The East Carolinian, February 9, 2005






8, 2005
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www.theeastcarolinian.com
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 80 Number 52
WEDNESDAY February 9, 200
What Is your stance
on abortion?
Abortion issues under debate,
may return to Supreme Court
ERICA QUICK
SECOND YEAR
MEDICAL STUDENT
"I'm Pro-choice, I know
there are a lot of different cir-
cumstances and it's hard to tell
them that they have to have
the child in situations of rape
or incest. It's up to the woman
to decide
AARON STEELE
JUNIOR
ART MAJOR
"With my religion I'm
against it but I can't make a
decision for someone else's
body
A Pro-Choice demonstrator marches in
Washington with thousands of protestors
JENNIFER FORTENBERRY
SENIOR
PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR
"I think it depends on the
situation and that woman's
beliefs and views
Roe vs. Wade put
under scrutiny
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Thirty-two years after the
infamous Supreme Court ruling,
the right to choose whether or
not to have an abortion versus
the right to life has found its way
back into the judicial system.
The Christian Medical Asso-
ciation, the largest faith-based
association of physicians, filed a
brief with the U.S. District Court in
New York, Jan. 31 hoping to reverse
a ruling that lifted the federal ban
on partial-birth abortion.
Dr. Dan Stevens, executive
director of the Christian Medical
Association and medical doctor
in family practice, said they
had not heard anything from
the courts yet, but they expect a
decision soon.
The Partial-birth Abortion
Ban Act was instituted in 2003,
but in August, the court decided
it was unconstitutional and lifted
the ban.
Stevens said surveys show
90 percent of Americans are
opposed to partial-birth abor-
tion. However, the courts are
filled with what he calls 'Judicial
Activists' who feel they can set
the law no matter what the public
opinion may be.
Partial-birth abortion is a pro-
cedure done during the second
or third trimester of pregnancy.
During the process, the doctor
grabs the legs with forceps and
pulls it down until delivered up
to its head. Then he exposes the
back of the head, pierces the skull
and extracts the brain.
Stevens said in the past, this
procedure has been done with
tlie misc-oni:eption that the fetus
could not understand the feel-
ing.
"There's been a lot of denial
that the infant feels pain said
Stevens.
"They actually feel it two to
three times more intensely
Stevens said recent studies
show at this stage, the infant has
developed the sense of pain, but
has not yet developed the mecha-
nisms that blunt the sensation of
extreme pain.
Cheryl Dudasik-Wiggs, with
ECU Women's Studies, said she
cannot speak for everyone in the
Women's Studies program, but
she thinks Roe vs. Wade is being
chiseled away in the courts and
may be overturned by the current
administration.
"In fact, President Bush is
stacking the lower federal courts
with anti-choice judges and with
the tenuous rieatfn and age of se -
eral of the justices, he may have a
Pro-Life activists hold
during a Pro-Choice
chance to overturn the decision
and control our personal health
care issues for many decades
said Dudasik-Wiggs.
Ted Miller, with NARAL Pro
Choice America, also said the
administration's goal is to ban
abortion.
"It is clear that the Bush
administration wants to turn
over Roe v. Wade said Miller.
He said the situation with
the Supreme Court makes the
upcoming years important to
watch because Bush has a chance
to appoint Pro-Life judges.
To put this into perspective,
Miller said the last time there was
a seat open in the Supreme Court,
current college freshmen were
in the third grade. Bush could
appoint up to three justices.
Blake Dameron, an ECU stu-
dent who is involved with Victory
Campus Ministries, said banning
abortion would be a good thing.
up signs admist demonstrators
rally in Washington.
"I definitely believe in the
sanctity of human life said
Dameron.
Dudasik-Wiggs said outlaw-
ing abortion would not alleviate
the problem. It would just make
the situation worse. She said
many students do not remember
the fatal consequences when
abortion was illegal.
"It is a right they have taken
for granted even if they do not
actively support it Dudasik-
Wiggs said.
"But there was a time, when
their mothers were young, that
access to legal, safe abortions
did not exist in our country.
Does that mean no one got an
abortion? No. It meant women
desperate to end their pregnan-
cies were forced - literally - into
back alleys or into the offices of
unskilled mercenaries
see ABORTION page A3
ECU to address
retention rates
Additional efforts
being taken
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
ECU loses an approximate
22 - 24 percent of students after
their first year. Numerous ECU
faculty, staff, administrators
and student leaders are working
together to help improve reten-
tion rates.
Don Joyner, assistant vice
chancellor for academic services,
organized and addressed the
ECU community with plans to
use new approaches to make
improvements.
Jim Smith, interim vice chan-
cellor of academic affairs, feels
retention should be a top priority
at ECU and supports Joyner in
his efforts.
"We should strive to do better
and we are said Smith.
He said Joyner's new
approaches have been well
received and should have a posi-
tive impact on the issue.
Joyner's new approach in
addressing this issue uses five
benchmarks including the level
of academic challenge, active and
collaborative learning, student-
faculty interaction, enriching
educational experience and sup-
portive campus environment.
The National Survey of Student
Engagement determined these
benchmarks as the five key fac-
tors necessary to have a strong
Impact on student retention.
Joyner said while ECU does
considerably well in retention
rates when compared to sister
schools, he feels more could be
done to address the issue.
"The tragedy is not being
able to save a student when there
would have been something we
could have done to help them
said Joyner.
He said he is currently in
the process of forming a steer-
ing committee which would
take the list of initiatives and
find a way to strategically plan
which initiatives ECU is ready to
undertake. The committee would
then invite people to serve on
a subcommittee, which would
focus on a particular initiative.
People from all across the vari-
ous programs at ECU are working
toward this issue, which Joyner
feels is essential.
"You would have to have a
collaborative approach to any of
these initiatives Joyner said.
Freshmen, transfer students
and distance education students
are the three main groups of first
year students, who are identified
as the most at risk populations
when it comes to retention. Each
of these groups must be treated
differently when trying to make
improvements with this issue
toward them.
Joyner said he feels It is
important for ECU to remain a
larger school but have a "small
school feel Various aspects of
the students need to be consid-
ered when configuring the best
measures that could be taken to
address the issue. Reports have
yielded 46.2 percent of ECU stu-
dents come from a town smaller
than ECU's population and may
feel intimidated during their first
year. Joyner said ECU must also
understand there is a develop-
ment process in the 17 - 22 year
old age group and ECU needs to
be aware of those developmental
stages to help ensure the stu-
dents' needs are met.
The Center for Counseling
and Student Development is in
the process of partnering with
the Office of Academic Affairs to
help address this issue. Joyner is
working with Alfred Smith, assis-
tant vice chancellor for Student
Development, in formulating the
partnership.
Alfred Smith said a major proj-
ect the Office of Student Develop-
ment is doing is putting various
classes in place to assist students
who are in need of academic help.
Specific aspects the programs will
concentrate on were taken from
see RATES page A2
City planners discuss
future of downtown
LEE
The Black Widow'
challenges Greenville
Michael Glenn discussed with community the opportunity to
buy spaces in the old Blount Harvey building.
Residents get chance
to compete against
pool champion
NICK HENNE
NEWS EDITOR
ECU students and Greenville
residents visited Tie Breakers
sports bar Tuesday night to see
pool champion Jeanette Lee, also
known as "The Black Widow
The night's events consisted
of trick shot sessions, and people
had the chance to play Lee one
on one.
While Lee was there for the
fun just like anyone else, she
took the competition serious as
always.
"If you challenge me, I'm
going to have to do my business,
but on the side from that we
can have drinks and have a nice
time said Lee.
Before the night's events
occurred, Lee said she looked for-
ward to challenging the various
Greenville residents, including
Bill Herrion, ECU men's bas-
ketball coach, who was said to
attend the event.
"Coach Herrion, I heard you
wanted to challenge "The Black
Widow well I say step into my
web Lee said.
Lee said although she has
not seen much of Greenville, she
enjoyed her visit.
"It's beautiful here and obvi-
ously there are a lot of people
who love billiards, so I'm really
excited because I'like to share my
passion Lee said.
She said her time for com-
petition was in the upcoming
WPBA tournament, the Carolina
Milliard's classic, where she is
scheduled to competing against
other female pool champions.
She said she looks at each
tournament as her opportunity
to shine and it is not only some-
thing she works hard for but it is
something she loves to do.
Lee said she received the
name "The Black Widow" from
"some idiots" in a pool room
see BLACK WIDOW page A2
Various funding
allocated to serve cause
CHRIS MUNIER
STAFF WRITER
Members of Uptown
Greenville met at Via Cappuc-
cino Tuesday night to discuss
recent renovations and announce
upcoming events.
Uptown Greenville is cur-
rently in the midst of many
renovations to businesses and
is expected to receive $352,000
in grant money this year from
the state of North Carolina. A
number of businesses on Evans,
Dickinson and Cotanche Streets
are in the process of revitaliza-
tion and more assistance is on
the way.
Eric S. Clark, vice president of
First Citizens Bank, said as far as
renovations were concerned, the
city is receiving a decent return
on dollars spent for the projects.
Greenville is applying for
the CLG Grant that would help
restore historical locations in the
Dickinson area.
Austin Bunch, vice chairman
of governmental affairs for the
Greenville board of directors,
said the uptown area would
continue a two-year celebration
leading up to ECU's centennial.
On Tuesday, March 29, there
will be a Victory Bell Com-
memorative Service on Tenth
Street. Bunch said there is
talks about having the Victory
Bell moved back to campus.
Uptown Greenville will
launch a new logo within the next
few months according to Debbie
Vargas, promotion and market-
ing chair for Uptown Greenville.
) Several fundraising events are
being planned for the Uptown
Greenville area within upcom-
ing weeks. A five-kilometer run
called Fiesta Biathlon is in plan-
ning and will be a bicyclerun-
ning event that will begin and
end at Chico's Restaurant. Vargas
said there is an art walk being
slated for April 15.
All these events are expected
to draw large turnouts from the
Greenville community as well as
people from out of town. These
projections are based on success
they have had with activities in
the past.a
Members at the meeting were
pleased to hear about the repairs
and beautification that had been
done to locations including Rio
Grande and Cafe Carribe.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
INSIDE I News:A2 I Comics: A10 I Opinion: A4 I A & E: A5 I Sports: A7





Page A2 news@theeastcarolinlan.com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY February 9, 2005
Campus News News Briefs
Spaghetti Dinner
Five Brody medical students
are holding a spaghetti dinner
Feb. 9 at 7 p.m in 2 West 40
Brody School of Medicine to
raise money for an upcoming trip
to work in Kenyan clinics. The
event is open to the public and
costs $5 'or students and $7 for
non-students. The students will
serve spaghetti with marinara or
meat sauce, bread and dessert
buffet-style.
Comedy at Pirate
Underground
SWASH and The Late Night Players
will perform improvisational
comedy Feb. 9 at 8 pm This event
is free and sponsored by Student
Union Popular Entertainment and
Spectrum Committees.
Learn About Career
Fairs
Jim McAtee from Student
Professional Development will
be presenting "How do CFAC
Students Make the Most out of
Career Fairs' Feb. 9 from 2 - 3 p.m.
and 4 - 5 p.m. in 201 Joyner East.
The presentation will address
topics such as networking,
power greetings and career fair
preparation.
Black History Month
Speaker
A public lecture will be held in
honor of Black History Month at
the Willis Building Auditorium
Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. The event Is
sponsored by ECU'S GeoClub,
Department of Geology and
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center.
The featured speaker is Jonathan
Tilove, a race and immigration
reporter with the Newhouse News
Service and a two-time National
Headliner Award winner and
author of the 2003 Random House
book Along Martin Luther King:
Travels on Black America's Main
Streets. For more information, call
Derek Alderman at 328-4013.
Massage Clinic
The ECU physical therapy
students are holding a message
clinic Feb. 10 from 5 - 9 p.m. in
the Belk Allied Health Building.
Come get a massage for only
$5 for 10 minutes, $10 for 20
minutes and $15 for 30 minutes.
No appointments are necessary,
but if you would like to make one,
contact cmf0625@mail.ecu.edu.
HOSA Meeting
Health Occupations Students
of America will hold an interest
meeting Thursday, Feb. 10 In
221 Mendenhall at 4 p.m. HOSA
is open to all health related
majors.
NAACP Founders Week
This week is NAACP Founders
Week. Various nightly activities
include ethnic food tasting, open-
mic social, 'Legacies Nearly
Forgotten" and volunteering with
local service agencies.
The Vagina
Monologues
The annual production of Eve
Enslers The Vagina Monologues
will be Feb. 11 - 12 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This year, the
ECU V-DayVagina Monologues
event is being co-sponsored by
the women's studies department,
the student organization V.O.I.C.E.
and the Student Involvement
Team. Tickets are $8 in advance
for students, $10 for students
at the door, $12 for the general
public In advance and $15 for the
general public at the door. You
can purchase tickets by calling
1-800-ECU-ARTS or online at
ecuarts.com. The proceeds will
benefit local charities that help
abused women.
Contra Dance
The ECU Folk and Country
Dancers are sponsoring a contra
dance Saturday, Feb. 12 at the
Willis Building. A potluck supper
will begin at 6 p.m a concert
starts at 7 p.m, beginners lesson
at 7:30 p.m. and the contra dance
from 8 -10:30 p.m. Live, old-time
and Celtic music by a string band
will be performed. The cost is $3
for students, $5 for members and
$8 for the general public. Call
752-7350 for details.
Local
Duke freshmen use
IPods for classes and tunes
DURHAM, NC - Duke University
freshmen are using their school-
issued iPods to learn Spanish
vocabulary, recording lectures,
analyzing music and - no surprise
here - for downloading their favorite
tunes.
Among those is Pelen Powelson, who
said she's mostly used her iPod to
record more than 1,000 songs, which
take up about one-fifth of the iPod's
20-gigabyte capacity.
"I have almost no use for CDs
anymore she said.
