The East Carolinian, October 19, 2000






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referendum
�lu .ic 5 NUMBER 13
50 days to go
until Graduation
NEWSBRIEFS
Fall Break
ECU is on Fall Break starting Saturday,
Oct. 21 through Tuesday, Oct. 24. There are
no classes, but the administrative offices will
be open.
Pirate Football
The ECU Pirates play football against the
University of Louisville at 7 p.m. Thursday,
Oct. 19 in Louisville. This C-USA clash will be
televised on Fox Sports Network.
Concert
Marcus Roberts, regarded as one of the top
jazz pianists in the country, will be featured
in the Performing Arts Series concert at 8
p.m. Friday, Oct. 20 in Wright Auditorium.
Accompanying Roberts will be Jason Marsalis
on drums and Roland Guerin on base. Public
tickets are $20 and are available at the Central
Ticket Office In Mendenhall Student Center, or
by calling 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
McNairy visit
Leigh Harvey McNairy, democratic candi-
date for the 3rd Congressional District, will
speak at 11 a.m. today at the Wright Place.
Community Health Fair
Two student associations from the Brody
School of Medicine will host a Community
Health Fair from 10 a.m2 p.m. Saturday, Oct.
21 on the School of Medicine's campus. The
sponsoring groups are the Student National
Medical Association (SNMA) and the American
Medical Student Association (AMSA).
The SNMA and AMSA are committed to
minority and underserved health issues of
eastern North Carolina. They provide health
fairs to educate under-served communities
about the importance of healthy living. The
entire Greenville community is invited to
attend the fair. For more information contact
Ken Dunham at 754-8102.
Organizations meeting
The Campus Organization Council will
meet at 6:30 p.m. Oct. 30 in Hendrix Theatre.
For more information contact Michael Aho
at 328-8508.
Peer Mentor Program
Interest Meeting
A peer mentor interest meeting is scheduled
from 5 p.m5:30 p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 31 in the
Ledonia Wright Cultural Center. For further
information, contact the Office of Intercultural
Student Affairs at 328-6495 or visit Room 203
of the Whichard Building.
English major
interest meeting
All students considering majoring in
English will be able to find out more about
the department, including prospects for jobs
upon graduation, degree requirements and
departmental offerings such as Summer in
London at an interest meeting scheduled for 3
p.m. Tuesday, Oct. 31 in GCB 1024.
ONLINESURVEY
Do you know someone who
has done Ecstasy or GHB?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Do you think third party candidates
should be included in the debates?
22 Yes
77 No
SPORTSA8
Pirates prepare to face Louisville
tonight
FEATURESA6
New laws in effect to restrict phone
solicitation
HURSDAY, OCTOBER 19, 2000
TODAY'S
WEATHER
Sunny
HIGH 72' LOW 48"
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN i
Ecstasy, Liquid G use on the rise at ECU
Officials warn
students of the
risks of club drugs
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Dangerous substances
known collectively as club
drugs are gaining popular-
ity on many college cam-
puses, including ECU.
According to the
National Institute on Drug
Abuse (NIDA), two of the
most prevalent club drugs
today are Ecstasy and
GHB. The drugs can be
found in party settings
and are usually colorless
and tasteless. Because they
have been frequently asso-
ciated with sexual assaults
they are classified as date
rape drugs.
Fcstasy, in its true
form, is known as MDMA
(methylenediozymetham-
phetamine) and is a hal-
lucinogenic that alters the
mind. Recent research has
linked the use of this drug
to long-term damage to
the part of the brain that
Is critical to thought and
memory.
"The percentage of stu-
dents using Ecstasy has
been increasing steadily
for the past five or six
years, including on this
campus said Robert Mor-
phet, Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Devel-
opment. "Ecstasy is the
one drug that really does
cause brain damage and
injury, and sometimes are
permanent
Many people use
Ecstasy to become more
energetic and to receive
a euphoric feeling when
their skin is touched.
Chronic abuse of the drug
will cause symptoms such
as increased heart rate and
blood pressure, psycho-
logical difficulties includ-
ing confusion, anxiety
and sleep problems, along
with muscle tension and
nausea. Dehydration is
also a side-effect of the
drug.
According to the
NIDA, Ecstasy is manufac-
tured primarily in Amster-
dam and is snipped into
the United States in mass
quantities. The price has
dropped from $30 per pill
in Greenville three years
ago to the current price of
$20 per pill. The pills are
illegal and addictive.
