creeps' out
there, a quick and easy solution
is the Internet. Like everything
else, the Internet provides a con-
venient way to meet people.
Web sitesuch as match.com
and AOL's love.com profile mil-
lions of people. The chance of
finding someone that is slightly
Interesting is favorable. Meet-
ing the man or woman of your
dreams can be done at the click of
a mouse. The Internet can provide
those of us with a hectic schedule
or busy workload to meet new
and interesting people.
The Web sites usually have
a small fee for contacting mem-
bers, but anyone can set up a
profile, which includes a pic-
ture for free. The likelihood of
being contacted by other people
from the same town or region is
improved if a picture is attached.
Information included In the
profile includes the interests and
what the member is looking for
in a significant other.
People sign up looking for
all sorts of things. Whether
it's a long-term relationship or
just a new friend, the online
community can provide many
interesting prospects for someone
looking for a change.
Online dating can be excit-
ing, but like meeting any stranger,
it can be dangerous at the
same time.
Freshman Clay Williams,
business major, shares some of the
problems faced with online dating.
"It's difficult to interact with
people online. You can't see facial
expressions or hear inflictions in
their voice. You're just talking to
a computer. There's no way to
know who's on the other end
said Williams.
A profile that's too good to
be true, such as: "Physicist and
part-time model looking for
someone to take long walks on
the beach with may very well
be completely fabricated.
Many people look down at
online dating. There's always
something to hide behind and
can be considered a last effort
for anyone desperate enough
for someone to talk to or start a
relationship with.
Josh Meinel, freshman
finance major, finds there are
better things to do online than
talking to strangers.
"1 have no will to try online
dating. There's no excitement.
1 would rather spend my time
online doing something produc-
tive said Meinel.
Even after several online
conversations with someone, it's
always best to be wary of who
you meet. Giving out a phone
number or address to a stranger
is a very bad idea. Match.com
offers advice for keeping online
dating safe.
"Start slow, guard your ano-
Dating at piratesingles.com
nymity, exercise caution and
common sense, request a photo,
chat on the phone, meet when
you are ready, meet in a safe
place, take extra caution outside
your area and get yourself out
of a jam
With Valentine's Day
approaching, many of these sites
offer promotions and deals for
those looking to spend the day
with someone special. Match,
com always displays married
couples that met on their site.
The statement match.com
issues is a promise to their cus-
tomers. "Match.com members
form a diverse, global com-
munity of singles who share
common goals - to find great
dates, make new friends, form
romantic relationships or find life
partners the Web site said.
"Whether young or old, gay
or straight, from a big city or a
small town or from anywhere
around the world, singles come
to match.com to flirt, mingle,
have fun and make meaningful
connections
While there are many differ-
ent positions on online dating,
the truth is that many people
have found someone worth
spending their lives with on the
Internet. Whether it's for fun or
it's a serious quest to find some-
one for a long-term relationship,
the Internet does provide some
amazing possibilities for anyone
looking to have a good time. The
idea that someone could meet a
stranger through the computer
is becoming more and more
common and less frowned upon
as millions look toward online
dating for someone to be with.
This writer can be contacted at
features9theeastcarolinian.com.
Valentine's, not just
a hallmark holiday
History makes
day lovelier
LAURA KEEUNG
SENIOR WRITER
J.
Throughout the average year,
there are many "holidays" cele-
brated that add billions of dollars
to any greeting card company's
wallet. If there was ever one
of these "hallmark holidays
Valentine's has to be one of them.
The flowers, cards, chocolate
covered desserts and balloons
are all symbols of love, yet cost
much more than they are worth.
This leaves one wondering, is this
really a holiday?
. It turns out that Valentine's
Day is actually a historical holi-
day. For all you singles, this might
be something you don't want to
hear, yet the legends are pretty
interesting. Valentine's Day has
elements of Christian and Roman
tradition. According to thehisto-
rychannel.com, St. Valentine was
a priest in third century Rome.
At this time, war was a part of
everyday life. Emperor Claudius
II outlawed young men to marry
because he believed they would
be better soldiers if they did not
have wives r children. When St.
Valentine heard of this, he per-
formed secret marriage ceremo-
nies for young couples regardless
of the consequences he might
face. When Claudius discov-
ered St. Valentine's betrayal, he
ordered him to be put to death.
Another legend implies that
St. Valentine was imprisoned
because he helped free Christians
from Roman prisons. At these
prisons, people were beaten and
tortured. Freeing slaves would
have had the ultimate punish-
ment, death.
