The East Carolinian, January 13, 2005






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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Volume 80 Number 42
THURSDAY January 13, 2005
ECU professor aids Kazakhstan in radiation
Experts developed
plan to find
orphan sources
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
An ECU professor who regu-
larly works with a U.N. agency
traveled to Kazakhstan where
he spent eight days with two
other experts to assess concerns
over lost radiation in the former
Soviet country.
Daniel D. Sprau, radiation
expert and associate professor
for the Environmental Health
Sciences and Safety Program, has
been a consultant to the United
Nations' International Atomic
Energy Agency for about 10 years.
Sprau said the IAEA is
located in Vienna, Austria
and employs thousands
of people who work with
problems concerning atomic
energy such as radiation, weap-
ons of mass destruction and
nuclear power.
According to the
IAEA's radioactive source
security presentation, in Octo-
ber 2003 there were 137 member
states. Countries become IAEA
members and can request help
with problems concerning
atomic energy.
"They had a request from
Kazakhstan which is part
of the former Soviet Union,
for representatives to come in
and help them establish a strat-
egy for finding what they call
'orphaned sources said Sprau.
Sprau said orphan sources
are radioactive materials which
have no control over them. These
sources were previously used in
either medicine or industry.
Such problems arise in some
countries because they have not
yet been able to develop a suc-
cessful program. After the fall
of the Soviet Union, Kazakhstan
became an independent country
that had to start from the begin-
ning in creating a new govern-
ment infrastructure.
Sprau and two other radia-
tion experts went to Kazakhstan
to develop a strategy in finding
and controlling orphan sources
and to report their findings back
to the IAEA.
"We met with people from
the customs agency, the inter-
national atomic energy their
environmental protection agency
and their research institute to
see what they needed in order to
develop a strategy and then imple-
ment the strategy Sprau said.
Sprau said there are signifi-
cant amounts of radioactive-
sources and Kazakhstan must
either find a use for it or dispose
it. The three radiation experts
gave Kazakhstan leaders a copy
of their report before they turned
it into the IAEA.
Sprau said much of the proj-
ect involves writing procedures
and providing funding for moni-
toring equipment. This equip-
ment includes radiation detectors
Shelton
thrives
in old
position
The International Atomic Energy Agency, where Sprau works, is located in Vienna, Austria
which Kazakhstan now imple-
ments at its borders to make sure
no dangerous materials are going
in or out of the country.
Sprau said international proj-
ects like this one take a long
time to progress, so it may be
some time before their plan is
put to use, but Kazakhstan has
already developed some new
agencies in order to begin solv-
ing their problem.
"Part of the government
infrastructure is controlling
radiation sources, so they now
have essentially an atomic
energy agency and they have a
licensing and registration pro-
cedure, but they haven't found
all the sources Sprau said.
see RADIATION page A2
SHELTON
Vice chancellor says
Ballard's administration
is off to a good start
KRISTIN DAY
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Former Interim Chancellor Wil-
liam Shelton, back in his old position,
reflected on the first semester under a
new administration, which has proven
to be a successful one and spoke on his
current and former positions.
Shelton, vice chancellor for the
Division of University Advance-
ment, said the year has gone well and
there seems to be a sense of stability.
"Even though there have
1 been a number of personnel
see SHELTON page A3
Campus to host community
forums on international affairs
Eight forums
scheduled to discuss
variety of issues
JONATHAN CROCKER
STAFF WRITER
With the beginning of a new
semester, new busy schedules,
new classes and a pile of new
assignments, other things are
also arising from ECU.
Starting Jan. 22 and running
until March 12, ECU'S Politi-
cal Science Department will be
hosting a range of eight
international forums open to
the community.
"The Great Decisions
Program is sponsored by the
Foreign Policy Association, they
have been doing this now for
about SO years. These groups
meet all over the country said
Rick Kilroy, from the department
of political science.
"These forums are meant
to be community outreach
programs on topics related to
international relations, foreign
policy and national security
Some of the speakers attend-
ing these events will be a mix
of ECU faculty, faculty from
other institutions, business and
government members and the
state department.
The program begins on
Jan. 22 with professor Richard
Ericson speaking on the topic
of Russia.
Attending these forums
allows the participants to learn
about international affairs as
well as viewing cultural books,
artifacts, videos and even tasting
foreign food.
Ballots will be passed
out toward the end of the pro-
gram, allowing participants to
answer a few questions which
will then be taken by the ECU
Foreign Policy Association.
They will then be turned in,
along with others across the
nation, to the secretary of state
to form a public opinion about
foreign policy.
The forums are free to
students and faculty from ECU
and other institutions and
informative books cost $15. The
general public must pay $49 to
attend these forums and the
book is included within the price
of admission.
Faculty can benefit from the
forums in various ways.
"Teachers who attend these
programs may receive continued
education credit Kilroy said.
Chase Crocker, junior
physical education major, said
he thinks the forums are a great
asset offered to the community
and its students.
"On first hearing of these
forums being offered, I believe
that I would like to participate to
further my knowledge of foreign
policy and affairs said Crocker.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolian.com.
ffc International
W Affairs
The programs begin on
Jan. 22 and run eight consec-
utive Saturdays. The program
consists of a sedes ot lectures
by academic and professional
experts on the Middle East,
Russia, Intelligence Reform,
Overseas Job Outsourcing,
Global Water Issues, Sudan
and the Darfur, Global Poverty
and China.
Each session will be held from
10 a.m. -12 p.m. at the Rivers
West Building Auditorium.
Full-time students and teach-
ers can attend tor free and
purchase the book for $15.
The fee Is $49 for all eight
sessions, textbook and refresh-
ments Included.
Additional program Information
and how to register are avail-
able at ecu.educs-acadcpe
great declslons.cfm.
The program contact Is
Rick Kilroy at 328-2349,
kllroyr@mall.ecu.edu.
Fraternity collects donations,
benefits tsunami victims
Beta Theta Pi fraternity is holding a drive this week collecting donations from students and
faculty to raise money for tsunami victims. The proceeds go to the American Red Cross
Disaster Relief Fund designated for tsunami victims. This is one of several attempts by
student organizations to collect donations for this cause. Their goal is to raise $500.
New position created to oversee
diversity issues among students
Chancellor assistant to
aid intercultural relations
AMBER PAYNE
STAFF WRITER
ECU is in the process of devel-
oping a new position of an assistant
to the chancellor, to advocate the
diversity of student life among the
faculty, students, administration
and staff.
The assistant will work
directly with the chancellor,
reporting to him as well as repre-
senting him on various commit-
tees when appropriate. He will
also lead the Chancellor's Com-
munity Advisory Committee
and work with the Interna-
tional House to promote'stu-
dent exchange programs by
increasing the number of stu-
dents traveling to and from
ECU in exchange programs.
Duties the position will take
on include forming a diversity
plan for ECU to implement,
working with the students and
faculty to ensure equal repre-
sentation among students of all
ethnicities, working with deans
and faculty to start a support-
ive program to deal with issues
of diversity in the classroom
and using the liberal arts pro-
gram to promote multicultural
ethnicities through arts, dance,
shows and exhibits.
The diversity plan is set up
to motivate everyone on campus
to get involved with spreading
awareness, knowledge and con-
sideration for other ethnicities.
"We do not have enough
cultural diversity and awareness
among our faculty and staff said
Garrie Moore, vice chancellor for
Diversity of Student Life.
"That is why myself, the
chancellor and others have
worked diligently to start a new
committee that will build rela-
tions and work on the various
subjective cultural issues
Moore said three or four
individuals would be hired
to work under the assis-
tant. He hopes to have these
positions filled by March.
The Equal Employment
Opportunity Office and
Human Resources Office have
worked with most of the diver-
sification efforts that take
place on campus. Moore said
see DIVERSITY page A5
The Greenway Master Plan will expand the current greenway system of Greenville.
Organization to expand greenway system
Project would benefit
Greenville residents
SUMMER MARTIN
STAFF WRITER
The Friends of Greenville Green-
ways are in the process of expanding
the current system of greenways
throughout Greenville in accor-
dance with the City of Greenville's
Greenway Master Plan.
The proposed extensions
FROGGS will contribute to con-
structing run along the Tar River
from Town Commons to Beech
Street, link up with the existing
Green Mill Run greenway and
extend the path behind the Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium across Charles
Boulevard and through the woods
near Pirate's Cove to Evans Street.
After a sidewalk and bike lane are
constructed along the east side of
Evans Street, a 7.5 mile paved loop
will exist for students and Greenville
resident use.
The group's initial project is a
five-year plan and will cost approxi-
mately $1.5 million. FROGGS has
generated some ideas to promote
fundraislng as soon as the group
achieves nonprofit status. The
plan is for the City of Greenville
to link with a greenways plan for
Pitt County, which ECU lecturer
Alan Burne is currently devel-
oping with a group of students.
Several service-learning stu-
dents from Kelli Munn's senior-level
communication class were assigned
to design a power point presenta-
tion and a brochure to be used as
promotional materials for FROGGS.
These promotional materials were
displayed at meetings the organiza-
tion held for all members to see and
comment on.
The brochure, power point pre-
sentation and video showed maps
and photographs of the current
trails, gave the audience an idea
of the benefits of having a larger
Greenway system and informed
see GREENWAY page A2
INSIDE I News: A2 I Classifieds: A7 I Opinion: A4 I Living: Bl I Sports: B4





btlEW 8
Page A2 news@theeastcarolinian.com 252. 328. 6366
NICK HENNE News Editor KRISTIN DAY Assistant News Editor
THURSDAY January 13,2005
Campus News
Apartment Fair
Adult Commuter Student Services.
is sponsoring the ECU Apartment
Fair Jan. 18 from 10 am. - 2 p.m.
In the MSC Great Rooms. More
than 100 apartment complexes
from Greenville will send
representatives who will provide
Information on their complex.
Come and find the place that's
right for you.
Delta Week
As part of Delta Sigma Theta
Sorority's Delta Week, "Cake on
the Yard a Delta tribute and trivia
will be held Jan. 13 In 3009 Bate
from 7 - 8:30 p.m. There will also
be a party at Club Fuzion.
Fraternity Rush
IFC fraternities are having rush
next week seeking ECU men
of all class ranks to see their
organizations. Contact the
Greek Life Office at 328-4235
for details.
Lacrosse
The ECU Men's Club Lacrosse
Team will have a mandatory
meeting for all who want to play
this spring Jan. 13 at 7 p.m. in
202 SRC. If you cannot attend
and are still interested, please
contact either Jamie Montgomery
at 443-253-4009 or Tim Connolly
at 410-294-9913. You can also
e-mail at eculax@earthlink.net.
MLK Holiday Cultural Program
Tenor Darryl Taylor will perform
American Giants: Paul Laurence
Dunbar and Langston Hughes
Monday, Jan. 17 in the Fletcher
Recital Hall at 7 p.m. The event Is
free and open to the public. For
more information, please contact
David Dennard at 328-4364, or the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center at
328-1680.
MLK Holiday March
This annual candlelight vigil and
march In honor of Martin Luther
King, Jr. will be held Monday,
Jan. 17 at 5:30 p.m. The march
will begin at College Hill. For
details contact David Dennard at
328-4364.
Community Unity Breakfast
The Greenville-Pitt County
Chamber of Commerce, the
Office of the Mayor and the City
of Greenville will host this annual
event at the J.H. Rose High School
Auditorium Jan. 17 at 7:30 a.m.
This is an event to celebrate and
recognize the diversity and unity of
the Greenville community. Attorney
and motivational counselor, Earl T
Brown, will be speaking. Brown
is also a volunteer mediator for
the Eastern Carolina Mediation
Center. For more information,
please call 752-4101.
Club Baseball
Club baseball tryouts will be
from Jan. 12 - 15 from 3:45 p.m.
until sunset and Jan. 16 from
1 - 5 p.m. at J. H. Rose High
School. A van will be at the
bottom of College Hill at 3:15 p.m.
for those who do not have any
means of transportation. If you
have a schedule conflict, please
send an e-mail to clubbaseball�
mall.ecu.edu. For more information
visit ecu.eduorgclubbaseball.
Faculty Recital
The School of Music will be hosting
a faculty recital at A.J. Fletcher
Music Hall Jan. 20 at 7 p.m. For
more information, call 328-6851.
Physicians Shadowing
Program
Students still have a chance
to participate in a five-week
session to shadow in areas
of medicine with the Primary
Care Physicians Shadowing
Program. Approximately 20
students will participate in the
program. Students must have
at least a 3 3 GPA and be a
sophomore or junior For details
contact Karen Floyd at 328-
2645 or floydka@mail.ecu.edu.
Commuter Breakfast
Student Professional Development
is hosting the Good Morning
Commuter Breakfast Jan. 20 from
8:30 -11:30 a.m. at the lower level
in MSC. Bruce Maxwell, associate
director of SPD, will be available
to talk about career services
provided by SPD.
Want your event printed in TEC?
Please send your announcement
along with the date, time, location and
contact information lo assistantnews
edtor@theeastcarolinian.com.
News Briefs
Local
Judge orders hearing
about NC high schools
RALEIGH, NC - The judge who has
overseen a decade-long lawsuit
over the state's obligation to teach
all students well will hold hearings in
March about the poor performance of
some high schools, including those in
North Carolina's largest school district.
Wake County Superior Court Judge
Howard Manning Jr. said Tuesday that
the hearings could last as long as a
week. He wants explanations about
why some high schools, particularly
those in the Charlotte-Mecklenburg
system, perform relatively poorly.