"Ecstasy use is quite
prevalent here at ECU
Morphet said. "Students
who use Ecstasy come
into counseling because
they are scared and are
significantly depressed.
They are also psychologi-
cally dependent on the
drug
The drug depletes a
chemical in the neu-
rotransmitter in the
human brain known as
seratonin. Seratonin helps
regulates the mood of a
person. The presence of
too much Ecstasy in the
blood will reduce serato-
nin levels in the brain and
cause increased depres-
sion.
According to Dr. W.
Wilson at Duke Univer-
sity, 18-20 year olds who
abuse Ecstasy now, will
eventually become depen-
dent on anti-depressants.
"Ecstasy was used in
a lot of raves at ECU last
year Morphet said. "This
year, it is used more at off-
see ECSTASY page 3
Above: According to CCSD counselor Bob Morphet,
GHB and Ecstasy use is on the rise at ECU. His center is
devoted to educating students on the risks of drug and
alcohol use. (photos by John Stowe)
Left: Freshman Samantha Lizotte says she was drugged
with GHB by a male aquaintance who gave her an
opened drink at a frat party last year. Lizotte was
unfamiliar with GHB at the time she was given the
drink.
Above left: GHB is a colorless, tastless drug most often found in liquid
form. Its physical side-effects include vomiting, dizziness, loss of
consciousness, tremors and can result in a coma.
Above right: Ecstasy (here in pill form) gives side-effects such as
depression, anxiety, dehydration and can lead to permanent damage to
the brain's nerve endings, (photos from World Wide Web)
Students unite to Take Back the Night
University orga-
nizations march
for sexual assault
awareness
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Students gathered at
Belk Hall on College Hill
Drive to take part in the
annual Take Back the
Night March Wednesday
night.
The march, which was
postponed during last
month's Sexual Aware-
ness Week due to rain,
took place this month in
accordance with Alcohol
Awareness Week which is
sponsored by the Center
of Counseling and Stu-
dent Development.
The marchers, who
ranged from whole groups
of student organization
representatives to indi-
vidual supporters, held
candles in their hands
and chanted, "men and
women unite to take back
the night
The event began at
began at College Hill
Drive, then proceeded to
5th Street, the Student
Recreation Building and
commenced at the Sonic
Plaza.
Mary L. Antineau,
associate dean of stu-
dents, spoke out to the
crowd about memories
that students will take
. And the
winners are,
with them once they leave
college. She added how
many females leave col-
lege with the memories of
sexual assaults and rapes.
"There is a saying that
it takes a village to raise a
child Antineau said. "I
would like to paraphrase
that and say it takes a uni-
versity to create a healthy
environment, a climate
where each of us can feel
safe and have memories
that we can share with
our children and grand-
children
Adrian Cox, a former
student of ECU and a
member of Alpha Phi
Alpha, presented his view
on the role of men and
their responsibility toward
women who are rape. He
discussed the negative
images of women that are
H2K
Queen
Deborah Anderson
Campus Crusade for Christ
H2K
King
Justin Bailey
ECU Ambassadors
Student organizations walked together in support of sexual
assault awareness Wednesday evening, (photo by John
Stowe)
portrayed by the media.
"I think it is really
important that men be a
part of this because there
is a certain responsibility
that we have in terms
of helping the responsi-
bilities to women Cox
said. "It makes a stronger
impact if men-specifkally
if the man is viewed as
the perpetrator and the
woman is a victim-it is
see Take Back page 2
SKITS COMPETITION
Third pace-ECU Cheerleaders
Second place-Chi OmegaSigma Alpha Epsilon
First place-The Student Union
BANNER COMPETITION
Third place- Tie between
Elementary Education Club
and Chi OmegaSigma Alpha Epsilon
Second place-Tie between
The Student Union
and Epsilon Sigma Alpha
First place-tCU Chapter of the NAACP
FLOAT COMPETITION
Third place-Chi OmegaSigma Alpha Epsilon
Second place-The Student Union
First para-Epsilon Sigma Alpha
SPIRIT CUP
The Student Union





Z The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
MC MIC
Thursday, October 19, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday,
www.thee
SfiflJM
SGA has a new executive posi-
tion filled. Teresia Paul, ABLE
president, has been installed as
SGA External Affairs coordina-
tor.
Teresia brings a unique and
wonderful perspective to SGA.
She has been instrumentally
Involved in the formation of the
Campus Organization Council
and Is committed to students.
Brent Queen (President) and
1 had the opportunity of attend-
ing the Friends of the Joyner
Library annual banquet on Oct.