The last legend adds an ele-
ment of the Valentine's Day card
history It is said that after St. Val-
entine was imprisoned, he fell in
love with the jailor's daughter. He
would send her letters and sign
them, "from your Varentine
According to ameficancatho-
lic.org, "The roots of St. Val-
entine's Day He in the ancient
Roman festival of Lupercalia,
which was celebrated Feb. IS. For
800 years the Romans had dedi-
cated this day to the god Luper-
cus. On Lupercalia, a young man
would draw the name of a young
woman in a lottery and would
then keep the woman as a sexual
companion for the year
Each of these myths occur
around the same period of time
and suggest that St. Valentine
died around the year 270 A.D.
The month and day are what
have many confused. The Roman
myth Implies that February Is the
month of purification, therefore,
celebrates love as purity. In Eng-
land and France, it Is believed
that Feb. 14 is the day that birds
begin mating for spring, making
it the most romantic day of the
year. It is believed by many others
see HALLMARK page B2
this group of friends knows you don't need a significant other to have fun Feb. 14.
Flying solo on Valentine's Day
Tips for the single
Valentine
TOMEKA STEELE
SENIOR WRITER
There is love in the air. Every-
where you turn you see budding
couples holding hands. On the
bus you overhear those tender
words "I love you" at the end of
someone's conversation. In the
hallway you get a full frontal
show of a serious make out ses-
sion. Then you see all the red
hearts, bears and candy in the
student store and it dawns on
you, Valentine's Day is drawing
near and you are single.
It can be a rather depressing
feeling knowing you don't have
a Valentine but it doesn't mean
that's the end. There are plenty
of things for the single person to
do on Valentine's Day other than
staying home alone.
First, if you're single, chances
are you have friends who are
single as well. One can plan a
fun day out or in with single
friends. Going as a group to a
movie or out to eat will keep
everyone occupied from think-
ing about being alone. You will
have a great time because you're
with friends.
"If you don't have a date, go
out with friends. Last year, all my
friends and I went out to eat at
Outback Steakhouse. We laughed
all night and had a really good
time said Adanna Igboko, junior
nursing major.
Enjoying Valentine's Day
with friends is a wonderful idea
and if all your friends are busy,
there's always family. Spending
Valentine's Day with family is
the same as spending it with a
significant other.
Being around family rein-
forces those feelings of uncondi-
tional love. Your family not only
loves you on Valentine's Day but
all year round. Sometimes it's
hard to spend time with family
and this holiday is the perfect
day to do it.
Another choice for the single
person on Valentine's Day is to
make it a day to pamper yourself.
Women can go to the spa for the
day and get their hair and nails
see SOLO page 82





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
2-10-05
Valentine
from page B1
Solo
from page B1
the card along with a long note
said Jennifer Lee, freshman.
Most females feel that it Is
all about the thought and heart
that goes into a gift. Like getting
her a purse that she was dying
to get at the mall. Of course she
would be happy to get the purse,
but the fact that you remember
2nd actually got the right one
says a lot.
Kate Spade and Lacoste per-
fumes are really popular these
days and are becoming more dif-
ficult to find but make great gifts,
followed by a romantic dinner.
Be sure she likes the smell first.
Girls are generally picky about
what they spray on their bodies
and no two girls are the same. Try
asking a trustworthy best friend
for gift hints for that special lady
in your life.
Any Valentine's Day would be
a success if you got your girlfriend
a trip to the day spa. Or better yet,
creating your own spa - giving
your own massages could be an
interesting and fun idea.
Good luck withtyour Valen-
tine's Day shopping. Hopefully
everyone will get to spend it
with the one they love. And for
those of you who have class or
an exam Monday night, remind
your professor they should be at
home with their loved ones.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
These love birds clearly know that everyday should be full of love, not just Valentine's Day.
done. If you're going to be single
it won't hurt to look good. It can
only stroke your ego and make
you feel better about yourself.
The single man can have a
pamper day as well. Go get your
hair cut and buy a fresh pair of
shoes. Shopping tends to take
the mind off things, especially
for women, but don't overdo
it. Don't spend all your money
shopping frivolously to com-
pensate for not having a date on
Valentine's Day.
"For Valentine's Day I'm
going to see my boyfriend in
Richmond but I think a good idea
for single girls is to have the clas-
sic sleepover. They are always fun
and women love to talk so it will
keep the single person's mind
off being single said Shadayna
Taylor, senior history education
major.
If you don't want to be single
on Valentine's Day, grab some
courage and ask someone out
you've been eyeing. If you are
single there is a great prob-
ability that you've been scoping
someone out. Ask that person to
be your Valentine.
This could be a scary thing
to do but the rewards are greater
than the drawbacks. The worst
someone can say is "no" and
before hand prepare yourself
for that possibility. Make sure to
have something fun and not too
intimate planned just in case they
agree to be your Valentine. Who
knows, you could find love.
