The East Carolinian, November 9, 2000






arolinian 10
ds@tec.ecu.edu
ERSONALS
IONS TO the newly
elta Council Officers:
:a Moore. VP New
ion-Nikki Speer, VP
immy Burkette, VP
Karen Matthew, VP
i Ludlow. Secretary-
irer- Marianne Hume,
; Delegate Melissa
i, Friday night in the
last! Maybe our next
ter. The brothers of
lilon.
li, thank you for the
; usual, it was won-
i ol Kappa Delta
would like to thank
ates. We had a great
Port Marina in New
Tau Alpha!
Saturday's tailgate
igh the game wasn't
e at, it was fun! The
3 Alpha Epsilon.
hanks its ladies for
during the volleyball
congratulates them
ship.
last Thursday night
e look forward to
i brothers of Sigma
would like to thank
la for the social at
lursday! Hope you

aha. thanks for the
ekend. We had a
ind cannot wait to
The sisters of Chi
;s of Alpha Xi Delta
arable evening We
our next event. The
Chi
iappa Delta thanks
social last Thursday,
nd look forward to
would like to thank
srnities for an awe-
past socials. Sigma
Jta Chi, Chi Phi and
:hi Omega! A big
ugby team for your
e sisters and new
fau Alpha
would like to thank
groat social! Let's
soon
iilon, thanks for the
jht; we had a blast,
na Sigma.
HER
ing away $100 to
an to sign up for
t smallworld.com
NCS.
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easttarolinian
NEWSA2
5Ci4's hard work pays off with
passage of bond referendum
VOLUME 75 NUMBER 1 56
30 days to go
until Graduation
NEWSBRIEFS
Movies
The Blockbuster feature film this week
is What Lies Beneath which begins show-
ing at 7:30 p.m. tonight in the Hendrix
Theater at Mendenhall Student Center
(MSC). It will be followed by the film
Cecil B. Demented at 10 p.m. These
movies will continue to show until
Sunday, Nov. 12. Movie times on Sunday
are at 3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Recital
Jonathan Wacker of the School of
Music will direct the Percussion Ensemble
in a recital beginning at 8 p.m. tonight in
the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall.
Symphony
The North Carolina Symphony
Orchestra will perform at 8 p.m.
Friday, Nov. 10 in Wright Auditorium.
Ticket information is available by calling
328-1244.
ECU football
The ECU Pirates will host the Univer-
sity of Houston Cougars for their final
home game of the season. The Confer-
ence USA match-up kicks off at noon
Saturday, Nov. 11 in Dowdy-Ficklen Sta-
dium.
Foodservice meeting
The ECU Student Foodservice Advi-
sory Committee will be holding a meet-
ing at 5 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 14 in Sweet-
heart's at Todd Dining Hall. Students will
get to meet the food service manage-
ment team and enjoy a free catered
dinner. RSVP requested by Sunday, Nov.
12 by calling 328-2470.
Geography Awareness
Week
Nov. 12-18 is National Geography
Awareness Week. The Department of
Geography at ECU is hosting a lecture
which will be on Nov. 16 at 4:00 PM
in Room 102B Brewster Building. Depart-
ment chair Ron Mitchelson (328-6230)
and this year's speaker Derek Alderman
(328-4013) can be contacted for further
information.
0NLINESURVEY
Did you vote
In Election 2000?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Should Richard Alston
have been suspended?
91 Yes
8 No
SPORTSA8
Football team hopes to rebound
against Houston
FEATURESA6
Above and Beyond: Miranda
Morton
TODAY'S
WEATHER
Cloudy
HIGH 71 LOW S8'
2
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINi
Election too close to call
Above: Texas Governor George W Bush and his wife Laura leave the Travis County Courthouse in Austin, Texas
after casting their vote Tuesday morning (KRT photo by Ron JenkinsFort Worth Star-Telegram)
Right: Vice President Al Gore exits the voting booth after casting his ballot at the Forks River School in
Elmwood, Tenn Tuesday (KRT photb by Chuck Kennedy)
Florida recount
begins as
candidates wait
MIAMI, Florida
(CNN)-GOI' presidential
nominee George W. Bush
cautiously claimed vic-
tory Wednesday, even
though his narrow lead in
Florida-a crucial electoral
state-was stuck in limbo
pending a vote recount.
His Democratic rival,
Vice President Al Gore,
gave a brief statement this
afternoon in which he
urged "respect for the rule
of law as Florida officials
began carefully counting
ballots again.
"We now need to
resolve this election in a
way that Is fair and forth-
right, and in a way that
is fully consistent with
the Constitution and our
laws Gore said. "Because
of what is at stake, this
matter must be resolved
expeditiously, but delib-
erately and without any
rush to judgment
Bush, the Texas gov-
ernor, has a 1,784-vote
lead over Gore in Florida.
Because the lead is so
narrow, Florida's election
officials, by law, enacted
a mandatory recount
Wednesday. The recount
must be completed by the
end of the business day
Thursday.
"Because of the close-
ness of the presidential
election, an automatic
recount as provided by
law is currently under
way Florida Gov. Jeb
Bush, the Republican pres-
idential hopeful's younger
brother, told reporters
Wednesday afternoon.
"We thought it would
be close Jeb Bush said.
"Never in my wildest
dreams did I imagine it
would be this close. I have
the greatest confidence in
the independently elected
bipartisan group of coun-
try supervisors of elections
that exist all across our
state
Four Florida counties
reported the first recount
results Wednesday after-
noon, with only a slight
change indicated for the
vice president, who picked
up 23 votes among their
combined tallies.
"This morning brings
news from Florida that
the final vote count
there shows that Secre-
tary (Dick) Cheney and I
have carried the state of
Florida George W. Bush
told reporters Wednesday
afternoon. "And if that
result is confirmed by an
automatic recount as we
expect it to be, then we
have won the election
"We have to make sure
the outcome is finalized
as quickly as possible
he said, adding that the
situation reflects on the
"strength of our democ-
racy
Bush promised that he
would work hard to gain
the confidence of Gore
voters.
A county-by-county
recount had begun by
Wednesday afternoon,
and election officials said
they would release results-
as they received them.
The Electoral College
and ultimate victory for
either Gore or Bush is at
stake.
In Washington, Pres-
ident Clinton, newly
returned from New York
after first lady Hillary
Rodham Clinton's vie- .
tory in that state's Senate
race, said the continually
unfolding events sur-
rounding this year's presi-
dential election should
quash any notion that
individual votes are not
significant.
"If ever there was a
doubt about the impor-
tance of exercising democ-
racy's most fundamental
right, the right to vote,
yesterday put it to rest
1 . ���
Clinton said. "The Ameri-
- caw-people have spoken
The president, said he
and Gore spoke after the
vice president retracted
his one-on-one conces-
sion to Bush. He did not
give much detail about
the contents of that con-
versation.
"1 talked to him (after
the phone call) Clinton
said. "He was pleased that
he was getting the popular
vote, and we had a very
good talk. He congratu-
lated Hillary
A Gore campaign
spokesman said his side
believes enough votes
remain uncounted to
See FLORIDA pg 3
si � � � � it
Counterfeit investigations pending Bond referendum passes
Two illegal bills used;
different locations, same night
Lex Wilson
STAFF WRITER
Six days after the arrest of ECU's back-up quarterback
Richard Alston, both the Greenville and ECU police
departments are continuing their investigations into
whether another incident involving a counterfeit bill
is related to Alston.
Alston was arrested last Thursday after attempting
to pay for a meal with a $100 counterfeit bill at the
Burger King drive-thru on 10th Street and Greenville
Boulevard.
More details regarding the events leading up to
Alston's arrest have surfaced. According to Burger
King's restaurant manager, who refused to be identified
for this story, Alston drove up to the drive-thru at
approximately 8:45 p.m not at 11:30 p.m. as originally
reported by Greenville Police Department (GPD).
"We were just about to finish up an event with
the Phi Mu Alpha fraternity, which was scheduled
to end at 9 p.m when the incident took place the
manager said.
The manager said the window clerk, non-student
James Price, was following restaurant procedure when
he rejected the $100 bill Alston used to pay for his
meal.
"Burger King's policy entails that any currency
$20 and above are to be handed to a manager for
approval, always the manager said. "Our employees
sign a contract prior to hiring that if they do not get
currency approved and it turns out to be counterfeit,
they are responsible for repaying the full amount to
Burger King
The manager also said the counterfeit bill felt the
same as a genuine $20 bill that he approved five days
prior to the Thursday night incident. After Price took
the $100 bill and passed it to the manager, Alston was
told that the bill did not look genuine. The passenger
in Alston's vehicle then gave Price a genuine $20 to
pay for the meal at which time Price told them it
was policy to hold the vehicle until police arrived.
Alston, waited for approximately 20 seconds before
driving away.
Price took down Alston's license plate number and
reported the incident to the GPD. "The $100 bill
looked real Price said. "I didn't think that it was fake.
The only thing about it was that it felt very similar to
wallpaper-sort of slick
Alston has since been released on a $5,500 unsecured
bond.
Another incident involving an attempt by an
individual to pass a counterfeit $100 bill occurred
around 11:45 p.m. the same evening in the Galley
dining area in Jones Residence Hall on College Hill
Drive. Police have not given any information yet
regarding a suspect.
"The ECUPD along with the GPD are still trying to
determine if the two incidents are related by running
down all relevant leads said Capt. Frank Knight of the
ECU Police Department (ECUPD). "The investigation
is still ongoing and several law enforcement agencies
are coordinating on the investigation
According to the FBI, counterfeiting money is a
federal offense. Both the FBI and possibly the U.S.
Treasury Department could be participating in the
investigation, however, Knight would not confirm
this.
"I can not offer this information being that the
Investigation is still pending Knight said.
Alston could not be reached for comment.
Anyone with information regarding this incident
should contact the Greenville Police Department at
830-3937.
This writer can be contacted at newsQtec.ecu.edu.
ECU to receive
$190.6 million
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS
EDITOR
The long awaited
$3.1 billion Higher Edu-
cation Bond- Referen-
dum was passed on
Tuesday with the sup-
port from the North
Carolina voting com-
munity. ECU's share
of the bond is $190.6
million.
At the close of the
election, 75 percent of
the state approved the
bond referendum, in
Pitt County, 82 per-
cent agreed that a ref-
erendum was needed to
improve our universi-
ties facilities.
The bond will pro-
vide the much needed
renovations and con-
struction of academic
facilities on the 16 Uni-
versity of North Caro-
lina (UNC) campuses
and various commu-
nity colleges.
Portions of the
bond's money are allo-
cated to ECU and other
UNC institutions faced
with the prospect of
50,000 additional stu-
dents expected state
wide over the next 10
years.
Receiving the third
largest share of the
bond referendum, ECU
will facilitate the money
toward completing the
current construction
of the new Science and
Technology Building
adjacent to the Howell
Science Complex.
The preparation site
for the main infrastruc-
ture of the building
was recently completed
with the $7 million ini-
tially allocated by the
N.C. General Assem-
bly.
"We are totally
elated and the next
thing we have to do is
go through a process to
get permission to pro-
ceed with the construc-
tion of the building
said Austin Bunch, assis-
tant to the chancellor.
Advertisements for a
contractor are projected
for mid to late Decem-
ber. ConstrucUon is pro-
jected to begin by the
middle of spring semes-
ter. The projected com-
pletion date is 2003.
SBONDi