5. We were proud to represent the
student body at both the chan-
cellor's reception and dinner.
All ECU students need to
become more involved in sup-
porting specific elements of their
university. Brent and I were
unhappy to see only few students
present. Student membership
is only $1. So, help out Joyner
Library and send in a buck to
become a friend.
ECU needs your help on Elec-
tion Day, Nov. 7. On the ballot,
you will find a critical question
regarding higher education capi-
tal facilities improvement bonds
for North Carolina's public uni-
versities and community col-
leges.
The total amount of bond
is $3.1 billion. Of this amount
$2.5 billion will
to be used for
projects identi-
fied as critical
in meeting the
facilities needs
of an additional
50,000 new stu-
dents over the
next decade
and $600 mil- HfctoeC. 4A�
lion for ��rSGACHIEFOFSTAFF
friends in the
community college system.
Of the $2.5 billion for the uni-
versities, ECU is set to receive
$190.6 million. We understand
that this is a great deal of money,
but North Carolina State Trea-
surer, Marian Boyles, who is widely
admired as a fiscal conservative,
has assured North Carolinians that
these bonds will not require a tax
increase.
Students at ECU will benefit
significantly from the bond. Among
the most important projects are a
new Science & Technology Building
on the main campus and a new
Nursing and Allied Health Building
on the health sciences campus.
Other main campus projects
include renovation and conversion
of current facilities for academic
use, modernization of laboratories
and classrooms, repairs and expan-
sion of the campus infrastructure,
and improvements in classrooms
and laboratories.
Technology upgrades will be
brought into the Speight, Brews-
ter, Rivers, General Classroom,
Rawl and Austin buildings. The
Brody School of Medicine will
receive much-needed additional
library and study space to accom-
modate current and future enroll-
ment growth in health science
programs.
It is a great time to be part
of ECU and its growing family.
Please help every university of
North Carolina (UNC) system
student by providing needed
funds for the advancement of
our educational facilities. We
know we can count on you to
support these efforts, and our
hope is that you will tell others
to do the same.
On another note, if you
have any concerns that you
would like to address, please
call or e-mail me at 328-4721
or mca0918@mail.ecu.edu. We
would be happy to address your
views and concerns no matter
what they are. So please take
advantage of this opportunity.
We are your SGA, and we repre-
sent you the student.
Take Back from page 1
important for us to be out here
to say that we understand, we are
here, it is not all of us, and we are
here for support
� Nicole Herding, a senior in
health education, spoke out on
her sexual assault that occurred
in 1994.
"I want to take this negative
thing that happened to me and
turn it into something positive by
helping others Herding said. "I
have been through a lot but I have
grown from what happened and 1
feel very comfortable talking about
it in front of everyone tonight
During Herding's speech, stu-
dents nearby gathered to listen to
her story and powerful announce-
ment of survival.
"I am a true survivor and 1 am
never going to stop fighting she
said.
Antineau stressed the impor-
tance of unity within the university
community in order to make a
difference.
"Respect yourself, respect each
other Antineau said. "Please
together, let's build a university
community where every person is
safe to learn, is safe to joyful and is
safe to care for each other
The rates of crime and sexual
assault have increased at ECU this
past year, most significantly this
semester both on- and off-campus.
For more information on sexual
assault awareness and what to do
if you are a victim, contact the
Center of Counseling and Student
Development at 328-6661.
October 23 -29
LliUJouest passes
Treat a friend to a workout at lit Student
Recreation Center. Ml guests an free October 23-29.
One geest per member!
SBC HAUNTING HOURS
MONDAY-THURSDAY � 6AM TO 11:30PM
FRIDAY � 6AM TO 10PM
SATURDAY - SUNDAY � 9AM TO 10PM
Student spouse memberships are available.
� LIFE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMS
� PERSONAL TRAINING
�FITNESS ASSESSMENTS
� 150.000 SQ FT.
FITNESS CYCLING CLASSES
I TRACK
� 6 BASKETBALL COURTS
� 7 RACQUETHALL COURTS
�FREE AND MACHINE WEIGHTS
WALL
lamRECREATKHU
www.recserv.ecu.edu � 328-6387
ELTORO
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October 26th & 27ii
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To Check-in To
The ihtrhare
hotel
OCTOBER 31 FROM 9 P.M. TO
2 A.M. IN MENDENHALL
It's Midnight Madness - the
spookiest bash of the year. Wear
a costume, or come as you are
for loads of food, video karaoke.