He also said he wants potential solutions
and how much they would cost.
Manning called the poorly performing
schools "academically dead citing
a list from the state Department of
Public Instruction that showed fewer
than 60 percent of students at 48
schools around the state performing
at grade level.
"There are 800 or 1,000 students at
each school he said, "And you've got
the bulk of them who are going out
of there completely uneducated and
completely unable to get a job. So we
can't wait any longer to deal with that"
Manning wrote in a November memo
that CMS high schools have some of
the state's lowest test scores even
though they spend a relatively high
amount per student compared with
other school systems.
"Your crowd in Mecklenburg better
start figuring out some way to get that
thing straight Manning told a lawyer
for Charlotte-Mecklenburg schools.
CMS Superintendent James Pughsley
said Tuesday he would be "circling
the wagons with staff to put together
information Manning wants.
Accused hostage-taker
said to have mental Illness
SMITHFIELD, NC - The woman
accused of taking three hostages
at the Caterpillar plant in Clayton on
Nov. 2, has told doctors she hosts 18
personalities, according to a report
from a state mental hospital.
The report from Dorothea Dix Hospital
in Raleigh detailed Pam Arizona's
30-year struggle with mental
illness, including suicide attempts
and involuntary commitments to
psychiatric hospitals.
Mental health experts at Dix found
Arizona, 55, of Raleigh competent
to stand trial on charges of first-
degree kidnapping and making a
false bomb report. They said she
understands the legal system and
is able to assist in her defense.
But they said she has a mental illness
known as borderline personality
disorder, which involves unstable
relationships, self-image and behavior.
They gave directions to Johnston
County jailers and her attorney on
how to manage her occasional
volatile episodes and depression.
The Dix doctors noted that in the
past, other experts have diagnosed
her with dissociative identity
disorder, which is associated with
multiple personalities.
However, the Dix doctors said that
although they could not rule out that
diagnosis, they thought the other
doctors had misinterpreted her
behavior. They agreed she needed
further evaluation.
National
More reports of lasers
being shot Into airplane cockpits
WASHINGTON - The FBI is
investigating at least a dozen cases
of lasers being beamed into aircraft
cockpits since Christmas.
The lasers can temporarily blind
pilots. A cluster of incidents received
wide attention between Christmas
and New Year's Day, and the FBI
says at least four more have occurred
in the past week. Authorities have
continued to rule out terrorism.
Transportation Secretary Norman
Mineta was briefing reporters
Wednesday about the issue at the
Federal Aviation Administration's
aeronautical research center in
Oklahoma City.
Mineta was expected to announce
new measures for alerting pilots and
Radiation from page A1 Greenway from page A1
Sprau said the program is members of the Greenville commu-
preparing them to react when lasers
are shined at their aircraft. He was
also expected to outline ways to
notify law enforcement investigators
more quickly.
Last week, a pilot told law enforcement
officials that a green light appeared on
the nose of his aircraft as it was taking
off from the Burbank, Calif airport.
"To our knowledge there was no
danger to the aircraft said Cathy
Viray, spokeswoman for the FBI in
Los Angeles.
Last weekend, two pilots near
Washington Dulles International
Airport reported lasers beamed at
them, according to FBI spokeswoman
Debra Weierman.
The first incident occurred Saturday
and involved a helicopter from
the Fairfax County (Va.) Police
Department - the other happened
Sunday to a US Airways Express flight.
Tennessee man facing
charges In rampage at garage
JACKSON, Tenn. - A man was being
held Wednesday after a bloody
rampage at a state maintenance
garage. The man's estranged wife
and two others were killed, and two
others were wounded.
Homicide and attempted homicide
charges were expected to be filed
against David Jordan, 40, police said.
According to police, Jordan - armed
with an assault rifle, a 12-gauge pump
shotgun, a 9 mm semiautomatic pistol
and a ,45-caliber semiautomatic
pistol - walked into the Department of
Transportation garage Tuesday and
opened fire on his wife, department
employee Donna Renee Jordan, 31.
She died at the scene.
Walking back outside, he then shot
David Gordon, an employee of HCI
Delivery Services who was dropping
off a package, and Jerry Wayne
Hopper, a Forestry Department
employee who was having work done
on his state vehicle, police said. The
garage is used for maintenance on
state vehicles.
Gordon and Hopper both
died at Jackson-Madison County
General Hospital.
Sprau said the program is
not aimed toward nuclear
weapons, but if they did not
find and use or get rid of the
radioactive material, people
could steal it and use it
for dirty bombs and other
terrorist acts. People could get
hurt by exposure. Sprau said
people can become overexposed
to radiation and not know it
because the effects cannot be
seen or felt immediately.
According to IAEA's
presentation, exposed persons
can suffer social as well as
psychological problems. They can
experience anger, fear, insomnia,
nightmares and depression.
During his time in Vienna,
Sprau usually performs
consulting work that includes
writing technical documents
for a few weeks. He knew some
people in the program from trips
to Vienna and was asked to work
in the field.
This was Sprau's first project
out in the field, but he does
not expect it to be his last. He
said the same kind of project is
developing for Indonesia.
Overall, Sprau feels the
experience was beneficial.
"It was interesting and I think
it was valuable. We have to find
these sources to make sure they
don't harm people and they
don't fall into the wrong hands
Sprau said.
Sprau said programs like
the project in Kazakhstan
are funded by the U.S. gov-
ernment because leaders don't
want problems such as stolen
radiation coming to America.
He said in the United States,
problems like orphan sources
do not arise because there is
a strict program concerning
radiation and the materials are
well-controlled.
When Sprau is called
away to Vienna, he said he usu-
ally gives exams to his class
and then has somebody else
take over teaching responsibili-
ties. Sometimes someone from
Vienna will teach through the
global classroom.
The Environmental
Health Sciences and Safety
Program which Sprau works
for at ECU is under the
department of health education
and promotion. They work with
subjects in environmental health
such as food safety, wastewater,
air pollution, disease vector con-
trol, mosquitoes and rodents.
This writer can be contacted at
new$@theeaitcarolinian.com.
members of the Greenville commu-
nity how they can help the project
to be a success.
"We want the people of the
community to know this project is
not just for ECU students, but for the
community as a whole said Vince
Bellis, retired biology professor.
The greenways will provide
a safer place for all Greenville
residents to walk, ride bikes
and enjoy the outdoors. It will
also protect wildlife habitats
and other open spaces, provide
stream restoration and offer a
healthy place to get some exercise.
In 1991 the city constructed
its first greenway, Green Mill Run
and attempted to create a larger
greenway system, but the pro-
posal did not succeed for lack of
prioritization and funding. This
year and in the future, FROGGS
is making an effort to gain wide
support and funding from the
entire Greenville community to
make the project a success.
When the organization
receives nonprofit status, which
would most likely be in Febru-
ary or March, it will officially
be able to collect donations. At
this time its members and a new
group of volunteer students will
begin presenting its vision at
various Greenville community
clubs and organizations such as
the Kiwanis Club and the Rotary
Club, displaying the student-pro-
duced power point presentation
and film to gain a spotlight for
the project and solicit funding for
actual greenway construction.
FROGGS has already been
given some donations, includ-
ing a $500 grant from the local
nonprofit organization, uptown
Greenville, which is currently
see GREENWAY page A5
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Two other men - Transportation
Department employees Larry Taylor,
54, and James Goff, 53 - were
wounded, authorities said. Both were
listed in stable condition Wednesday
at the hospital.
Police did not give a motive for the
bloodshed. Jordan was arrested
a short time later, not far from the
maintenance garage, after officers
followed him.
World
Afghan president
says amnesty for drug
traffickers 'not a bad Idea'
KABUL, Afghanistan - President
Hamid Karzai said an amnesty
for former drug smugglers was
"not a bad idea" if it could help
eliminate Afghanistan's booming
narcotics industry, but he suggested
Wednesday it was far from becoming
government policy.
Under pressure from the United States
and Europe, Karzai has called for a
"holy war" against Afghanistan's drug
business, the world's largest, and made
it a priority for the five-year term he won
in landmark September elections.
"It's not a bad idea to take people away
from criminal activity Karzai said. "But
anything like that has to be done with
very careful thought, with very careful
guarantees, with absolute surety that
this is going to discourage trafficking
Afghan poppy cultivation jumped an
estimated two-thirds last year and
supplied 87 percent of the world's
opium, the raw material for most of the
heroin sold to young addicts in areas
such as Western Europe and Russia.
The UN. valued the trade at $2.8
billion, or more than 60 percent of
Afghanistan's 2003 gross domestic
product, and warned that the country
was turning into a "narco-state
Two Afghan ministers told The
Associated Press last week they were
weighing whether to offer traffickers
amnesty from prosecution if they
help stop the cultivation of opium
poppies and invest their wealth in
reconstruction.
Some officials say such a program
might be effective after a U.S
sponsored crackdown on smugglers,
refiners and corrupt officials expected
in the next few months. Plans also are
being made to destroy poppy fields
and help farmers grow licit crops.
Iraqi Insurgents seem worried
bin Laden will hijack their cause
CAIRO, Egypt - Osama bin Laden has
vowed to turn Iraq into the front line
of his war against the United States,
but Iraqi insurgents seem worried that
he's out to hijack their rebellion.
At times, the Iraqis and foreign Muslim
militants seem to be competing.
Media reports and Web statements
have speculated that a Saudi carried
out the Dec. 21 suicide bombing of
a U.S. mess tent in the northern Iraqi
city of Mosul that killed 22 people.
But Ansar al-Sunnah, the homegrown
group that took responsibility for that
deadliest of attacks on a U.S. target
in Iraq, named the bomber as Abu
Omar of Mosul, a nom de guerre that
pointedly claims him as an Iraqi.
Earlier this month, a posting on Ansar
al-Sunnah's Web site told foreign
militants to stop coming. The group,
which defines itself as both nationalist
and Islamic, said it needed money,
not more recruits.
"We have concrete information that a
sharp division is now broiling between
Iraqis waging a nationalist war and
foreign Arabs spurred by militant Islam
said Mouwafak al-Rubaie, the Iraqi
government's national security adviser.
"They are more divided than ever
Al-Rubaie said one reason was the
perception among Iraqis that Abu
Musab al-Zarqawi, the Jordanian
militant whom bin Laden endorsed
as his deputy in Iraq, was of little help
during the American onslaught on the
Iraqi insurgent hotbed of Fallujah in
November.
"Al-Zarqawi and his group fled
Fallujah and let the Iraqis face the
attack alone al-Rubaie said in a
telephone interview.
Some Iraqis may have drawn parallels
between the debacle in Fallujah and
what happened to Afghanistan after it
became bin Laden's headquarters.
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1-13-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A3
Shelton
It begins on the streets.
It ends here.
Inspired By
A True Story
from page A1
changes, you just sense that there
is a core within the institution
said Shelton.
lie said from a financial standpoint
the administration has been successful
this year in supporting faculty and staff
by making compensation adjustments.
Among the administration's
strengths, Shelton said it has the abil-
ity to establish a balance between the
old and the new ways at ECU.
"I think you have a combi-
nation of fresh ideas on the one
hand and yet, a reserve of history
about the institution Shelton said.
He said the only problem this
administration has encountered
is due to circumstances in which
they entered into. Several positions
remain at interim status and a vari-
ety of searches are underway. I Ie said
it will be a matter of time of finding
and selecting the appropriate people.
Shelton said during his time as
chancellor, his job was to address rele-
vant issues at that time whether it was
getting through management flex-
ibility training, redirecting resources
or realigning personnel. He contin-
ued to work with strategic planning
that had already begun but left it up
to Ballard to choose the final design.
Shelton said while serving as
interim chancellor, he also held
the position of vice chancellor with
University Advancement. 1 Ie said he
could not have done this without the
help of the staff.
"The staff at university advance-
ment accepted the situation. I cannot
say enough about how the staff just kept
on rolling they did a great job fulfill-
ing their responsibilities Shelton said.
Shelton has spent the last semes-
ter working solely for his depart-
ment, which handles such things as
financing, development, marketing,
news and information and some spe-
cial projects. He feels this semester
they have the essential elements of a
strong advancement program.
"Our division is one that can
deliver and I am proud of that fact
Shelton said.
Working as chancellor last
year has affected his work for the
department both negatively and
positively.
"The downside is I'm a year
behind in doing what I planned
Shelton said.
"On the other side, during that
year, I met more people and got to
understand the university in an
unbelievable way
When he left his presidential
position at Michigan University, he
decided that aspect of his life was
over. He said jobs like that are dif-
ficult because it requires a person
to be on duty all day, every day.
Now that he has returned
to his vice chancellor position,
Shelton said he is most proud
of the unexpected opportunity
given to him the year before.
"I am proud that first of all,
President Broad had the confidence
to put me in that role. Secondly,
the community of ECU accepted
me and the faculty, staff and
students accepted me Shelton said.
Shelton said Ballard has been suc-
cessful in taking over the position of
chancellor and has made ECU capa-
ble of looking forward to the future.
"We have gone through a period
of transition and we're emerging
from that period of transition
it's not so much having to look
back, but now we can focus on
looking forward Shelton said.
Shelton said he thinks ECU is
headed toward understanding itself
as an institution more clearly and is
emerging as a different place.
"We're moving from that small,
normal school to that university
that focuses equally on research,
teaching and service. We're literally
emerging into what I call a 'modern
university Shelton said.
With the developments of the
new administration, Shelton sees a
promising future for ECU.