2 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Thursday, November 9, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
M&3
Congratulations ECU and
North Carolina voters! Students
at ECU will benefit significantly
from the new bond.
Among campus renovation
and conversion of current facili-
ties for academic use, repairs
and expansion of the campus
infrastructure and improvements
in classrooms and laboratories
will also take place.
The Brody School of Medicine
will receive much-needed addi-
tional library and study space to
accommodate current and future
enrollment growth in Health Sci-
ence programs as well.
SGA did everything possible to
help campaign for the bond. We
distributed stickers and campaign
literature to all
campus organi-
zations, sent a
letter to every
ECU North Car-
olina parent,
had voter regis-
tration drives,
spoke on WZMB
91.3 FM, spoke
to campus orga-
nizations, hung MnSMOl C. AhO
posters, made SGA chief OF staff
banners and all
in all, got the word out!
With the passage of this bond
Tuesday, ECU now has the potential
to become a strong contender in
both national and global academic
programs. All degrees will be worth
a little more now-so, thank you
for your help in passing these
�bonds.
In legislative matters, the
following campus organization
constitutions were approved:
Airwaves (umbrella media orga-
nization), Pirate Bridge Club
and ECU Student Athletic Train-
ers Club (which will provide
all student athletic trainers the
kills needed for their training).
Additionally, 14 new stu-
dents were sworn into their
respective legislative seats. The
legislature still has seats open,
so if you are interested in filling
one of these, please stop by
Room 255 Mendenhall and fill
out an application.
'Bkbh'g J. Seafood
Thursday - Student & Faculty Night
$5.00 Off Peck Of Oysters-Dinner only!
$1.25 Beer Specials
(Bring Student ID for discount)
Located 5 minutes from ECU and PCC Campuses. Just
past the intersection of Firetower Rd. and Charles Blvd.
Now catering Oyster Roasts and" seafood, etc.
OPEN TUES-SAT � 3840 S. CHARLES BLVD. � 353-0011
www.attic-niqhtclub.com
Ie52-7303:
209 E. 5th St.
Uptown
Greenville
East Carolina Playhouse Presents
November 16-21,2000
SAT 11
PKM Reunion VETERANS DAY
WED 15
FAT DOCTOR
THU16
�van & jarron
FRI17
WEEKEND EXCURSION
& Revelation Darling
SAT 18
FAR TOO JONESFeel
Love Fury
SAT2S
DAVID ALLEN COE
DECEMBER 2000
FRI01
CHAIRMEN OF THE BOARD
SAT 02
WXQRLEXX A TERRY AM SHOW 1
WED 06
VICTOR WOOTEN (of Bela
Fleck The Fleckstones)
FRI08
BREAKFAST CLUB
mBMKBSBSSBBBBBBSBS
Wesley Commons South
Why not Gobble up a delicious deal?
$100 off security deposit
i &2 Bedroom Units with:
An odd assortment of twenty-somethings come together to learn life lessons.
A play by Lanford Wilson
328-6829
McGinnis Theatre � East Carolina University � Greenville, NC
, General Public Jio and $9 -ECU Faculty and StaffSeniors I9 and $8
StudentsYouth $7 and $6
All performances 8:00 p.m. except Sunday November 19, at 2:00 p.m. 6. ?
free water and sewer
refrigerator and stove
washer and dryer connections
1stfloor patio with fence
2nd floor balcony
5 blocks from ECU campus
on site laundry facilities
On ECU bus route
pets allowed with fee
(no weight limit)
bike racks
some units with dishwashers
For more Information; Call 758-1921
NOW PRE-LEASING FOR JANUARY, 2001!
k O
ECU-MEM'S WATER POLO CLUB IS
RENTLV RECRUITING FOR SPRING
TESTER! SPECIAL INTRODUCTORY
PRACTICES VILLBE HELD IN NOV
IF INTERESTED. PLEASE ATTENO
MEETING THURSDAY NOV. 9 @ 6PM.
T
"Experience is neeoeoi
FOR MORE INFO CONTACT
� - if
AOAM GAFFEY 830 - 6086
GAFFEVSVIM@K0TMAIL.COM
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
3 328-6387
www.recserv.ecu.edu
lamspoRTS
1





Thursday, November 9, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@tec.ecu.edu
TUNE IN TO
FOR FULL COVERAGE OF THE
EAST CAROLINA VS. HOUSTON
GAME.
DAN EBERHARD & STERLING JONES
WILL CALL THE ACTION LIVE FROM
DOWDY-FICKLEN STADIUM.
(PRE GAME SHOW BEGINS 30 MINUTES PRIOR TO
KICKOFF)
DC COMICS ARE
JUST PART OF THE
EXCITEMENT AT:
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(252)758-6909







SILVER
BULLET
'AVouch Of Class'
756-6278
Dolb
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
FRI&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
i.�nu�-w.rm.� (tiMh�ilaaliiilium.i




A

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A.