Illusion N' Fusion, bingo, bowl-
ing, and billiards - all FREE.
Not to mention a special screen-
ing of The Rocky Horror Picture
Show, a costume contest with
cash prizes, a psychic hotline,
and dancing with Jay Arthur at
Club Mystique.
All ECU Students will be admit-
ted for with a valid ECU One
Card. You may also bring a guest
(high school age or older), but
you must obtain a guest pass
prior to the event from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Todd Dining
Hall Meal Plan Office, or the Stu-
dent Rec Center.
Tickets for The Rocky Horror Pic-
ture Show will be available at
Midnight Madness from 11 p.m.
to midnight. All the props for
the show will be provided - no
outside props will be allowed.
Yoi
Yoi
Yoi
Free Pr
Call Car
209-BSoutl
To lear A Jazz Giant
OCTOBER 20 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Don t miss jazz pianist Marcus Roberts and his trio
when they bring an evening of cool jazz and classic
Broadway to Wright Auditorium. Present your valid ECU
One Card at the Central Ticket Office before October
20 at 6 p.m. to receive your half-price ticket. All tickets
purchased at the door will be full-price.
To View
Fine Art
OCTOBER 10 UNTIL
NOVEMBER 3 IN THE MSC
GALLERY
Come check out "Bodies:
From a Simple Life an
exhibit featuring paintings
by Charlotte-based artist Kim
Stimpson. Stimson's paint-
ings reflect an interest in con-
trast, texture, and simplicity.
To Find
Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality, Adult and Commuter
Services, Banking, Central Ticket Office, InterFraternity Council,
Operations and Reservations, Panhellenic, RideRiders Board,
School Supplies, Student Fund Accounting Office, Student Gov-
ernment Association, Student Leadership, Student Locator, Stu-
dent Union, Transit, Technical Services, WZMB Radio
To Visit
An Island
Iaradise
OCTOBER 24 AT 4 P.M.
AND 7:30 P.M. AT
HENDRIX THEATRE
oin Dr. Richard Kern on a
cinematic adventure when
he presents The Falklands
Refuge in the Sea, his excit-
ing documentary featuring
the wildlife on these wind-
swept islands. Show your
valid ECU One Card to
receive two free film tickets.
You can use your declining
balance to purchase tickets
for a theme dinner to com-
plement your film. Dinner
tickets must be purchased
no later than 3 days in
advance.
On the Web: www.ecu.edumendenhall
Hours: MonThurs. 8 am-11 pmFri 8 am-midnightSat noon-midnightSun noon-11 pm
i:





toberl9, 2000
trs@tec.ecu.edu
TOO
Barber & Style
men's hair
styling shoppe
0 E. 10th St.
Pirate
Special
Sgoo
&:Cut
Thursday, October 19, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@tec.ecu.edu
J Station
Champion
Fit. Cctittr
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Ufair Shopping Or,
2S00 E. 10th St.
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ECSTASY from page 1
campus apartments and parties
GHB (gamma-hydroxybutyrate)
is also known as Liquid G or Liquid
E. Unlike Ecstasy, GHB is a sedative
in clear, liquid form. This addictive
drug tends to bring the pulse and
heart rate down.
The problem with this drug
is that one may be potentially
stronger than the next. Its potency
has the ability to intoxicate an
individual into a coma.
"People are using GHB on them-
selves to gain that druni, intoxi-
cated feeling because it is like
having 8 to 12 beers Morphet
said. "The other reason it is used
is to slip in other people's drink
to facilitate sexual assault. This is
happening throughout the country,
including here at ECU
GHB causes loss of control of
body movement and a person will
tend to black out. Respiratory shut-
down may occur from the inges-
tion of GHB which' could lead to
death. The emergency room at Pitt
County Memorial hospital (PCMH)
had several admissions from ECU
students last year because of GHB
use.
"I never heard about GHB before
and did not know someone slipped
it in my drink said freshman
Samantha Lizotte. "First of all,
the drink I was given was an open
bottle and handed to me by a guy
that I had met a couple of times
before
I.izotte is one student who fell
victim to GHB poisoning last year
at a fraternity party. She was with
a bunch of friends who discovered
that a male acquaintance slipped
the drug in her drink. Her symp-
toms occurred 30 minutes after
her drink was taken away. These
symptoms included gasping for
breath, turning white, rolling eyes
and profuse sweating.
"When I was in the ambulance,
I did not remember the questions
that were asked but apparently
I answered them Lizotte said.