"I am still very optimistic that we
will be able to achieve our goals over
the next few years Shelton said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
Samuel l Jackson
Coach Carter
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OPINION
1-13-C
Page A4
editor@theeastcarolinian.com
252.328.6366
AMANDA Q. UNGERFELT Editor In Chief
THURSDAY January 13, 2005
Our View
TEC remembers Martin Lutner King Jr.
Classes will be cancelled Monday and many will
not have to report to work in honor of civil rights
activist Martin Luther King Jr. TEC would like
to take this time to print the inspirational words
of this remarkable man in his "I Have a Dream"
speech delivered on the steps at the Lincoln
Memorial in Washington, DC. on Aug. 28,1963:
"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise
up and live out the true meaning of its creed:
'We hold these truths to be self-evident: that
all men are created equal I have a dream that
one day on the red hills of Georgia the sons
of former slaves and the sons of former slave
owners will be able to sit down together at a
table of brotherhood. I have a dream that one
day even the state of Mississippi, a desert
state, sweltering with the heat of injustice and
oppression, will be transformed into an oasis
of freedom and justice. I have a dream that my
four children will one day live in a nation where
they will not be judged by the color of their skin
but by the content of their character. I have a
dream today.
"This will be the day when all of God's children
will be able to sing with a new meaning, 'My
country, 'tis of thee, sweet land of liberty, of thee
I sing. Land where my fathers died, land of the
pilgrim's pride, from every mountainside, let
freedom ring And if America is to be a great
nation, this must become true. So let free-
dom ring from the prodigious hilltops of New
Hampshire. Let freedom ring from the mighty
mountains of New York. Let freedom ring from
the heightening Alleghenies of Pennsylvania!
Let freedom ring from the snowcapped Rockies
of Colorado! Let freedom ring from the curva-
ceous peaks of California! But not only that; let
freedom ring from Stone Mountain of Georgia!
Let freedom ring from Lookout Mountain of
Tennessee! Let freedom ring from every hill
and every molehill of Mississippi. From every
mountainside, let freedom ring.
"When we let freedom ring, when we let it ring
from every village and every hamlet, from every
state and every city, we will be able to speed up
that day when all of God's children, black men
and white men, Jews and Gentiles, Protestants
and Catholics, will be able to join hands and
sing in the words of the old Negro spiritual,
'Free at last! Free at last! Thank God Almighty,
we are free at last
OKStTfiH KICS 15 Mot &WeMC IV us.
Opinion Columnist
The true meaning of democracy
Our Staff
How to tell
the difference
PETER KALAJIAN
STAFF WRITER
Since the invasion of Iraq in the
spring of 2003, a certain question has
vexed me terribly, forcing me to re-
evaluate the very nature of America and
our ongoing attempts to democratize
the world: At what point do the upcom-
ing Iraqi national elections officially
become legitimate?
With large portions of the Iraqi
population beyond the pale of Allied
military control and pre-election terror
attacks on the rise, the United States
and her touted "coalition of the will-
ing" must exercise extreme caution
in their control over the Iraqi election
process. A synchronized national offen-
sive from the various terrorist organiza-
tions toiling to destabilize the election
could cost hundreds or thousands of
American lives, not to mention the
innocent Iraqi civilians who are invari-
ably caught in the crossfire.
After a happy New Year's break
from the old presidential responsi-
bilities, George W. Bush is returning
to his foxhole in the Oval Office with
some very serious business to attend
to. Every effort is being made by right-
wing media outlets like Fox News to
blur the American public's view of Iraq
and re-focus those attentions on issues
like social security and rewriting the
tax code.
Contrary to popular opinion and
Republican propaganda campaigns,
things are not all right in Iraq. Being
a police officer in a large Iraqi city has
been that nation's most dangerous
occupation. Widespread fears, con-
firmed by press releases from top Penta-
gon officials, of an insurgent offensive
surrounding the elections are being
felt all over the nation. A large and
enthusiastic turnout on Election Day,
hopefully free from car bombings and
suicide attacks, will either be the saving
grace or the final hurrah for the Bush
administration's War on Terror.
Success in Iraq means everything,
Nick Henne Kristin Day
News Editor Asst News Editor
Carolyn Scandura Kristin Murnane
Features Editor Asst. Features Editor
Brandon Hughes
Asst. Sports Editor
Rachel Landen
Special Sections Editor
Herb Sneed
Asst. Photo Editor
In My Opinion
Tony Zoppo
Sports Editor
Nina Coefielrl
Head Copy Editor
Tanesha Sistrunk
Photo Editor
King's dream included decent wages
Alexander Marclnlak Dustln Jones
Web Editor Asst. Web Editor
Jennifer Hobbs
Production Manager
Newsroom
Fax
Advertising
Kltch Hines
Managing Editor
252.328.6366
252.328.6558
252.328.2000
Serving ECU since 1925, TEC prints 9,000 copies
every Tuesday. Wednesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year and 5,000 on Wednesdays
during the summer. "Our View" is the opinion of
the editorial board and is written by editorial board
members. TEC welcomes letters to the editor which
are limited to 250 words (which may be edited for
decency or brevity). We reserve the right to edit or
reject letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent via
e-mail to edltor@theeastcarolinian.com or to The East
Carolinian. Student Publications Building, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. Call 252-328-6366 for more
Information. One copy of TEC Is free, each additional
copy is $1.
(KRT) � Did you know that raising
the minimum wage was a demand of
the March on Washington for Jobs and
Freedom where the Rev. Martin Luther
King Jr. gave his "I Have a Dream"
speech?
King, A. Philip Randolph of the
Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters
and other leaders of the 1963 March
on Washington demanded "a national
minimum-wage act that will give
all Americans a decent standard of
living
They didn't dream that four decades
later, the value of the minimum wage
would go down as the cost of housing,
food, health care and other necessities
went up.
They didn't dream that four decades
later, 36 million Americans would be
below the official poverty line - far
below a decent standard of living.
They didn't dream that four decades
later, the black poverty rate would still
he triple that of whites.
At the time of the march in 1963,
the minimum wage was $7.80 an hour,
adjusting for inflation in 2004 dollars.
Today's minimum wage is far lower
-just $5.15 an hour.
In "Where Do We Go From Here?"
King wrote, "There is nothing but a
lack of social vision to prevent us from
paying an adequate wage to every
American citizen whether he be a hos-
pital worker, laundry worker, maid or
day laborer
The minimum wage reached Its
peak value in 1968, the year King was
assassinated.
Today's $5.15 minimum wage is
41 percent less than 1968's inflation-
adjusted minimum wage of $8.78.
Full-time, year-round minimum
wage workers made $18,262 in 1968,
adjusting for inflation. Today's full-
time minimum wage workers make just
$10,712 a year.
The minimum wage sets the wage
floor. As the floor sinks, millions of
workers find themselves with wages
above the minimum, but not above the
poverty level.
Business Week observed last year
in a cover story on the working poor,
"Today more than 28 million people,
about a quarter of the workforce
between the ages of 18 and 64, earn less
than $9.04 an hour, which translates
into a full-time salary of18,800 a year
- the income that marks the federal
poverty line for a family of four
One out of three black workers
earns less than $9.04 an hour - barely
above the value of the minimum wage
of 1968.
Certainly, King didn't dream that
four decades after the March on Wash-
ington, the U.S. Conference of Mayors
would find in its annual "Hunger and
Homelessness Survey" that 17 percent
of the homeless were employed, as
were 34 percent of adults requesting
emergency food assistance.
The last minimum-wage increases
in 1996-97 were followed by rising
incomes and falling poverty and unem-
ployment nationwide. We need another
boost to the minimum wage, and the
economy.
Most Americans believe a job should
keep you out of poverty, not keep you
in it. Most Americans want to raise the
minimum wage significantly.
Yet Congress has had seven pay
raises since 1997, when the minimum
increased to $5.15, while approving
none for minimum-wage workers.
This month, congressional pay rose to
$162,100 - way up from $133,600 in
1997. That cumulative $28,500 con-
gressional pay hike is more than the
total earnings of two minimum wage
workers.
At the time of the 1963 March on
Washington, members of Congress
earned nine times the pay of minimum-
wage workers. Now, they earn IS times
as much. To reverse that growing gap,
Congress should tie their pay raises to
raises in the minimum wage.
Georgia Congressman John Lewis, a
leader of the March on Washington, has
said if King were alive, "he would be in
the forefront of reminding the govern-
ment that its first concern should be
the basic needs of its citizens - not just
black Americans but all Americans - for
food, shelter, health care, education,
jobs, livable Incomes and the opportu-
nity to realize their full potential
A. Philip Randolph introduced King
before the "I Have a Dream" speech as
"the moral leader of America
Congress and the White House
should stop taking a holiday from
King's dream and enact "a national
minimum wage act that will give
all Americans a decent standard of
living
now that the snowball has com-
menced its roll down the mountain, but
the very act of interfering with the
election process on the part of the
Americans could de-legitimize the
entire endeavor, in the eyes of Iraq and
the world. If only 30 percent of the
eligible Sunni voters turn out to cast
their votes for Iraq's future, the election
itself will be compromised. The overall
percentage of the entire population
could participate, but that would still
silence the Sunni voice within the
emerging government.
The point is if the Iraqi government,
combined with the American force, is
unable to provide adequate security
for the scheduled elections, the future
of the American occupation will be at
a crossroads. If the country cannot be
brought under some semblance of law
and order and competent bodies put in
place within Iraqi society to administer
those changes, the Iraqi government
will continue to look more like a puppet
regime than a viable international
institution with any sort of future. It
is an awful shame to lose American
soldiers in a fight that may not even
be winnable.
Happy New Year's to all of the
American citizens serving in the armed
forces around the world. You do your
jobs and I am certain the American
people will do their best to support
you. Thank you for your service and
sacrifice.
Pirate Rant
Why the heck are you required
to have a driver's license to take
driver's education?
New SAT analogy: Monica
Lewinsky is to Bill Clinton as
Tony Blair is to President Bush.
Would this NC weather
please make up its mind?
Why is James Pinkney not
enrolled this semester?
Toby Keith is such a
character. This guy has a fan
base of people who border on
being uncouth. I consider myself
patriotic and proud to be an
American, but do we need songs
like "Beating Saddam With My
Shotgun" and "Running Over
Osama On my John Deere" to
feel patriotic?
Who thinks it is a good idea
to spend thousands of dollars on
a bag and body drop and then
proceed to drag his or her car
down the road?
Generally, a professor only
needs to say something seven
times for it to sink in. That eighth
time is overkill.
If they charge students a
fortune for textbooks, professors
should use them every once in
a while.
Everyone in Greenville knows
ECU students stay out late. Why
aren't there more fast food joints
open late?
I am so sick of Greenville traf-
fic. I wish there wasn't 50 stop-
lights on my way to the mall.
Parking is a major issue for
everyone at ECU. Every spot
that's not in a zone is a 30 minute
meter. How many of us are going
somewhere for only half an
hour?
Here's an idea, get off of your
cell phone and drive. I have some-
where to go, even if you don't.
Why does my profes-
sor always fuss at the class for
making noise, then turn around
and ask a question and get
frustrated when no one wants
to make a noise to answer?
Students need to learn that
the right side is the proper way
to walk on the sidewalk.
Adding a new dining hall
isn't going to satisfy my crav-
ings. However, opening up a Taco
Bell and Bojangles' on campus
would.
Why do men decide at 2 a.m.
they want to call for a booty call?
You need to call ahead and make
a booty appointment.
If you have chest hair, women
don't find it sexy when it is
poking out of the top of your
shirt.
I thought when you became
a junior or senior, there would be
less attendance policies. Appar-
ently not.
ECU has a rich football tradi-
tion, except for the four years I'm
here. Lucky me.
Why do cops love to give out
tickets for seat belt fines, speed-
ing two miles over the limit,
failure to signal, etc. near the
college? I'm sure there are far
worse crimes they could pursue
throughout the rest of the city.
Why do southern students at
ECU hate northern students? The
war is over, in case you haven't
noticed. Embrace the fact that
we came down here to experi-
ence a different type of lifestyle
and we're still living down here
because we like the south. Don't
tell us to go back home. We're
helping to bring money into your
state, don't forget.
I'm glad Flanagan is finally
complete. After two years of
looking at an empty building
surrounded by a wire fence and
being stared at by men twice my
age working on the construction
site I was starting to wonder if the
project would ever be complete.
Editor's Note: The Pirate Rant is
an anonymous way for students and
staff in the ECU community to voice
their opinions. Submissions can be
submitted anonymously online at
www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-
mailed to editorOtheeastcarolinlan.
com. The editor reserves the right
to edit opinions for content and
brevity.
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1-13-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
PAGE A5
Once Again Its On!
Announcing the Spring 2005 ACUI
All-Campus Tournaments
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
Billiards Spades chess
GreenWay from page A2 DiVerSity from page A1
(Bawd
m
a.
Table Tennis
ta
Table Tennis
Tues. January 31,6:00 p.m.
Multipurpose Room
(Men & Women's
Singles Divisions)
9 Ball
Mon January 24,6:00 p.m.
MSC Billiards Center
(Men & Women's
Singles Divisions)
(Bowlin;
Thurs. January 27,6:00 p.m.
Outer Limitz Bowling Center
(Men & Women's
Singles Divisions)
Spades
Fri. January 21,6:00 p.m.
MSC Social Room
Chess
Sat. January 22 10 a.m5 p.m.
MSC Social Room
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to
represent ECU at regional competitions to be held at Virginia Tech University
which is located in Blacksburg, VA the weekend of February 18-20, 2005.