One important thing the
single person should remem-
ber is Valentine's Day is just a
commercial holiday. Love is
something that should be shared
and showed everyday, not just
one day of the year.
It's not healthy to sit around
dwelling on the fact that no one
will give you roses or candy on
Valentine's Day. It's best not
to be surrounded by couples
either. One of the perks of being
single is that you don't have to
worry about buying any gifts
or racking your brain about the
perfect gift. Spend your money
on yourself. Like the saying goes,
you can't love anyone until you
love yourself. One should never
define themselves based on their
relationship status.
"On this Valentine's Day I
will be doing homework and
going to class. The celebration
of love is an everyday event.
Never should something so
beautiful be constricted for glori-
fication within one day. It is truly
impossible to properly express
love in one day. It is a delicate
task worth taking your time
on said Julio Ramirez,
freshman English education
major.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Scents control hormones of both men, women
(KRT) � Men, you are going
to thank me for this column.
Women, too. Because in the
course of researching the latest
perfume trends, as any serious
journalist must, it was learned,
from a bona fide scientific insti-
tute the three smells that most
turn women off.
Cherries. Barbecued meat.
And cologne.
"All acted to inhibit female
sexual arousal reports Dr. Alan
Hirsch, director of the Smell and
Taste Treatment and Research
Foundation in Chicago.
Thank you, thank you, thank
you, Dr. Hirsch. For, while the
number of men rubbing them-
selves with cherries andor spare
ribs is not large (although if you
ride the subways, you know
they're out there), the number
of misguided men still slap-
ping themselves with cologne is
legion. Now at last they know: It
is time to stanch the stench.
Why do these three particular
scents make women turn up their
noses, lovewise? Hirsch's theories
are not what you'd call ultra-
deep, but then again, he seems
to be the only guy studying this,
so we'll stick with him.
Perhaps, he posits, the smell
of cherries reminds women of the
medicine they took as children.
Yuck. Perhaps charred meat reminds
them of cooking. Yuck. And per-
haps, he says, "Cologne reminds
them of going out with men
You mean a smell that
reminds a woman that she's
going out with one of them
again, you know, a man, is
enough to doom a date? Well,
says Hirsch, who has also spent
real-life, grown-up, paid-for time
discovering that the scent of
certain candies arouses women:
"My advice for men is to get rid
of the cologne and buy a box of
Good & Plenty
Now, it takes a man who
innately intuits the sex-junk
food connection to even think of
exploring the marital happiness-
garlic bread connection. And
that's exactly what Hirsch did. In
a study recently conducted by his
institute (and it's not that I didn't
interview real perfume compa-
nies about trends. I did. But you'd
get sidetracked too, if you learned
that), Hirsch's researchers visited
50 Chicago families, bringing
them a free pasta dinner, twice.
One time the dinner included
garlic bread, one time it didn't.
The researchers then sat there,
stomachs rumbling, observing
the family's interactions.
Conclusion? The garlic bread
factor cannot be overstated. In its
presence, researchers recorded
8 percent more positive family
interactions and 22 percent fewer
negative ones.
Now whether this was because
the scent of the bread made every-
one happy, or that eating it satis-
fied some basic instinct, like, say,
hunger, or simply that the smell
of garlic finally overwhelmed the
smell of dad's cologne, causing
mom to crawl across the table,
Sophia Loren-like, growling with
lust well you know.
I'm sure the invaluable Smell
and Taste Foundation will let us
know soon.
ARE YOU
AN
NOT IF YOU
HAVEN'T TOLD
YOUR FAMILY.
www.shareyouriife.org
1-800-355-SHARE
Sid CoaMcn or Ogn 4 Tim Donation
that Feb. 14 was the day of St.
Valentine's death.
In 498 A.D Pope Gelasius
declared Feb. 14 St. Valentine's
Day. This was 200 years after his
untimely death.
In Great Britain, Valentine's
Day began celebration around
the 17th century. During the mid-
18th century, people exchanged
love letters on Valentines Day,
as opposed to cards. It wasn't
until postage rates dropped and
printing improved that cards
became popular at the end of
the century.
America began celebrating
Valentine's Day during the 1700s
with the exchange of cards. The
first person to mass produce
Valentine's was a woman named
Esther A. Howland. She was often
referred to as the "Mother of
Valentine's
Through the years, Ameri-
cans have become more and more
elaborate with gifts, cards and
flowers on Valentine's Day. Some
don't even know why they cel-
ebrate the day, they just do. Just
remember that it all began with
a good man, fighting for what he
believed in. The power of his love
was so strong that he did not care
about his fate. Valentine's Day
can now be remembered for love
and heroism, instead of just cards
and candy.