About 1,650 freshmen were given
the iPods in August at cost of about
$500,000 to the school. The devices
are theirs to keep as long as they
hang onto them through the end of
the school year.
As an accessory to the iPods, Duke
handed out microphone recording
modules made and donated by the
Belkin Corp. The program is costing
the university about $500,000 for the
devices and additional equipment
and support staff time.
Duke is evaluating the pilot project
and a report is due next month. By
late March or early April, the university
will decide whether to continue the
program in some form with a new
crop of freshmen next year, said
Lynne O'Brien, director of the Duke
Center for Instructional Technology,
which is overseeing the experiment.
Autopsy confirms NCSU
student's death from lldocalne
RALEIGH, NC - The medicaf
examiner's autopsy report confirms
that a NC State University student
died of a lidocaine overdose after
applying a prescription-strength
anesthetic gel to her legs before laser
hair removal treatments at a spa.
The autopsy, which was completed
Friday, describes Shiri Berg, 22, as
otherwise healthy and well-nourished.
It says the anesthetic gel she applied
from her feet to her waist likely led
to her seizures, cardiac arrest and
brain death
That gel included 10 percent lidocaine
and 10 percent tetracaine in a solution
prepared by Triangle Compounding
Pharmacy of Cary. She died Jan. 5 at
Rex Healthcare.
David Kirby, a lawyer for the Berg
family, said the autopsy report brings
his investigation into Berg's death to
near conclusion.
This was a very healthy woman with
no pre-existing health problems
Kirby said. "She applies a preparation
for a routine procedure, and the
preparation caused her death
The autopsy also confirms that after
applying the gel, Berg wrapped her
legs in cellophane.
A passing motorist found her in
her car having seizures and called
paramedics on the morning of Dec.
28. She died nine days later.
National
University of Colorado
professor's case stands out
BOULDER, Colo. - Nothing has
incited more passion and outrage at
the University of Colorado than Ward
Churchill, an ethnic studies professor
whose comparison of World Trade
Center victims to a notorious Nazi
has led to death threats, arrests and
condemnations by two governors.
Talk-show hosts and lawmakers have
vilified him as a hate-monger and the
school is considering firing him.
Churchill has refused to apologize; on
the contrary, he has threatened to sue
the school if it fires him. No one has
defended Churchill's statements, but
some people have threatened him.
Two students were arrested at a
Board of Regents meeting last week
and swastikas were spray-painted on
Churchill's pickup truck.
On Monday, Colorado administrators
announced they had canceled a
speech by Churchill for Tuesday
because of security concerns.
Earlier this month, Hamilton College
in upstate New York canceled a
speech by Churchill because of death
threats against the professor and its
administrators.
"We feel that this Is an extreme
violation of our free speech rights
said Mo Wells, a membef of the
Colorado student group that organized
Churchill's speech. The group planned
to file a lawsuit Tuesday challenging
the cancellation.
Jury convicts former
priest In clergy sex abuse case
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - For three days,
jurors in the trial of Paul Shanley
listened carefully to tense exchanges
between the accuser and the former
priest's lawyer.
At times, the accuser sobbed on
the stand and begged the judge
not to force him to testify in graphic
detail how Shanley pulled him out of
Sunday morning catechism classes
beginning at age 6 and molested
him in the bathroom, the rectory, the
confessional and the pews.
On Monday, Shanley was convicted
of repeatedly raping and fondling
the accuser at his Roman Catholic
church during the 1980s. He Is
perhaps the most notorious figure
in the sex scandal that rocked the
Boston Archdiocese nearly three
years ago.
The accuser, now 27, put his head
down and sobbed as the verdicts
were read after a trial that hinged
on the reliability of what the man
claimed were recovered memories
of decades-old abuse.
Shanley, 74, showed no emotion as
he stood next to his lawyer, Frank
Mondano. Ball was revoked and
Shanley was immediately led to jail.
"It appears that the absence of a case
is not an impediment to securing a
conviction Mondano said, vowing
to appeal.
Greenway expansion project making
progress, receives federal funding
Extra funds intended
to fuel project growth
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
SENIOR WRITER
The Friends of Greenville Gre-
enways has been formed to help
speed up the City of Greenville's
federally funded greenway project
and provide extra cash to further
benefit the project.
Greenville was given a $1.5
million grant from the federal
government to expand on the
city's current greenway system.
The system currently runs from
Green Springs Park on Fifth Street
to the area around Dowdy Fick-
len Stadium, allowing citizens a
jogging or walking path through
scenic areas.
The expansion will add 2.S
miles to the greenway that will
run from Town Commons to the
intersection of 264 and Tenth
Street, allowing users to meet up
with the current greenway loca-
tion at Green Springs Park via
Beech Street.
FROGGS intends to raise
funds to ensure the new gre-
enway can be completed with
additional items that may not
be possible to purchase working
with a $1.5 million budget.
"The $1.5 million might fund
the bare asphalt trail but you're
going to need benches and light-
ing, maybe emergency call sta-
tions for joggers said Jill Twark,
chair of FROGGS.
"You want safety to be a
( priority
Another benefit FROGGS hopes
to bestow on the project through
fundraising is a further extension
of the greenway, cutting through
the wetlands area between Charles
Street and Evans Street.
This project requires board-
walks and bridges to form an envi-
ronmentally safe path through
the wetlands, carrying an esti-
mated price tag of $600,000.
But FROGGS feels it will provide
residents of Greenville with a
beautiful and scenic path that is
worth the high cost.
The group was incorporated
in September and is currently in
the final stages of receiving non-
profit status, which will allow
them to solicit money by making
donations tax-deductible.
The City of Greenville's cur-
rent greenway expansion is part
of a much larger plan by the city
to expand its greenway system.
Twark said In 2003 Greenville
contracted Greenways Inc a
company that plots out green-
ways in cities across the country,
who then created a master plan
to develop 120 miles of greenway
in the next 23 years.
Money raised by FROGGS
will go toward helping speed up
this proposed expansion.
Twark said the formation of
FROGGS came through a sug-
gestion of forming a non-profit
group to supplement funding for
the project by Jason Pauling, city
engineer.
The two met while working
on the Greenway Subcommittee
of City Council, which meets
once everv two months to discuss
the greenway expansion.
The idea of using non-profit
organizations to speed up the
funding of greenway projects
has been utilized in other cities,
including Raleigh and Durham.
"You don't have to worry
about the government finding
the money over time, we can
fundraise more quickly than they
can Twark said.
FROGGS is currently putting
together a Web site and promo-
tional video through student
volunteers at ECU to help raise
awareness and funds for their
cause.
Twark said the group would
use the Web site to ease the pro-
cess of soliciting funds and the
video to provide information to
community groups.
Nikki Jenkins, senior musical
theatre major, said expansion of
the greenways is a good idea.
"It would be a good place
for families and joggers said
Jenkins.
"There are so many restau-
rants and businesses popping up
it would be nice to balance
that out
Guillame Bagal, sophomore
biology and chemistry double
major, said as a member of the
cross-country and track teams,
he likes the idea of a large stretch
of greenways.
"They're beneficial for the
students, the rec center is there,
but many people don't go because
it's so crowded said Bagal.
Thii writer can be contacted at
news@theeas tcarolinian. com.
Crime Scene
Jan. 31
6 pm
Larceny from buildings
An unknown subject stole a pair
of socks and seat pants from the
Cotton Hall laundry room.
Feb. 1
9:30 a.m.
Larceny from buildings
By unknown subject taking a parking
pass from an office in Jenkins Art
Feb. 3
2:45 p.m
Larceny from motor vehicle
By unknown person taking hangtag
from vehicle without permission.
Feb. 5
11:35 am
Larceny of bicycle
By someone cutting the cable lock
that secured the bike to the rack.
Feb. 6
6 a.m.
Larceny
By unknown subject taking Items
out of victim's purse, which was in
her dorm room In Belk Hall. Among
the Items stolen were her room keys
and birth control pills.
f) Weekly Crime Tip
Larceny is the number one crime
on campus.
Make sure you always secure your
vehicle and double-check before
you leave. If you own a rag-top
vehicle, use a parking sticker
Instead of a hangtag.
Treat your residence hall like you
would your permanent home.
Always keep your doors locked
even if you will only be away for
a few moments. Also be aware of
who you let In to your residence
hall. Larcenies come from both the
students around you and guests.
Always lock your doors when
leaving your office. A larceny only
takes seconds to occur.
Victoria Blier said she and fellow
jurors were swayed by the accuser,
believing the man would not have
come forward if he weren't telling
the truth. He received a $500,000
settlement with the archdiocese
nearly a year ago.
International
Israeli, Palestinian leaders
announce cease-fire at summit
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - Israeli
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and
Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas
declared Tuesday that their people
would stop all military or violent
activity, pledging to break the four-
year cycle of bloodshed and get
peace talks back on track.
With the flags of their countries
whipping in the wind, Sharon and
Abbas met face-to-face at a Mideast
summit Tuesday. Afterward, Abbas
said: "We have agreed on halting all
violent actions against Palestinians
and Israelis wherever they are
Sharon made a similar pledge.
Today, in my meeting with chairman
Abbas, we agreed that all Palestinians
will stop all acts of violence against all
Israelis everywhere, and, at the same
time, Israel will cease all Its military
activity against all Palestinians
everywhere he said.
Abbas said it was time for the
Palestinian people to regain their
freedom.
"A new opportunity for peace is
born today in the city of peace. Let's
pledge to protect it Abbas said,
referring to the nickname of Sharm
el-Sheik earned through past peace
summits.
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak,
who summoned the two leaders and
has been a key mediator throughout
the process, said both sides showed
a serious desire to "work together
truly and sincerely
"The challenges today are large
and deep, but the mission Is not
impossible. If the road Is long, we
today took the first step Mubarak
said.
The Palestinian and Israeli peoples
equally deserve a secure life for the
coming generations to enjoy, based
on justice, international principles and
good neighboriiness the Egyptian
president added in a speech he said
he was delivering on behalf of himself
and Jordan's King Abdullah II.
Japan moves closer to
lifting ban on U.S. beef Imports
TOKYO - Japan moved a step closer
to partially lifting a ban on U.S. beef
imports after a government panel on
Tuesday accepted U.S. assurances
that a specific grade of U.S. beef
would be free of mad cow disease.
The panel's decision, if accepted by
the government, will clear the way for
Japan to begin importing U.S. grade
A40 beef, which comes primarily from
cattle aged 12 to 17 months.
Panel member Akihiro Okitani, a
professor at the Nippon Veterinary
and Animal Science University, told
reporters that there was a high
probability that meat of this grade was
free of mad cow disease.
Japan imposed a ban on U.S. beef
imports in December 2003 after
the United States discovered its
first case of the fatal brain-wasting
illness, known formally as bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE,
in a Washington state Holstein cow.
Okitani praised information that U.S.
researchers provided the panel to
help it make its decision.
The U.S. researchers came up with
highly reliable data Okitani said. He
added it was now up to the Japanese
government to decide whether to lift
the ban on beef imports.
Before the ban, Japan was the most
lucrative overseas market for U.S. beef
producers, buying $1.7 billion worth
of beef in 2003.
RateS from page A1
a survey of students who were on
academic probation.
A broad range of ideas to
improve retention was brought
up and is under consideration.
Some ideas that received inter-
est from the meeting atten-
dants included having a required
summer reading program for
freshmen, improving faculty and
student communication, creat-
ing a centralized tutoring center
in Mendenhall, bringing high
school students to campus and
creating a first year experience
Web site. These are some of the
initiatives the steering committee
will use to most appropriately
address the issue.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
ft Retention Rates
Freshmen to sophomore year
retention rates for fall 2002 freshmen
throughout the UNC system.
76.6 - ECU
83 - Appalachain
90.1-NC State
77.8 - UNC Ashevllle
95.3 - UNC Chapel Hill
75.7 - UNC Charlotte
75.5 - UNC Greensboro
67.2 - UNC Pembrook
85.6 - UNC Wilmington
69.1 - Western Carolina
University
76.7 - Winston - Salem State
74.9 - Elizabeth City State
73.4 - Fayettevllle State
73 - NC A&T
78.2 - NC Central
BlaCk WidOW from page 7
who used to make fun of her
because she would dress in black.
She said when the pool room
owner would talk about how she
appeared sweet and cute when
she first walked into the pool
hall, she would afterward defeat
them.
She said she began playing
pool when she turned 18 and
became pro at age 21 before
she was ranked number one in
the world at age 23. She feels it
is her natural competitiveness
that drives her to keep playing.
She has undergone eight major
surgeries in her time, and she
said she finds pool a good way
to be physically active and com-
petitive.
In the future, Lee wants to
strive to ultimately be the best
player she can be and no ranking
can determine how much she
can accomplish. She would also
like to know she did more than
just win.
"I'd like to know that I
changed the sport, I'd like to
know that 1 elevated the level of
the game, its reputation, I'd like
to know that I brought new eyes
to the sport, that I brought more
education to the kids Lee said.
Lee said the biggest difference
between champions and every-
one else is that champions keep
getting up and striving to achieve
their goals. She encourages every-
one who has goals of any kind
not to let up because there are
always going to be things that are
going to get in their way and stop
them and they need to always go
forward.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
Amanda Geiger never saw the drunk driver.
Friend Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.



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2-09-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
Dolly the sheep scientist gets
license to clone human embryos
Professor Ian Wilmut, who led the research team based at the Roslin Institute, who created
Dolly the cloned sheep, poses in Edinburgh, Scotland Feb. 8.
LONDON (AP) � The Brit-
ish government Tuesday gave
the creator of Dolly the Sheep a
license to clone human embryos
for medical research into the
cause of motor neuron disease.
Ian Wilmut, who led the
team that created Dolly at Scot-
land's Roslin Institute in 1996,
and motor neuron expert Chris-
topher Shaw of the Institute of
Psychiatry in London, plan to
clone embryos to study how
nerve cells go awry to cause the
disease. The experiments do not
involve creating cloned babies.