FLORIDA from page 1
bring victory to the Democratic
ticket.
But if that is not the case, Gore
campaign chairman William Daley
said, "Vice President Gore and
Senator (Joe) Lieberman are fully
prepared to concede and to support
Governor Bush if and when he is
officially elected president
Gore overtook Bush in the
national popular vote tally by 1
percentage point, 49 percent to 48
percent.
Officials in Florida said all the
precinct ballots and all the absentee
ballots had been counted in all 67
counties with the major exception
of overseas absentee ballots. Now
all the votes will be recounted
by supervisors from all counties,
with representatives from the news
media and both candidates pres-
ent.
Election officials said either
the number of overseas absentee
ballots or a change as a result of the
recount could tip the election for
Bush or for Gore.
It is also possible that one can-
didate could win the Electoral
College vote and the other win
the popular vote, which hasn't
happened in a hundred years.
������������
BOND from page 1
"It is just so exciting said
Chancellor Richard Eakin. "I truly
believe the191 million is probably
one of the best things that has
happened to ECU in many years
Other buildings and laboratories
that will receive renovation include
the Flanagan, Belk Allied Health,
Speight, General Classroom, Austin,
Rawl and Rivers buildings. A new
Health Science library will also be
constructed. Construction will take
six years to complete.
This writer con be contacted
at newsasst0tec.ecu.edu.
DiANNE LAMBERT
RIVERGATE EAST
3195 E. Tenth Street, Suite D
Greenville, NC 27858
Phone: 252-830-4887
800-756-2486
Fax: 252-757-2486
� Weaving Supplies
� We cut any shape
matt for art students
1
110 off i
� anything
over $10.00
I I
SfiM'S TROPHIES
FOR FAST & FRIENDLY SERVICE
COMPUTERIZED ENGRAVING
� PLASTIC SIGNS - NAME TflGS
- RIBBONS � PLf?Q0ES
� TROPHIES � CUSTOM LOGOS
757-1388
OR FAX US YOUR ORDER - 757-2476
1804 DICKINSON fiVE.
GREENVILLE, NC
ACROSS FROM PEPSI
HOURS
8:30 - 5:00 M-F
Join us every Sunday:
Bible School at 9:30
Worship at 10:30
� Blended Worship Service
� Children's Worship Service
� Small Groups
� Youth Ministry
� Children's Ministry
Church Office:
600-A Country Club Dr.
Greenville, NC 27834
(252)353-2539
Currently meeting at
the Boys' & Girls' Club of Pitt Co.
Firetower Rd.
Christ's Church
� New IwiiTwni Christian I hurch
exists to bring glory
to God by building up
the lives of those He
loves.
-pr Computer Peripherals I
Unlimited
930A South Evans Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27858
(252) 752-3458
Hours:
Monday-Friday 9:00am to 8;00pm
Saturday 9:00am to 9:00pm
Sunday 1:00pm to 6:00pm
Fall Specials For ECU Staff and Students
Quality Cutom Computer Jole
Computer Port and flccezorie
Repair and Upgrade
Troinina en Hardware and Software
Gaming
� Memory PC 100 128MB SDRAM $89.00 28MH
PC 100 64MB SDRAM $49.99 (Free Installation) R AM UPGRADE
� AOpen 10100 Network Cards $23.99, regular price $35.99 $89.00
� WordPerfect Office 2000 $20 with a purchase of any hard drive
� Labor Rates $35.00 @ Hour, regular rate $40 @ hour
� GAMING HALF PRICE FOR STUDENTSII STARTING AT $1.25 Per HOUR
"Fall Specials end November 21, 2000. Starr and Students must have university II) when making a
purchase on any fall special. Prices on all items in the store are subject to change without notice
PRICE DROP
To Get Demented
NOVEMBER 9 AT 10 P.M. AND NOVEMBER 12
AT 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Cecil B. Demented (R) Underground filmmakers force
a Hollywood star to headline their latest low-budget
project. Get in free with one guest on presentation
of your valid ECU One Card.
M
Jr. CPU
AMD Duron 600 MHZ Processor
FICAZ11 Motherboard
64MB PC 100 SDRAM
20GB ATA66 Hard Drive
8MB Video Card
16 Bit Integrated Sound
56.6K V90 FaxVoice Modem
48X CD ROM
1.44MB Floppy Drive
140 Watt Speakers
Keyboard
Internet Scroll Mouse
Enlight Mid Tower Case
17" KDS Monitor
Windows ME
ONLY $975.00!
Gamers Dream
AMD Athlon 950 MHZ Processor
F1CAZI1 Motherboard
256MB PC 133 SDRAM
40GB ATA66 Hard Drive
32MB GH FORCE Video Card
Sound Blaster Live Value Sound Card
56.6K V90 FaxVoice Modem
Ricoh CDRW
52X CD ROM
1.44MB Floppy Drive
Altec Lansing ACS54 Five Piece Speakers
Keyboard
Internet Scroll Mouse
Hnlight Mid Tower Case
17" KDS Monitor
Windows ME
ONLY $1,850.00!
To Go for Baroque
NOVEMBER 16 AT 8 P.M. IN
WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Travel through time with Tafelmusik, one of the
world's premiere period-instrument orchestras, to
hear the music of classic Baroque composers as they
would have heard it themselves. Advance discount
tickets are available at the Central Ticket Office until
Nov. 16 at 6 p.m.
pvie
NOVEMBER 9-11 AT 7:30 P.M.
AND NOVEMBER 12 AT 3P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
What Lies Beneath (PC-13) Picture-
perfect couple Norman and Clair
(Harrison Ford and Michelle Pfeiffer)
find their storybook life disrupted by
the appearance of a ghost bent on
revenge. Get in free with one guest
on presentation of your valid ECU One
Card.
To Catch a Free
Flick
NOVEMBER 15 & 19 AT 7:30 P.M.
AND NOVEMBER 16 AT 10 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
The Education of Little Tree (PG) An
8-year-old Cherokee boy loses his par-
ents but gains insight into Cherokee
life when he goes to live with his
grandparents. Present your valid ECU
One Card to get in free with one
ALL NEW SYSTEMS COME WITH A 2 YEAR ON-SITE WARRANTY AND A FREE WINDOWS
INTRODUCTORY CLASS
If you need a new computer system, stop by and our friendly staff will help you Scute on
the right system for you. Our computer systems are higher quality and comparable in price
to leading national brand computer systems. The difference, you will know what you are
buying! We guarantee you will be happy with our services, so stop by today!
To Polish
Up ur
Manners
NOVEMBER 17 AT 5 P.M.
IN MSC MULTI-PURPOSE
ROOM
Impress your date, your
parents, and anyone else
with your polished table-
manners. Student Leader-
ship Development
Programs presents "Keep
Your Elbows Off the Table
a popular dinner etiquette
program. Tickets must be
purchased from the Central
Ticket Office and are avail-
able only to ECU students.
guest.
To Network
NOVEMBER 16 AT 4 P.M. IN MSC UNDERGROUND
Interact 2000 offers you the opportunity to develop
the networking skills that are so crucial to getting and
keeping jobs after college. Learn the "Seven-Second
Commercial a sure way to get your contacts to work
for you. For information, contact Student Leadership
Development Programs at 328-4796.
To ?taj In The Know
The ECU Adult Commuter Listserv allows students over 24
to receive campus information and weekly updates and
post information for other adult and commuter students
through personal e-mail accounts. For information contact
Adult and Commuter Student Services at 328-6881.
On the Web: www.ecu.edumendenhall
Hours: MonThurs. 8 am-11 pmFri 8 am-midnightSat noon-midnightSun noon-11 pm






4 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
DIVERSIONS
Thursday, November 9, 2000
comics@tec.ecu.edu
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Wilson Acres
Now pre-leasing for
Spring 2001
Featuring 2 & 3 bedroom townhouses w1 12 baths
Water, sewer & cable included
Each unit contains a self-cleaning oven, a large
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56 Double-reed
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vember 9, 2000
ics@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, November 9, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
OPINION
The East Carolinian 5
editor@tec.ecu.edu
19