For more information on
Valentine's Day history, please
visit thehlstorychannel.com.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Ernst
BILLIARDS & SPORTS BAR
Billiards, Sports Bar, & Dance Club
Located in the Rivergate Shopping Center behind Walgreens
Available for private parties
Sunday
Dollar Night
$1.00 Domestics
$2.00 Hi-balls
$2.00 Cold Shots
Monday
$1.75 Miller Light
$6.00 Pitchers
Tuesday
COLLEGE NIGHT
$4.00 Pitchers
$1.75 Miller Light
$2.00 Imports
$2.00 Pool wcollege ID
Karaoke at 10:00
Wednesday
Live Music with
Travis Proctor at 10:00
$2.00 Premiums
$1.73 Miller Light
Thursday
Ladies Night
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DJ AT 10:00
Friday &
Saturday
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DJ at 10:00
LADIES FREE! LRDIES FREE! LRDIES FREE!





2-10-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
PAGE B3
Chocolate, food of the cocoa gods
Rewarding taste
buds everywhere
JOANNA WALDHOUR
STAFF WRITER
Theobroma cacao - what is
that? It's Latin for "food of the
gods" and the official name of
the cacao tree - the origin of the
seemingly irresistible chocolate.
Chocolate itself has had a
long and special history with
humans, dating back into the
past for more than 2,000 years.
With the cacao tree that
grows in Central and South
America near the equator, it is no
surprise that, in those countries,
the ancient civilizations of the
Mayans and the Aztecs referred
chocolate as "food of the gods
The cocoa bean was so valu-
able to the Mayans they had
cocoa pods carved into the walls
of the stone temples. They were
also used as a form of currency.
It's said that 10 cocoa beans could
pay for a rabbit - SO beans could
pay for a mule.
The Aztecs also drank a
chocolate beverage and called
it "xocoatl xoco means better,
and atl means water. They drank
it during sacred ceremonies and
allowed their sacrificial victims to
have a last drink of xocoatl before
their death. Montezuma II, Aztec's
royal monarch, liked xocoatl so
much he had great storehouses
filled with cocoa beans. It is said
he drank 50 or more portions of
xocoatl daily.
With the inventions of the
steamed engine and later, the
cocoa press, it became easier for
cocoa production, which caused
a decrease in the price of cocoa
beans. No longer was the choco-
late drink only available to the
wealthy or royalty, it was enjoyed
by all.
During the 19th century, an
English company created the first
solid eating chocolate.
More chocolate was being
consumed, but nowhere else in
the world did the production of
chocolate proceed faster than
it did in the United States. In
America, the pilgrims sent sweets
and sugarplums to their loved
ones. These gifts had high value
because it was rare to have sugar
during that time. The first choco-
late factory opened in 1765.
After the sugar became more
available to the people during the
1800s, the sweet exchanges con-
tinued and were being enjoyed.
Sweet candy in red and white
color started to become popular
with red representing the passion
of love and white representing
purity. By 1900, those red and
white heart shaped boxes filled
with chocolate began to appear
in chocolate stores.
During World War II choco-
late was recognized as an impor-
tant source of nourishment to the
U.S. Allied Armed Forces and is
used today as part of the meals
for the U.S. Army to give them
energy to carry on.
Today, according to research
studies, chocolate is America's
favorite flavor of dessert and sweet
snack. The Chocolate Manufac-
turer's Association reported that
a total of 57 percent of women
preferred chocolate, while a total
of 46 percent of men preferred
chocolate as their favorite flavor.
Sixty-five percent of Americans
prefer milk chocolate, while only
27 percent of Americans prefer
dark chocolate.
"The reason that chocolate is
so popular is because it's simply
one of the most delicious foods
that a person can eat. It has a
special taste that melts in your
mouth and there is nothing really
quite like it said Susan Smith,
a spokesperson for the National
Confectioners Association in an
Internet interview.
"Valentine's Day is the big-
gest one-day sale for chocolates
said Pat Green, owner of the
Chocolate Tree of Beaufort, SC
and first vice president of Retail
Confectioners International.
"Our most popular piece is
the tiger paw, also called turtles
or pollywags - a chewy caramel
with pecans and covered in
chocolate Green said.
"Many men and women
spend a lot of money for
Valentine's Day, most particu-
larly the single men spend the
most some of the married men
actually bring back the heart
shaped boxes year after year and
say 'refill it for me But the single
biggest sale is the biggest, fanciest
box filled with chocolates that
a person buys so that hopefully
their sweethearts will share it
with them Green said.
"Because so many people
consume chocolate - about 14
pounds on average annually,
per person in the United States
- we try coming up with new
chocolates of different flavorings,
creams and nuts. To test the vari-
ety of tastes, we hold an annual
kAll You Can Eat Night at the
Chocolate Tree. We sell advanced
tickets and people come in to eat
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Apartments 4 Rental Houses
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THE BRODY SCHOOL of MEDICINE at EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
anything and everything they
want during a two-hour time
frame.