All expenses for the trip will be paid by Mendhall Student Center.
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms
are available at the MSC, Billiards Center & Outer
Limitz Bowling Center located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Sudent
Center. Call the Recreations Program Office at 328-4738 for more
information.
spearheading the renovation of
downtown Greenville, as well as a
large banner with FROGGS' name
and logo on it to advertise with flair
at public events such as the River
Festival and Freeboot Fridays.
"The banner looks wonderful
and we are very grateful to have
been given something so nice
to put up at our display table
said Jill Twark, assistant profes-
sor in the foreign languages
department, who has been the
chair and central organizer of
FROGGS since its inception this
past August.
FROGGS now has approxi-
mately 87 members and sup-
porters who frequently receive
updates and e-mails from Twark.
The organization is made up of
people who enjoy the outdoors,
biking and taking walks. They
envision Greenville one day
being filled with 120 miles of
greenways, as foreseen in the
official Greenway Master Plan.
One such member is 75-year-old
Carroll Webber who recently returned
from participating in a 700-mile bike
ride on the East Coast Greenway, an
interstate greenway project that will
someday stretch from the Canadian
border in Maine, all the way down to
the tip of Key West, Florida.
Weber said he enjoys going on
bike rides, especially when he gets
to see nature unspoiled by human
development. He coined a new
slogan at the meeting to express
what FROGGS is doing, which is to
"grow the green in Greenville
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
the position would be a cata-
lyst in combining elements
from those groups with the
new committee making the
impact greater.
"This is something we as an
institution have talked about for
years and now the chancellor
has given us the opportunity
to start this organization. His
previous experience in working
with culturally diverse positions
has prepared him for this new
project Moore said.
The fall 2003 fact book shows
11 percent of ECU'S employees
were of ethnic minorities includ-
ing American Indian, Asian, Afri-
can American and Hispanic.
ECU has the largest percent-
age of African American student
enrollment in the UNC system
with 18 percent.
Moore said new scholarships
would possibly be provided
from the diversity committee so
students will have a chance to
go overseas and interact in a new
climate. Scholarships are offered
to students with a GPA of at least
3.0 and tuition at the host school
is the same as tuition at ECU.
"Students are not aware of
the many study abroad programs
our school has to offer. We hope
our new diversity committee will
change that Moore said.
The International House,
located on Ninth Street
behind the SRC, has infor-
mation for students about
studying abroad for semesters or
summer sessions.
Charles Lyons, director of
International Affairs, said the
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new ECU Diversity Committee
would be a great asset to the
university.
"ECU has a small
percentage of students studying
abroad compared to students at
other schools, so we are not at
the level we would like to be at
with international study yet
said Lyons.
The University of North Car-
olina Exchange Program is set up
to cater to students within the
UNC system who want to travel
abroad. Countries to visit include
Australia, Germany, Spain, Eng-
land, Thailand, France and Italy.
In the summer of 2004, a group
of ECU students visited and stud-
ied in Italy for three weeks.
Lea Farmer, a senior, went on
the trip to Italy.
"Italy was the best time of my
life said Farmer.
"I made so many new friends
and really grew as a person. It
matured me and better prepared
me for what would come in my
future in the real world
Lisa Field, a senior, went to
Australia last spring semester.
"Traveling overseas and actu-
ally living iua new environment
definitely broadened my hori-
zons said Field.
"I never imagined meeting
so many people from all over the
world. I would love to have the
chance to go again
UNC-Chapel Hill and NC
State already have diversity
institutions.
This writer can be contacted at
news@theeastcarolinian. com.
BREAK
BfiHfiMfiS
CRUISE
$279!
5 Days, Meals. Parties. Taxes
Party With Real Word Celebrities!
Cancun $459
Jamaica $499, Florida $159
Ethics Award W nnmy Cempdn1
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1-800-678-6386
"Get it Started"
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10 off all Tanning Supplies
A Full Service Salon
All Hair Care Needs
Manicures I Pedicures I Waxing
Visa � Mastercard � Discover
It's time to exercise something
other than your mind.
Student
Membership
www.curvttintcrnafioiul.iorn
fiiuiJy. a place to work oui thai fits a small student
budget and a busy student xJicdule. Curves is 30-
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252-413-0359
3140-D Mosclcy Dr.
Greenville, NC 27858
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ROMANCING YOUR ADDICTIONS
TOBACCO ACCESSORIES � ADULT NOVELTIES
EXOTIC CIGARETTES � T-SHIRTS
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Body Piercing & Jewelry � Detox Solutions � Candles
Hair Dye � Adult Videos � Black Lights � Whipcream
Gag Gifts and a Bunch of Other Cool Stuff
Welcome Back Students!
Show Your Student ID And Get
13 OFF EVERYDAY!
205 E. 5th Street
GREENVILLE, NC
(252) 758-6685
www.smiledamnit.com
www.partylikehell.com
Featuring:
Free Cable TV
Free Water & Sewer
Cats Allowed With Fee
Alrlmba Wireless Available
Sparkling Swimming pool
Professional On-Slte Management
24-hour Emergency
Maintenance
Laundry Center
On ECU Bus Route
WasherDryer Connections
Spacious Floor Plans
pwEsgwswr
Stratford Arms
PARTMENTS
252.756.4800
1900 S. Charles
im.
ille, NC 27858
So close to
Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium, even we
stand up for the
National Anthem!
�Cozy One &Tvvo BedroomOne Bath Units
�Free Water and Sewer
�Central Heat & Air in Two Bedrooms
�Wall AC Unit 6c Baseboard I le.it in One Bedroom
�WasherDryer Connections
�1st Floor Patio with Fence
�2nd Floor Front or Back Balcony
�Pets Allowed with Fee
�Energy Efficient
�On ECU Bus Route
P0 Box 873 � 108 Brownlea Drive Suite A � Greenville, NC 27835-0873
phone (252) 758-1921 Ext. 60 � fax (252) 757-7722
Office Hours: Mon-Fri 9am-5pm, Sat 9am-2pm





PAGE A6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
1-13-05
DONT MISS IT!
East Carolina University
Partners In Campos Life
We Relish Students!
Free Prizes
Free Food
Free T-Shirts
The Event Starts at 7:00pm
at the SRC Outdoor Pool
Prizes Will Only Be Awarded to ECU Students With A Ualid OneCard
T-Shirts Are Only For Those Who Jump
Individuals with disabilities, requesting accommodations under the Americans with Disabilities Act fADAJ,
should contact the Department for Disability Support Services at f252J 328-6799 CVJ or f252J 328-0899 fTTYJ.





CLASSIFIEDS
PageA7
THURSDAY January 13, 2005
For Rent
4 bedroom for rent two blocks
from campus one block from
City Market $980 per month.
Call 355-1895 leave message.
1 bedroom apartment in
house for rent one block
from ECU. 750 E. 4th Street.
Renovated inside and
really nice. $300 641-8331.
Close to Campus, available
now. 109 AB, 119A Stancil
Dr. Fully remodeled, 3
bedrooms, one bath, fenced
backyard, $625.00. 122 N.
Eastern, fully remodeled,
3 bedrooms, 1 bath,
$850.00. 252-758-9009.
3 bedroom house for rent
one block from ECU. 804
Johnston Street (next to 4th
St.) Everything is new; new
central air, new kitchen, new
appliances, new bathrooms,
new washer dryer, new
dishwasher etc. Super
nice. $950 Call 341-8331.
Large 3-4 Bedroom duplex
two blocks from ECU. 113
Rotary Ave. Large bedrooms
and closets, new central ac,
new carpet. $1000 341-8331
Above BW-3. Apartment for
rent. 3 bedroom, 2 12 bath.
2 story. Cathedral ceilings, tile
floors, water & trash included.
Available in December. Call
anytime. 252-725-5458 or
329-8738 or 252-725-5457.
DUPLEX FOR rent nice quiet
neighborhood. Convenient
to ECU 595month. Dep.
required. Pets ok with deposit.
Fenced Backyard. Available
Feb 1st & March 1st. 355-3248
One, two, three and four
bedroom houses, duplexes,
andapartments.Allwithinfour
blocks of campus. Pet friendly!
Reasonable rates, short leases
available. Call 830-9502.
3 Bedrooms 3 Full bathrooms-
University Terrace. Walk in
closets, large living room,
balcony, w watersewer
included. Spacious laundry
room, close to campus and
on the ECU bus lines. Short
term (6 month) Spring '05
leases available @ $850.00
month. Currently pre-
leasing for Fall '05, Early
Bird Special of $875.00
month. Please call Pinnacle
Property Management
561-RENT or 561-7679.
Roommate Wanted
1 BR to sublease in a 3BR
house, fenced backyard,
wireless internet, 5 blocks
from campus. $350mo.
plus 13 utilitiescable.
Jessica (804)- 304-2815.
Female roommate needed
to sublease room in 3 BR3
BA apartment at University
Manor. $365mo. 13
utilities. Apartment and
roommates are clean and
nice! Call Sarah 910-445-1357.
Services
Spring Break 2005- Travel
with STS, America's 1
Student Tour Operator
to Jamaica, Cancun,
Acapulco, Bahamas and
Florida. Now hiring on
campus reps. Cail for group
discounts. Information
Reservations 1-
800-648-4849 or
www.ststravel.com.
BELLY DANCE for Fun and
Fitness! For women 8-80!
Thursday 5:30-7:00 PM $135
for 10 week session starting
Jan 20 Limited Availability
- call 355-5150 Now!
1 Spring Break Website!
Lowest prices guaranteed.
Free Meals & Free Drinks. Book
11 people, get 12th trip free!
Group Discounts for for 6
www.SpringBreakDiscounts.
com or 800-838-8202.
Hefr Wanted
Baby Sitter for three small
kids. Early education
majors only. Call 321-0181.
Bartending! $250day
potential. No experience
necessary. Training provided.
(800) 965-6520 ext. 202.
part time Jobs Available. Joan's
Fashions, a local Women's
clothing store, is now
filling part-time positions.
Employees .are needed for
Monday, Wednesday, Friday,
and Saturday (10 a.m. to 6
p.m.). Individuals must be
available for regular Saturday
work. Preference for students
who will be able to work some
during Spring Break and
Easter Break. The positions
are for between 15 and 30
hours per week, depending
on your schedule and on
business needs. The jobs
are within walking distance
of ECU and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate
with your experience and
job performance and
is supplemented by an
employee discount and
tuition assistance. Apply in
person to Store Manager,
Joan's Fashions, 423 S.
Evans Street, Greenville
(Uptown Greenville).
Do you need a good job?
The ECU Telefuncl is hiring
students to contact alumni
and parents for the ECU
Annual Fund. $6.25hourplus
cash bonuses. Makeyourown
schedule. If interested, visit
our website atwww.ecu.edu
telefund and click on JOBS.
Bedrooms & Sofas Plus is
looking for clean cut and
responsible individuals.
Full and Part Time Delivery
Positions Available. Apply in
Person at425-A S.E. Greenville
Blvd. no phone calls.
Other
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� of poor maintenance response
� of umetumed phone calls
� of noisy neighbors
� of crawly critters
�of high utility bills
� of ECU parking hassles
� of ungrateful landlords
� of unanswered questions
� of high rents
� of grumpy personnel
� of unfulfilled promises
� of units that were not cleaned
� of walls that were never painted
� of appliances that don't work
Wyndham Court &
Eastgate Village Apts.
3200 F Moseley Dr.
561-RENT or 561-7679
www.pinruKleproperty
management.com
SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDME
www.carolinaskysports.com
Twin Oaks 3 BR. 2.5 Bath.
2 space parking.
swimming pool, washerdryer
connections ECU bus route
Only ?675! Call 916-3272!
Have you heard?
RJ. Rentals Property Management is
currently offering absolutely the lowest
rent rates for Riverwalk ever made available
for this campus oriented community.
All houses are 3 Bedroom, 3 Bath,
Appliance furnished. There are two
terrific plans to choose from. Flats are
$800month, Pilings are $880month.
Also at Dockside rent a 3 bedroom,
23A Bath, Appliance furnished
Duplex for only $800month.
Rates are limited to lease signing
no later than March 1, 2005 and
must be for a period of 1 year.
Hurry, Call today, prices will expire
on March 1, 2005. Call 252-355-2295
for all the details of this ad
rnnecomutg,
Position Announcement
ommittee is currently looking for a person to fill the 2005 position
ming Chairperson.
tfieapp
be
idget ancT process
ely fashion
omecoming
id weekly Fall meetings
t, ail applicant mutt:
jfent in good
ersity
ulative GPA of 2.5
g of sophomore or up
This is a paid student position
must include letter of interest and resume of related experience
er than January 20, 2005 to Paul Clifford, cliffordp@mail.ecu.edu
u can make a difference!






PAGE A8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � NEWS
1-13-04
AFFORDABILITY
CONVENIENCE
LOCATION
WYNDHAM COURT
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
5 Blocks From ECU.
Energy Efficient.
Kitchen Appliances.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
On ECU Bus Route.
Pets OK With Deposit.
EASTGATE VILLAGE
2 Bedroom And 1 Bath Apartment.
Fully Equipped Kitchens.
Washer & Dryer Hookups.
Central Air & He
:r On ECU Bus Route.
24 Hour Emergency Maintenance.
Pets OK With Deposit.
Nightly security patrols.
BRADFORD CREEK
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath Duplexes.
Country Club Living Without The Price.
On Bradford Creek Golf Course.