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The suspense is mounting
and our country is held
in abeyance. After a long
night of watching the
networks play guessing
games with one another,
we still have absolutely no
clue who the next leader
of the free world will be.
OUR VIEW
The suspense is mounting and our country is held in abeyance. After
a long night of watching the networks play guessing games with one
another, we still have absolutely no clue who the next leader of the
free world will be.
There are pathetic speculations whining, and thick, smog-like opinions.
What is going on? Everyone is confused Electoral what! Why are the
numbers different on each station? Percentage this, percentage that! Drip,
drip, drip Last night we watched a jigsaw map of our country flash blue
and red across our TV sets, and anchor people with plastic faces were
supposedly telling us "the truth?"
We all went to bed, woke up, and over Frosted Flakes and a cup of joe,
we picked up this intense novel where it left off. Still no winner, still no loser.
Something about losing this and not gaining that, lost numbers here, forgot
to smile there, and something is rotten in the state of Florida!
All we want to know is when are these candidates going to pick up
those dilapidated signs of their faces littering the road? What a bunch
of eye-sores!
Until the time comes for them to pick a number and stick with it, the
networks will still keep us enraptured.
fou&ten Monte
IN MY OPINION
Why I voted for Gore
A IN MY OPINION
Some dating traditions need to persist today
It's funny how people change
over time. As we grow and mature,
we will see different perspectives
and the way we view the world will
change. Our outward appearances
and the actions we take will then
change. It's like a cycle.
Traditions change and people
grow. I'll never forget the quote,
"Things don't change by and by.
People do This is true and can
be applied to any aspect of life,
especially dating.
For example, one thing that has
changed through generations are
the people who we'd want to date.
Modern guys are very different from
their ancestral men as a whole. In
the past, going on hearsay, a guy
was much more polite and really
knew how to treat his lady. He
respected her and her ideals more
than those in present day. He would
court and woo her, bringing her
flowers, writing her poetry and
whispering sweet nothings in her
ear.
She wouldn't have to worry
about whether or not he had ulte-
rior motives, because he probably
wouldn't be that straightforward
about his physical attraction to
her.
On the other hand, the ladies
then were always pristine and
seldom, if ever, wore pants. Their
skirts and blouses would never
show too much skin, but rather
just enough. Their hair was always
done nicely and only a few pieces
of jewelry were worn as to keep
the nice delicate appearance. Their
hands would be well-manicured
and little or no make-up would be
worn.
She'd never be caught calling
her man a "cheatin' dog" because
he'd have no reason to look else-
where, or at least it was remotely
heard of. Very few had premarital
sex back in this (what may seem
like) ancient time of dating because
they viewed sex as a union between
two people who believed they'd
be together forever. The point is,
many things that are happening
now probably happened back then;
they just knew how to keep their
mouths shut.
But now, everything is different.
We are loud when telling others
about our lives. Many of us don't
care about being judged by others so
we let it all hang out, literally speak-
ing. Many of us don't care that if
something we say is misconstrued,
it can hurt someone's feelings or
seem obscene to another's innocent
ears. Many girls don't watch their
language when talking to other
females and are vulgar in talking
to guys.
Girls now tend to be more bold
with their language. They don't
hesitate in using profanity around
anyone except for maybe their
preacher and their parents. They'll
ask a guy, "You want a piece of
me?" in the blink of an eye and
depending on what he says, she
may tell him to come on. That was
unheard of 50 or more years ago. It
would have been seen as rude and
unladylike.
Generally speaking, the dating
game today is typically mostly
physical, whereas in the past it
was more emotional. Don't get me
wrong, there are many emotions all
of us deal with when we're dating
that special person, but that's not
all our feelings are based on. That's
why your parents freaked out when
you said you were, or they caught
you, sleeping over at your boyfriend
or girlfriend's house. They weren't
allowed to do that, unless they
disobeyed their parents or snuck
out.
Not only is dating now really
physical, but a lot of mannerisms
from the past are eliminated in
modern dating. Most guys usually
don't even hold doors open. To
those that do and don't let them
slam in our faces, thank you. Many
don't pull out a chair for their
date to sit down and just figure she
can get it on her own. Many don't
bring flowers, or even call to say
they're sorry when they've done
something wrong.
They either act like it never hap-
pened, make you feel guilty even
If it wasn't your fault, or never call
back. Many guys feel that because
women are so independent, they
can pay their own way out on out-
ings. Women don't want the man
to do everything for them all the
time. But now and then, the gesture
is what's important, and believe
me, she'll notice and appreciate
you even more for it.
Girls, leave something to be
desired. Don't wear clothes so
revealing he has nothing left to
fantasize about. You want to keep
things exciting, but not too much.
Overall, boys and girls, realize
that even though both sexes have a
lot in common, we're very different.
It would be nice to carry over some
traditions now and then. When
we're in any kind of relationship,
friendship or intimate, we like to
feel appreciated.
So the next time you go to stick
out your mouth, unless you have
good reason, remember it takes
more muscles to frown. So smile,
and give him something to wonder
about.
Try doing something different
and unexpected for a change. Try
going back, looking at the tradi-
tional dating of the past and apply
it to today. You may just end up
with the results it seems like you've
been waiting forever for. ,
Who did you vote for? I'm sure
that is the topic of most conversa-
tions as the first presidential elec-
tion of the new millennium comes
to an end. Some will turn away,
reluctant to reveal their voting
choices, some will sneer at the
thought of anyone actually voting
for Nader and then there are some
who will look at you and say, "elec-
tion?" I made my vote for Al Gore
and 1 am not afraid to tell you
why.
This being the first election that
I was able to vote in, I decided early
on that I was going to follow the
candidates, the debates and the
issues, and then logically make my
decision. Unfortunately, it did not
take that long.
I tried my hardest to ignore the
character flaws that were waved
around about Bush, such as, the fact
that he was an alcoholic, that he
comes across as being unintelligent,
and that he reportedly told the
Queen of England, at a dinner at
the White House during his father's
administration, that every family,
including hers, had a black sheep.
Yes, this could have all been
overlooked, if only he had a reason-
ably strong platform to stand on.
Nader, in my opinion, was the
lost candidate of this election. He
had the issues and the solutions
to many problems, but for some
reason he just,couldn't get the
backing.
I would have seriously voted for
Nader, If this wasn't such a close
election, but I don't think that I
would have been able to live with
myself if I voted for Nader and Bush
won the election. Therefore, I voted
for the close second to Nader.
The main reason that I voted
for Gore was because of his belief
that women's issues are important.
Being a woman, I feel that it is
very important that the person I
elect to make the rules which we
live by, has some sort of respect
for me, as an individual and as a
woman. Gore is for a women's right
to choose, an issue that has caused
many debates between religious
and political persons for a long
time.
I, however, am not looking at
it as a religious issue, but simply
as a freedom that should not be
controlled by a bunch of politi-
cians. I am not saying that I agree
or disagree with abortion, but is
it really fair to make such a life
changing decision for someone?
The other reason that made
me vote for Gore is his standing
on environmental issues. Over the
years, Gore has proven that he is
a prevalent advocate for the pres-
ervation of our environment. He
intends to combat such problems
as, pollution, deforestation and
global warming, and this is not just
talk to get votes. During the Clinton
administration, he played a big part
in legislation for conservation and
plans to contest global warming,
which is something that should be
a great concern for people world-
wide.
He also plans on preserving
the undeveloped land nationwide,
unlike his counterpart, who wants
to destroy acres of natural, undevel-
oped land in Alaska for a quick solu-
tion to a natural resource problem,
and then worry about it later. I'm
sorry Mr. Bush, wrong answer.
In addition to this, Gore
clenched my vote by standing (or
such Issues as, making tougher gun
control laws, giving tax cuts to
those people who are actually in
need of them and by possessing
strong skills in foreign policy. He
has proven, in the past eight years,
that he has the experience, the
knowledge and the leadership that
it takes to bring the United States
in the next millennium.
After all, do we really want
someone who can't pronounce
supposably correctly, making
deals involving nuclear fire arms?
Although I do not yet know who
has won the election, while writing
this opinion piece, I feel that my
first presidential vote was given to
a well deserving Al Gore.
This writer can be contacted
at kmonte0tec.ecu.edu.
iumoU IN MY OPINION
Bush butchers the English language
aw9. tucuoa IN MYOPINION
The day the music industry died
Baylor U.(U-WIRE)-It's about
time a member of the recording
industry stopped trying to fight
technology and started working to
keep up with It.
Bertelsmann media company
announced last week its intention
to team up with Napster and start
charging users for the right to swap
music files online.
In doing so, the company,
which owns BMG and sells records
by Whitney Houston, Kenny G and
Britney Spears, showed how the
Internet will become a legitimate
medium.
In joining with Napster, Ber-
telsmann broke ranks with most
of the recording industry which
had rejected Napster.com with its
bootleg recordings as a threat to
artists' rights.
These artists and industry execu-
tives were fighting a losing battle
against the dawning of the Digital
Age. The music industry simply saw
Napster as an illegitimate parasite
that robbed artists of the royalties
that were due to them. They saw
Napster as a competitor.
Many universities, including
Baylor, followed the music indus-
try's lead. Baylor's announcement
this fall to ban access to Napster
from university computers arose
in part out of fears of legal action
against Napster and the sites that
allowed access to it by the recording
Industry.
Rational thinkers realized that
even if Napster were forever banned
from cyberspace, the technology
would not cease to exist. Copycat
Web sites could and already have
begun to create online communi-
ties similar to Napster. Napster
made it popular, but the Internet
I made it possible.
The challenge was to find a way
to seize the technology and use it
to the benefit of the industry.
BMG did that.
With this new plan to charge
users about a $5 fee to trade music
files every month, the companies
have added accountability to the
technology's possibilities. There's
no such thing as a free lunch, and
there shouldn't be any such thing
as free music.
Oklahoma Daily (U-W1RE)
NORMAN, OklaThis is Preserva-
tion Month. I appreciate preserva-
tion. It's what you do when you run
for president. You gotta preserve
explained George W. Bush to a
group of New Hampshire elemen-
tary students during Perseverance
Month. That's P-E-R-S-E-V-E-R-A-
N-C-E.
Over the last year we have come
to love little Dubya for his uncanny
ability to make a fool of himself at
any given moment. We watch in
amazement as he stumbles, fumbles
and bumbles, attempting to regur-
gitate lines fed to him by countless
advisors, speechwriters and ex-
presidents. And what will Bush
gain from his exceptional lack of
intellect? Probably the presidency.
It's depressing to think that this
pathetic scion of one of America's
most powerful families will be
representing us as the leader of
the free world for the next four
years. But surely Bush makes up for
his lack of intelligence with other
qualities, right?
Well, let's see. Maybe it's his
homespun west Texas philosophy
that makes him so durn likeable.
Like he said at a South Carolina
oyster roast, "We must all hear the
universal call to like your neighbor
just like you like to be liked your-
self
That's like some of the most
likeable words I have ever heard.
Leave it to Dubya to screw up the
golden rule. And he's supposed
to represent the Christian right.
Shame on him.
Maybe it is his sound political
ideals that keep Bush atop the polls
then.
"If you're sick and tired of the
politics of cynicism and polls and
principles come and join this cam-
paign said Bush at a rally in Hilton
Head, S.C.
Well, I know I'm fed up with the
poliUcs of principle. What business
do principles have interfering in
political campaigns anyway?
Bush is a strident proponent
of education, though, and that
can't be overlooked. Like he so elo-
quently pointed out on a campaign
stop in Florence S.C, "Rarely is
the question asked: Is our children
learning?" Well, let's hope they are,
if only to correct your grammatical
aberrations, Governor.
It seems during the debates
that Bush got a real surge in the
polls especially with the undecided
voters. So maybe his uncanny skills
in the art of forming sound argu-
ments compel us to him.
During the last of this year's
three debates Lisa Key asked, "How
will your tax proposals affect me as
a middle-class, 34-year-old single
person with no dependents?"
Gore answered first by giving
the specifics of how his plan would
benefit taxpayers at lower income
levels. Gov. Bush then began by
saying Gore's tax breaks, education
and elder care benefits would "cost
a whole lot of money, a lot more
than we have
Dubya then proceeded down
his usual slippery slope of pretzel
logic by finishing his answer as
follows, word-for-word:
"I think also what you need to
think about is not the immediate,
but what about Medicare? You get
a plan that will include prescrip-
tion drugs, a plan that will give
you options. Now, I hope people
understand that Medicare today is
is is Important, but it doesn't
keep up with the new medicines.
If you're a Medicare person, on
Medicare, you don't get the new
procedures. You're stuck in a time
warp in many ways. So it will be
a modern Medicare system that
trusts you to make a variety of
options for you.
"You're going to live In a peace-
ful world. It'll be a world of
peace because we're going to have
a clearer clear-sighted foreign
policy based upon a strong military
and a mission that stands by our
friends-a mission that doesn't try
to be all things to all people. A
judicious use of the military which
will help keep the peace.
"You'll be in a world, hopefully,
that's more educated, so It's less
likely you'll be harmed in your
neighborhood. See, an educated
child is one much more likely to
be hopeful and optimistic.
"You'll be in a world in which-
rits into my philosophy. You know,
the harder work-the harder you
work the more you can keep. It's
the American way. Government
shouldn't be a heavy hand, that's
what the federal government does
to you. Should be a helping hand.
And tax relief in the proposals I
just described should be a good
helping hand
Any high school student run-
ning for class president would be
laughed off stage if they made
a speech as incoherent as this.
Bush Isn't running for president of
his class though, he's running for
president of his nation.
i