It is the second such license
approved since Britain became
the first country to legalize
research cloning in 2001. The
first was granted in August to a
team that hopes to use cloning
to create insulin-producing cells
that could be transplanted into
diabetics.
Dr. Brian Dickie, director of
research at the London-based
Motor Neuron Disease Associa-
tion, said the latest decision by
the Human Fertilization and
Embryology Authority means
"we are a step closer to medical
research that has the potential
to revolutionize the future treat-
ment of neuron disease an
incurable muscle-wasting condi-
tion that afflicts about 350,000
people and kills some 100,000
each year.
While the latest project would
not use the stem cells to correct
the disease, the study of the
cells is expected to help scien-
tists develop future treatments,
according to the Human Fertiliza-
tion and Embryology Authority,
which regulates such research
and approved the license.
Stem cells are the master
cells of the body. They appear
when embryos are just a few
days old and go on to develop
into every type of cell and tissue
in the body. Scientists hope to
be able to extract the stem cells
from embryos when they are
in their blank state and direct
them to form any desired cell
type to treat a variety of diseases,
ranging from Parkinson's to
diabetes.
Getting the cells from an
embryo that is cloned from a sick
patient could allow scientists to
track how diseases develop and
provide genetically matched cell
transplants that do not cause the
immune systems to reject the
transplant.
Such work, called therapeutic
cloning because it does not result
in a baby, is opposed by abortion
foes and other biological con-
servatives because researchers
must destroy human embryos to
harvest the cells.
Cloning opponents decried
the license Tuesday, saying the
technique is dangerous, undesir-
able and unnecessary.
"What a sad and extraordi-
nary volte face turnaround for
the pioneer of animal cloning
said the London-based Comment
on Reproductive Ethics. "Wilmut
has always been the loudest voice
in recent years warning of the
dangers of mammalian cloning.
And we remember how in the
years following the birth of Dolly
the Sheep, he assured the world
he would never go near human
cloning
Wilmut has repeatedly con-
demned the idea of human
cloning to create babies, but not
so-called therapeutic cloning.
"We recognize that motor
neuron disease is a serious corv
genital condition said Angela
McNab, chief of Britain's Human
Fertilization and Embryology
Authority. "Following careful
review of the medical, scientific,
legal and ethical aspects of this
application, we felt it was appro-
priate to grant the Roslin Insti-
tute a one-year license for this
research into the disease
Wilmut and Shaw plan to
clone cells from patients with
the incurable muscle-wasting
disease, derive blank-slate stem
cells from the cloned embryo,
make them develop into nerve
cells, and compare their develop-
ment to nerve cells derived from
healthy embryos.
The technique, called cell
nuclear replacement, is the same
as that used to create Dolly.
The mechanism behind
motor neuron disease is poorly
understood because the nerves
are inaccessible in the brain
and central nervous system
and cannot be removed from
patients.
"This is potentially a big
step forward for (motor neuron
disease) research Shaw said.
"We have spent 20 years look-
ing for genes that cause (motor
neuron disease) and to date we
have come up with just one gene.
We believe that the use of cell
nuclear replacement will greatly
advance our understanding of
why motor neurons degenerate
in this disease, without having to
hunt down the gene defect
Genetics expert Peter Braude
of King's College, London, who
is not involved with the work,
said that studying how nerves go
wrong in motor neuron disease
and how it can be cured is par-
ticularly difficult and that clon-
ing is the only way to produce
the cells necessary to answer
such questions.
Abortion
from page A1
She said this and women who
tried to self-abort with wire coat
hangers often led to the woman's
death from a painful infection.
Dudasik-Wiggs also said the
term "pro-abortion" is a misno-
mer because they do not neces-
sarily support the actual proce-
dure, they support the choice.
"Likewise, the term "partial
birth abortion" is misleading, as
it was created as part of an ongo-
ing strategy of rhetoric designed
to conjure up ghoulish images
and ignite passions Dudasik-
Wiggs said.
"But once this procedure
is outlawed and there may be
enough votes to do so, it is a short
step to banning all abortions.
This scenario frightens me
Miller said last week Chris-
tian Medical Association's case
was appealed.
Stevens said if the brief does
not eventually pass, they would
go to the Supreme Court, which
he expects to happen. He said the
practice must be stopped because
there are abortionists who prey
on younger girls and the process
is very damaging psychologically
to women,
Dudasik-Wiggs said even
though there are consequences
to abortion, it should still be the
woman's decision.
"The decision to end a preg-
nancy is an agonizing and fright-
ening one for any woman to
make Dudasik-Wiggs said.
"But it is her decision alone
to make. Should she seek counsel?
Absolutely. Should she weigh all
her options? Definitely. But the
government does and should not
have the right to tell her what she
may do with her body
Stevens said 15,000 infants
have been affected by partial-
birth abortion, clinics do about
1,000 procedures a year and the
doctors make a lot of money.
NARAL Pro-Choice America
is also currently tracking the
FDA's decision on whether or not
to make the morning after pill
available over the counter.
The FDA was supposed to
have a decision Jan. 27 but
delayed. A scientific panel as
well as the FDA said it was safe
for over the counter use.
Miller said they support
it because it would prevent
unwanted pregnancies and in
the long run, abortion.
Dudasik-Wiggs is an advocate
for birth control and said the
current administration's policy
of ignoring teenage sexuality
dbes not prevent unwanted
pregnancies.
"Women and men need to
have access to complete and
reliable information about their
bodies and about contraception
Dudasik-Wiggs said.
The Christian Medical Asso-
ciation is an organization created
to motivate and train Christian
doctors. They have 17,000 mem-
bers across the United States
working on campuses and mis-
sion trips.
This writer can be contacted at
news�theeastcarolinian. com.
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2005 Housing Guide
Are you
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In the Thursday, February 17 Edition of The East
Carolinian.
m THEEAST CAROLINIAN
tec





mMB
2-09-0
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinlan.com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
WEDNESDAY February 9, 2005
Campus News News Briefs
Spaghetti Dinner
Five Brody medical students
are holding a spaghetti dinner
Feb. 9 at 7 p.m In 2 West 40
Brody School of Medicine to
raise money for an upcoming trip
to work in Kenyan clinics. The
event is open to the public and
costs $5 for students and $7 for
non-students. The students will
serve spaghetti with marinara or
meat sauce, bread and dessert
buffet-style.
Comedy at Pirate
Underground
SWASH and The Late Night Players
will perform improvlsational
comedy Feb. 9 at 8 p.m. This event
is free and sponsored by Student
Union Popular Entertainment and
Spectrum Committees.
Learn About Career
Fairs
Jim McAtee from Student
Professional Development will
be presenting "How do CFAC
Students Make the Most out of
Career Fairs" Feb. 9 from 2-3 p.m.
and 4 - 5 p.m. in 201 Joyner East.
Tne presentation will address
topics such as networking,
power greetings and career fair
preparation.
Black History Month
Speaker
A public lecture will be held in
honor of Black History Month at
the Willis Building Auditorium
Feb. 10 at 7 p.m. The event is
sponsored by ECU'S GeoClub,
Department of Geology and
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center.
The featured speaker is Jonathan
Tilove, a race and immigration
reporter with the Newhouse News
Service and a two-time National
Headliner Award winner and
author of the 2003 Random House
book Along Martin Luther King:
Travels on Black America's Main
Streets. For more information, call
Derek Alderman at 328-4013.
Massage Clinic
The ECU physical therapy
students are holding a message
clinic Feb. 10 from 5 - 9 p.m. in
the Belk Allied Health Building.
Come get a massage for only
$5 for 10 minutes, $10 for 20
minutes and $15 for 30 minutes.
No appointments are necessary,
but If you would like to make one,
contact cmf0625@mail.ecu.edu.
HOSA Meeting
Health Occupations Students
of America will hold an Interest
meeting Thursday, Feb. 10 in
221 Mendenhall at 4 p.m. HOSA
is open to all health related
majors.
NAACP Founders Week
This week is NAACP Founders
Week. Various nightly activities
include ethnic food tasting, open-
mic social, "Legacies Nearly
Forgotten" and volunteering with
local service agencies.
The Vagina
Monologues
The annual production of Eve
Enslers The Vagina Monologues
will be Feb. 11 - 12 at 8 p.m. in
Wright Auditorium. This year, the
ECU V-DayVagina Monologues
event is being co-sponsored by
the women's studies department,
the student organization VOICE,
and the Student Involvement
Team. Tickets are $8 in advance
for students, $10 for students
at the door, $12 for the general
public In advance and $15 for the
general public at the door. You
can purchase tickets by calling
1-800-ECU-ARTS or online at
ecuarts.com. The proceeds will
benefit local charities that help
abused women.
Contra Dance
The ECU Folk and Country
Dancers are sponsoring a contra
dance Saturday, Feb. 12 at the
Willis Building. A potluck supper
will begin at 6 p.m a concert
starts at 7 p.m beginners lesson
at 7.30 p.m. and the contra dance
from 8 -10:30 p.m. Live, old-time
and Celtic music by a string band
will be performed. The cost is $3
for students, $5 for members and
$8 for the general public. Call
752-7350 for details.
Local
Duke freshmen use
iPods for classes and tunes
DURHAM, NC - Duke University
freshmen are using their school-
issued iPods to learn Spanish
vocabulary, recording lectures,
analyzing music and - no surprise
here - for downloading their favorite
tunes.
Among those is Pelen Powelson, who
said she's mostly used her IPod to
record more than 1,000 songs, which
take up about one-fifth of the iPod's
20-gigabyte capacity.
"I have almost no use for CDs
anymore she said.
About 1,650 freshmen were given
the iPods in August at cost of about
$500,000 to the school. The devices
are theirs to keep as long as they
hang onto them through the end of
the school year.
As an accessory to the iPods, Duke
handed out microphone recording
modules made and donated by the
Belkin Corp. The program is costing
the university about $500,000 for the
devices and additional equipment
and support staff time.
Duke Is evaluating the pilot project,
and a report is due next month. By
late March or early April, the university
will decide whether to continue the
program in some form with a new
crop of freshmen next year, said
Lynne O'Brien, director of the Duke
Center for Instructional Technology,
which Is overseeing the experiment.
Autopsy confirms NCSU
student's death from lldocalne
RALEIGH, NC - The medlcar
examiner's autopsy report confirms
that a NC State University student
died of a lidocalne overdose after
applying a prescription-strength
anesthetic gel to her legs before laser
hair removal treatments at a spa.
The autopsy, which was completed
Friday, describes Shiri Berg, 22, as
otherwise heatthy and well-nourished.
It says the anesthetic gel she applied
from her feet to her waist likely led
to her seizures, cardiac arrest and
brain death.
That gel included 10 percent lidocaine
and 10 percent tetracaine in a solution
prepared by Triangle Compounding
Pharmacy of Cary. She died Jan. 5 at
Rex Healthcare.
David Kirby, a lawyer for the Berg
family, said the autopsy report brings
his investigation into Berg's death to
near conclusion.
"This was a very healthy woman with
no pre-existing health problems
Kirby said. "She applies a preparation
for a routine procedure, and the
preparation caused her death
The autopsy also confirms that after
applying the gel, Berg wrapped her
legs in cellophane.
A passing motorist found her in
her car having seizures and called
paramedics on the morning of Dec.
28. She died nine days later.
National
University of Colorado
professor's case stands out
BOULDER, Colo. - Nothing has
Incited more passion and outrage at
the University of Colorado than Ward
Churchill, an ethnic studies professor
whose comparison of World Trade
Center victims to a notorious Nazi
has led to death threats, arrests and
condemnations by two governors.
Talk-show hosts and lawmakers have
vilified him as a hate-monger and the
school is considering firing him.
Churchill has refused to apologize; on
the contrary, he has threatened to sue
the school if it fires him. No one has
defended Churchill's statements, but
some people have threatened him.
Two students were arrested at a
Board of Regents meeting last week
and swastikas were spray-painted on
Churchill's pickup truck.
On Monday, Colorado administrators
announced they had canceled a
speech by Churchill for Tuesday
because of security concerns.
Earlier this month, Hamilton College
in upstate New York canceled a
speech by Churchill because of death
threats against the professor and its
administrators.
"We feel that this is an extreme
violation of our free speech rights
said Mo Wells, a membef of the
Colorado student group that organized
Churchill's speech. The group planned
to file a lawsuit Tuesday challenging
the cancellation.
Jury convicts former
priest In clergy sex abuse case
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. - For three days,
jurors in the trial of Paul Shanley
listened carefully to tense exchanges
between the accuser and the former
priest's lawyer.
At times, the accuser sobbed on
the stand and begged the judge
not to force him to testify In graphic
detail how Shanley pulled him out of
Sunday morning catechism classes
beginning at age 6 and molested
him In the bathroom, the rectory, the
confessional and the pews.
On Monday, Shanley was convicted
of repeatedly raping and fondling
the accuser at his Roman Catholic
church during the 1980s. He Is
perhaps the most notorious figure
In the sex scandal that rocked the
Boston Archdiocese nearly three
years ago.
The accuser, now 27, put his head
down and sobbed as the verdicts
were read after a trial that hinged
on the reliability of what the man
claimed were recovered memories
of decades-old abuse.
Shanley, 74, showed no emotion as
he stood next to his lawyer, Frank
Mondano. Ball was revoked and
Shanley was immediately led to jail.
"It appears that the absence of a case
is not an impediment to securing a
conviction Mondano said, vowing
to appeal.
Greenway expansion project making
progress, receives federal funding
Extra funds intended
to fuel project growth
MICHAEL HARRINGTON
SENIOR WRITER
The Friends of Greenville Gre-
enways has been formed to help
speedup the City of Greenville's
federally funded greenway project
and provide extra cash to further
benefit the project.
Greenville was given a $1.5
million grant from the federal
government to expand on the
city's current greenway system.