"I normally will cook a
peanut brittle or butter brunch
while they watch and let them
eat it while it's still warm. We
test our products and watch
for their reaction. That is how
we found out what our white
chocolate covered popcorn, ice
cream truffle and our chocolate
almond caramel would be. It's a
fun night Green said.
Research studies have been
finding pOlyphenol antioxidants
in cocoa powder and chocolate,
which are also found in fruits
and vegetables. They may have
the potential to reduce the risk
of developing heart disease and
certain cancers and may improve
cholesterol.
"There is a lot of research that
needs to be done, but it is true
that chocolate is very high in
antioxidants. They can be found
in varying levels of cocoa prod-
ucts and chocolate. It may have
some healthful benefits. With
moderation, it fits into any health
diet and lifestyle Smith said.
Cocoa powder is the highest
with antioxidants and then dark
chocolate comes second.
"Tropik Sun sells mostly
gourmet chocolates, such as tur-
tles, fudge and a variety of choco-
late covered nuts and raisins
said Reanna Riggs, employer at
Tropik Sun, located at Colonial
Mall.
"Valentine's Day brings an
increase in sales, and our most
popular chocolate piece is the
turtle, enjoyed by both men and
women
Chocolate has come a long
way, first as a bitter drink
from the gods to the first solid
chocolate, then finally to its
evolved taste and texture of
today. No matter if people prefer
the soft velvety, rich chocolate
truffles, french chocolate or tiger
paws - one thing is clear - choco-
late has always had a strong and
large following and has satisfied
many people with its tempting
and tantalizing taste throughout
the whole world.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Chocolate is a favorite food of not only humans but puppies.
Join our team!
The East Carolinian is now Accepting Applications for
Advertising Representatives
Positions available for Summer and Fall
Are you interested in Sales
and Marketing?
Do you enjoy meeting new people?
Looking for a great addition to your
resume?
If you answered yes to these questions
then we want to talk to you.
Apply In our office on the second
floor of the Student Publications
Building (above the Cashier's Office)
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
VALENTINES DAY
Valentine's day gift ideas at Pirate Market,
Croatan, Spot & Wright Place
Use your Pirate Bucks
ml and save 7
Long-stemmed roses, candy, chocolates,
balloons, vases, stuffed bears, picture frames,
gift packs and more
Gifts for guys and girls
and save 7
L T)
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HOO Red Banks Road � Greenville � 252-756-1245





k (j
&
Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TUNY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY February 10, 2005
Sports Briefs
Smith named defensive
backs coach
Rick Smith has been named
defensive backs coach at ECU
according to an announcement
from head football coach Skip
Hottz Tuesday. Smith's hiring will
officially complete the Pirates'
initial staff for the newfy-appointed
Holtz, who was named to the top
football position at ECU Dec. 3,
2004. In all, Smith has six years
of experience as a defensive
coordinator at the NCAA Division
l-A level and 24 years as a
collegiate coach, all coming on
the defensive side of the ball. In the
process,e played integral roles
In five bowl game appearances.
Smith joins defensive line
assistant head coach Donnle
Thompson, offensive coordinator
line coach Steve Shankweiler,
quarterbacks coach Phil Petty,
running backs coach Junior
Smith, defensive coordinator
Greg Hudson, linebackers coach
Rock Roggeman, wide receivers
coach Donnle Kirkpatrick, tight
endsspecial teams coach Greg
McMahon and director of football
operation Clifford Snow on the
Pirates' staff.
Titans hire USC
coordinator
Southern California assistant
Norm Chow was hired as offensive
coordinator of the Tennessee
Titans on Wednesday after helping
the Trojans win two consecutive
national championships. He was
to be introduced at a morning
news conference, Titans
spokesman Robbie Bohren told
The Associated Press. Chow
replaces Mike Helmerdlnger,
who was hired as the New York
Jets' offensive coordinator last
month. This is his first job in pro
football after 32 seasons at BYU,
NC State and USC. Tennessee
coach Jeff Fisher, a USC alumnus,
also interviewed assistant head
coach George Henshaw and
quarterbacks coach Cralg
Johnsort from his own staff.
Chow, 58, joined USC In 2001
and was the team's offensive
coordinator, tutoring Helsman
Trophy winners Carson Palmer
and Matt Lelnart. At BYU, Chow
worked with quarterbacks such
as Heisman Trophy winner Ty
Detmer, NFL star Steve Young and
Chicago Bears QB Jim McMahon
- a former teammate of Fisher's.
Sports Trivia
1.) What well-known NFL
quarterback played In the Jim
Carrey movie, "Ace Ventura: Pet
Detective"?