6 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarotinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, November 9, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, r
www.theea
I
FEATURESBRIEFS
Today's Birthday: Expect lots of
action today, but too much may get on
your nerves.
Aries
(March 21-April 19)
The long-distance communication
problem you dealt with yesterday could
finally be solved today.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Don't talk about what you're doing, just
do it. Go through your closets, rearrange
shelves, just stay busy.
Gemini
(May 21-June 21)
ff somebody is nagging you to excer-
cise, give health a try. A program that
involves a group is the best one for you.
Cancer
(June 22-July 22)
Resist an older person's trying to talk
you into taking on more responsibility.
More money isn't involved, so stay firm.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
Love works out well tonight, but you're
stuck at home. You can be passive for a
change. You might like it.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You might find the perfect thing on
sale. It might be slightly damaged, but
there's a huge savings.
Libra
(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
You're making a good impression.
Money is short for romance, but your
imagination makes up the defecit.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
A rush order is coming in. Ask for over-
time or double-time pay. The customer will
pay what you're worth.
Sagittarius
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Your idea needs a little work but will
succeed. Input from a person you admire
helps you solve a technical problem.
Capricorn
(Dec. 22-jan. 19)
Dig for buried treasure. That item
you've been saving to fix up will be the
perfect thing.
Aquarius
Qan. 20-Feb. 18)
A friend could teach you something
that will boggle your brain. It'll shake up
reality as you know it.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March20)
Negotiate the cold, hard cash. Ask for
payment for work already done, or some-
thing you're considering doing.
The path
less traveled
i-
0itOUT
http:home.hiwaay.netcomicsherogen
The First Annual
Non-traditional
Student Week took
place this week.
Here, Shelly Myers,
director of Adult
and Commuter
Student Service,
and student Mike
Edwards sign a
registration sheet
(photo by Matt
Vick)
Students Mike Edwards. Kevin Nooney and Director of Adult and Commuter Student Services Shelly Myers gather
to discuss issues that concern non-traditional students at ECU on a regular basis. Non-traditional Student Week is
now a nationally recognized week devoted to honoring non-traditional students. ECU defines a non-traditional as
any student over 24 years old (photo by Matt Vick)
Writers Reading Series continues
Linda Beatrice
Brown makes visit
Earline White
FEATURES WRITER
"My students are always remarking to me that
they were not aware of the number of talented writ-
ers from this area, writing right now
Margaret D. Bauer
Professor
Dr. Linda Beatrice
Brown, the distinguished
professor of Humanities
at Bennett College in
Greensboro, N.C. will read
her own work on Thurs-
day, Nov. 16, at the Green-
ville Museum of Art.
Beatrice Brown will
have a "meet the writer"
session at 3 p.m. followed
at 7 p.m. by the reading,
reception and book sign-
ing. Admission will be
$3 for the general public
and $2 for students and
Seniors.
Beatrice Brown holds
the Willa B. Player Chair
in the Humanities, and is a
poet and lecturer. She has
written for such publica-
tions as The Black Scholar
and Religion and Intellectual
Life. She is also the author
of two novels, Rainbow
Roun'Mah Shoulder, Cross-
ing Over Ionian and a col-
lection of poetry, A Love
Song to Black Men.
"It is always interest-
ing to see a writer read
hisher own work said
Randall Martoccia, English
professor. "The experience
uncovers things that a
reader wouldn't normally
get from just reading off
the page. Plus, at these
events the attendees are
able to probe the mind of
the writer by meeting with
himher. It's an invaluable
experience
Her latest book, The
Long Walk, has been in the
works since 1992. It was
in that year, the current
president of Bennett Col-
lege had the idea that
the story of Willa B. Play-
er's leadership of the col-
lege deserved to be docu-
mented. The college com-
missioned the book from
Player's niece, Beatrice
Brown, during the first
year of her employment as
the Willa B. Player Profes-
sor of Humanities.
"It is nice for students
to be subjected to differ-
ent poetswriters said
English graduate student
Jeff Stewart.
Beatrice Brown did her
undergraduate work at
Bennett College and con-
tinues to live in Greens-
boro.
"My North Carolina
literature students are
always remarking to me
that they were not aware
of the number of talented
writers from this area,
writing right now said
Margaret D. Bauer, profes-
sor. "Beatrice Brown Is
one of them. She may not
be one of the best known,
but she should be, because
I would argue that she is
among the most talented.
And in this stale, with the
competition as amazing
as it is, that's saying a lot
Bauer said.
"Brown's novel, Cross-
ing Over Jordan, provides
an original exploration of
the continued effects of
slavery, particularly upon
women, even today
Bauer said.
"In this novel, she
traces how the sexual
abuse of slave women con-
tinued after slavery; how
it affected these women's
own marriages; how if
affected the way they
and their husbands raised
their own children; how
it affected how these chil-
dren treated their chil-
dren, through the turn of
the 20th century into the
21st Bauer said.
This writer can be contacted
at features@tec.ecu.edu.
Above and Beyond:
Miranda Morton
Morton doles out smiles and info (photo by Kenny Smith)
Bridget Hemenway
STAFF WRITfcR
Every day on campus, students pass dozens of
nameless faces. Some may smile, but some don't even
look. However, nearly all are truly special people. One
of those people is sophomore Miranda Morton.
As a student, Morton goes above and beyond to do
her best. As a person, she goes the extra mile to make
sure she recognizes students across campus and
greets them with a friendly smile. Originally from
Winston-Salem, N.C Morton came to ECU last year
to start on her degree in
"I love to volunteer and
give my time to others.
It gives me confidence to
know I'm helping others
as much as I can
Miranda Morton
Sophomore
accounting. Her need for
extra money and her desire
to help others led her to
a job at the Mendenhall
Student Center (MSC) help
desk.
"It's a lot of responsibil-
ity Morton said. "People
depend on you to know
what you're doing. You can
never tell someone you
don't know the answer to
their question
Aside from answering the student locator phone
line and the MSC information line, Morton sells
bubble sheets, rents table cloths and reserves rooms
for student groups. She also fields numerous questions
from students, staff and visitors about MSC7s activities,
including the movie schedule.
"I worked hard to learn all of this information
Morton said. "You have to be an unlimited source
of knowledge
Aside from her work at MSG, Morton is also a
member of the Society of National Collegiate Scholars.
"1 really thought getting a fob wouldjriake it harder
to maintain my 3.6 GPA But actually I am cToing better
Morton said. "I have had to learn time management,
which has really helped me keep everything in order. I
think anyone who hesitates to work or even volunteer
their time shouldn't be afraid of risking their grades.
You have to challenge yourself and believe in yourself.
Not only does this prepare you for the real world, but
it makes you a stronger person
Morton spends her extra time as a math tutor and
volunteering for Habitat for Humanity.
"I love to volunteer and give my time to others"
Morton said. "It gives me confidence to know I'm
helping others as much as I can
She tries to encourage her younger sisters to achieve
all that they can.
"1 want to support them in everything her sisters)
do Morton said. "My mother was my biggest support
and I feel it really helps to have someone who believes
in you. I try to encourage everyone I know because
people need to hear that every day. 1 don't know what
I would do without my family and most especially my
best friend Alisha, who is the nicest person you will ever
meet. I make every effort to let them know how much
they have helped me to become the person I am
"Miranda works the busiest hours of the day and
she does her job well said Sharon Wilson, information
desk supervisor. "All of my students work very hard.
A lot of them actually trained Miranda. We all enjoy
working with Miranda. She is very dependable and
dedicated
"I love my job because the people I work with are
so friendly and helpful Morton said. "I wouldn't
be half as good at my job if it weren't for the other
students I work with
There are thousands ol outstanding students at ECU
and Morton is just one of them.
Her smile, positive attitude and genuine concern
for others has helped her to achieve all that she has.
"I don't like being singled out because I feel that
everyone has something terrific that makes them
special Morton said.
Baked Potato Soup
23 cups of butter or margarine
23 cups of all-purpose flour
7 cups of milk
4 large baking potatoes (baked, cooked,
peeled and cubed)
4 green onions, sliced
12 bacon strips, cooked and crumbled
1 11A cups of shredded cheddar vheese
1 cup of sour cream
34 teaspoon of salt
112 teaspoon of pepper
In a large soup kettle, melt butter. Stir in
flour, heat and stir until smooth. Gradually
add milk; stirring constantly until thickened.
Add potatoes and onion. Bring to a boil, stir-
ring constantly. Reduce heat; simmer for 10
minutes. Add remaining ingredients; stir until
cheese is melted. Serve immediately.
7i recipe h courtesy ol The School
of Hospitality Management Luncheon Series,
a.