The system currently runs from
Green Springs Park on Fifth Street
to the area around Dowdy Fick-
len Stadium, allowing citizens a
jogging or walking path through
scenic areas.
The expansion will add 2.S
miles to the greenway that will
run from Town Commons to the
intersection of 264 and Tenth
Street, allowing users to meet up
with the current greenway loca-
tion at Green Springs Park via
Beech Street.
FROGGS intends to raise
funds to ensure the new gre-
enway can be completed with
additional items that may not
be possible to purchase working
with a $1.5 million budget.
The $1.5 million might fund
the bare asphalt trail but you're
going to need benches and light-
ing, maybe emergency call sta-
tions for joggers said Jill Twark,
chair of FROGGS.
"You want safety to be a
t priority
Another benefit FROGGS hopes
to bestow on the project through
fundraising is a further extension
of the greenway, cutting through
the wetlands area between Charles
Street and Evans Street.
This project requires board-
walks and bridges to form an envi-
ronmentally safe path through
the wetlands, carrying an esti-
mated price tag of $600,000.
But FROGGS feels it will provide
residents of Greenville with a
beautiful and scenic path that is
worth the high cost.
The group was incorporated
in September and is currently in
the final stages of receiving non-
profit status, which will allow
them to solicit money by making
donations tax-deductible.
The City of Greenville's cur-
rent greenway expansion is part
of a much larger plan by the city
to expand its greenway system.
Twark said in 2003 Greenville
contracted Greenways Inc a
company that plots out green-
ways in cities across the country,
who then created a master plan
to develop 120 miles of greenway
in the next 23 years.
Money raised by FROGGS
will go toward helping speed up
this proposed expansion.
Twark said the formation of
FROGGS came through a sug-
gestion of forming a non-profit
group to supplement funding for
the project by Jason Pauling, city
engineer.
The two met while working
on the Greenway Subcommittee
of City Council, which meets
once every two months to discuss
the greenway expansion.
The idea of using non-profit
organizations to speed up the
funding of greenway projects
has been utilized in other cities,
including Raleigh and Durham.
"You don't have to worry
about the government finding
the money over time, we can
fundraise more quickly than they
can Twark said.
FROGGS Is currently putting
together a Web site and promo-
tional video through student
volunteers at ECU to help raise
awareness and funds for their
cause.
Twark said the group would
use the Web site to ease the pro-
cess of soliciting funds and the
video to provide information to
community groups.
Nikki Jenkins, senior musical
theatre major, said expansion of
the greenways is a good idea.
"It would be a good place
for families and joggers said
Jenkins.
"There are so many restau-
rants and businesses popping up
it would be nice to balance
that out
Guillame Bagal, sophomore
biology and chemistry double
major, said as a member of the
cross-country and track teams,
he likes the idea of a large stretch
of greenways.
"They're beneficial for the
students, the rec center Is there,
but many people don't go because
it's so crowded said Bagal.
Thii writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Crime Scene
Jan. 31
6 p.m.
Larceny from buildings
An unknown subject stole a pair
of socks and seat pants from the
Cotton Hall laundry room.
Feb. 1
9:30 a.m.
Larceny from buildings
By unknown subject taking a parking
pass from an office in Jenkins Art.
Feb. 3
2:45 p.m.
Larceny from motor vehicle
By unknown person taking hangtag
from vehicle without permission.
Feb. 5
11:35 a.m.
Larceny of bicycle
By someone cutting the cable lock
that secured the bike to the rack.
Feb. 6
6 a.m.
Larceny
By unknown subject taking Items
out of victim's purse, which was In
her dorm room in Belk Hall. Among
the items stolen were her room keys
and birth control pills.
f) Weekly Crime Tip
Larceny Is the number one crime
on campus.
Make sure you always secure your
vehicle and double-check before
you leave. If you own a rag-top
vehicle, use a parking sticker
Instead of a hangtag.
Treat your residence hall like you
would your permanent home.
Always keep your doors locked
even if you will only be away for
a few moments. Also be aware of
who you let In to your residence
hall. Larcenies come from both the
students around you and guests.
Always lock your doors when
leaving your office. A larceny only
takes seconds to occur.
Victoria Blier said she and fellow
jurors were swayed by the accuser,
believing the man would not have
come forward if he weren't telling
the truth. He received a $500,000
settlement with the archdiocese
nearly a year ago.
International
Israeli, Palestinian leaders
announce cease-fire at summit
SHARM EL-SHEIK, Egypt - Israeli
Prime Minister Ariel Sharon and
Palestinian leader Mahmoud Abbas
declared Tuesday that their people
would stop all military or violent
activity, pledging to break the four-
year, cycle of bloodshed and get
peace talks back on track.
With the flags of their countries
whipping in the wind, Sharon and
Abbas met face-to-face at a Mideast
summit Tuesday. Afterward, Abbas
said: "We have agreed on halting all
violent actions against Palestinians
and Israelis wherever they are
Sharon made a similar pledge.
"Today, In my meeting with chairman
Abbas, we agreed that all Palestinians
will stop all acts of violence against all
Israelis everywhere, and, at the same
time, Israel will cease all its military
activity against all Palestinians
everywhere he said.
Abbas said it was time for the
Palestinian people to regain their
freedom.
"A new opportunity for peace is
born today in the city of peace. Let's
pledge to protect it Abbas said,
referring to the nickname of Sharm
el-Sheik earned through past peace
summits.
Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak,
who summoned the two leaders and
has been a key mediator throughout
the process, said both sides showed
a serious desire to "work together
truly and sincerely
"The challenges today are large
and deep, but the mission is not
Impossible. If the road Is long, we
today took the first step Mubarak
said.
The Palestinian and Israeli peoples
equally deserve a secure life for the
coming generations to enjoy, based
on justice, international principles and
good nelghborilness the Egyptian
president added in a speech he said
he was delivering on behalf of himself
and Jordan's King Abdullah II.
Japan moves closer to
lifting ban on U.S. beef imports
TOKYO - Japan moved a step closer
to partially lifting a ban on U.S. beef
imports after a government panel on
Tuesday accepted U.S. assurances
that a specific grade of U.S. beef
would be free of mad cow disease.
The panel's decision, If accepted by
the government, will clear the way for
Japan to begin importing U.S. grade
A40 beef, which comes primarily from
cattle aged 12 to 17 months.
Panel member Aklhlro Okitani, a
professor at the Nippon Veterinary
and Animal Science University, told
reporters that there was a high
probability that meat of this grade was
free of mad cow disease.
Japan imposed a ban on U.S. beef
imports in December 2003 after
the United States discovered its
first case of the fatal brain-wasting
Illness, known formally as bovine
spongiform encephalopathy, or BSE,
in a Washington state Holstein cow.
Okitani praised information that U.S.
researchers provided the panel to
help it make its decision.
The U.S. researchers came up with
highly reliable data Okitani said. He
added it was now up to the Japanese
government to decide whether to lift
the ban on beef imports.
Before the ban, Japan was the most
lucrative overseas market for U.S. beef
producers, buying $1.7 billion worth
of beef in 2003.
RateS from page A1
a survey of students who were on
academic probation.
A broad range of ideas to
improve retention was brought
up and is under consideration.
Some ideas that received inter-
est from the meeting atten-
dants included having a required
summer reading program for
freshmen, improving faculty and
student communication, creat-
ing a centralized tutoring center
in Mendenhall, bringing high
school students to campus and
creating a first year experience
Web site. These are some of the
initiatives the steering committee
will use to most appropriately
address the issue.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
f) Retention Rates
Freshmen to sophomore year
retention rates for fall 2002 freshmen
throughout the UNC system.
76.6 - ECU
83 - Appalachaln
90.1 - NC State
77.8 - UNC Ashevllle
95.3 - UNC Chapel Hill
75.7 - UNC Charlotte
75.5 - UNC Greensboro
67.2 - UNC Pembrook
85.6 - UNC Wilmington
69.1-Western Carolina
University
76.7 - Winston - Salem State
74.9 - Elizabeth City State
73.4 - Fayettevllle State
73 - NC A&T
78.2 - NC Central
BlaCk WidOW from page A1
who used to make fun of her
because she would dress in black.
She said when the pool room
owner would talk about how she
appeared sweet and cute when
she first walked into the pool
hall, she would afterward defeat
them.
She said she began playing
pool when she turned 18 and
became pro at age 21 before
she was ranked number one in
the world at age 23. She feels it
is her natural competitiveness
that drives her to keep playing.
She has undergone eight major
surgeries in her time, and she
said she finds pool a good way
to be physically active and com-
petitive.
In the future, Lee wants to
strive to ultimately be the best
player she can be and no ranking
can determine how much she
can accomplish. She would also
like to know she did more than
just win.
"I'd like to know that I
changed the sport, I'd like to
know that I elevated the level of
the game, its reputation, I'd like
to know that I brought new eyes
to the sport, that I brought more
education to the kids Lee said.
Lee said the biggest difference
between champions and every-
one else is that champions keep
getting up and striving to achieve
their goals. She encourages every-
one who has goals of any kind
not to let up because there are
always going to be things that are
going to get in their way and stop
them and they need to always go
forward.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Amanda Geiger never saw the drunk driver.
Friends Don't Let Friends Drive Drunk.






ary 9, 2005
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2-09-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
Dolly the sheep scientist gets
license to clone human embryos
Professor lan Wilmut, who led the research team based at the Roslin Institute, who created
Dolly the cloned sheep, poses in Edinburgh, Scotland Feb. 8.
LONDON (AP) � The Brit-
ish government Tuesday gave
the creator of Dolly the Sheep a
license to clone human embryos
for medical research into the
cause of motor neuron disease.
Ian Wilmut, who led the
team that created Dolly at Scot-
land's Roslin Institute in 1996,
and motor neuron expert Chris-
topher Shaw of the Institute of
Psychiatry in London, plan to
clone embryos to study how
nerve cells go awry to cause the
disease. The experiments do not
involve creating cloned babies.
It is the second such license
approved since Britain became
the first country to legalize
research cloning in 2001. The
first was granted in August to a
team that hopes to use cloning
to create insulin-producing cells
that could be transplanted into
diabetics.
Dr. Brian Dickie, director of
research at the London-based
Motor Neuron Disease Associa-
tion, said the latest decision by
the Human Fertilization and
Embryology Authority means
"we are a step closer to medical
research that has the potential
to revolutionize the future treat-
ment of neuron disease an
incurable muscle-wasting condi-
tion that afflicts about 350,000
people and kills some 100,000
each year.
While the latest project would
not use the stem cells to correct
the disease, the study of the
cells is expected to help scien-
tists develop future treatments,
according to the Human Fertiliza-
tion and Embryology Authority,
which regulates such research
and approved the license.
Stem cells are the master
cells of the body. They appear
when embryos are just a few
days old and go on to develop
into every type of cell and tissue
in the body. Scientists hope to
be able to extract the stem cells
from embryos when they are
in their blank state and direct
them to form any desired cell
type to treat a variety of diseases,
ranging from Parkinson's to
diabetes.
Getting the cells from an
embryo that is cloned from a sick
patient could allow scientists to
track how diseases develop and
provide genetically matched cell
transplants that do not cause the
immune systems to reject the
transplant.
Such work, called therapeutic
cloning because it does not result
in a baby, is opposed by abortion
foes and other biological con-
servatives because researchers
must destroy human embryos to
harvest the cells.
Cloning opponents decried
the license Tuesday, saying the
technique is dangerous, undesir-
able and unnecessary.
"What a sad and extraordi-
nary volte face turnaround for
the pioneer of animal cloning
said the London-based Comment
on Reproductive Ethics. "Wilmut
has always been the loudest voice
in recent years warning of the
dangers of mammalian cloning.
And we remember how in the
years following the birth of Dolly
the Sheep, he assured the world
he would never go near human
cloning
Wilmut has repeatedly con-
demned the idea of human
cloning to create babies, but not
so-called therapeutic cloning.
"We recognize that motor
neuron disease is a serious corir
genital condition said Angela
McNab, chief of Britain's Human
Fertilization and Embryology
Authority. "Following careful
review of the medical, scientific,
legal and ethical aspects of this
application, we felt it was appro-
priate to grant the Roslin Insti-
tute a one-year license for this
research into the disease
Wilmut and Shaw plan to
clone cells from patients with
the incurable muscle-wasting
disease, derive blank-slate stem
cells from the cloned embryo,
make them develop into nerve
cells, and compare their develop-
ment to nerve cells derived from
healthy embryos.
The technique, called cell
nuclear replacement, is the same
as that used to create Dolly.
The mechanism behind
motor neuron disease is poorly
understood because the nerves
are inaccessible in the brain
and central nervous system
and cannot be removed from
patients.
"This is potentially a big
step forward for (motor neuron
disease) research Shaw said.
"We have spent 20 years look-
ing for genes that cause (motor
neuron disease) and to date we
have come up with just one gene.
We believe that the use of cell
nuclear replacement will greatly
advance our understanding of
why motor neurons degenerate
in this disease, without having to
hunt down the gene defect
Genetics expert Peter Braude
of King's College, London, who
is not involved with the work,
said that studying how nerves go
wrong in motor neuron disease
and how it can be cured is par-
ticularly difficult and that clon-
ing is the only way to produce
the cells necessary to answer
such questions.
AbOrtiOII from page A1
She said this and women who
tried to self-abort with wire coat
hangers often led to the woman's
death from a painful infection.
Dudasik-Wiggs also said the
term "pro-abortion" is a misno-
mer because they do not neces-
sarily support the actual proce-
dure, they support the choice.
"Likewise, the term "partial
birth abortion" is misleading, as
it was created as part of an ongo-
ing strategy of rhetoric designed
to conjure up ghoulish images
and ignite passions Dudasik-
Wiggs said.
"But once this procedure
is outlawed and there may be
enough votes to do so, it is a short
step to banning all abortions.
This scenario frightens me
Miller said last week Chris-
tian Medical Association's case
was appealed.