2.) On March 2, 1962, Wilt
Chamberlain scored 100 points
against the New York Knicks.
What was the final score of the
game?
3.) Who said this: 'I'm going
to cancel my prescription Is
response to negative comments
written about him In a local
newspaper?
4.) Cal Ripken played in how many
consecutive games?
5.) Why is this number - .367
- significant in major league
baseball history?
ANSWERS
ID former afcami Dolphmi quarterback and
current CBS Sporta commentator Dan Marino
appeared in Vie 1994 movie 121 Philadelphia
Wanton 1fJS-Nev rort KMcka M 131 Former
Boeun Ned St� pitcher Sod Stanley 141 2632
rrom 1962 � 1998 151 it n me mam leeguea
mgneel career betting average. Ty Coco from
190510 192a
'Cozz due for breakout year
Mark Minicozzi could
have big season for ECU
BRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
Mark Minicozzi is the type
of guy you're privileged to know.
Always wearing a smile and a
gjove, Cozz never complains on
the field and is always giving 100
percent of himself to the game
of baseball.
A selfless person, with every
reason not to be, the Pirate third
baseman plays the game set on
achieving one goal, getting to
Omaha. Individual accolades,
nope, not worried about them.
Draft status, yeah, it can wait.
The College World Series won't
wait, and for the time being, this
is the only focus.
But even amidst all the talk of
college baseball supremacy, Cozz
remembers who first recruited
him to ECU.
"Coach LeClair is a huge
inspiration to me said Mini-
cozzi.
"He coached me when I first
got here and he's just a great
man
LeClair, whom is battling
everyday with Lou Gehrig's dis-
ease, made the statement when
he left the program because of
health problems that "We will
get to Omaha That statement
still rings loudly in the head of
Minicozzi.
"I would sacrifice anything
to get to Omaha for him Mini-
cozzi said.
"It would be the best thing in
the world
The Pirates were so close
a season ago, losing the Super
Regional Series to the eventual
College World Series runner-up
South Carolina in Columbia.
"That leaves a bitter taste
in my mouth, but that was last
year Cozz said.
"The goal this year is to get
to Omaha, so we're going try and
bring them to our place this year
and beat them here
The preseason pollsters seem
to indicate that ECU baseball
is In a rebuilding year, and the
mention of Omaha to them may
even bring about a chuckle or
two. The Pirates aren't ranked in
any preseason top 30, and just
one year after a SI win season, it
looks as if ECU is going to have
to prove itself once again.
"I think we always keep the
polls in the back of our minds
Minicozzi said.
"It's just a little extra to play
for this year since they don't
think we're any good.
"I think pitching wise, we
pretty miiu 11 have everyone back
from last year, and hitting wise,
we have a lot of new faces, but we
have a lot of power throughout
the line-up.
"I think we'll be solid. We'll
be fine
While Cozz won't do much
for the Pirates' pitching, he can
see BASEBALL page B5 Minicozzi batted .342 with 10 home runs and 50 RBI last year for the Pirates.
ECU to take on Marquette
The ECU women kicked off the season with a sweep of Campbell.
Lady Pirates start
season swinging
Softball team hopes to
repeat last year's success
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
It is a shame that only a few
knew of the success of ECU's soft-
ball team last season. Overshad-
owed by the triumphs of the ECU
baseball team, the Lady Pirates
posted their best ever record
since joining Conference USA,
47-24-1. The team also managed
to make their way to the C-USA
tournament for the second time,
defeating Southern Miss, once,
before being eliminated by a
strong USF and DePaul squads.
After losing four starting
seniors last year, the Lady Pirates
should be able to remain strong this
season. With four returning seniors
and six juniors, the Lady Pirates
have experience on their side.
"We are leaning toward our
seniors this year said Head
Coach Tracey Kee.
"They are going to have to
step up and become leaders
The first chance to test the
Lady Pirates came last weekend
as ECU opened their season in a
double-header with in-state rival
Campbell. Game one was a pitch-
er's duel as ECU sophomore pitcher
Kt'li Harrell struck out an impres-
sive IS batters. The game stayed
tied at zero until the 10th Inning
when freshman outfielder Beth
Nolan drove In the first RBI of the
season, giving ECU a 1-0 victory.
In game two, the Lady Pirates
came out swinging, scoring five
runs in the first two innings. ECU
senior shortstop Leigh Savoy
capped the game off with the
Lady Pirates' first home run of
the season, a solo blast In the
bottom of the sixth. Campbell
never recovered from being down
and ECU rolled on, completing
the sweep with a 6-1 victory.