ember 9, 2000
;s@tec.ecu.edu
by Kenny Smith)
s pass dozens of
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its; stir until
sly.
The East Carolinian 7
features@tec.ecu.edu
Since 1967
BEEF BARN
A Great Place After
a Games on Fri & Sat
II
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756-1161
Got candy?
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NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
�24 Hour Message Service
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tl





S The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarotinian.com
SPORTS
Thursday, November 9, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
SPORTSBRIEFS
Simms named All-CAA
ECU midfielder Clyde
Slmms was named to the
All-CAA second team. The
team is selected by the
league's coaches.
Simms is the 11th ECU
player to be named to the
team and the first ECU
freshman to be named to
the team since 1992.
Simms leads the team in points with
10 and assists with four. The Jamestown,
N.C. native also added three goals this
season.
"I am very excited that Clyde has been
recognized as one of the top players in the
conference said ECU Head Coach Devin
O'Neill. "It's not easy to make an all-con-
ference team in a strong conference like
the CAA. Clyde has made a good transi-
tion from high school to college soccer
and he has done a great job for us this
year
Furcal gets
NL Rookie honors
Atlanta Braves
shortstop Rafael Furcal
was named the NL
Rookie of the Year
Tuesday. Furcal cap-
tured 25 of the 32 first-
place votes.
Furcal batted .295
and notched 40 stolen
bases in his rookie campaign. He also
scored 87 runs, hit four home runs and
had 37 RBIs.
NHL lengthens
McSorley suspension
NHL Commissioner
Gary Betteman agreed
to keep former Boston
Bruins enforcer, Marty
McSorley off of the
ice for another three
months.
According to the
Commissioner's ruling,
McSorley will be suspended until Feb. 20.
The date is one calendar since the player's
vicious slash that sidelined the Vancouver
Canucks' Donald Brashear.
McSorley was convicted on assault
charges stemming from the incident in a
Vancouver court earlier this year.
Manuel named
AL's top skipper
Chicago
White Sox'
manager )erry
Manuel was
named the AL
Manger of the
Year. Manuel
received 25
first-place votes and got a total of 134
points.
Oakland A's manger Art Howe finished
second with 74 points.
Manuel's White Sox went 95-67 and
earned their first post-season appearance
since 1993.
The run was made more remarkable
by the fact that the team did so with a
$37 million payroll, the 21st highest in the
league.
Championship
fight Saturday
Lennox Lewis will put
his heavyweight title on the
line Saturday in Las Vegas
when he takes on Samoan
challenger David Tua.
Lewis enters the bout at
37-1-1 with 29 knockouts.
Lewis' last two fights have
failed to get past the second round.
Tua, the native of Samoa who resides
in New Zealand, enters the bout at 37-1
with 32 knockouts. Tua packs power, but
many insiders think it will not be enough
to handle the arsenal of the champion.
Pirates look for
boost against UH
Above: Greg Lelever and the Pirate defense will have
to contend with an experienced Cougar offense
Saturday, (file photo)
Left: The ECU coaches and players will have to work
hard to focus and get past the distractions of last
week, (file photo)
Squad will try
to right ship
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU's final home game
of the season Saturday
versus Houston conies in
the midst of trying off-
field distractions, a tense
conference race and a sud-
denly muddled bowl pic-
ture.
The Pirates will take
the field for the first time
since their 16-13 loss to
UAB two weeks ago. The
loss dropped the Pirates
out of the Conference-
USA title race and com-
plicated the Pirates post-
season possibilities.
The game was played
in front of the smallest
crowd to see a game in
Greenville this season.
During the following
off week, backup quarter-
back Richard Alston was
arrested for trying to pass a
counterfeit $100 dollar bill
at a local Burger King. He
was then suspended from
the team indefinitely.
Saturday's game gives
the team an opportunity
to erase any
of the bad
memories of
the past two
weeks as
well as a
shot at a
winning
season and
a bowl bid.
"The
coaches, the
players, everybody's
enthused, we know we've
got to win this game
said safety Antwan Adams.
"This game means a lot.
We'll have a winning
season, be eligible for a
bowl game after this game.
So there's a lot on the
"This is a have-to deal.
We're ten points away
from being a top 25
team. We can't afford
any more mistakes
Following the loss a
month ago at Memphis,
the team had no margin
for error when it came
to a chance at a conference
title. Currently, the Pirates
are still walking the tight-
rope, a second place in
the confer-
Steve Logan
Head Coach, l-CU Football
ence is on
the line.
"It's a
one-game
season for
us said
Head
Coach
Steve
Logan.
"This is a
have-to deal. We're 10
points away from being
a top 25 team. We can't
afford any more mis-
takes
"It's a big game said
quarterback David Gar-
rard. "If we go out and
win this one then we'll
probably be assured of
a bowl game. We defi-
nitely need to go out and
win this one and win the
rest of them and turn
our season into a positive
one
With the suspension
of Alston, the Pirates will
have to go with one quar-
terback for the first time in
almost two years. Alston
has had an appearance
in every game so far this
season.
"Well I'm not happy
to take all the snaps
Ciarrard said. "I would
like to have somebody
to come in and get them-
selves some reps. But I'm
happy to do what ever the
team needs me to do
The distraction of
Alston's arrest has been
played down by the
coaches and players.
Another source of con-
See ECUpg 9
Swimmers sweep CAA foes
Women top William
5r Mary, men beat ODU
Ryan Downey
SENIOR WRITER
Hie swim team had an undefeated road trip this
weekend. Both the men's and women's teams picked
up wins over Old Dominion and William & Mary
respectively. The great performances kept the men's
swim team undefeated at 5-0 and pushed the women
to 4-1.
"This past weekend we were just ecstatic said Head
Coach Rick Kobe. "To go on the road for the second
consecutive weekend and come away 4-0 is awesome.
On Sunday we just swam very well for a second day.
The team we swam against (William & Mary) didn't
have a meet Saturday so they were rested
The men's team is starting off better then last year
when after five meets they were 4-1 and 2-1 in the
conference. Their depth gives them an edge on the
road that they didn't have last season.
The road is becoming a comfortable place for these
Pirates. The men swam strong against ODU and were
able to win the meet before the last race, making the
final event a 400 freestyle relay nothing more then
high stakes victory lap.
"We've got a real deep team this year said
sophomore Chris Miller. "I think having all of these
fast guys really pumps us up
The team will face what could be their toughest
opponent this Friday at the Minges natatorium when
they will be taking on the NC State Wolfpack. The ACC
Power will be bringing a very athletic and talented
team.
"It will definitely be our toughest meet said Miller.
"They have a lot of powerhouse swimmers on their
team but I think we have more depth. It will be the
fourth and fifth place finishers that decide the meet
for us
The women's team Is reloading after a great season
last year. After splitting two meets last weekend they
were able to put together two strong performances this
weekend and take a sweep on the road.
The women had a tough time, against ODU on
Saturday, having to finish first and third in the final
event to pull out the win. Sunday the women and the
men were able to take 10 of 13 events from William St
Mary. The women's team which is heavily loaded with
freshmen and sophomores is coming Into its own.
"Our team is really young this year as far as lots of
freshmen and sophomores said freshman Meghan
Dunaway. "That helps because as the training gets
harder we are all going to go through it together. We
help each other out inside and outside the pool
Ages didn't matter this weekend as the team came
together when It counted against ODU. The women
needed great performances and they got them from
everybody.
"It was incredible to be down and come back at
See SWIM pg 9
Women's
golfer not to be
underestimated
Krasny shows
promising early
returns
Scott Lange
STAFF WRITER
Freshman
Jessica Krasny
has had a solid
first season, (file
photo)
Standing at only
5-foot-4inches, one
would think this golfer
would not be that
intimidating. But after
one swing of her club,
her presence is felt.
This is no ordinary
golfer.
Jessica Krasny, a freshman on the ECU
women's golf team, has been playing golf since
she was 10 years old. Her dad would take her
out on the course and spend hours hitting golf
balls. He then decided to start signing her up for
some local tournaments. Since then Krasny says
her parents have been very supportive and try to
come to most of her tournaments.
Krasny, who is from Summerville, S.C started
playing in tournaments after just a year of
playing. She won her first individual title in
Charleston, S.C. at a local tournament. Since
then, Krasny has developed a passion for the
game, and a world of potential.
She says the one memory of playing golf
she will always remember is breaking par for
the first time.
"It was at the Surf Club in Myrtle Beach, S.C,
I hit the ball really well and shot a 67 overall
Krasny said.
Krasny says the one part of her game that
she works on the most is her putting. She goes
out on the course for about three or four hours
a day practicing her putting and hitting range
balls. She also says sometimes she practices up
to 60 hours a week. All of this practice will be
necessary though if she plans to reach some of
the goals which she has for herself.
"I would love to win an NCAA tournament
title someday Krasny said. "My ultimate goal
though would be to
" would love to win an
NCAA tournament title
someday My ultimate
goal though would be to
turn pro. I think that
would be exciting
Jessica Krasny
Freshman, ECU Golf
turn pro. I think that
would be exciting
Krasny attended
Bishop England
High School in
Charleston. Recruit-
ers from the College
of Charleston, Wof-
fard College and
the University of
South Carolina were
all interested in
Krasny coming to
play for them.
Krasny though decided to come and play for
ECU after Head Coach Kevin Williams paid a
to visit.
"Jessica was very highly recruited out of high
school Williams said. "I think she was excited
that we were starting a first year program
Everything has started out great for Krasny
in her first year. The coaches on the team have
been very happy with what they have seen.
Assistant coach Sally Hammel has been very
impressed.
"Overall she has been very productive and
consistent Hammel said. "We could not be
more pleased to have her on our team
Williams mentions the kind of impact she
has had on the team.
"She is in the top 100 in the country Wil-
liams said. "She has also finished in the top 10 in
four of our tournaments this year
After deciding to come and play for the golf
team, Krasny went to play at a tournament this
past summer. She played at he Serrano Golf
Course in California.
"It was the best course that I have ever played
on Krasny said. "The course was in great
condition. They really spend a lot of time taking
care of the course
The coaches on the team have been very
happy with what they have seen. Hammel has
been very impressed.
"Overall she has been very productive and
consistent Hammel said. "We could not be
more pleased to have her on our team
There is a life outside of golf though for
Krasny. She is currently majoring in communica-
tions and says she would like to become involved
in journalism sooner or later. Krasny also enjoys
swimming and surfing at some of the local
beaches around Charleston. She loves to watch
golf on television as well, and says her favorite
golfer is Fred Couples. But reminds everyone
though, that the majority of her time is spent
on the golf course.
Krasny has played very well on a golf team
that has seven freshmen and only one junior. Do
not be surprised If the name Jessica Krasny pops
up on a women's pro tour .someday.
This writer can be contacted at spons@tec.ecu.edu
u
i
Tr
V