Stevens said if the brief does
not eventually pass, they would
go to the Supreme Court, which
he expects to happen. He said the
practice must be stopped because
there are abortionists who prey
on younger girls and the process
is very damaging psychologically
to women,
Dudasik-Wiggs said even
though there are consequences
to abortion, it should still be the
woman's decision.
"The decision to end a preg-
nancy is an agonizing and fright-
ening one for any woman to
make Dudasik-Wiggs said.
" But it is her decision alone
to make. Should she seek counsel?
Absolutely. Should she weigh all
her options? Definitely. But the
government does and should not
have the right to tell her what she
may do with her body
Stevens said 15,000 infants
have been affected by partial-
birth abortion, clinics do about
1,000 procedures a year and the
doctors make a lot of money.
NARAL Pro-Choice America
is also currently tracking the
FDA's decision on whether or not
to make the morning after pill
available over the counter.
The FDA was supposed to
have a decision Jan. 27 but
delayed. A scientific panel as
well as the FDA said it was safe
for over the counter use.
Miller said they support
it because it would prevent
unwanted pregnancies and in
the long run, abortion.
Dudasik-Wiggs is an advocate
for birth control and said the
current administration's policy
of Ignoring teenage sexuality
does not prevent unwanted
pregnancies.
"Women and men need to
have access to complete and
reliable information about their
bodies and about contraception
Dudasik-Wiggs said.
The Christian Medical Asso-
ciation is an organization created
to motivate and train Christian
doctors. They have 17,000 mem-
bers across the United States
working on campuses and mis-
sion trips.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian.com.
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M THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Itec





OPINION
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor In Chief
WEDNESDAY February 9, 2005
Our View
How will you celebrate
Valentine's Day?
It's that special time of year again. A time
when men and women are rushing out to find
the perfect gift for their significant others and
planning the perfect evening - that's right,
Valentine's Day.
There are many speculations as to the origin
of Valentine's Day, the most popular being
that of Saint Valentine. Bishop Valentine was
chosen as the patron saint to replace the
Lupercian Festival, which was a celebration
of the god of fertility and of sensual pleasure.
Valentine had fallen in love with his jailer's
daughter right before his execution for help-
ing young lovers marry against the wishes
of the emperor Claudius. His final note to her
ended with, "From Your Valentine a phrase
we still see today.
Valentine's Day has become extremely com-
mercialized. Decorations for this special
occasion begin appearing in stores soon
after Christmas while flowers, candy, cards
and stuffed animals have become the stan-
dard gift to give your sweetheart. Schools
and offices around the world use the holiday
as an excuse for a party. Many feel this day
no longer holds any sentimental value. What
happened to romance and originality? While
we are far from the meaning of the original
Valentine's Day, it is still a day to cherish those
you love, whether it be a lover, a friend or a
family member. Showering your loved ones
with gifts, while always a nice gesture, does
not have to be the one and only way you show
your affection. Often those three simple words
can convey a thousand meanings and evoke
a thousand emotions - "l love you
Each country and each person has their own
beliefs and traditions surrounding Valentine's
Day - poems, love songs, love letters, flowers
or candy. However you decide to celebrate
and whomever you decide to celebrate with,
make it special. Don't fall under the candy
company spell of what Valentine's Day is sup-
posed to look like. Above all else, be romantic
and be original.
Our Staff
Amanda Q. Ungerfelt Editor in Chief
Nick Henne News EditorKristin Day Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Features EditorKristin Murnane Asst. Features Editor
Tony Zoppo Sports EditorBrandon Hughes Asst Sports Editor
Nina Coefield Head Copy EditorRachel Landen Special Sections Editor
Tanesha Slstrunk Photo EditorHerb Sneed Asst Photo Editor
Alexander Marclnlak Dustln Jones Web Editor Asst Web Editor
Jennifer Hobbs Production ManagerKitch Hlnes Managing Editor
Newsroom252.328.6366
Fax252.328.6558
Advertising252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
Include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
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Carolinian, Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
Information. One copy of TEC Is free, each additional
copy is $1.
CHtf Of UM. T5UNAMI RZCPVST&vCliOhl
Opinion Columnist
Social security encourages irresponsibility
Wasn't that a great State of
the Union speech George
Bush gave last Thursday?
TONYMCKEE
CONSERVATIVE CORNER
It was forceful, upbeat, uplifting
and straight to the point. And who
didn't get choked up when that Iraqi
voter turned and hugged the mother
of the marine who lost his life fighting
to liberate her country? Besides the
insensitive, inconsiderate, unconscio-
nable jerks in the liberal media who
immediately started asking if the hug
was "staged" for political gain, that
is. And I had thought the media had
sunk as low as it could go already. Was
I ever wrong.
Getting back to the State of the
Union, the best part of the speech was
when President Bush eloquently laid
out what the real situation with social
security is and presented a plan to fix
it. Of course, the Democrats did not
agree - this year that is. As with the
Iraq war, Sadaam Hussein, weapons
of mass destruction and several other
topics, the Democrats conveniently
suffer from collective amnesia when
they feel like it.
As President Bush pointed out,
former President Clinton and many
other Democrat leaders have said in the
past social security was broken, needed
fixing and some, like Clinton, even said
that private accounts are one way to fix
the problems. Matter of fact, some of
the same Democrats that were howl-
ing there is nothing wrong with Social
Security and vehemently opposing pri-
vate accounts now were the same ones
applauding the loudest when Clinton
brought It up. What changed, other
than the much-hated George Bush is
now the one suggesting it?
Have you noticed that the most
hate-filled, racist, vile, insulting, class
dividing speech and actions in public
discourse lately come from the all-
loving, compassionate, tolerant liberal
Democrats? Don't you think that is odd?
But I digress.
President Bush did a good job
pointing out the undeniable truths
about social security, but he erred on
the remedy. Instead of trying to fix
the program, he should be working to
phase it out altogether.
From the start, social security
was ill-advised, putatively illegal
and morally questionable. Now,
when you strip away all the emo-
tional and political baggage people
have attached to it over the years,
social security is nothing more
than a reward for irresponsibility.
Consider this analogy:
Both of us work, bring home the
same amount and get paid once a
month. You, being the responsible
individual that your parents taught you
to be, take some of your hard earned
money and save it, just in case. I, on the
other hand, take my money and spend
it on cigarettes, booze and women.
Now, because the government says
I can, I go to your house, hold out my
hand and say, "Gimme You have no
choice but to hand over the money
you had set aside so I can get through
the month. I am rewarded for my
irresponsible actions, you are
punished.
That, ladies and gentlemen, is social
security in a nutshell.
For decades, social security has been
mythically portrayed as a "no-risk" way
to achieve financial security. We were
told that all you had to do was give up
a small percentage of your paycheck,
and that money would go into a special
"retirement account" the government
set had set up. Even out employer put
in a certain amount for each worker.
When we retired (at age 65), we would
be getting a check from that account
to get us through our "Golden Years
Sound familiar?
As welfare reduced the incentive of
many to work for a living, the myth of
social security reduced the incentive
of many to take responsibility for their
own financial security at retirement.
Since there was no longer any need
to save for retirement, people started
spending everything they made, and
more, in an orgy of "I want, 1 want,
I want That is what we have been
taught. It is now time to "un-teach"
ourselves.
We need to instruct people,
starting in middle or high school, how
to handle money responsibly. This
should be easy for liberals, since they
are huge fans of "education especially
when it comes to social programs,
homosexual rights, environmental
causes, etc. And since this plan would
benefit everyone, rich or poor, it is a
made-for-liberal approach.
If we start teaching children how to
responsibly handle money now, while
at the same time beginning a phase
out (or a voluntary "opt-out") of social
security, a vast majority of the current
problem would be nonexistent by the
time the program goes bankrupt (and
it will go bankrupt).
Changes have been made with
welfare and other programs to stop
rewarding irresponsibility. Social secu-
rity needs to be next.
End it, don't "fix it
In My Opinion
First Amendment: Use it, or you risk losing it
(KRT) � The First Amendment is
a muscle that must be used, or it will
become flabby. A survey of high school
students by the John S. and James L.
Knight Foundation reveals a frail Con-
stitution: Kids are weak in knowledge
of their rights.
- 73 percent said they didn't know
how they felt about the First Amend-
ment or took freedom of speech and
the press for granted.
- More than a third (35 percent)
thought that the First Amendment goes
too far in protecting rights.
- One in six students indicated that
people shouldn't be allowed to express
unpopular opinions.
- Only half said newspapers should
be allowed to publish freely without
government approval of stories.
The apathy is alarming. Those who
don't understand the First Amendment
are certainly less Inclined to exercise it,
and they'll be less skeptical and more
easily conned by government officials
who want to twist and limit it.
Ignorance is not kids' fault.
Unawareness starts at home. Parents'
understanding of the First Amendment
isn't much better. Even in the best of
times, three out of 10 adults believe
that the First Amendment goes too
far. That belief jumped to half in the
months after Sept. 11. Talk-show hosts
like Rush Limbaugh make good money
assailing the credibility of mainstream
journalists and of anybody who dis-
agrees with him.
In school, First Amendment-rich
electives are getting left behind in
the race to raise test scores in math
and English. California requires three
courses in social studies, including a
semester course in American govern-
ment and civics. But often, the focus
is on specific information found on
state history and social studies tests,
not on broad concepts. Schools need
to convene more discussions of con-
troversial Issues and to promote civic
involvement outside of class.
The Knight survey of 100,000 stu-
dents in 544 high schools found a clear
correlation between knowledge of the
First Amendment and participation
in a school radio station or newspa-
per. One-quarter of schools no longer
publish papers, and many of those
that have dropped them are in poor
communities.
The exhilaration that Iraqis felt
in voting for the first time should
remind Americans of rights they often
don't appreciate. An atrophying First
Amendment is harmful to the nation's
civic health.
Pirate Rant
I disagree with the person
who asserted that puppies are
good in last week's rant. Puppies
are evil, soulless demons who
pee all over the floor and bark
constantly.
President Bush stated that
we will fight for freedom and
liberty for all people in the world.
Too bad he is fighting against
freedom and liberty at home
with the "Marriage Protection
Amendment I still can't believe
this country re-elected that lying
hypocrite.
For all you people that show
up late to class every day and
expect to copy off my paper
the entire time and keep asking
me "what did he just say?" and
distract me from what's going
on, so I can't learn here's a
message: This is college. Grow
up and learn to show up on time
and get your own notes. It's not
my responsibility to keep you up
with the class.
I love Pirate Rant. It amuses
me and usually makes my day
because people are so funny.
Students, when you are in
a play or a movie theater where
it's dark inside, please don't
mess with your cell phones so
that everyone can see your lit-up
screen. It's very distracting and
much brighter than you might
think. Just turn your phone
off and put it away until the
performance is over. Please, it is
common courtesy.
Quit walking on the jogging
track. You can walk to Krispy
Kreme or to Hardee's and get
the artery-clogging "Myocardial
Infarction Burger
I am so excited that wheat
wraps are now offered in the
galley. The regular tortilla wraps
are OK, but the wheat tastes
much better and it's healthier. ;
Goodbye freshman 15, hello'
Spring Break.
Someone stole my bike
again.
Let's try to turn off our music,
televisions and mouths by 2 a.m.
on a weekday.
Get that darn coffee shop out
of the library. It's like a rule that
everyone has to have a cup of
coffee in the entire building and
drinking invites the opportunity
to converse, no matter if someone
around is studying.
To the bus drivers who can
not wait five more seconds for
me to sit down -1 know you can
see me walking down the aisle to
that next seat. Wait just a second
before hitting the pedal to the
metal and sending me flying (or
crashing). Or don't -1 mean hey,
I could use the money a lawsuit.
would bring.
Pat on the back to Matthew
Joyce for a very well-written letter
to the editor.
Why is it that people insist
on talking while the professor is
talking? I came to class to hear
what the professor had to say.
Not to listen to you gossip in the
back row.
To the ranter who called Bush
a fascist - trust me, there's noth-
ing patriotic about the leftwing
manure you campus libs spew
out. One of these days, you'll
have to come out from behind
mommy's apron strings and go
out into the cold, hard world and
you'll find not everyone buys into
your b.s. Go ahead and start pre-
paring yourself now, nutbag.
If I want to wear my sunglasses,
I will wear my sunglasses. They
are currently sitting firmly on my
head with Croakies attached.
I hate the way a smoker
smells. Smokers, please do not
sit next to me in class. I do not
want to smell the aftermath of
your addiction.
If you are dating a girl, don't
treat her like you "may" have time
for her. Girls hardly ever date the
best looking guys because they
think they're hot s" It gets
really annoying.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
malled to editortdtheeastcarolinian.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.





nary 9,2005
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or content and
Arts & Entertainment
PageA5features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN MURNANE Assistant Features Editor WEDNESDAY February 9, 2005
Mendenhall Movies:
Saw
Wednesday: 9:30 p.m.
Thursday: 7 p.m.
Friday: 9:30 p.m.
Saturday: 7 p.m. and Midnight
Sunday: 3 p.m.
The Motorcycle Diaries
Wednesday: 7 p.m.
Thursday: 9:30 p.m.
Friday: 7 p.m. and Midnight
Saturday: 9:30 p.m. '
Sunday: 7 p.m.
Top 5's
Top 5 Movies
1. Hide and Seek
2. Are We There Yet?
3. Million Dollar Baby
4. Coach Carter
5. Meet the Fockers
Top 5 DVDs
1. The Village
2. Without a Paddle
3. Troy
4. Paparazzi
5. Anchorman
Top 5 TV Shows
1. "American Idol"
2. "CSI-
3. "ER"
4. "Desperate Housewives"
5. "Numb3rs"
Top 5 Music Videos
1. Jennifer Lopez - Get Right
2. Ciara with Missy Elliot -1,2
Step
3. The Game with 50 Cent - How
We Do
4. Lindsay Lohan - Over
5. Mario- Let Me Love You
Top 5 Books
7. The Broker
2. The Da Vinci Code
3. The Five People You Meet in
Heaven
4. State of Fear
5. Chainfire
Horoscopes:
Aries: You'll have more time
the next few days to rest and
recuperate. Don't attempt any
big advances now, you need to
recover your strength.