Approximately 1,350 Sq.ft.
Covered Parking.
Fully Equipped Kitchens, r �
Washer & Dryer, m -
Pets OK With Deposit.
0 � M
DOCKSIDE DUPLEXES
3 Bedroom And 2.5 Bath.
6 Blocks From ECU.
Approximately 1350 Sq.ft.
Covered Parking.
Fully Equipped Kitchens
Washer & Dryer.
Pets OK With Deposit.
561 -7679
561 -RENT
RIVERWALK
w � iiff � 3 Bedroom And 3 Bath Houses.
W�LA ryr ut Kitchen Appliances.
DO I -KfclM I Dishwasher.
3200-F Moseley-Drive Washer & Dryer.
Greenville, NC 27858 Central Air & Heat.
Professionally managed by Covered Parking.
Pinnacle Property Management No Pets Allowed.
WWW.PINNACLEPROPERTyMANAGEMENT.COM
Offering Apartments & Houses, Plus Duplex Communities
Convenient To ECU, Pitt Community College & The Medical District





1-13-04
. � iy
Page B1 features@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 CAROLYN SCANDURA Features Editor KRISTIN IVionNANE Assistant Features Editor THURSDAY January 13, 2005
Announcements:
An annual candlelight vigil and
march in honor of Martin Luther
King Jr. will take place on Monday,
Jan. 17 at 5:30 p.m. on College Hill.
Darryl Taylor will perform American
Giants: Paul Laurence Dunbar
and Langston Hughes, Jan. 17 at
7 p.m. in ECU'S Fletcher Recital
Hall. This event is free.
On Saturday, Jan. 22 at 8 p.m. see
Aida-Opera Verdi Europa. This
takes place at Wright Auditorium
and tickets are $10 - $24.
On Satdrday, Jan. 29 at 2 p.m Qi
Shu Fang will introduce you to
Chinese Peking Opera. Their tales
are told through a combination
of martial arts, acrobatics, music,
dance and mime. Tickets are
$6 - $9.
The Equestrian Club will have an
interest meeting on Tuesday Jan.
8 at 7 p.m. in 1010 Bate.
Helpful Hints:
The start of the year is the perfect
time to make changes and
develop new habits. Resolutions
for diet, exercise and weight loss
are running rampant, but a new
look and a new attitude are also in
order. In short, get back to basics
- strive for good physical and
mental health, good grooming
and organization, a good attitude
and good communication.
Recipes:
Sorbet Shakes
1 (12-oz.) can evaporated skim
milk
12 tsp. Vanilla extract
1 tsp. honey
12 banana, ripe or overripe,
mashed
2 scoops chocolate sorbet
Whipped cream, for garnish
In a bowl add 14 cup of milk,
cover and freeze for 15 to 20
minutes. Remove bowl from
freezer and with a hand held
beater mix for 2 to 3 minutes on
high, after reaching soft peaks, add
vanilla and honey and continue to
mix until stiff. Set aside. Blend
remaining milk, bananas and
sorbet in blender and pour into a
glass tumbler, top with a dollop of
banana whipped cream.
Mexican Lasagna
3 Tbsp. extra-virgin olive oil
2 lbs. ground chicken breast,
available in the packaged meats
case
2 Tbsp. chili powder
2 tsp. ground cumin
12 red onion, chopped
1 (14-oz) can stewed tomatoes or
fire-roasted chopped tomatoes
1 cup medium heat taco sauce
1 (15-oz.) can black beans,
drained
1 cup frozen corn kernels
Salt
8 (8 in.) spinach flour tortillas,
available on dairy aisle of market
212 cups shredded Cheddar or
shredded pepper jack
2 scallions, finely chopped
Preheat the oven to 425 degrees F
Preheat a large skillet over medium
high heat. Add 2 tablespoons
extra-virgin olive oil twice around
the pan. Add chicken and season
with chili powder, cumin, and red
onion. Brown the meat, 5 minutes.
Add stewed tomatoes or fire-
roasted chopped tomatoes and
taco sauce. Add black beans and
corn. Heat the mixture through, 2
to 3 minutes then season with salt,
to your taste.
Coaf a shallow baking dish with
remaining extra-virgin olive oil,
about 1 tablespoon oil. Cut the
tortillas in half or quarters to
make them easy to layer with.
Build lasagna in layers of meat
and beans, then tortillas, then
cheese. Repeat: meat, tortilla,
cheese again. Bake lasagna 12 to
15 minutes until cheese is brown
and bubbly.
Taken from the Food Network
toodtv.com
'Seven Habits of
Highly Effective
People' at ECU
HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PEOPLED,
SSL
5Hm highly effective peopij �?, as
7"r�� HIGHLY EFFECTIVE PKUSEDul
1)7 $
Will you keep yours?
MEREDITH STEWART
STAFF WRITER
The tradition of making a New
Year's resolution has been going on
for decades. The word resolution
comes from "resolve meaning
to make up one's mind or decide
firmly. On New Year's Day, millions
of people make resolutions, but more
than half know they will never keep
them. Maybe it's because your peers
always fail to carry theirs out or your
life feels too cluttered. The end of the
year is a time for clearing things out
and starting with a new slate.
The top four things PSflPU.
resolve to do include - losing welgW
stop procrastinating exercise more
or spend less money on unnecessary
things. While these are all notable
resolutions, it is rare that many
people stick with them. The majority
of people get back into the routine
or overeating, watching too much
television and overspending.
"For the past two years I have
made a resolution to get more in-
shape, but each time I failed to make
time for the gym said Ashley Yopp,
political science major.
For some people, keeping a New
Year's resolution is important for
the first month or so, but eventu-
ally becomes insignificant as their
schedule beings to fill-up.
"Last year I resolved to spend
more time with my family before
coming off to college, but as a senior
in high school I had too many
things on my mind said Amanda
O'Neil, freshman.
Perhaps the reasons behind not
keeping a resolution is not the lack
of will power, but maybe people
are going about their change in the
wrong way. If you try a resolution
and are finding it very difficult to
maintain, try the next step down.
Instead of trying to lose 20 pounds,
try only 10. Making your goals
realistic is a great start to having a
successful year.
The main reason people malfe
' re"s"oi&rt6ns is because they feel as if a
change is needed in their life. It's the
beginning of a new year ajnd what
better way to celebrate tfc(af$ becom-
ing an improved person; Although
for some people, recognizing and
understanding your personal weak-
nesses is the most difficult part of all.
"I made a resolution to study
more this semester said Jonathan
Ennis, freshman.
I'm sure there are many students
who are attempting this same goal.
Once you have committed to making
a change you need to make a plan.
Incorporate your resolution into
your daily routine so you will be
sure to stay on track. If you plan to
workout two hours everyday or never
to eat carbohydrates again, you are
setting yourself up for failure. And
many people do fail because they
don't have a plan when temptation
comes along.
"I have already broke my resolu-
tion of not partying this semester
said a senior.
It's a matter of taking small steps
and rewarding yourself that really
helps keep your resolutions going
all year long. Think positive. Tell
yourself "I made it through a whole
week Instead of thinking, "this is
too hard to manage
"Last year I did something good
for at least two people a week said
Lauren Stewart, psychology major.
It's very rare thai someone
donates their time to help others.
"It's a great feeling to know
that I am helping others, even if it's
just opening a door or smiling to
brighten one's day. Sometimes the
small things are what make a world
of difference Stewart said.
O'Neil hopes to do the same this
year, despite her busy schedule and
18 credit hours she has this semester.
The best way to keep a New Year's
resolution is to take it one day at a
time, reward yourself and do not fall
into temptation.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
Stephen Covey has writen guides for
all ages.
How to get back on track
AMANDA WINAR
STAFF WRITER
The tennis shoes have been recovered from the
dusty depths of your closet, the Oreos have been
thrown out and you've just purchased the new
abzenith2million that claims to give you six-pack
abs in two weeks or less.
Typically, the New Year brings New Year's
resolutions like this to lose weight and get in shape.
Some people go a step further and make plans to get
that new promotion at work or straight As in school,
even save enough money for that new dream car.
There are hundreds of ways to change ourselves and
better our lives, yet many people never think to
start the year out right by trying to actually change
the people they are instead of the people they only
appear to be.
The stubborn pounds of belly fat will make you
unhappy in a bathing suit or while you're trying
to squeeze into that 'not-so-little' black dress,
but what about the other 355 days of the year?
According to world-renowned author Stephen
Covey, the change starts from within. Covey
wrote a book titled, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective
People, which focuses on creating a successful and
ethically driven life through our use of knowledge,
skill and desire. Covey explains in his book that,
"Knowledge allows us to know what to do, skill gives
us the ability to know how to do it and desire is the
motivation to do it
Covey said there are habits in our lives, which
when put to use, can help us become happier
and also more productive. A new year for many
people means a fresh start to try something new or
accomplish those hard sought-after goals.
Covey said when a person is ready to change
something about themselves, his habits are a simple
guideline. An example of this is Habit Two of Covey's
see HABITSpage 03
Getting back
the swing of
Use of the SRC is part of tuition costs for full-time students
Helpful ways to get out
of the post-holiday slump
Hints to get their health
back on track
JESSICA CRESON
SENIOR WRITER
From Halloween with candy
at a constant arms reach to
New Year's that is the largest
party holiday of the year, plus
Thanksgiving and Christmas in
between, staying in shape and
healthy is the last thing on many
peoples' minds.
Health includes many differ-
ent aspects of a person. Eating
better and exercising are the
most common things that tend to
take a beating during the holiday
season, but family issues and lack
of sleep, which can be sources
of stress, overall wellness that
can increase chances of cold and
flu and addictions are also some
major affects.
The "New Year's Resolution"
concept is one of the best ways
for a person to address a problem
and take action in order to fix it.
see SLUMP page B2
New year, new
semester, new start
CARMIN BLACK
STAFF WRITER
With the holiday season and
New Year's now behind us, the
students here at ECU are having
to "force themselves" to get back
into the swing of things.
Many students asked have
admitted to already missing
vegging out on the couch watch-
ing television all day, taking
vacations the parents fund and
having home cooked meals pre-
pared without question. But
reality must set in sometime, we
are college students, mom and
dad are no longer at our side so
we must, as tragic as it seems, go
back to classes and even begin
studying again.
Crystal Lewis, freshman ele-
mentary education major, was
asked if she has found it easy to
get back into the swing of school
now that school is back in session.
"Well honestly I haven't had the
chance to have to re-establish
my routine since classes haven't
really started, I mean it may take
some adjusting now that I can't
just do whatever I want anymore,
but for the most part I think it
should be easy
Maybe it would help if the
staff at TEC provided a few help-
ful tips students can use to regain
a sense of structure.
Experts say the most impor-
tant thing about taking a long
break from a career or from being
a full time student is to make sure
you begin each day at the same
time. Doing this will allow your
body's "internal clock" to be in
a sense set on a certain schedule,
making it easier to feel awake and
energized when you rise.
Everyone has heard breakfast
is the most important meal of the
day and according to nutrition
experts this couldn't be truer.
Specialists say one third of your
daily calorie intake should be
consumed at breakfast, which
will serve as the fuel needed to
get your body going.
Make up your mind to set a
day-to-day schedule, above and
beyond the already established
schedule of classes.
Keep a day planner and write
down your daily events in order,
this will insure that nothing is left
undone. The key to keeping a set
schedule is to make sure to stick
with it for at least 14 days. It takes
14 days to form a habit, which in
this case will be a good thing.
Take time for yourself. Yes, it's
time to buckle down and hit the
books with fire and fervor. And
yes this is a great time to salvage
your GPA from that class you
bombed last semester, however
we are young, life should be fun
into
things
and it's OK to have your cake and
eat it too, sometimes.
Another great tip for getting
back into the swing of school is to
get to know your professors. They
are human and they enjoy help-
ing their students out whenever
necessary.
By communicating with your
teachers you will have an upper
edge against the rest of the stu-
dents who come to an occasional
class here and there and remain
virtually nameless. If you let
them know your face and your
name, they are more inclined
to help you out in the long
run if they see you care about
your grade and value your time
learning, as well as their time
teaching.
All in all getting back may
take a little work. It's never fun
doing exactly what you don't
want to do when you know you
should. But on the bright side,
you're here with your friends, you
can now get away from the nags
and complaints of siblings and
parents and you can reward your-
self not only with the sense of
satisfaction that will come with
your newly formed agenda, but
since it is a new year - a new start,
a new chance to reverse anything
you wish you could have changed
before you left last semester.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.





PAGE B2
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � LIVING
1-13-05
Slump
from page B1
A New Year's resolution provides
a fresh start and a good excuse for
people to make a change.
"Over the break I got a lot of
rest and good nights sleep, so for
the New Year I want to try and
get as much sleep as possible. 1
have felt so much better with
a lot of rest said Erica Carter,
communication major.
One of the major things
people need to learn to avoid
is making excuses for not
exercising or eating well.
ECU students have no room
for excuses with the nice
gym provided for students
to use, but the average person
as well has many opportunities
for exercise.
Walking at any moment
possible makes more differ-
ence than we might realize.
Walking to work, school, a
friend's house or even riding
a bike. If everything is too
far to walk to, making an
occasion with other people
to walk or exercise is another
way to motivate and promote
health. Classes offered at a local
gym can be something fun and
beneficial to do with friends
or family. If money becomes a
problem with joining a gym,
then walking or jogging is
achievable by stepping right
outside the front door.