rhursday, November 9, 2000
v.theeastcarofinian.com
The East Carolinian 9
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Watch for the November 30th issue of the Fountainhead!
ZSSS
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go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 IIS Hwy. 13, Greenville.
ECU from 8
cern is Houston attacking defense.
The Cougars are led by All-Confer-
ence linebacker Wayne Rodgers.
The defense held Southern Miss to
only six points earlier this year.
"Defensively It's ust pressure,
pressure, pressure and lots of man
to man coverage Logan said.
"We've seen it before, we've Just
got to go handle it again
"The crowd definitely has to be
in it Adams said. "It's like a 12th
man when you get the crowd into
it. It means a lot
"It's going to start off fiat
because we lost the last game
Garrard said. "They're expecting us
to come out and show them that
we're ready to play this game. So
we're going to come out and give
them the energy to get them to
start cheering and to get them to
start feeling good to be a Pirate
again
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
SWIM from 8
the end of the meet said junior
Lindsay Gardiner. "You could Just
tell that everybody knew what they
had to do and did their part. I
think the reason we won it is that
everybody dug down deep and did
the job they had to do
The NC State meet which will
take place Friday at 4:30 p.m. will
be a telling sign as to how good the
team is going to be this season. It's
a midseason litmus test.
"We have without a doubt our
toughest meet of the season with
NC State said Kobe. "We are
excited to have them come in. They
are a great swim team
This writer can be contacted
at sports@lec.ecu.edu.
MOSES, JESUS
& MOHAMMED
What Did They Have in
Common f
FASTING
THE MONTH OF RAMADAN
vuliural Awareness (committee
Presents
� ����
SPEAKER: DR.IHAB M. SAAD
PLACE: ROOM 1032 GCB
DATE: MONDAY, NOVEMBER 13, 2000
. IME: 6:00 P.M.
mr � F .ovF tr Br Br tr W S& Br"
�.��� .��; 'v:
Date: Monday, November 13, 2000
Where: Wright Auditorium
Time: 7:00 pm
Admission: FREE To ECU Students with valid University ID.
FREE To ECU FacultyStaff with Valid University ID.
FREE To Kids 5 years old or younger
General Public $5.00 adults $2.00 Children
(general public ticket prices will be the same at
the door the night of the program)
?Tickets will be on sale at the
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 328-4788
?Shuttle Bus Service will be available at the lower level parking lot next to
Minges Coliseum Shuttle Bus Service Times 6:00pm - 6:50pm
(last pick-up from parking lot)
After the show the shuttle bus service will take people back
to the parking lot
i