Taurus: You'll have more time to
spend with friends for the next
couple of days. That's good, but
resist the urge to splurge the
money you've recently earned.
Gemini: One surprising
development just went your way,
but the next one won't. Don't push
your luck, show respect.
Cancer: Your efforts will pay off
for years to come. You should be
proud of yourself. You're not quite
through yet, so postpone a trip
you'd like to take.
Leo: Take time away from the
game to add up your wins and
losses. Don't worry about missing
anything, this is not a good time
to gamble.
Virgo: Maybe you need to look
at the situation from a new point
of view. Imagine you're seeing
it through the eyes of a kooky
friend.
Libra: After you've made the
commitment, it's time to get
down to work. You'll learn more
as you go along, so continue to
pay attention.
Scorpio: You'll have more time
in the next few days to cuddle
with someone you love. Make
arrangements for something
special, but don't spend a lot of
money.
Sagittarius: It's not a good idea
to get your roommate all riled up.
Advise caution for the next few
days, and practice it yourself.
Capricorn: Previous commitments
interfere with your ability to study
the subject you'll be using next.
Just do the old stuff the old way.
It'll be easier.
Aquarius: Don't get carried away
in your enthusiasm and buy a
whole bunch of toys you really
don't know how to use yet. Easy
does It tiger.
Pisces: Changes are predicted
for the next couple of days. Don't
let yourself be pushed this way
and that. Steer a steady course.
Take Action Tour kicks off
Concert looks to
benefit youth of
America
KYLE BILLINGS
STAFF WRITER
Imagine an annual tour
stacked with amazing musi-
cians, every year coming to a
town near you, even releasing a
CD you know you'll want. How
much more worthwhile would
that production be if you knew it
was to benefit the youth popula-
tion, raising thousands of dollars
for problems such as depression
and suicide? These epidemics are
targeted by the Take Action Tour,
which travels countrywide in
pursuit of education and hope-
fully saving lives.
This year the Take Action
Tour is headlined by none other
than Sugarcult, which is quite
fitting considering it had the
theme song for college classic
Van Wilder. Other bands play-
ing include Hawthorne Heights,
The Early November, Anberlin,
Maxeen, Melee, Plain White T's
and Hopesfall.
"According to the National
Mental Health Association, sui-
cide is the third leading cause of
death for young people aged 1S-
24 is the tour's purpose as stated
on takeactiontour.com.
"The Take Action Tour and
-The 11th leading
cause of death, 2001.
-The third leading
cause of death in
15-24 age group.
-There Is a 4:1 ratio
of men to women
who commit suicide.
Take Action Tour CD, with songs from more than 40 bands Is on sale at various local retailers for less than $7.
organization educate millions of
youth on depression, suicide and
finding help in their area
The tour spans two months,
raising money for the National
Hopeline Network and Youth
America Hotline. Sub City Records
and Hurley International sponsor
the annual event, and according
to the Web site, over the past four
years, $170,000 was raised by the
tour and CD compilations for the
National Hopeline Network. It
also mentions that sponsor Sub
City Records has contributed to
multiple charities through funds
raised by the tour.
"A high number of youths go
through harsh depression and
even suicide, and I think the idea
of this tour is a good one because
it will bring kids together to listen
to good music and learn how to
find help at the same time said
Ian Collins, freshman child psy-
chology major.
Since its inception, the Take
Action Tour has been able to
mobilize a national front to
combat the effects of suicide
and depression. Many times, this
disease is unseen and undi-
agnosed. Thousands of youth
throughout the country suffer
without a proper outlet. Take
Action Tour and National
Find the 'Boogeyman'
No chick flick movie dates this year
TREVOR KIRKENDALL
STAFF WRITER
February is the month of love and Hol-
lywood knows this. Every year about this
time, we are treated to films about love and
relationships because that is what brings couples
close together. However, there is another type of
film that will do that same thing, and that is a
horror film.
A horror film can be cheesy at times, but it
does something guys absolutely love - it makes
their lady friend get real close when the film gets
a little scary. What better way to get her to snuggle
up close to you?
Usually a few weeks before Valentine's Day,
Hollywood releases a horror film. This year's film
is Boogeyman. It stars Barry Watson, from TV's "7th
Heaven as Tim, a tormented young man who must
return to his childhood home in order to face a fear
that has haunted him all his life, the treacherous
boogeyman.
We all know the boogeyman story. He haunted
just about every single one of us as we were grow-
ing up. The boogeyman would come out of the
closet and get us while we slept. If mom or dad left
the closet door open, he would be able to get into
the room. It seems the vast majority of us grew
out of this illusion by five or six years of age, if
not before.
For Tim, this illusion was reality. As he grew
up, there really was a boogeyman that was out
to get him, despite what anyone else thought.
The thought of knowing the boogeyman was
somewhere looking for him has tormented him all
his life. In order to completely do away with these
illusions, he must return home to face his fears.
Sam Raimi and Rob Tapert, founders of the
same production company that brought viewers The
Grudge, produced Boogeyman. Raimi also has a long
history of scaring people throughout the course
of his career. He created, along with Tapert and
fellow creative partner Bruce Campbell, the char-
acter Ash who was the star in the Evil Dead trilogy.
Raimi also directed the eerie' and underrated film
The Gift with Cate Blanchett and Katie Holmes.
Just seeing the names of Raimi and Tapert on a
Watson's character haunted by Boogeyman.
movie poster should make one wonder just how
scary this film could actually be. Raimi is a master
of fright.
The film co-stars Emily Decchanel, Skye McCole
Bartusiak and Lucy Lawless. It was directed by
Stephen Kay.
Boogeyman opened Friday, Feb. 4 and is this
year's Valentine's Day horror flick. Rather than
going out to see yet another romantic comedy
where the ending is always the same thing
year after year, why not put you and your date in a
position to be terrified? There's nothing more
fun than getting scared at a movie, especially when
it's with that special someone on that special day.
This writer can be contacted
at features@theeastcarolinian. com
Ani DiFranco, latest release shines
Knuckle Down'has
new sound with help
from other musicians
JESSICA CRESON
SENIOR WRITER
Ani DiFranco, who has been
a singer, songwriter and guitarist
performing since high school in
Buffalo, NY, released her latest
album, Knuckle Down, last week.
It started off with poetry and
morphed into songwriting once
she learned how to play the guitar.
This album has something
a little different to offer listen-
ers than her previous releases.
For the first time, DiFranco has
collaborated with other musi-
cians. Joe Henry, an applauded
performer and songwriter who
has released nine solo albums, is
co-producing Knuckle Down.
DiFranco has put out at least
one album each year since 1990,
now reaching 23 album releases
total.
Her 2004 release Educated
Guess was done entirely by
DiFranco, including vocals and
each instrument.
Knuckle Down has many guest
musicians providing a more
dynamic and intricate sound.
Many of the musicians have
played with DiFranco before,
such as Todd Sickafoose on bass,
Julie Wolf, who is a former band
member and played melodica,
Tony Scherr on electric guitar and
Noe Venable on vocals. Andrew
Bird is a Righteous Babe record-
ing artist (DiFranco's label), and
plays violin, glockenspiel and
whistles on the album.
Some less recognizable names
who contributed just as much to
Knuckle Down are Patrick Warren
on piano, samples and cham-
berlain, Jay Bellerose on drums
and percussion and Niki Haris
on vocals.
The bluegrass culture is one of
the things DiFranco tries to pre-
serve through her musical talent
and style. Much of her music is
highly influenced by bluegrass
and folk music. Overall, her music-
can be described as "folk-punk
Unique look and sound suit her.
Over the years, DiFranco has
gathered a reputation for herself
of performing and speaking out
on things in which she believes.
During live concerts, she began to
dabble into storytelling after trying
to kill time during early years of
tuning instruments and technical
problems. Now it's something fans
expect and look forward to.
She has given much of her
time and energy to supporting
her strong beliefs in various
subjects ranging from the death
penalty to feminism, women's
reproductive rights to homosex-
Hopeline Network (1-800-SUI-
CIDE) worked to create the Youth
America Hotline (1-877-YOUTH-
LINE) to create such an outlet for
help. Recently, efforts have lead
to a partnership with National
Mental Health Association to
further fight for the cause. The
tour has enjoyed success, with
sponsors that include Alternative
Press Magazine, Tower Records,
Hot Topic and Etnies. The Web
site illustrates the impact the tour
had, citing, "We have received
thousands of government-fund-
ing petition signatures and
thousands of e-mails and letters
from many of you who have been
impacted by the tour
So mark your calendars. The
tour aims to attract thoe who
have a sincere interest in support,
and those who love the music.
Information can be found on
takeactiontour.com, and provide
you a way to take action and
support such a cause or receive
help yourself. Collins said, "It
would be worthwhile because
if someone down the road
is helped from this tour, that
would be a life saved thanks to
music
This writer can be reached at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
I9IIIK ��&�
Familiar television personalities Morrow and Krumholtz.
CBS runs 'Ilumb3rs'
on new crime drama
see ANI page A6
Network debuts show
in top five for week
GARY MCCABE
STAFF WRITER
When "Friends" became a
hit comedy in 1994, it didn't
take long for the television
producers to take notice and
begin churning out similar
shows of their own. Because of
"Friends television audiences
were subjected to a barrage of
"Friends" rip-offs.
American television is going
through a similar period. "CSI:
Crime Scene Investigation"
has become a phenomenon
since its debut in 2000 and
just like "Friends a handful
of strikingly similar television
shows have hit the airwaves in
response. Because of "CSI we
now have "Cold Case "With-
out a Trace a handful of "CSI"
spin-offs and now, CBS's new
drama, "Numb3rs
Produced by Ridley and Tony
Scott, "Numb3rs" is the story of
two brothers named Don and
Charlie Eppes. Don, played by
Rob Morrow, is a no-nonsense,
tough-as-nails FBI agent who will
do anything to solve a case. Char-
lie, played by David Krumholtz of
The Santa Clause films, is a bril-
liant mathematician with
a hint of social anxiety.
Although both sons reside in Los
Angeles, their lives rarely intersect.
That is, until their widowed
father, played by Judd Hirsch,
attempts to bring them closer
together. When Charlie looks
over his brother's file on a
rapist-turned-murderer, he
insists he can catch him using
mathematics. With no leads
of his own, Don lets his little
brother help out. Inspired by a
sprinkler and using a series of
math equations, Charlie pin-
points the murderer and Don
tracks down and captures him.
And thus, the premise of the
show is set.
The show's debut following
the AFC Championship Game
between the New England Patri-
ots and the Pittsburgh Steelers
was a huge success, attracting
nearly 16 million viewers. The
show proved it could stand on
its own legs when it moved
to its regular timeslot on Friday
at 10 p.m. and still garnered a
strong 9.8 rating. If "Numb3rs"
continues to be a success;
it would only strengthen
CBS's stranglehold on tele-
vision dominance with the
highest rated drama ("CSI"),
comedy ("Everybody Loves
Raymond"), reality show ("Sur-
vivor") and news program ("60
Minutes)
"Numb3rs" faces two prob-
lems. First is its timeslot, which
is at a time when people are out
of their homes and not watching
television. Networks rarely place
their biggest shows on Friday
nights and if "Numb3rs" con-
tinues to get good numbers, CBS
would be smart to move it to a
more desirable night and time.
The second problem facing
"Numb3rs" is its content. Math
is hardly a popular subject
and potential viewers may
be turned off by it. Current
viewers could also grow con-
fused and frustrated with the
complex equations which are
the crux of the show. Nick
Falacci, while understanding
the potential problems, is more
optimistic, saying, " we think
most viewers are fascinated by
mathematics and are curious
about how the world works
around them
While obviously Influenced
by highly successful "CSI
"Numb3rs" does manage to set
itself apart from the landmark
show. When Charlie goes into
"math mode the viewer sees
the world as you would expect
he does at the time, with the
world turning into numerals
and codes. The show is also a
see NUMB3RS page A6





I
PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � FEATURES
2-09-05
Ani
from page A5
Numb3rs
from page A5
ual "visibility" and to the historic
preservation of buildings in her
hometown of Buffalo.
"I speak without reservation
from what I know and who I am.
I do so with the understanding
that all people should have the
right to offer their voice to the
chorus whether the result is har-
mony or dissonance, the world
song is a colorless dirge without
the differences that distinguish '
us, and it is that difference which
should be celebrated not con-
demned. Should any part of my
music offend you, please do not
close your ears to it. Just take
what you can use and go on says
DiFranco when describing her
storytelling to the press.
DiFranco has performed with
a variety of artists including
Prince, Macee Parker, Dan Bern
and Janis Ian. Dave Matthews
Band and Ch'ick D have both
covered songs by DiFranco and
she had duets with John Gorka
and Jackie Chan.
This writer can be contacted at
featurei@theeastcarolinian.com.
bit warmer than the cold world
of "CSI" with genuinely tender
moments between the two lead
actors.
So far, reviews for the new
show have been fairly positive.
Tim Goodman of The San Fran-
cisco Chronicle calls "Numb3rs"
enthralling if not all together
exceptional" and attributes the
show's appeal partly to its cast,
especially praising Peter Mac-
Nicol, who plays Charlie's quirky
physicist friend.