"I woke up four hours later in
the hospital and was temporarily
paralyzed from the chest down
Lizotte filed a report with
the Greenville Police Department
(GPD) and an investigation was
performed. Unfortunately, they
could not charge the man because
of a lack of evidence.
Most of the parties where club
drugs are administered take place
off campus where the ECU police
department (ECUPD) has no juris-
diction. At this time there have not
been any formal reports of Ecstasy
or GHB use on campus.
"If you go to any parties off
campus, go with friends that will
look out for you said Capt. Frank
Knight of the ECUPD. "If some-
thing was to happen to you, your
friends can bring you back on
campus where you can get help
and medical attention
If passed by the House of Rep-
resentatives, people administering
this drug in the future will be
charged with homicide if death
occurs.
"People always told me it was
out there; I never knew it would
happen to me Lizotte said.
For more information on these
drugs, you contact the Center of
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment at 328-6661 or go online to
www.nida.nih.gov.
This writer can be contacted
at newsosst@tececu.edu.
Want to know
what'
ening
Browse over to the only campus-wide
calendar of events at ECU. Check it
often for activities, events, meetings, -
etc. Use it when you need to list your
own campus happenings.
c
S.V
ry r
��
jj
A web-based service of the ECU Student Media.





4 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
DIVERSIONS
Thursday, October 19, 2000
comics@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday,
www.thee
The Joey Show
Joey Ellis
this week s exhiliraling episode:
"a brief romance"
comic
Strip
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CAPTAIN RlBMAN A Politician's Politician
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Round
Roast
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Quick kiss
5 Emulate eagles
9 Bowling
challenge
14 Lotion ingredient
15 Neat
16 Portion of bread
17 One on one's
side
18 Funeral director
20 Consider anew
22 Rayed flowers
23 Table scrap
24 Attila, for one
26 Otherwise
27 Type of syrup
30 Gin cocktail
32 Chills and fever
33 Firinoz-range
object
34 Turn left!
37 Affirmative
38 Polite social
behavior
39 Wider s"
Town"
40 Cigar residue
41 Goes in
42 Skin opening
43 Actor Meredith
45 Family car
46 Avoid
48 Golfer Ernie
49 Author Fleming
50 Customer
52 Proofs of age
56 Twist together
59 Neapolitan
dough
60 Not tight
61 Writer Ferber
62 Russian ruler
63 Hues
64 Discard
65 Abominable
snowman
DOWN
1 Carson's
predecessor
2 French pronoun
3 Gun
manufacturer
4 Eavesdropper's
post
5 Daring feat
1?S4I 21'A7sM9Id10111?13
14r13
17.ff?s
20?8P930I??31
r3334?34353R
P73B
3244
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4047414
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A rights reserved
6 Porker's
comment
7 Annex
8 Cereal grass
9 Machjets
10 Typewriter roller
11 Probability
12 Bakery workers
13 Concise
19 Wild talkers
21 Anger
24 Gain control over
25 Goaders
27 Yucatan people
28 Matures
29 Circuit controller
30 Fireplace shelf
31in the bag
33 Touching at a
single point
35 Distinctive
atmosphere
36 Birdhouse nester
38 Sea of France
42 Punishment
imposed
44 Civil disturbance
Solutions
Find the solution to
this puzzle on our
website: tec.ecu.edu
Click on the crossword
puzzle button.
45 Cul-do-46 Milk not to cry over? 47 Vietnamese52 Traveler's stopovers 53 Get up 54 Mild oath
capital 49 Concepts 51 Raw minerals55 Bombay wrap 57 Moisten 58 Altar words
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:tober19, 2000
cs@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 19, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
OPINION
The East Carolinian 5
editor@tec.ecu.edu
eastcarolinian
Newsroom252 328.6366
AoVertisng252.328.20fX)
Fan22.328.65b8
E-mailednomiltec.ecu.alj
StaphM Schranm, Sporls Editor
JatoiStom, Pluto Editor
Erin Mudge, I ayout Designer
Editor
K, Features Editor
Uwa Imdlct, Head Copy Editor
Uttto, Founbktimd Editor
HofftHM, Layout Designer
SB-wig tOJ since 192b. The taa Caralman crims 1 IflOO cope every luesriay
ana Thursday ruing ihc mgutar academe yo� and 51(10 on VVortresdays during
the summer Xw VleW Is (he opnon u( IhB erjtunal buried and svmtta by (dual
hoard members. The East Carntrtan menmes loners in the edior �Noh arc
tailed to 2S0 wrds (�tnji may be noted for decency or brevity). Vte reserve
thn right to cm or reject lottos end ai toners must bo signed and include a
Mwrjiurw umber I mta- may bosail �i rural lo orliorW4ec.Bui.edu or to The
Let Carotin, student Rttcanons BuUnrj, Greerwie. NC 2ffl68-43M Call
252-32fi�66 lor more iilomtflwn
We hope that after
reading our
GHBEcstasy article, and
after hearing rape sur-
vivor Nicole Herding's
emotional speech at
Wednesday's Take Back
the Night March, that
ECU students will want
to take the initiative to
educate themselves fur-
ther on these issues.