Thursday, November 9, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian 10
ads@tec.ecu.edu
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BEECH STREET Villas, three bed-
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over my lease. Lease runs through
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$700mo 1. deposit required. No
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SERVICES
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
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WWW.PERFECTCOLLEGECARS COM
Your parents never had it this good!
THE ECU Physical Therapy Program is
holding a message clinic Nov. 16 from
5-9pm at the Belk bldg. on Charles
Blvd. Advanced tickets are available.
Look for us selling tickets on Campus
or purchase them at the door.
FOR SALE
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom S Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SPECIAL DISCOUNT 3 BR 2 12 bath
townhouse at Twin Oaks. Available
Jan 1st. $450 for January. Fireplace.
Ceiling Fans. Pool. Patio. Convenient
to ECU. $615 month for other months
plus deposit. At least 6 month lease.
Please call 752-2851. Thank You.
SPACIOUS TWO Bedroom 1 12
bath townhouses available Jan. 1 in
TwinOaks. Rent $500 a month. Close
to campus and in bus route. Call
321-1432 for more information.
WALK TO ECU. 1 Bedroom APT.
$300-325 Month. CALL 758-6596.
www.walk2campus com
THREE BEDROOM 1 12 bath apart-
ment for rent. No deposit needed!
Located in Wilson Acres. Seven
minute walk to campus. $750 includes
water, sewage, cable, and trash. Call
931-0668.
NEED AN Apartment? Find us on the
Web for a complete listing of 1000
units near and away from campus
www.wainrightproperties.com or
call Wainright Property Management
252-756-6209.
201 N. Summit St: Charming home
completely remodeled 3-4 BR. 2B
fenced in yard for rent. $800month.
Must see! Available, call 752-9816
before 9pm.
ONE TWO and Three bedroom Apt.
Four blocks from ECU. Available Jan.
Call 321-6842.
SOLID OAK bedroom suit, queen,
black finish, custom-built, excellent
condition, with accompanying desk. All
pieces for $700 Call 252-355-3923.
1990 MAZDA 323. 5 speed, high
miles, runs excellent, very depend-
able, $800. Trek BMX bike, aluminum
oversized frame, great condition.
$100. Bill� 830-2155
FOR SALE 1998 Chevy Cavalier. Power
sunroof, cd, new tires, fold down rear
seats, keyless entry. Metallic Blue.
Runs and looks new. $6,699 takes it
book value 10.499. Call 551-7604 or
pgr. 695-3734.
20 GALLON Aquarium with light,
hood, and stand. Also comes with
many extras to get you started.125.
Call 758-0306. Ask for Brian
AAAA! SPRING Break Specials! Can-
cun & Jamaica from $389! Air, hotel,
free meals, drinks! Award winning
company! Group leaders free! Florida
vacations $129! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
PITBULL PUPPIES, champion blood
lines, first shots, dewormed, UKC,
ADBA. registered. Parents on site.
Great companion pet. Males and
females available Many colors avail-
able. Deposits accepted. 412-1908.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Spring Break
Bahamas Party Cruise! 5 days $279!
Includes meals, parties! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Departs Florida!
Get group - go free! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
SERVICES
ENGLISH TUTOR. Retired prof will
tutor you in English. Just $18hr.local
561-7358 or (252)617-9082. Or visit
Exact. 111 E. 3rd St Greenville. E-mail:
proofread1@earthlink.net
PHOTOGRAPHY. HAVE a photog-
rapher at your event, or party.
View and order photos on the
web. Call Coastal Photography at
252-641-1600 www.coastal-photogra-
phy.com ez101fflrocketmail.com
FREE CELL Phones! Great plans with
one year of service. For more informa-
tion call Courtney at 561-8055.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Attention
Professors, students and staff. Will do
all typing, last minute, term papers,
and manuscripts etcReasonable
rates. All work is letter perfect. Please
call 439-0088
ADVERTISE HERE. IT WORKS
HEY Ambassadors
How do you Feel?
for more information mil
the Alumni House @ UWU
Hf IP WANTED
ENERGETIC FEMALE who loves child-
ren needed to care for three children
ages 8.7.and 3. Prefer child develop-
ment, elementary education major.
Flexible hours with some overnights
and weekends. Must be nonsmoker.
neat, organized, responsible, safe
driving record, and own car. Possibly
some hours cleaning, ironing, and
other household jobs. References
required. Excellent pay and benefits.
Call 752-1572.
CAROLINA PIZZA and Pasta Works
is now hiring experienced wait and
kitchen staff. Apply in person or call
757-7756 M-F from 2-5.
GO DIRECT-$savings! 1 Internet-
based Spring Break company offering
Wholesale Spring Break Packages (no
middlemen)! Zero traveler complaints
last year! Lowest price guarantee!
1-800-367-1252 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
BEST JOB for College Students A
local distributor for a National Corpo-
ration is seeking highly motivated
individuals to join our successful team.
We provide: Salary & excellent com-
missions. Awesome bonuses. Great
advancement opportunities. Blue
Cross Blue Shields health insurance.
Principal life insurance, and full com-
pany benefits. Call: 1-800-248-3131
FEDEX GROUND Package Handlers.
AM sort positions starting at $7.50hr
Guarenteed Periodic Advances. Apply
at 2410 United De. Greenville. NC
27834 (Off Staton Rd.)
CO-MANAGER and Partner wanted
for Sonic Drive-In Restaurant. Apply in
person at 2085 Fire Tower Rd.
FEMALE MODEL wanted by advertis-
ing agency. Excellent opportunity to
get into modeling. Pays $75. Some
nudity required. Contact Ryan @
752-4410 for more information.
ATTENTION LADIES! Now hiring adult
entertainment FTPT. 18. Immediate
Openings! Call 746-8425 for details.
PART TIME teller wanted for check
cashing company. Must be 18 years
old. Provide a criminal record with
application or resume. Must have typ-
ing, computer skills and cash handling
experience. Fax or mail resume to:
Checks 2 Cash Attn. Store Manager.
500 S. Memorial Dr. Greenville NC.
27834. Fax:252-413-0807.
DANCERS EXOTIC 1000- 1500wk.
18up. No experience. All nationalities.
919-583-8044. SIDS Goldsboro.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES. CLUBS.
STUDENT GROUPS: Earn
$1000-$ 2000 this quarter with the
easy CampusFundraiser.com three
hour fundraising event. No sales
required. Fundraising dates are filling
quickly, so call today! Contact Cam-
pusFundraiser.com at (888)923-3238.
or visit www.campusfundraiser.com.
SPRING BREAK reps needed to prom-
ote campus trips. Earntravel free!
No cost. We train you. Work on
your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www.springbreakdirect .com
WZMB IS currently accepting applica-
tions for the spring. 2001 semester
for the following positions:program
director, music director, production
manager, promotion manager, grants
manager, web engineer, news direc-
tor, sports director, specialty show
hosts, and DJs. Applications for these
positions are available at WZMB radio
station and should be submitted
before December 6, 2000. WZMB is
located in the basement of Menden-
hall Student Center, across from the
social room. 328-4751.
GOLDEN CORRAL is hiring part &
full-time in all positions. Benefits
available. Apply 2-4pm. Mon-Thur at
504 SW Greenville Blvd. No phone
calls please!
WANTED: A few good Pirates -The
ECU Telefund is looking for students
to contact alumni for the ECU Annual
Fund Drive. $6.00 hour. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call
328-4215 between 3-5p.m. M-Th.
GREEK PERSONALS
DELTA CHI. Thank you for the fun
social on Fridayl We had a great
time, hope you did too! Love. Alpha
Delta Pi.
OTHER
FREE MONEY Giving away $100 to
the 1000th person to sign up for
Fantasy Sports at smallworld.com
using promo-code NCS.
SPRING BREAK 2001
Camptia MM- CAtn 1 Fmt Trip
�tt ty N� UK! CM k� FREE Ink
P�ckorvt�lton4ln�sunspla�htour.com
1 -800-426-7710
6REEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS BROTHERS of
Sigma Alpha Epsilon on your success-
ful 3 on 3 basketball tournament.
Keep up the good work. Theta Chi.
THE LADIES of Kappa Delta would
like to thank Theta Chi for the last
social we had together. We had a
wonderful time.
THANK YOU ladies of Chi Omega for
an exciting evening. We look forward
to our next event. Theta Chi.
KAPPA ALPHA, we would like to
thank you for the last social we had.
The ladies of Kappa Delta.
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to thank
Lyndsay Grimes for planning an awe-
some semi-formal, we all had a blast
in New Bern! Love your sisters.
THANKS TO everyone that partici-
pated in our 3 on 3 basketball tourna-
ment Saturday. It was a success. The
brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to thank
Lambda Chi Alpha for the awesome
social this past weekend. Can't wait
to see you at dinner! Love, Zeta Tau
Alpha.
CONGRATULATIONS TERRELL Floyd
on your acceptance into the Australian
Program. We wish the best of luck,
your Kappa Delta sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the newly
appointed Kappa Delta officers. We
know you will do a great job.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE FIFTH annual Festival of Trees
is being held Wednesday. November
29-Sunday. December 3rd in the
Willis Building at the corner or Reade
Circle and First street in Greenville.
Over 70 decorated Christmas trees.
Free admission. Sponsored by the
Family Support Network of Eastern
North Carolina, a nonprofit parent-to-
parent support program. Please call
328-4494 for more information.
EVERYONE IS invited to a program
on the quality of men and women.
November 15 5-7pm room 1011 GCB:
A Bahai perspective presented by
Mary Lou Roznowski.
THE EAST Carolina Native American
Organization will be meeting 1115
in GCB at 7:30.
ZETA PHI Beta "new members con-
gratulations. You deserved it. We love
you! Kara. Terrika. Nicole. Yukari. Keri.
Jaton. and Lavatte! Keep that Zeta
Spirit, and always represent that blue
and white
STORY TIME with Santa is being held
November 30 (6-7pm) and Saturday
December 2 (8:30-9:30am) in the
Willis Building at the corner of Reade
Circle and First street. Prepaid tick-
ets required. $7 each, includes a
professional portrait of child and
Santa by Dewayne Frutigu of ASAP
photography. Proceeds benefit the
Family Support Network of Eastern
North Carolina. Please call 328-4494
for more information.
SUMMER ADVENTURE. Give yourself
Italy and Greece in Summer 2001 and
earn ECU college credits in the pro-
cess. Inexpensive group rates. Schol-
arships available. For more informa-
tion, email mercerc@mail.ecu.edu or
call 328-4310 and leave a message.
NOVEMBER FOLK and Country Dance!
Sat Nov. 11. Free Beginner lessons,
7-7:30pm: Dance 7:30-10:30pm.
Come alone or bring a friend. Live
pld-time music by Elderberry Jam.
Students $3. Public $5-$7. Location:
Willis Building, 1st and Reade St.
(downtown). Sponsors: ECU folk and
country dancers, 752-8854.
ARE YOU AN
ORGAN DONOR?
HOT IF YOU HAV�'T TQ40 YOUR FAMH.Y.
www wwftyounit�.o.g. auo-3ftb-SH�.r(�
He doesn't have to be homeless. And with your help he won't be.
It could happen to any one of us. And If ft did, wouldn't you pray
for someone to help you put your life back together. We're here
for James for as long as it takes.
caR us at 1.800.809.0080 or visit
y
Volunteers
of America
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ZETA PHI Beta would like to thank
everyone for supporting our scholar-
ship ball. The after-party was the
bomb!
CLIMBING at Linville Gorge. Nov. 17-19.
This trip will be focused on multi-
pitch climbs to get you even higher
off the deck. The cost of the trip is
$65 and the Registration Deadline is
Nov. 10. For more information please
call 328-6387.
CLIMBING at Pilot Mountain. Dec. 2.
Pilot offers many options from begin-
ner to expert to test yourself on the
rock. The cost of the trip is $30 and
the Registration Deadline is Nov.27.
For more information please call
328-6387.
WINTER GEAR WORKSHOP Nov. 15.
7pm-8pm. This workshop is FREE
to all members and will be held at
Adventure Outdoors in Arlington
Commons across from Pet Smart.
The Registration Deadline is Nov. 14
and limited spots are available so sign
up early. For more information please
call 328-6387.
TABLE TENNIS TOURNAMENT. Nov. 15
at 7pm. Anyone interested in partic-
ipating in the tournament should
register on Monday. Nov. 14 from
10am-6pm at the SRC 128. For more
information please call 328-6387.
HOLIDAYS IN MOTION. Dec.5. You
are invited to the workout party of
the year! This party features multi-
impact dance moves set to tunes of
the season guaranteed to get you
in shape for the holidays. The pro-
gram is FREE! Check Class schedules
for times or call 328-6387 for more
information.
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
WWW.CAROLINASKYSPORTS.COM
NEED A PART TIME JOBP
FedEx around
b lusini: t Iv XA(,i: HANDLERS to tail vans and
milnklir-ok-rMur Hit .mi shilt hiMir- I i in luKjm
VWt(iurnWHinatiManv jvaibl afttT tndavv
I hi in i' i mi 11 op) hi iii inn in. ,x r.iiMniN .nut ounajic
niaw possible. Applications tun Ik.rilktJiHrt M till
1 'nig! Dnu- flagr Uk- Mujfa timer) (irmwilli
One environment
One ample way to care for,
Earth Share
nrww.earthshare.org
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. READY TO HYPE UP
YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus organi-
zations
Call J.Arthur @ 252-258-2722
Greenville Housing Authority
Seeking energetic, dynamic individual
lo develop and implement leisure and
recreational senior programs.
Flexible hours.
Contact: Michael Best �P 329-4000
KKW �rw of But Cho t nrnvnt AmjmJ �tf t of�
Sm BuSneuei Awgrirw lor fJuttmng tmes to CW l BC
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 Un � MM Mi � Fne fmm . Masts Ian
Honda $119
' mt� � fmtim Ui. Uiuu. M team
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
t Htm.� hm . rm fed � m � Maa
jpringbrt jkitavcl.com - Our UtH Year!
1-800-678-6386
IMPROVE YOUR GRADES
Retired English Profs, will
proofread and edit your papers
before you turn them in.
Just 1 cent a word.
EXACT, 111E. 3 St Greenville.
561-7358
PJWfrea,di�earthjjjiiuiet


Title
The East Carolinian, November 9, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 09, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1442
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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