Robert Bianco of USA Today
also praises the cast, saying, "As
strong as the supporting cast may
be, 'Numb3rs' is run by its two
stars and their quirky fraternal
energy. You may not instinctively
picture Morrow as an agent, but
few actors are better at creating
smart, complex characters with
a bad habit of getting in their
own way. And Krumholtz, after
a string of failed series, finally
has found a character that allows
him to be appealing rather than
annoying
Rob Owen, of the Pittsburgh
Post-Gazette was not as fond of
the show said, "Ifs not a bad show
- merely ho-hum. Perhaps it will
have greater appeal to people who
liked math in school, but to me
'Numb3rs' just seems like a 'CSI'
clone with the quadratic formula
tossed in for good effect
Staying power will ultimately
be the deciding factor as to
whether the show will be a suc-
cess or not. Will the math applied
to "Numb.3rs" continue to evolve
and hold viewers or will it even-
tually be written off as a novelty?
And in a time with more than 10
shows with a similar format, can
the writers come up with story-
lines and crimes that are new and
original?
Setting itself apart from
the pack will ultimately decide
"Numb3rs" fate. In the premiere
episode, Krumholtz's character
Charlie explained to his brother
that, " everything is numbers
You better hope so, Krumholtz, or
else it's back to playing Bernard
the Elf in The Santa Clause 3.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Missy Higgins offers fresh Australian sound
'Sound ofWte'will
put her on the map
JESSICA CRESON
SENIOR WRITER
The Melbourne native, Missy
Higgins, has released her first EP,
which is a sample of the completed
album in America. There are five
songs on this CD, including "All
for Believing" and "Scar
Higgins' songs are poetry
accompanied by various instru-
ments, mainly the piano or acous-
tic guitar. Her voice is polished
and strong and her talent is
apparent by the well-written and
confident lyrics, along with her
skill on the piano and guitar.
The first track, "All for Believ-
ing has the darkest sound of
the five songs on the EP with the
piano and cello behind her power-
ful, yet refined voice.
"All for Believing" is also the
song responsible for her success
thus far.
When Higgins was 13, she
decided she didn't want to live at
home any longer, so her parents
sent her about an hour away from
Melbourne to boarding school.
She had an assignment for her
music class to write an original
composition. This assignment was
not done until half an hour before
the class started. The composition
was "All for Believing
With encouragement from her
teacher and family, she wound up
entering this song into a contest
called Unearthed, which is run
by a national alternative radio
network, Triple J. Soon after, she
received the phone call saying she
won the contest.
This gave her immedi-
ate attention from record com-
panies, but she was still only
a senior in high school. After
much thought, she decided to
stay focused in school and then
take six months to travel around
Europe before she signed anything.
Higgins did not want to make
any mistakes that would lead her
to be a one-hit wonder. Music and
self-respect are too important to
her for that result.
In the midst of her trip to
Europe, she was beckoned to
L.A. where a radio station had
been playing "All for Believing"
and wanted to meet her. Higgins
ended up doing a showcase perfor-
mance and signing with Warner
Bros.Reprise Records.
She was then flown back to
Europe to continue her traveling.
On her next trip to L.A. she
met with producer John Porter
(The Smiths, Elvis Costello, Los
Lonely Boys, Ryan Adams) and
her new band.
"Scar" is the next important
song on this EP. It debuted at No. 1
on Australian charts in September
and was the most played song of
the year in Australia.
"It's basically a song about
people's need to pigeonhole
things in order to process them
said Missy Higgins on her Web
site, missyhiggins.com.
"It's about rebelling from the
easy path of just going along with
everybody else and trying not to
standout. It's also about realizing
you've trusted the wrong people
and finding a way to benefit from
the scars they've left behind
The Sound of White was fully
completed in mid-2004 with a
total of 12 songs. Higgins began
touring with local heroes, John
Butler Trio and the Finn Broth-
ers. This was where "Scar" was
so eagerly accepted.
Higgins will begin touring,
but this time as the headliner.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Join our team!
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Advertising Representatives
Positions available for Summer and Fall
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and Marketing?
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
VALENTINES DAY
Valentine's day gift ideas at Pirate Market,
Croatan, Spot & Wright Place
Use your Pirate Bucks
and save 7
Long-stemmed roses, candy, chocolates,
balloons, vases, stuffed bears, picture frames,
gift packs and more
Gifts for guys and girls
CAMPUS LIVING
!����� ��������
The Late Night Players
With ECU'S Swash Improv Group
February 9th @ 8pm
Come ready to laugh at
the Pirate Underground!

For Information On the Show
252-328-6004
Pirate
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uvb aMTBirrAAMcVT
"�V





2-09-05
t!
ms for
ket,
ies,
o

ft-
PageA7sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
WEDNESDAY February 9,2005
Sports Briefs
Merritt Earns National,
C-USA Honors
The United States Track Coaches
Association announced that
LaShawn Merritt of ECU has been
selected as the Male Athlete-
of-the-Week for NCAA Division I
track & field. In addition, he was
also named the Conference USA
Athlete-of-the-Week Tuesday,
becoming the first male and
second C-USA athlete in the
history of the league to win three
weekly honors during a single
track season. Merritt, a freshman,
turned in the fastest 400 meter
dash time in the world so far this
season at the Gator Invitational
in Gainesville, Fla. Sunday (Feb.
6). Merritt's school-record time
of 45.94 Is also the fastest indoor
performance ever by anyone
under 18 years of age. When
converted from the 200 meter flat
track at the Stephen C. O'Connell
Center, the time is 45.54 as listed
on the national performance list.
Merritt also teamed with B.J. '
Henderson, Domlnick Richmond
and DeAndre Hyman to earn a
third-place finish in the 4x400
meter relay with a time of 3:12.84
to earn provisional qualification.
The Pirates will next be in action
at the Tyson Indoor Invitational
and the Virginia Tech Challenge
on Feb. 11 -12.
Man charged with
stalking Koumlkova
A homeless man was charged
with stalking and burglary after
swimming nude across Blscayne
Bay in search of tennis star Anna
Koumlkova's waterfront residence
and getting caught near her
neighbor's home. Police said
- William Lepeska screamed,
"Anna! Save me as he was taken
away Jan. 30. He is scheduled
to make a court appearance
Wednesday. Lepeska, 40, who
sports an "Anna" tattoo on his
right biceps, was found near
the swimming pool of a house
three doors from Koumlkova's
$5 million home. Police said
Lepeska acknowledged that he
spent several months searching
for her address on the Internet
and swam nude 200 yards
after locating it. Lepeska sent
Koumikova "numerous letters and
posted e-mails to her Web page"
and "made several alarming
statements indicating that he
believed Ms. Koumikova had left
a door unlocked for him to enter
her residence and left clothing
for him to wear as If she was
expecting his arrival police said.
Koumikova was cooperating with
prosecutors and "consulting with
her personal security team At
Miami Beach police headquarters,
Lepeska "refused to stand for a
photograph" and demanded a
psychiatric evaluation. He became
"hostile and belligerent assumed
a "boxer's fighting stance and
began throwing punches police
said. He allegedly bit an officer's
left thumb, drawing blood, and hit
White in the chest. Police used
pepper spray and an expandable
baton to subdue him and charged
him with aggravated battery,
battery and resisting arrest with
violence.
Sllva agrees to
extension with Twins
Right-hander Carlos Silva and
the Minnesota Twins avoided
arbitration by agreeing Tuesday
to a two-year contract that
Includes a mutual option for
2007. Silva, in his first season
with the Twins, went 14-8 with a
4.21 ERA In 203 Innings for the AL
Central champions. Acquired In
a December 2003 trade with the
Philadelphia Phillies, Sllva had one
career major league start before
arriving in Minnesota. Terms of
the deal weren't immediately
available.
ECU Men's Basketball:
The good, the bad, the ugly
The Pirates have just two Conference USA road wins in four years. ECU'S next matchup, however, is at home against Marquette.
ROBERT LEONARD
SENIOR WRITER
Every
single season
there seems
to be one
main theme
with the bas-
ketball team.
Something
is going to
be good,
something
is going to
be bad and
something is
going to be flat out ugly. This
season is no different.
The Good
The progression of the fresh-
men has been outstanding. These
guys get better every game. No
one has impressed me more than
Tommy Hammonds. 1 really liked
him from the first moment I saw
him. In an earlier installment of
the Full Court Press I mentioned
that "no one impressed me more
than Tommy Hammonds" and
that "he looked like a veteran,
not a freshman
Today, 14 weeks after that
particular article, I still feel the
same way. Hammonds really
stepped into the spotlight in the
Charlotte game a few weeks back
when he shot a perfect 4-4 from
the three-point line and scored
16polrrts.
This kid can shoot. This kid
is smart with the basketball. This
kid knows how to play the game.
This kid will be a star in Confer-
ence USA.
John Hart has also been very
impressive. The thing I like best
about him is his attitude. His
playing time has been limited
this season behind guys like
Castro, Rouse and Moussa, but
it seems he never complains. He
just goes into the game and does
his job.
Josh King is the smartest
player of all the freshmen. I have
not seen him take a bad shot all
season. Even though he is the
best shooter on the team and
arguably the best in the history
of ECU, he does not force shots.
So many times freshmen with his
kind of talent will force shots, but
he refuses to take a bad shot.
Marvin Kilgore has improved
tremendously this season. I
feared he might be a little flashy
at times, but that has stopped. He
has come in when JaPhet needed
a breather for five and six min-
utes at a time and has proven to
be a worthy backup.
The Bad
The free throw shooting has
been atrocious. Numbers do not
lie - 61.9 percent from the free
throw line on the year, 467 free
throw attempts, 178 misses. That
is 178 scoring chances ECU has
had that were not converted.
While no one is going to be
perfect from the charity stripe,
which has not exactly been
generous to ECU, 61.9 percent is
horrible.
When NC State was blowing
out ECU earlier in the season,
missing five free throws instead
of two, really isn't going to make
a difference. It's the close games
where it kills you as a team
On the season, ECU is averag-
ing losing by just six points. If
you crunch some numbers and
say the Pirates shoot 75 percent
from the line on the season, that
six point margin changes very
quickly.
Instead of going 289 - 467
from the line, with 75 percent,
that stat goes up to roughly 350
-467.
That simple change adds 61
more points on the scoreboard
for the Pirates for the season, or
about three a game.
When you look at games like
the overtime loss at Western
Carolina, those three free throws
would have come in handy. One
could argue ECU would have won
three more games with 75 per-
cent free throw shooting (West-
ern Carolina, South Carolina
lost by four and South Florida
(lost by one).
If a game is close and we
need someone to knock down
free throws, I want Cook or King
on the line. Cook has proved
he is the most clutch free throw
see BASKETBALL page AB
Waskiewicz
Diet Diary:
Part II
My motivation is up, but
will my weight go down?
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
SENIOR WRITER
My first experience with
personal training at the stu-
dent recreation center was
over. The next few days I found
myself in pain, mainly in my
abs and legs. I was some-
what frustrated with the pain
but I knew the soreness just
meant muscles were forming.
The one thing that just kept
on going through my head
was my weight - 271 pounds.
I still could not get over how
much I have gained since my
freshman year. It kind of
made me depressed think-
ing about how much weight I
needed to lose in order to
get back into shape. At least I had
a goal to work toward.
Finally, my next day of
personal training had arrived.
I still had no idea what
to expect since it was my first
day actually getting into the
activities. Leslie Warren, my
personal trainer, met me in
front of the juice bar at the SRC.
She explained to me what was in
store for the day.
It turned out I had
in store a little bit of every-
thing. We headed upstairs to
the fitness room and I got
started.
The first thing that I did
was jump on the treadmill
and began walking. I set the
speed for 2.7 - I started out low
since I had little experience
with the treadmill. Little did
I know after the day was over
I would be better acquainted with
the machine.
After 30 seconds, Warren told
me to bump up the speed so I
could jog for another minute. I
really didn't bump the speed up
too much, only to 4.5 because
I was still cautious about the
treadmill, I ust didn't trust
it. I had a bad experience
with one in the past when I fell
off and almost broke my leg in
two places.
After the treadmill we moved
on to the dumbbell press, the
only catch this time was that
it was on a workout ball. I
experienced the ball before
many of times but not while
doing the dumbbell presses.
It was a little difficult at first to
stay on the ball, but I soon got the
hang of it. I did one set
of 12 and then asked Warren
how many she wanted me to
do for the second. I then heard
one of her personal phrases that
she repeated throughout the
day, "Muscles don't know num-
bers she said. She was basically
see DIET page A8
Pirates prevail against UNC Wilmington
The men's team finished 8-1 for the season while the women ended the year at 7-1. The men's only loss came at the hands of Chapel Hill Jan. 26.
ECU swim teams round
out seasons with wins
DAVID WASKIEWICZ
STAFF WRITER
The ECU swim teams were
eager to get back to winning last
weekend as they faced in-state
rival UNC Wilmington in the
last meet of the regular season.
The ECU men and women's team
were both coming off a loss to
Chapel Hill so a win against
UNC Wilmington would prove
to be crucial to gain momentum
heading into the Conference
USA Championships and Invi-
tational.
Records were broken in
the 133-108 victory over the
Seahawks. Freshman Christie
Icenhower had a score of 296.10
in the three-meter diving event.
The score was enough to set the
ECU school record.
In the women's 1,000 free-
style freshman Megan Pulaski
broke her personal best record
coming In at 10:13:22. Pulaski
also captured a win in the 500-
freestyle coming in at 5:03.72.
The men's team finished
strong as senior Casey Cronin
placed first in both the 200 IM
and the 200 backstroke with
times of 1:54.10 and 2:07.56
respectively. The 400-relay team,
which consisted of Cronin, Josh
Barthlow, Matt Donohue and
Kelly Hendrick, also placed first
with the time of 3:24.52.
ECU Head Coach Rick Kobe
was excited about the team's
win.
"This was a huge meet for our
swimmers and we really swam
well today in front of a sell-out
crowd said Kobe in an interview
with SID.
"This was a great way to
finish out the regular season by
beating our in-state rival
The Pirates' next stop is Hous-
ton Feb. 23-26. The women's
team will compete in the C-USA
Championship while the men
will take part in the C-USA Invi-
tational.
This writer can be contacted at
sports&theeas tcarolinian.com.