Harrell, who pitched in game
one against Campbell, will be
the bread and butter for the Lady
Pirates this year. Last year as a
freshman Harrell struck out a
total of 161 batters and finished
with a 2.61 ERA. Winning 16
games last year with only seven
losses, Harrell will be expected
to make the biggest impact once
again this year.
Last year one of the biggest
stories of the ECU Softball team
came from then junior Kate
Manuse. Manuse broke C-USA
and ECU's school record for
doubles, knocking in 26. She also
placed second on the team in bat-
ting, averaging a .360 and was one
of two ECU players to be named
to the all conference team. This
year as a senior, Manuse should
continue to improve both on
offense and defense as she takes
over first base this year.
Overall, the Lady Pirates will
only get better this year with a
strong three pitcher rotation and
eight returning players to bring a
sense of leadership to the team.
"Our main goal is to make it to
the C-USA tournament Kee said.
"We have to keep on remind-
ing ourselves that It is far away
and we have to realize that it is a
marathon not a sprint.
"But our entire goal is to be in
Tampa at the end of this season
ECU's next test will take
place this weekend as the team
heads to Atlanta to participate
in the Georgia State Invitational.
The Lady Pirates will take on
teams such as Tennessee Tech,
Charleston Southern and Georgia
State.
"Anytime when you go on the
road it's tough, Kee said.
I feel that we have quality
competition. The teams have a
strong Softball tradition and we
haven't played these teams in a
couple of years
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Tommy Hammonds has started to warm up for the Pirates in the last four C-USA games.
Pirates looking to win
third straight at home
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
The ECU men's basketball
team has a rare break in action
this week as they prepare for
Marquette's arrival to Minges
Coliseum Saturday at 7 p.m.
The Golden Eagles traveled to
TCU last night but the score was
not available before press time.
After starting the season 11-1,
Marquette has found a bit of a dry
spell lately, going just .500 over
there last 10 games including
an uncharacteristic 4-5 confer-
ence record. With their recent
struggles, the last place the
Golden Eagles may want to see is
Textbook
Students
(AP) � Barry Lawing remem-
bers the first time his dad took
him to a Wake Forest game,
nearly four decades ago. He's
been hooked on Atlantic Coast
Conference basketball since.
Now a history instructor at
Forsyth Technical Community
College, Lawing has found a way
to bring that passion to academia.
For the second straight winter,
he is teaching a class on the
league's highest-profile sport, a
veritable ACC History 101 featur-
ing everything from old game
footage to guest lecturers, some
better known for scoring than
speechmaking.
Minges Coliseum, where in both
trips they failed to come away
with the expected victory.
for the Pirates to send Marquette
away empty-handed once again,
they will have to focus most of their
attention to a stellar perimeter game
from Travis Diener and Steve Novak.
Diener leads Conference USA in
points (20.0) and assists per game
(6.8) and was recently named to the
mid-season Naismith Trophy award
watch list, compiled of the nation's
30 best players. Novak is averaging
12.9 a game and has hit 55 three-
pointers on the season.
ECU should not have trouble
controlling the boards as well as
play on the inside.
The Pirates are C-USA's second
best rebounding squad lead by
Corey Rouse with 10.1 rebounds
a game. Rouse leads the confer-
ence in both the offensive and
defensive rebounding categories.
Moussa Badiane is also C-USA's
second leading shot blocker on
the season behind Jason Maxiell
of Cincinnati.
ECU had a couple of pretty
good road outings last week at
Memphis and TCU, but were not
able to bring home a win heading
into Saturday's showdown with
Marquette.
The key for the Pirate victory
truly lies within the paint area
and ECU will need to exploit the
Golden Eagles inside in order to be
efficient offensively and pick up
their third straight win at home
over Marquette and third straight at
home for 2004-2005 campaign.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
college basketball:
learn ABCs of ACC
In a state obsessed with ACC
basketball and for a teacher who
claims to have attended about
400 league games the mere exis-
tence of such a class is as sweet as
a J.J. Redick jump shot.
"It's almost like it's a part of
your childhood that you never
lose Lawing said. "You grow up
with this intense rooting inter-
est as a child, and you follow it
through to adulthood. And it's
a way you kind of connect with
your childhood
"It's a part of your whole life,
and you never really outgrow it
he added. "And to some extent,
you don't want to outgrow it
because you can always be a kid
when you go to a basketball game
and scream
For Lawing, who has taught at
Forsyth Tech for about 20 years,
the course offers a break from
his Western civilization classes.
This eight-week class is strictly for
fun and doesn't have an official
title. And unlike Jim Harrickjrs
infamous class at Georgia a few
years ago, where students were
asked on the final exam how
many points a 3-point shot is
worth, this is a noncredit course
designed as a community service
program.
see ACC page 85





2-10-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
Baseball
from page B4
ACC
from page B4
do plenty to help ECU offen-
sively. Last season Minicozzi
batted .342 with 10 home runs
and 50 RBI. He would have been
amongst the leaders on any
other team in the conference a
year ago, but on a team that set
numerous school and conference
records, Cozz's numbers were just
a pittance of the overall total.