"School drained me last
semester, so I never went to the
gym or had the time to exercise,
but this semester I want to start
out on the right foot by making
the time to go to the gym or
jogging said Andrew Hill,
geography major.
Eating healthy is an overall
hard thing to do day in and day
out, but N is an area many need
to work on.
According to health special-
ists, the psychological attach-
ment to food can be just as strong
as the physical attachment. This
can become a huge problem for
those who feel this need to eat
when there are no physical signs
of hunger. There can be a trig-
ger that makes people feel like
they have to eat even though
they are not hungry, such as
- it being "lunch time snack-
ing while watching a movie or
television and midnight snacks
that are unnecessary. '
If this is a problem, and in
some ways almost everyone is
guilty, then psychological hunger
needs to be controlled. Physical
hunger should be the only thing
that tells us if we are hungry or
not and if we only ate when the
hunger pains came, excess eating
would be avoided.
"This year I really want to stop
eating fast food. Getting used to just
stopping by Wendysand McDonalds
is such a horrible habit to get into. I
am trying to make it fun to cook and
be healthier by getting my
friends involved so it can be fun
Carter said.
Going out to eat is another
problem area, if done too often,
for overeating. The proportions
restaurants give are not what we
need. It is way too much. There-
fore, splitting a meal with a friend
or family member is a great way
to avoid overeating. Ordering a
doggy bag at the beginning of
a meal will allow better chance
of taking a decent amount of
the meal home instead of trying
to finish as much as possible at
one sitting.
Other ways to reduce fat
intake when out to eat is to get
reduced fat salad dressing on the
side to prevent excess calories
and fat. Substituting vegetables
for fries is a good way to get
away from junk food and get
more nutrients and vitamins.
Appetizers, most of the time are
large enough to be an entree, so
for proportion control, order an
appetizer as your meal.
Three ways to definitely
turn you around after the holi-
days, according to ediets.com,
range from thinking positively
to eating habits to exercising. It
takes all three to be healthy.
If there has been weight
gain over the holidays, try not
to get negative attitudes toward
yourself, rather turn it into posi-
tive energy that will give you
a push to the gym and better
eating habits;
, Again, increasing fruits and
veggies into your diet helps the
craving of carbohydrates and
they are more filling. There is
a high fiber content in fruits
and veggies that help con-
trol appetites. Also, fruits are
an excellent substitute for
desserts. The creativity of cook-
ing and experimenting can offer
many possibilities.
Last but not least, exer-
cise. Walking when you can,
going to parks or starting a
new class at a gym will really
make a difference in the way
people feel the whole day. Exer-
cise acts as a stress reliever,
energy booster and the best way
to get in shape.
This writer can be contacted at
leaturei@theeastcarolinian.com.
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1-13-05
1-13-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � LIVING
PAGE B3
iPod Demo Days � January 18-20
iPlay. iLearn. iBuy.
Habits
from page B1
?
which is "Begin with the End in
Mind and Habit Four: "Put First
Things First Right now most of
you are very motivated to change
yourselves because it is a new
year, but make sure to figure out
exactly what your goals are and to
prioritize. If you want to lose
weight in time to fit into that
awesome swimsuit for spring
break, then make time in your
schedule to go to the gym and
write little notes or hang up
beach pictures somewhere to
constantly remind yourself.
Sometimes it helps to find a
friend with similar goals that will
help you put things first.
Another habit of Covey's is
to "Be Proactive" by starting the
change from within. Accord-
ing to Covey, "highly effective
people make the decision to
improve their lives through the
things that they can influence
rather than by simply reacting
to external forces
In other words, if you have
a goal, then first sit down
and make a list of the
reasons why you wish to improve
yourself and then how you are
going to achieve such a change.
If you focus on changing little
things in your life like fit-
ting that extra run into your
schedule or doing something at
home rather than going shopping
(so you are guaranteed to
save money), then improving
yourself will not seem so much
like a chore and more like
improving your life.
Covey's "Habits" are based
upon the theory that one can
not only depend on others
or be simply independent,
but they should be interde-
pendent. In other words, if
you cooperate with the life and
people around you, will be able to
achieve something that can't be
achieved independently.
So by putting things first
from the start and really taking
the time to explore the depth
of your goals, you will be
able to achieve your goals easier.
So, grab a friend to be your
supporter and this year you
may just achieve those year
resolutions of yours. Good luck.
You can find copies of 7 Habits of
Highly Effective People by Stephen
R. Covey at Barnes St Nobles
and for used versions, check out
amazon.com.
This writer can be contacted at
features@theeastcarolinian.com.
See, play, and learn all about Apple's iPod�,
January 18 - 20, 8:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
at Dowdy Student Store.
Enter to win a 20 GB iPod or iPod mini.
Special 10 discount on iPod accessories.
10 off reg. price accessories all day Jan. 18 - 20, 'Apple' brand accessories excluded.
iPod traveling demo "display and play" only available 8 a.m. � 2 p.m.
w
'wl Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Wrisht Buildins � 328-6731 � 1-877-499-TEXT
Apple" offers ECU students an educational discount on iPodsR and much more through
Dowdy Student Stores. iPod drawings held 12005. See store for details.
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Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY January 13,2005
Pirates' comeback falls iust short
ECU trailed by as many
as 20 in second half
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
With 15:58 remaining and the
Pirates trailing 57-37, it looked as
if once again ECU would not have
enough to hang with one of the
elites in the nation in the Cincin-
nati Bearcats. However, in a matter
of minutes, the Pirates, riding
high on the shoulders of Corey
Rouse, would quickly change that
thought, and reel off one of the
most exciting runs ever put forth
at Minges Coliseum.
The Pirates opened the game
with a block from point guard,
Japhet McNeil, which quickly
turned into an emphatic Moussa
Badiane slam, erupting the ever-
present ECU fans.
The young Pirates did not seem
phased by the Bearcats' gaudy
13-1 record and national ranking
of 13, as they trailed by just one
point heading into the under eight
minute media timeout.
However, several turnovers and
questionable calls later, ECU found
themselves trailing by 14 going into
the intermission.
"The turnovers in the first half
really killed us because every time
it happened they laid it up at the
other end said ECU Head Coach,
Bill Herrion.
"We really challenged the team
at I i,i 1111 n it- to come out and quit get-
ting stepped on because in a league
like this is you allow a team to do
that, you will become exposed
It took the Pirates the opening
four minutes of the second half
before they heeded to 1 lemon's call-
ing in the locker room. But when
they did, Cincinnati and the 6,200
fans present at the game, knew the
Pirates were for real and were ready
to take on the challenge.
"We just kept playing, kept our
heads up and tried hard to get stops
on the defensive end and convert
on the offensive end Rouse said.
Rouse scored the Pirates'last eight
points of the 12-0 run, capped off by
an unthinkable three-point basket
from the 6-foot, 8-inch forward, lead-
ing to a Bearcat 30-second timeout.
"We just started believing
that we could win the game but
we have to take that approach
coming out of the locker room
before the game starts said sopho-
more guard Mike Cook on his
team's efforts in the second half.
Cincy would stretch the lead
back up to 15, only to see the
Pirates cut it down to four with just
under two minutes remaining. A
few free throw misses later, how-
ever, ECU'S incredible comeback
would fall just short, losing to
the Bearcats by the final of 84-78.
"We should have won the
game Cook said.
"If everybody just has that
attitude that we should have beat
the number 13 team in the country,
then we will win a lot games for the
rest of the year
Cook may have been right in
saying the Pirates should have won.
ECU out-rebounded the number
one ranked rebounding team in
Conference USA, 47-32 leading
to 21 second-chance points. The
Bearcats only had 12 second-
chance points.
The Pirates also scored 46
points in the paint compared to
Corey Rouse helped spark a 12-0 run in the second half and also played a large role in outrebounding the Bearcats by 15.
Cincinnati's 30.
Also, Bearcat opponents have
only averaged 60 points a game
against the pesky defensive squad.
"We are playing pretty good
basketball and I know that the
losing is affecting a lot of the people
in this area Herrion said.
"We are just in a league where
the margin for error is just micro-
scopic but this team is improving
Jason Maxiell lead the Bearcats in
scoring, dropping a game high 24.
The Pirates found themselves
with four guys in double figures,
lead by Rouse's monster 21 point,
13 rebound performance. Cook
went for 19 points while "Moose"
added 14 and Mike Castro tallied 10.
ECU may not have come out
on the winning end of this one,
but the Pirates have continued to
show signs of improvement since
the break, which is evident in the
balanced scoring attack against the
Bearcats last night.
Another key for the Pirates in the
tough loss was the noise level and
problems the crowd created for the
opposition throughout the game.
Coach Herrion believes his
team feeds off the energy of the
fans and only hopes that they will
continue to come out in bigger
numbers to support his Pirates.
"Come back Saturday and give
us that energy this weekend against
UAB Herrion said.
The Pirates host the University I
of Alabama-Birmingham this Sat
urday at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at '
iports@theeastcarolinian.com.
ECU swimming: no bark, just bite Hakim warrick:
Women earn No. 1
ranking in nation
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
With all the recent turmoil
surrounding ECU athletics, fueled
by the firing of former head foot-
ball coach John Thompson, and
the recent decline of the ECU
Men's Basketball Team, the Pirate
Nation is looking whole-heart-
edly for a team to rally behind.
The Pirate men's and women's
swimming and diving squads just
might be those teams.
As if satisfied with slipping
under the proverbial radar, both
the men's and women's team qui-
etly snuck into the top 10 in the
latest NCAA Division 1 Mid-Major
poll. The women are topping the
polls with one of the school's first
ever national No. 1 rankings in
any sport and the men are enter-
ing the top 10 at the No. 9 slot.
The women are currently 5-1
in their dual team meets, with
their only blemish coming from
a three-point loss at the hands of
a strong Duke squad. The men are
a perfect six for six in dual teams,
including victories over ranked
opponents George Mason, James
Madison, Davidson and George
Washington.
So what's the secret to all
the success?
"There is no secret said
Head Coach Rick Kobe.
"We've been doing it for
decades. We just train really hard.
If you buy In to hard training,
then you are going to be success-
ful. We have a tradition here and
our kids know when they come
into the pool area, it's time to
Hands down best
college player so far
ECU will square off against a consistently formidable William & Mary team this weekend.
work and get the job done
Included in Kobe's strict
training regiment for his team is
40-50,000 yards of swimming per
week. While most ECU students
enjoyed their final few days of
Christmas break perhaps by relax-
ing on the couch, the Pirate swim-
mers and divers capitalized on the
opportunity to better themselves
for the second half of the season.
"We just came back from our
training trip down in Florida
where we trained for five hours
a day Kobe said.
"That, in essence, puts us at a
completely higher training level
The higher level that has now
been achieved ensures when
Kobe begins to rest his squads in
three weeks to prepare them for
Division I Mid-Major Top 10
i)ECU
2)Miami
3)Richmond
4)UC-Irvine
5)Oakland
6)Navy
7)Eastern Michigan
8)Southwest Missouri St.
9)Denver
10)Southern Illinois
11
the Conference USA Champion-
ships, a drop-off in performance
is not likely to occur.
That new level of training
will come in handy as the Pirates
face their toughest stretch of
meets of the 2004-2005 season
in the coming weeks. The big-
gest of the remaining meets is
the North Carolina dual team
meet in Chapel Hill on Jan. 26.
Sandwiched in between now and
then are two ranked opponents
in William & Mary (Saturday
1 p.m.) and the University of
Maryland-Baltimore County,
two consistently strong teams.
The Pirates then end the regular
season with a home meet against
UNC-Wilmington.
ECU has a schedule like this
year in and year out and it's not a
forgiving one. However, all great
coaches have a reason for sched-
uling opponents when they do
and Kobe is no exception.
see SWIMMING page 85
Thompson left football team in shambles
Holtz hopes to pick up
pieces JT left behind
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
Unlike ECU'S former head
coach, Skip Holtz has spent years
being the "decision-maker He
knows what has to be done to
turn around a mediocre team.
Pirate fans want the Skip Holtz
flavor of "Holtz turnaround In
just five years, Holtz turned the
University of Connecticut's team
a full 180 degrees as they finished
with 10 wins In 1998, their high-
est total ever.
Holtz has a steep hill to climb
at ECU after the former coach deci-
mated a program once proud with
perennial wins and traditions.
John Thompson never won at
ECU, compiling a 3-20 record In
two short years or long, depend-
ing on which way you want to
John Thompson paces the sidelines during the last game of the season against NC State.
look at it. The lifelong assistant
did more to ruin the program
than just lose. He lost his team.
Twenty players in the past
two seasons left the program
for various reasons. Players are
undoubtedly to blame for many
of the dismissals. However, the
coach is ultimately held account-
able for the program and the
players who represent it.
Granted, Thompson inherited
a team he didn't recruit. How-
ever, Thompson lost almost an
entire recruiting class, including
14 of which saw significant play-
ing time in his two-year tenure.
Now with James Pinkney and
Guy Whimper no longer enrolled
at ECU, it proves Thompson's
reign might not have been as rosy
as he made it seem. Thompson
often spoke of the positive, all
but neglecting to acknowledge
the truth. Maybe he should have
see THOMPSON page 85
WARRICK
(AP) � It's January, which can
only mean a few things. Some
new laws have taken effect, the
Warriors already are out of the
playoff race, and it's time to hand
out some midseason awards.
PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Illinois and North Carolina have
emerged as the two top teams
in the country, but each has so
many weapons there isn't just
one marquee player. The top
candidates are Syracuse's Hakim
Warrick, Mississippi State's Law-
rence Roberts, Boston College's
Craig Smith, Arizona State's Ike
Diogu and Marquette's Travis
Diener. Roberts (19.8 points per
game, 11.5 rebounds per game)
is averaging a double-double,
and the Bulldogs' only losses are
to Syracuse and Arizona. Diogu
also is going for double-figures
in points (23.3) and rebounds
(10.4). Smith (19.6 ppg, 8.7 rpg)
makes things go for the unde-
feated Eagles, and Diener is
second in Conference USA in
scoring (20.9 ppg) and first in
assists (6.6 apg). But the choice
here is Warrick. The Orange is
the class of the Big East and its
only loss Is to Oklahoma State.
Warrick (19.4 ppg, 8.5 rpg) is the
main reason why.
COACH OF THE YEAR:
Boston College's Al Skinner is
getting a lot of attention because
the Eagles are considered a sur
prise. But don't forget that BC
has four starters back from a team
that went 24-10 last season and
advanced to the second round of
the NCAA Tournament. George
Washington has been one of
the season's biggest surprises,
knocking off Michigan State and
Maryland on its way to a national
ranking. Karl Hobbs deserves a
lot of the credit. Even St. Mary's
coach Randy Bennett should
receive some consideration for
keeping the Gaels at a high level
'even without two of tneir best'
players and making them even
better at full strength. But our
pick is Kansas' Bill Self. We all
knew the Jayhawks would be
good, but they've knocked off
two top 10 teams during a nine-
day span without injured AU-
American Wayne Simien.
BIGGEST SURPRISE: There
haven't been many. The current
national rankings have a lot of-
the same teams that were there
in the preseason, albeit with a
jumbled order. George Wash-
ington introduced itself to the:
nation by beating Michigan St.
and Maryland on back-to-back
days and has held its own since.
Arkansas could be a threat in the-
SEC after getting off to a 13-2'
start. New Mexico, not UNLVJ
or Utah, has been the class oft
the Mountain West so far. But;
although it's lost its last two-
games, Iowa has been the big-j
gest eye-opener this season. The:
Hawkeyes were picked to finish in
the middle of the pack in the Big
Ten but are 12-3 and have quality
wins on their resume.
BIGGEST DISAPPOINT-
MENT: Memphis has become
a punching bag for its under-
achieving season, but it's hard
to argue with the evidence. The
Tigers began the season ranked
24th in the country and have
four starters back from last year's
NCAA Tournament team. But
they are 8-7 and have losses to
Mississippi and Louisiana Tech.
They also don't have a quality
win. It hasn't helped that star
player Sean Banks has been in
coach John Calipari's doghouse.
Memphis is the firm choice for
this category, with honorable
mention to North Carolina State,
Florida and Providence.
MOST IMPROVED: UCo-
nn's Marcus Williams has taken
over the point guard duties and
is among the nation's leaders in
assists at 7.3 per game. Jawad
Williams of North Carolina is
tied for the team lead In scoring
after spending much of the past
two years in the shadow of Ray-
mond Felton, Rashad McCants
and Sean May. UCLA's Dijon
Thompson has been carrying
the Bruins on his back (17.5
PPg, 9.1 rpg) while the team's!
freshmen get their feet wet. But
the biggest jump in level of play
has come from Stanford's Dan
Grunfeld. After averaging
3.4 points and 1.4 rebounds
in a reserve role last season,
Grunfeld Is the Cardinal's
leading scorer at 18.1 ppg.
He's also the team's second-
leading rebounder at 5.5 rpg.
!





1-13-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
Thompson
from page B4
Swimming fr0mPa9eB4
:ontacted at
jlinian.com.
explained why there was a mad
exodus oftalented football players.
Losing Pinkney and Whim-
per are big blows. Both have
remote chances to rejoin the
team in the future, but the sce-
nario is not likely. It seems odd
that Pinkney learned a compli-
cated NFL-type playbook, but
could not buckle down to stay in
school. Head coaches are made
aware of a player's grades periodi-
cally throughout each semester.
Pinkney would have been on
"academic warning" before the
season even started so it should
have been red-flagged.
Also leaving the program
during last season were two key
senior receivers. Damarcus Fox
reportedly received a "cloudy"
result on a second drug-test and
was immediately dismissed. Fox
attributed it to a disagreement
with Thompson.
Edwin Rios, who started the
first game, was dismissed after
being "cut" from the team due to
an injury. Rios comments, made
in the Oct. 27, 2004 edition of
the Raleigh News St Observer con-
tradicted Thompson, who stated
that the two parted mutually.
Rios went on to say, "I wasn't
Thompson's favorite player
Iverick Harris, a promising
recruit from Burlington got lost in
the receiving shuffle. Harris, who
saw limited action, mysteriously
quit midseason. Tutu Moye, a
starter at tight end three years ago
didn't fit into Thompson's scheme
and quit when moved to linebacker.
As school started, Josh Chil-
som was deemed academically
ineligible. Eric Terry left the team
presumably for academic rea-
sons. Ike Emodi entered the NFL
supplemental draft because it was
rumored he was struggling aca-
demically. All three would have
been probable starters in 2004.
Several recruits that were
signed in February never made it
to campus. Players like Josh Grier,
Tony Richardson and Ted Riley
ended up at junior colleges. Richie
Santos, Quentin Cotton and Mike
Williams were asked to sit out
the 2004 season and begin when
spring practice started in 200S.
Transfers also hurt the team.
Sakeen Wright went back to his
native New Jersey after starting
in 2003 at the receiver slot. Paul
Troth, debatably the biggest
recruit ever for the Pirates never
panned out and then transferred.
Thompson decided not to start the
incumbent quarterback in 2002,
making way for plenty of quar-
terback struggles in 2003. Jared
Brogden joined Troth at Liberty.
Antoine Nealy, Benard
Sintim, Marques Woolford and
Kevin Fain disappeared into thin
air. Nealy and Fain both started
games in 2002.
John Thompson came to
ECU as a player's coach. Even
so, he chastised so many of his
players to the point that the fans
have to suffer.
Since arriving, Iloltz has
been what the doctor ordered. He
has hired a seasoned and capable
staff. He has spoken about win-
ning his team over, hit the
recruiting trail hard and promises
a new, more physical attitude.
But in order to complete the
familiar "I loltz turnaround" pat-
ented by his father Lou so many
times, Holtz will have to play the
cards he's been dealt. Unfortu-
nately for him, it's someone else's
fault that he does.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Be heard!
Send us your pirate rants!
Submit online at wvm.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-mail editor@theeastcarolinian.com.
"We have some tough meets
left and I always like to schedule
the tougher meets in the second
half, because it helps to prepare
the kids for the championship
meets that will come later Kobe,
the 23-year veteran said.
"William & Mary has an
excellent program. Their head
coach used to be my assistant
coach and it's his first year with
that program and he has done
a good job with them, so that
will be a good meet for both
our teams. UMBC is ranked just
ahead of our men's team, so that
will be a tough test for them.
Chapel Hill is the most
difficult meet on our schedule, so
we have some really tough meets
coming up. But that's just going
to make us that much tougher,
so when we go to the conference
championship meet, we will
have seen it all by then
The C-USA championships
begin Feb. 23, where the Pirates
will look to continue their streak
of never finishing worse than
second on either side of the
competition, an accomplishment
that Kobe says is all about consis-
tency from one event to the next.
"We always have three or four
swimmers that are stand-outs,
those who break records and
things of the such Kobe said.
"This year is no exception,
with Josh Barthlow and Megan
Pulaski, two dynamite freshmen
who have already set records
and seniors Casey Cronin and
Diane Parker. But sandwiched
in between those four, are about
50 more outstanding kids,
many of which are the best at
certain events. You don't win
the amount of meets and
championships that we win
or post streaks like our C-USA
second or better streak without
the consistency from top to
bottom. The bottom line is we
just have a ton of talent in all
our events
As far as predictions go for
the C-USA championships, Kobe
expects the men's meet to be a
two team competition between
the Pirates and TCU, while the
women's side, according to Kobe,
is very unpredictable.
"Six out of the seven
women's teams are all about
equal Kobe said.
"You can have an awesome
meet and still finish second to last.
It's definitely going to be a dog-fight
on both sides for that top spot
Can you name the sport at
ECU that has produced the most
individual and team conference
champions in the last quarter of a
century? If you can't, keepthinking.
In the meantime, coach Kobe
and the gang will quietly con-
tinue to win championships.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
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Page B4 sports@theeastcarolinian.com 252.328.6366 TONY Z0PP0 Sports Editor BRANDON HUGHES Assistant Sports Editor
THURSDAY January 13,2005
Pirates' comeback falls iust short
ECU trailed by as many
as 20 in second half
TRENT WYNNE
STAFF WRITER
With 15:58 remaining and the
Pirates trailing 57-37, It looked as
if once again ECU would not have
enough to hang with one of the
elites in the nation in the Cincin-
nati Bearcats. However, in a matter
of minutes, the Pirates, riding
high on the shoulders of Corey
Rouse, would quickly change that
thought, and reel off one of the
most exciting runs ever put forth
at Minges Coliseum.
The Pirates opened the game
with a block from point guard,
Japhet McNeil, which quickly
turned into an emphatic Moussa
Badiane slam, erupting the ever-
present ECU fans.
The young Pirates did not seem
phased by the Bearcats' gaudy
13-1 record and national ranking
of 13, as they trailed by Just one
point heading into the under eight
minute media timeout.
However, several turnovers and
questionable calls later, ECU found
themselves trailing by 14 going into
the intermission.
"The turnovers in the first half
really killed us because every time
it happened they laid it up at the
other end said ECU Head Coach,
Bill Herrion.
"We really challenged the team
at halftlme to come out and quit get-
ting stepped on because in a league
like this is you allow a team to do
that, you will become exposed
It took the Pirates the opening
four minutes of the second half
before they heeded to Herrion's call-
ing in the locker room. But when
they did, Cincinnati and the 6,200
fans present at the game, knew the
Pirates were for real and were ready
to take on the challenge.
"We just kept playing, kept our
heads up and tried hard to get stops
on the defensive end and convert
on the offensive end Rouse said.
Rouse scored the Pirates'last eight
points of the 12-0 run, capped off by
an unthinkable three-point basket
from the 6-foot, 8-inch forward, lead-
ing to a Bearcat 30-second timeout.
"We just started believing
that we could win the game but
we have to take that approach
coming out of the locker room
before the game starts said sopho-
more guard Mike Cook on his
team's efforts in the second half.
Cincy would stretch the lead
back up to 15, only to see the
Pirates cut it down to four with just
under two minutes remaining. A
few free throw misses later, how-
ever, ECU'S incredible comeback
would fall just short, losing to
the Bearcats by the final of 84-78.
"We should have won the
game Cook said.
"If everybody just has that
attitude that we should have beat
the number 13 team in the country,
then we will win a lot games for the
rest of the year
Cook may have been right in
saying the Pirates should have won.
ECU out-rebounded the number
one ranked rebounding team in
Conference USA, 47-32 leading
to 21 second-chance points. The
Bearcats only had 12 second-
chance points.
The Pirates also scored 46
points in the paint compared to
Corey Rouse helped spark a 12-0 run in the second half and also played a large role in outrebounding the Bearcats by 15.
Cincinnati's 30.
Also, Bearcat opponents have
only averaged 60 points a game
against the pesky defensive squad.
"We are playing pretty good
basketball and I know that the
losing is affecting a lot of the people
in this area Herrion said.
"We are just in a league where
the margin for error is just micro-
scopic but this team is improving
Jason Maxiell lead the Bearcats in
scoring, dropping a game high 24.
The Pirates found themselves
with four guys in double figures,
lead by Rouse's monster 21 point,
13 rebound performance. Cook
went for 19 points while "Moose"
added 14 and Mike Castro tallied 10.
ECU may not have come out
on the winning end of this one,
but the Pirates have continued to
show signs of improvement since
the break, which is evident in the
balanced scoring attack against the
Bearcats last night.
Another key for the Pirates in the
tough loss was the noise level and
problems the crowd created for the
opposition throughout the game.
Coach Herrion believes his
team feeds off the energy of the
fans and only hopes that they will
continue to come out in bigger
numbers to support his Pirates.
"Come back Saturday and give
us that energy this weekend against
UAB Herrion said.
The Pirates host the University
of Alabama-Birmingham this Sat
urday at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at i
sports@theeas tcarolinian. com.
ECU swimming: no bark, just bite Hakim warrick:
Women earn No. 1
ranking in nation
BRENT WYNNE
SENIOR STAFF WRITER
With all the recent turmoil
surrounding ECU athletics, fueled
by the firing of former head foot-
ball coach John Thompson, and
the recent decline of the ECU
Men's Basketball Team, the Pirate
Nation is looking whole-heart-
edly for a team to rally behind.
The Pirate men's and women's
swimming and diving squads just
might be those teams.
As if satisfied with slipping
under the proverbial radar, both
the men's and women's team qui-
etly snuck into the top 10 in the
latest NCAA Division I Mid-Major
poll. The women are topping the
polls with one of the school's first
ever national No. 1 rankings in
any sport and the men are enter-
ing the top 10 at the No. 9 slot.
The women are currently 5-1
in their dual team meets, with
their only blemish coming from
a three-point loss at the hands of
a strong Duke squad. The men are
a perfect six for six in dual teams,
including victories over ranked
opponents George Mason, James
Madison, Davidson and George
Washington.
So what's the secret to all
the success?
"There is no secret said
Head Coach Rick Kobe.
"We've been doing it for
decades. We just train really hard.