TopIS D-l Mid-MajorTop15 D-l Mid-Major
Poll (Men)Poll (Women)
1)SW Missouri St.1)UC-Irvine
2)Eastern Michigan2)Miami University
3)Southern Illinois3)TCU
4)PrincetonA)Richmond
S)UC-IrvineB5)ECU
6)Navy.ft6)SW Missouri St.
7)TCU7)Oakland
8)UMBC � fo8)Navv
9)Western KentuckyEastern Michigan
10) U) 11!)UL-Monro�10)Denver University
ECl4t���11)Southern Illinois Houston
Ball State12)
13)St. Bonaventure13)New Hampshire
14)Denver University14)Ball State
IS)George MasonIS)Western Kentucky
V





PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN �SPORTS
2-09-05
Duke's Redick putting it ail on the line
(KRT) DURHAM, NC � Sun-
rises and sunsets are automatic.
J.J. Redick isn't a force of
nature. But, when he's stand-
ing at a free-throw line, he is to
college basketball shooters what
Pavarotti is to tenors.
Redick, a junior at Duke, is
averaging 22.8 points per game
for the fourth-ranked Blue Devils
and is shooting 42.4 percent on
3-pointers. Opposing coaches and
defenders grudgingly admit he's
the college game's best shooter.
Redick has expanded his game
to include more drives to the
basket, which makes him harder
to guard and accounts for his scor-
ing increase. (He averaged 15.9
points per game last season.) But,
when the action stops and Redick
steps to the line, the drama isn't
about if he'll make a free throw;
it's about whether he'll miss.
Redick leads Division I in
free-throw accuracy this season.
He has made 93.2 percent, going
110 of 118. In 89 career games,
Redick has missed 24 free throws.
His 93.6 career percentage is on
pace to surpass the 91.3 per-
cent made by Villanova's Gary
Buchanan, who holds the NCAA
Division I men's career record.
"To me, a slump is missing
one said Redick, who scored 26
points and made all six of his free
throws in the Blue Devils' 82-65
victory over Georgia Tech on
Saturday. "I've made 10 of 11 in a
game and been mad. If I thought
back, I think I can remember 95
percent of the ones I've missed
Redick's accuracy has turned
his missed free throws into Rip-
ley's Believe It Or Not moments.
A week ago against Virginia Tech,
he was seven of 10 from the line
the first time in his Duke career
that he missed more than one
free throw in a game.
The Cameron Crazies were as
mystified as Redick. It couldn't
have been Redick's fault that he
missed "three" from the line. It
had to be something else, like
an equipment malfunction. The
Crazies chanted "Fix the rim
"It's the easiest shot in bas-
ketball. It's just you, the ball and
the basket said Ahearn, who is
making 92.8 percent from the
line this season, but doesn't have
enough attempts to qualify for
the NCAA stat leaders. "Nobody's
guarding you. I go to the line
expecting to make it every time, but
there are guys who step up there
and have no idea where it's going
It's the only time in a major
team sport where a player can
score without being defended. It's
a 15-foot shot at a 10-foot basket.
Teams that struggle shooting
free throws are like pitching staffs
that allow walks.
"The lack of practice is some-
thing that affects most players
Kentucky coach Tubby Smith
said: "Around the country, it's a
concern for coaches and there's
concern on our team. We're
down to (65.8) percent and that's
not good at all.
Harvard's 1984 team holds
the Division I single-season
record, shooting 82.2 percent
from the line. Since the NCAA
started keeping track of statistics
in 1948, the teams in Division I
have never combined to make 70
percent of their free throws in a
season. The best season percent-
age was 69.7 in 1979.
"Each gym, there's a little
hole In the floor at the free-throw
line Redick said. "It's right in
the middle to help players get
square to the basket. I put my
right foot six inches to the right
of that so that my body is com-
pletely squared up to the basket.
"When I get to the line,
saying Philippians 4:13 ("I can
do all things through Christ
who strengthens me") helps my
concentration. Right before I
release the ball, I say 'buckets
That sort of helps me clear my
mind.
"I've shot hundreds of
thousands of free throws so, from
there, it's just instinct
"In between shooting jump-
ers, I tell myself I'm gonna shoot
10, shoot five (free throws).
When I'm done and try to make
20 or 30 free throws, until I feel
good.
"And I always leaveon a make
Basketball
from page A7
shooter on the team. Against
Charlotte, he was put on the
line up a point with five seconds
left and he knocked down both
of them.
King is a perfect 8 - 8 on the
year from the free throw line.
His 100 percent obviously leads
the team.
The Ugly
If there is one thing I don't
like about Bill Herrion, it's his
road winning percentage. In the
last four years, his Pirates have
only won seven road games,
just two of them coming in the
C-USA (not including neutral
courts).
At one point last season, I
thought maybe the road woes
were over. We pulled out road vic-
tories at Middle Tennessee State,
at Radford, at Old Dominion and
at Virginia Tech. The win against
the Hokies was the last road win
for the Pirates - and that was over
a year ago.
I really don't know if the guys
just aren't being pumped up on
the road or what. I know playing
in Minges is a great lift for the
guys and I know they miss that
on the road, but the last time I
checked, the basket is still 10 feet
high at every gym in the country.
So there it is - the good, the
bad, and the ugly.
The positives include the
development of our young play-
ers for next year and they'll hope-
fully learn as the season goes on
that they must close games out.
Hopefully losses like these will
teach them something but the
bad and ugly come into to play
in how and where they lose these
games. Free throw shooting must
improve or this team will never
be successful and they absolutely
have to start winning on the
road. The NIT and NCAA tourney
are mere fantasies if you can't win
away from home court.
The writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Diet
from page A7
telling me to keep on going until
I couldn't do anymore.
Much to my surprise after
the dumbbell press, it was time
to go back on the treadmill.
It was called interval training.
I did an activity then I jumped
back onto the treadmill
for another minute or two.
This pattern went on throughout
the day until my legs felt like
slush.
My arms were also getting
tired as I kept on lifting weights
with the dumbbells. The set of
dips that I did afterward did not
help my arms any either.
I finished out my workout
with abdominal crunches on the
workout ball. Even though my
stomach was a little sore I was
able to do a decent amount before
I rolled off the ball defeated. My
abs ached as I helped myself off
the ground.
It was now time to see if I
had made any improvements
over the week with my weight
and arm strength. I stepped on
the scale hoping that my weight
went down over the week. When
the weight came up I was a little
relieved. The scale read 269.7.
My emotions were kind of mixed.
I was kind of hoping that I would
have gone down more than 1.3
pounds in a week but Warren
insisted that it was not healthy
to lose more than two or three
pounds in a week so she was satis-
fied with my loss.
I then moved on to my arm
strength test, doing as many
pushups as possible. After the arm
workout earlier in the day I was
kind of disappointed that I was not
able to do more than 13 pushups.
I left the personal train-
ing that week with my weight
still on my mind. Sure, Warren
said that no more than two or
three pounds of weight loss was
healthy, but I kept on thinking
to myself that it should be more.
In the end I want to lose more
than 50 pounds and 1.3 just did
not seem like a powerful number
to me. I guess as I continue with
the personal training program
my numbers will continue to go
down - hey, progress is progress.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeas t Carolinian, com.
Looking for something?
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PAGEA9
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
2-09-05
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Get Started. Get Ahead. Live.
iast Carolina University
Summer School 2005





CLASSIFIEDS & CO
Page A10
WEDNESDAY February 9, 2005
CLASSIFIED DEADLINES CLASSIFIED AD RATES
Thursday at 4 p.m. for the TUESDAY edition
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Ad must be received in person. We are located on
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Students (wvalld I.DJ-UP to 25 words.
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Each word over 25, add
For bold or all caps, add (perl
All ads must be pre-pald. No refunds given.
.$2
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FOR RENT
Pinebrook Apt. 758-4015
1&2 BR apts, dishwasher,
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High speed internet
available. Rent includes
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One, two, three and four
bedroom houses, duplexes,
and apartments. All within
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friendly! Reasonable rates,
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830-9502.
3 Bedroom House for rent
one block from ECU. 804
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ECU Pirates Salute cannon
- 2 were built and the other
is in my cannon collection.
For sale, Best offer. 215-
651-3478.
1995 Eagle Talon TSI AWD
107K Exc Cond Maroon
Cray Lthr 5-SPD 4-Cyl
Turbo All Power CC CD
Cass Sunroof $4000 Firm
355-1751
SERVICES
Spring Break 2005 - Travel
with STS, America's
1 Student Tour
Operator to Jamaica,
Cancun, Acapulco,
Bahamas and Florida.
Now hiring on-campus
reps. Call for group
discounts. Information
Reservations 1-8O0-648-
4849 or www.ststravel.
com.
HELP WANTED
Do you need a good job?
The ECU Telefund is hiring
students to contact alumni
and parents for the ECU
Annual Fund. $6.25hour
plus cash bonuses. Make
your own schedule. If
interested, visit our website
at www.ecu.edutelefund
and click on JOBS.
Food Delivery Drivers
wanted for Restaurant
Runners Part time positions
100 to 200 per week. Some
lunch time (11a-2p) M-F
and weekend availability
required. 2-way radios
allow you to be anywhere
in Greenville when not
on a delivery. Reliable
transportation a must.
Call 756-5527 between
2-5 only. Sorry no dorm
students and Greenville
Residents only.
Hey Graduates! Hot 103.7
and Eagle 94 is looking
for account executives
to market advertising in
Greenville and surrounding
areas. Great benefits,
unlimited income. Call Tori
Gray at 252-672-5900 Ext.
203 to set up interview.
Mystery Shoppers Needed!
Earn While You Shop! Call
Now Toll Free 1-888-255-
6040 EXT 13400
Greenville Recreation &
Parks Department is
recruiting part-time youth
soccer coaches for the
indoor soccer program.
Applicants must possess a
good knowledge of soccer
skills and have the ability
and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must
be able to coach young
people ages 3-18 in soccer
fundamentals. Hours are
from 3:30 pm to 9 pm,
Monday-Friday with some
weekend coaching. Flexible
hours according to class
schedules. This program
will run from March 7 to
mid May. Salaries start at
$6.25 per hour. Apply at the
City of Greenville, Human
Resources Department,
201 Martin L. King Jr. Dr
Greenville NC 27834. For
more information, please
contact the Athletic Office at
329-4550, Monday through
Friday, 10 am until 7 pm.
Fun Summer jobs in the
Outer Banks. Steamers
Shellfish To Go is looking
for employees for summer
jobs at the beach. We
need cashiers, cooks, and
expeditors. Housing is
available. Call Linda at
757-576-9655 or by email
shellfishtogo@msn.com
Bartending! $250day
potential. No experience
necessary. Training
provided. (800) 965-6520
ext. 202.
GREEK PERSONALS
Valentine's Alert: Sigma
Sigma Sigma will be selling
Valentines at Wright Place
all week from 11 -3. We will
deliver them on the 14th for
you. Its a great for sisters,
friends, and couples! Find a
Sigma to send a Valentine!
Alpha Phi will be hosting
a blood drive on Feb. 9
from 12-6 in the parking
lot, located at the bottom
of College Hill. Come give
the gift of life!
Who's your Alpha Phi Heart
Throb? Vote for your favorite
Valentine's hunk at the Heart
Throb booth on Feb. 8-Feb.
10 in front of the Wright
Place. All money will be
donated to the Alpha Phi
Foundation, which supports
Cardiac Care!
OTHER
Spring Break 2005 Only 6
weeks left Lowest Prices
Biggest Parties Earn 2
Free Trips Exclusive with
Sun Splash Tours www.
sunsplashtours.com 1-800-
426-7710
Free Up to, $100 play
poker online at site www.
partypoker.com play for
real or for play money use
bonus code ecupoker to
activate bonus Good Luck!
1 Spring Break Vacations!
Cancun, Jamaica, Acapulco,
Bahamas, & Florida. Best
Parties, Best Hotels, Best
Prices! Group Discounts,
Organizers Travel
Free! Space is limited!
Book now and save! 1-
800-234-7007 www.
endlesssummertours.com
"Before giving,
I always
look for the
Humane
Seal
By 6th grade, an alarming number
of girls lose interest in math,
science & technology. Which means
thsy won't qualify for most future
jobs. That's why parents have to
keep their interest alive,
In every way we can.
It's her future. Do the math"
wv.girlsgotech,
;org
OiGW Scouts.
NOAH WYLE
Star'ot NBCs hit show ER
The Humane Charity Seal
of Approval guarantees
that a health charity funds
vital patient services
or life-saving medical
research; but never
animal experiments.
Council on Humane Giving
Washington. D.C.
www. HumaneSeal. org
202-686-2210, ext. 335
PHYSICIANS COMMITTEE FOR RESPONSIBLE MEDICINE
a special ultraviolet camera makes
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�kin damage done by the tun. And
iince 1 la 5 Americans will develop
�kin cancer In their lifetime,
what better reason to alwaye use
sunscreen, wear protective clothing
and use common sense.
AMERICAN ACADEMY OF DERMATOLOGY
888 462.DERM
PROOF THAT A TAN NEVER FADB
Crossword
ACROSS
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6 Pouchlike
structures
10 Guitar adjuncts,
briefly
14 Core group
15 North Carolina
university
16 Bearing
17 Poe's middle
name
18 "Auntie"
19 Notion
20 . there, done
that
21 Scattering
23 Drink voucher
25 "Exodus" author
26 June celebrant
29 Warded off
31 Ovine
statement
34 Political refugee
36 Uncanny state
38 Episcopal cleric
39 Steno book
40 Municipal
41 Unbalanced
43 Formal attire
44 Silent assent
45 Carnal
47 Permit to
48 Sound quality
49 Type of school
51 Unstoppable
55 Plaster support
59 Resting atop
60 Actress Skye
61 Far from
specific
62 Roofer's supply
item
63 Type of curl
64 Endangered
layer
65 Vamoose!
66 Kennedy and
Williams
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 9, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 09, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1793
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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