That will change this season, as
Minicozzi has a legitimate reason
to lead the team in every major
offensive category. But it's going
to take more than just one guy
to saddle the load, and Cozz has
an outlook on the offense.
"JakeSmith, Mike Grace, Billy
Richardson and Drew Costanzo
are all going have big years
Minicozzi said.
Throw in Adam Witter, who
swings the bat like Paul Bunyan
swung an ax, the speedy Brian
Cavanaugh, contact hitter Brett
Lindgren, a couple of impact
newcomers in Harrison Eldridge
and junior college transfer Jay
Mattox, and this team offen-
sively, doesn't look too bad.
If anyone knows baseball,
it's the guys who either were
drafted or were seniors on last
year's squad, and according to
Minicozzi, they believe this team
is very good.
"They're real excited about
this team Cozz said.
"I'm best friends with all the
guys and I pretty much see them
everyday. I even live with John
Poppert, and all of them can't
wait to come out and support us
They won't have to wait
much longer as the Pirates hit
the road this weekend for a series
against nationally ranked Col-
lege of Charleston. First pitch is
scheduled for 5 p.mFriday, and
begins what could be for Mark
Minicozzi, one of the greatest
seasons anyone has ever had in
a Pirate uniform.
This writer can be contacted at
iports@theeastcarolinian.com.
The 23 enrolled students
need attend only six of the eight
classes "or be a Wake Forest fan
Lawing says to earn a satisfac-
tory grade.
Lawing gives a midterm and
final, though each takes only
about 20 minutes and the teacher
reads the answers aloud after the
tests are finished. The students
grade themselves, and high
scorers can win a prize.
The syllabus resembles that
of any college class, breaking
down each week's topic and
guest speakers. But in few courses
do students crowd the visitors
after a two-hour class to seek
autographs and photos.
For the first class, the focus
was University of North Caro-
lina basketball, and the speaker
was former Tar Heels coach Bill
Guthridge.
The second class focused
on NC State and Duke, and
the guests were a trio of former
all-ACC performers: Duke's Mike
Lewis - NC State's Vann Williford
- and 7-foot-4 Tommy Burleson,
who led the Wolfpack to the 1974
NCAA championship.
The rest of the lesson plan
betrays Lawing's hometown
bias. The last six classes focus
primarily on Wake Forest, the
subject of Lawing's 2000 book
"Demon Deacon Hoops though
the schedule also calls for him to
cover national titles won since
1982 by North Carolina, NC
State, Duke and Maryland.
While the course concen-
trates almost entirely on the "Big
Four" North Carolina-based ACC
schools, Lawing is prepared to
cover more if the class attracts
backers of other conference
schools. Last year, that meant
touching on Georgia Tecb 'or
one student.
"It's easy to focus on the 'Big
Four knowing almost all of the
fans will be from here Lawing
said.
It's not clear if college courses
highlighting other leagues are
offered elsewhere around the
country. But ACC commissioner
John Swofford, though not
officially sanctioning Lawing's
course, likes the subject matter.
"The sport of basketball in
the Atlantic Coast Conference
has a remarkable history, and
we are excited to know that
opportunities are offered for the
passionate fan that follows this
league he said.
During the recent class
on NC State and Duke, Lewis,
Williford and Burleson sat at
a table facing the students,
occasionally talking among
themselves and pointing at the
large screen in the auditorium
while watching highlights from
their era.
When a student walked in
late wearing a North Carolina
hat and jacket, Lewis grinned
and cracked, "The Tar Heel guy
is late
Lewis, who played for the Blue
Devils from 1966-68, recalled
a recruiting trip when Duke
All-American Jeff Mullins got
him a date for a party that night.
He also talked about match-
ing up against UCLA's Kareem
Abdul-Jabbar, then Lew Alcin-
dor: "I didn't really play against
him - I was just out there in his
way
Burleson told of being cussed
out by Kentucky coach Adolph
Rupp when the North Carolina
prep star said he wanted to play
in the ACC. He also demon-
strated his hook shot for the
class, posting up the S-foot-8
Lawing.
"Only people who were
born here and raised here can
completely understand the
hysteria that goes on during
basketball season said 18-year-
old Annie Weir, who went to
class in a Duke shirt.
"It's just a way of life to sup-
port basketball in ACC coun-
try
301 S. Jarvli
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PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINA -NEWS
2-10-05
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Now leasing for Spring and Fall 2005


Title
The East Carolinian, February 10, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 10, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1794
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
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