If you buy in to hard training,
then you are going to be success-
ful. We have a tradition here and
our kids know when they come
into the pool area, it's time to
njf?
HKj
flg Hands down best
college player so far
ECU will square off against a consistently formidable William & Mary team this weekend
work and get the job done
Included in Kobe's strict
training regiment for his team Is
40-50,000 yards of swimming per
week. While most ECU students
enjoyed their final few days of
Christmas break perhaps by relax-
ing on the couch, the Pirate swim-
mers and divers capitalized on the
opportunity to better themselves
for the second half of the season.
"We just came back from our
training trip down in Florida
where we trained for five hours
a day Kobe said.
"That, in essence, puts us at a
completely higher training level
The higher level that has now
been achieved ensures when
Kobe begins to rest his squads in
three weeks to prepare them for
Division I Mid-Major Top 10
1) ECU
2) Miami
3) Richmond
4) UC-Irvine
5) Oakland
6) Navy
7) Eastern Michigan
8) Southwest Missouri St.
9) Denver
10) Southern Illinois
"1
the Conference USA Champion-
ships, a drop-off in performance
is not likely to occur.
That new level of training
will come in handy as the Pirates
face their toughest stretch of
meets of the 2004-2005 season
in the coming weeks. The big-
gest of the remaining meets is
the North Carolina dual team
meet in Chapel Hill on Jan. 26.
Sandwiched in between now and
then are two ranked opponents
in William & Mary (Saturday
1 p.m.) and the University of
Maryland-Baltimore County,
two consistently strong teams.
The Pirates then end the regular
season with a home meet against
UNC-Wilmington.
ECU has a schedule like this
year in and year out and it's not a
forgiving one. However, all great
coaches have a reason for sched-
uling opponents when they do
and Kobe is no exception.
see SWIMMING page 85
Thompson left football team in shambles
Holtz hopes to pick up
pieces JT left behind
ERIC GILMORE
STAFF WRITER
Unlike ECU'S former head
coach, Skip Holtz has spent years
being the "decision-maker He
knows what has to be done to
turn around a mediocre team.
Pirate fans want the Skip Holtz
flavor of "Holtz turnaround In
just five years, Holtz turned the
University of Connecticut's team
a full 180 degrees as they finished
with 10 wins In 1998, their high-
est total ever.
Holtz has a steep hill to climb
at ECU after the former coach deci-
mated a program once proud with
perennial wins and traditions.
John Thompson never won at
ECU, compiling a 3-20 record In
two short years or long, depend-
ing on which way you want to
John Thompson paces tiie sidelines during the last game of the season against NC State,
look at it. The lifelong assistant able for the program and the
did more to ruin the program
than just lose. He lost his team.
Twenty players in the past
two seasons left the program
for various reasons. Players are
undoubtedly to blame for many
of the dismissals. However, the
coach is ultimately held account-
players who represent it.
Granted. Thompson inherited
a team he didn't recruit. How-
ever, Thompson lost almost an
entire recruiting class, including
14 of which saw significant play-
ing time in his two-year tenure.
Now with James Pinkney and
Guy Whimper no longer enrolled
at ECU, it proves Thompson's
reign might not have been as rosy
as he made it seem. Thompson
often spoke of the positive, all
but neglecting to acknowledge
the truth. Maybe he should have
see THOMPSON page S5
WARRICK
(AP) � It's January, which can
only mean a few things. Some
new laws have taken effect, the
Warriors already are out of the
playoff race, and it's time to hand
out some midseason awards.
PLAYER OF THE YEAR:
Illinois and North Carolina have
emerged as the two top teams
in the country, but each has so
many weapons there isn't just
one marquee player. The top
candidates are Syracuse's Hakim
Warrick, Mississippi State's Law-
rence Roberts, Boston College's
Craig Smith, Arizona State's Ike
Diogu and Marquette's Travis
Diener. Roberts (19.8 points per
game, 11.5 rebounds per game)
is averaging a double-double,
and the Bulldogs' only losses are
to Syracuse and Arizona. Diogu
also is going for double-figures
in points (23.3) and rebounds
(10.4). Smith (19.6 ppg, 8.7 rpg)
makes things go for the unde-
feated Eagles, and Diener is
second in Conference USA in
scoring (20.9 ppg) and first in
assists (6.6 apg). But the choice
here is Warrick. The Orange is
the class of the Big East and its
only loss is to Oklahoma State.
Warrick (19.4 ppg, 8.5 rpg) is the
main reason why.
COACH OF THE YEAR:
Boston College's Al Skinner is
getting a lot of attention because
the Eagles are considered a sur
prise. But don't forget that BC
has four starters back from a team
that went 24-10 last season and
advanced to the second round of
the NCAA Tournament. George
Washington has been one of
the season's biggest surprises,
knocking off Michigan State and
Maryland on Its way to a national
ranking. Karl Hobbs deserves a
lot of the credit. Even St. Mary's
coach Randy Bennett should
receive some consideration for
keeping the Gaels at a high level
'even without two or their best'
players and making them even
better at full strength. But our
pick is Kansas' Bill Self. We all
knew the Jayhawks would be
good, but they've knocked off
two top 10 teams during a nine-
day span without injured All-
American Wayne Simien.
BIGGEST SURPRISE: There
haven't been many. The current
national rankings have a lot of.
the same teams that were there
in the preseason, albeit with a
jumbled order. George Wash-
ington introduced itself to the'
nation by beating Michigan St.
and Maryland on back-to-back,
days and has held Its own since.
Arkansas could be a threat in the
SEC after getting off to a 13-2,
start. New Mexico, not UNLVJ
or Utah, has been the class of!
the Mountain West so far. But!
although it's lost its last two
games, Iowa has been the big-i
gest eye-opener this season. The
Hawkeyes were picked to finish in
the middle of the pack in the Big
Ten but are 12-3 and have quality
wins on their resume.
BIGGEST DISAPPOINT-
MENT: Memphis has become
a punching bag for its under-
achieving season, but it's hard
to argue with the evidence. The
Tigers began the season ranked
24th in the country and have
four starters back from last year's
NCAA Tournament team. But
they are 8-7 and have losses to
Mississippi and Louisiana Tech.
They also don't have a quality
win. It hasn't helped that star
player Sean Banks has been in
coach John Calipari's doghouse.
Memphis is the firm choice for
this category, with honorable
mention to North Carolina State,
Florida and Providence.
MOST IMPROVED: UCo-
nn's Marcus Williams has taken
over the point guard duties and
is among the nation's leaders in
assists at 7.3 per game. Jawad
Williams of North Carolina is
tied for the team lead in scoring
after spending much of the past
two years in the shadow of Ray-
mond Felton, Rashad McCants
and Sean May. UCLA's Dijon
Thompson has been carrying
the Bruins on his back (17.5
PPg. 9.1 rpg) while the team's!
freshmen get their feet wet. But
the biggest jump in level of play
has come from Stanford's Dan
Grunfeld. After averaging
34 points and 1.4 rebounds
in a reserve role last season,
Grunfeld is the Cardinal's
leading scorer at 18.1 ppg.
He's also the team's second-
leading rebounder at 5.5 rpg.






1-13-05
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
PAGE B5
out in bigger
: his Pirates,
urday and give
reekend against
contacted at
roiinian.com.
Thompson
from page B4
Swimming
from page B4
explained why there was a mad
exodus oftalented football players.
Losing Pinkney and Whim-
per are big blows. Both have
remote chances to rejoin the
team in the future, but the sce-
nario is not likely. It seems odd
that Pinkney learned a compli-
cated NFL-type playbook, but
could not buckle down to stay in
school. Head coaches are made
aware of a player's grades periodi-
cally throughout each semester.
Pinkney would have been on
"academic warning" before the
season even started so it should
have been red-flagged.
Also leaving the program
during last season were two key
senior receivers. Damarcus Fox
reportedly received a "cloudy"
result on a second drug-test and
was immediately dismissed. Fox
attributed it to a disagreement
with Thompson.
Edwin Rios, who started the
first game, was dismissed after
being "cut" from the team due to
an injury. Rios comments, made
in the Oct. 27, 2004 edition of
the Raleigh News & Observer con-
tradicted Thompson, who stated
that the two parted mutually.
Rios went on to say, "I wasn't
Thompson's favorite player
Iverick Harris, a promising
recruit from Burlington got lost in
the receiving shuffle. Harris, who
saw limited action, mysteriously
quit midseason. Tutu Moye, a
starter at tight end three years ago
didn't fit into Thompson's scheme
and quit when moved to linebacker.
As school started, Josh Chil-
som was deemed academically
ineligible. Eric Terry left the team
presumably for academic rea-
sons. Ike Emodi entered the NFL
supplemental draft because it was
rumored he was struggling aca-
demically. All three would have
been probable starters in 2004.
Several recruits that were
signed in February never made it
to campus. Players like Josh Grier,
Tony Richardson and Ted Riley
ended up at junior colleges. Richie
Santos, Quentin Cotton and Mike
Williams were asked to sit out
the 2004 season and begin when
spring practice started in 2005.
Transfers also hurt the team.
Sakeen Wright went back to his
native New Jersey after starting
in 2003 at the receiver slot. Paul
Troth, debatably the biggest
recruit ever for the Pirates never
panned out and then transferred.
Thompson decided not to start the
incumbent quarterback in 2002,
making way for plenty of quar-
terback struggles in 2003. Jared
Brogden joined Troth at Liberty.
Antoine Nealy, Benard
Sintim, Marques Woolford and
Kevin Fain disappeared into thin
air. Nealy and Fain both started
games in 2002.
John Thompson came to
ECU as a player's coach. Even
so, he chastised so many of his
players to the point that the fans
have to suffer.
Since arriving, Holtz has
been what the doctor ordered. He
has hired a seasoned and capable
staff. He has spoken about win-
ning his team over, hit the
recruiting trail hard and promises
a new, more physical attitude.
But in order to complete the
familiar "Holtz turnaround" pat-
ented by his father Lou so many
times, Holtz will have to play the
cards he's been dealt. Unfortu-
nately for him, it's someone else's
fault that he does.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian. com.
Be heard!
Send us your pirate rants!
Submit online at www.theeastcarolinian.com, or e-mail editor@theeastcarolinian.com.
"We have some tough meets
left and I always like to schedule
the tougher meets in the second
half, because it helps to prepare
the kids for the championship
meets that will come later Kobe,
the 23-year veteran said.
"William & Mary has an
excellent program. Their head
coach used to be my assistant
coach and it's his first year with
that program and he has done
a good job with them, so that
will be a good meet for both
our teams. UMBC is ranked just
ahead of our men's team, so that
will be a tough test for them.
Chapel Hill is the most
difficult meet on our schedule, so
we have some really tough meets
coming up. But that's just going
to make us that much tougher,
so when we go to the conference
championship meet, we will
have seen it all by then
The C-USA championships
begin Feb. 23, where the Pirates
will look to continue their streak
of never finishing worse than
second on either side of the
competition, an accomplishment
that Kobe says is all about consis-
tency from one event to the next.
"We always have three or four
swimmers that are stand-outs,
those who break records and
things of the such Kobe said.
"This year is no exception,
with Josh Barthlow and Megan
Pulaski, two dynamite freshmen
who have already set records
and seniors Casey Cronin and
Diane Parker. But sandwiched
in between those four, are about
50 more outstanding kids,
many of which are the best at
certain events. You don't win
the amount of meets and
championships that we win
or post streaks like our C-USA
second or better streak without
the consistency from top to
bottom. The bottom line is we
just have a ton of talent in all
our events
As far as predictions go for
the C-USA championships, Kobe
expects the men's meet to be a
two team competition between
the Pirates and TCU, while the
women's side, according to Kobe,
is very unpredictable.
"Six out of the seven
women's teams are all about
equal Kobe said.
"You can have an awesome
meet and still finish second to last.
It's definitely going to be a dog-fight
on both sides for that top spot
Can you name the sport at
ECU that has produced the most
individual and team conference
champions in the last quarter of a
century?Ifyoucan't,keepthinking.
In the meantime, coach Kobe
and the gang will quietly con-
tinue to win championships.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@theeastcarolinian.com.
Pirate BucksMeal Plan
Sign-Up
Tuesday, January 18th
at The Wright Place
9 am to 2 pm
Report news students need to know toe
Accepting applications lor STAFF WRITERS
� Learn Investigative reporting skills
� Must have at least a 2.0 GPA
Apply at our office located on trie 2nd floor of the Student Publications Building, or call 328-6366
UNIVERSITY
HOUSING h DINING
FIND US IF YOU CAN
wo
Nightly Pinner Specials 5.95
Monday - Homemade Meatloaf
Tuesday - Country Fried Chicken
Wednesday - Spaghetti and Meatballs
Thursday - Greek or Caesar Salad WChix
Friday - Fish and Chips
Saturday - Meat or 5 Cheese lasagna
Sunday - Fried Shrimp Plate
Paily Prink Specials
Monday - M.75 Pomestic Pottles
Tuesday - 2 Imports
Wednesday - M Mug Pud It 4 Pitchers
Thursday - �2 House Hi-balls?? Wine
?2.50 Import of the day
Friday -Margarita fr 2.50 Import of the day
Saturday - Li ts � 250 Import of the Pay
Sunday - 2.50 Pint Guinness, Pass,
Newcastle. Slack and Tan





PAGE B6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN � SPORTS
1-13-05
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 13, 2005
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 13, 2005
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
3cm x 2cm
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1783
Contributor(s)
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
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