OUR VIEW
In light of Alcohol Awareness Week and the Take Back the Night March,
we find it appropriate and necessary that campus officials are taking time
to educate and inform students on the dangers of alcohol, along with the
club drugs Ecstasy and CHB, as well as addressing the problem of sexual
assault on college campuses.
Unfortunately, these issues have become more and more prevalent at
ECU.
So many students come to our university without any prior knowledge of
substances such as Ecstasy and CHB, while many women arrive unaware of the
risks of sexual assault on college campuses. Increasingly these are the same
individuals who fall victim to predators looking for unsuspecting targets at
clubs, parties and even on campus.
Every year, Downtown Greenville becomes one big block party at Halloween.
Students from all over the state come to ECU to visit the clubs, see old friends
and have fun. Many choose to use drugs and alcohol. Some students also
end up dealing with assault. Yet we hope that after reading our GHBEcstasy
article, and after hearing rape survivor Nicole Herding's emotional speech at
Wednesday's Take Back the Night March, that ECU students will want to take
the initiative to educate themselves further on these issues.
We at TEC believe educating oneself on the risks and side-effects of drugs and
alcohol, as well as learning ways of preventing and dealing with sexual assault,
are the most important steps in keeping from becoming a victim.
We can only encourage everyone to consider very carefully the risks
and dangers out there this Halloween. If you do drink, keep in mind the
consequences and do so responsibly. If you choose to use drugs, also remember
there are consequences to your actions. If you end up being faced with assault,
remember there are people on our campus that are here to help.
IN MYOPINION
Body image isn't true reflection of self
gajiuu IN MYOPINION
Get off welfare and into a job
Many domestic issues, from
Medicare and prescription drugs
to campaign finance reform, have
taken center stage during the presi-
dential election. One issue that has
been missing from the spotlight is
welfare reform.
In 1995, Governor Bush fun-
damentally changed the welfare
system in Texas to make it one of
the most responsive systems in the
country. The systems goal, like that
of other welfare reform plans, was
to get the recipient off of welfare
and into a job.
The program he helped to put in
place had three different time limits
for recipients-one, two or three
years-depending on their prior
work experience and qualifications.
But time limits did not begin until
the child of a mother on welfare
turned four, and it didn't start at all
in counties that could not provide
child care or public transporta-
tion.
The Texas plan also allowed
people on welfare to count educa-
tion as work. And even if they
refused to work or go to school,thus
potentially losing benefits, their
children would still receive welfare,
food stamps, and Medicaid. That is
about as compassionate as a plan
can get, in my opinion.
In 1996, the Republican-led
Congress passed legislation calling
for more strict changes to the weN
fare system across the nation. That
legislation has forced Texas, and
other states, to change their system
to met Federal mandates. While
some of rules of that Federal legisla-
tion are stricter than the rules
some states passed, the heart of the
reform movement, getting people
off welfare and into a job, remains
the same. And it is working.
There are now job training pro-
grams across the country, where
welfare recipients receive instruc-
tion and get qualified for many jobs
they never would have dreamed
of having. Over 7.5 million people
are off of welfare and employed,
thanks to the 1996 legislation.
According to the Web site
www.algore.com, Al Gore has been
a leader in making welfare reform
happen. Unless I am mistaken,
the Clinton administration, which
includes Gore, vetoed the 1996
legislation "twice before signing it
into law. Where did Gore stand on
welfare reform then? Why didn't he
speak up for it? By 1996, Bush had
already passed useful and compas-
sionate welfare reform.
Jason Thuringeris the current ECU
College Republicans' chairperson.
Women have it hard. Life
throws different obstacles at us
every day, and many times, we have
no idea how to deal with them. We
may wake up in the morning, look
in the minor, and turn away think-
ing, "Man I need to lose weight
Then get dressed in clothes we
think shrink our bodies to make
us look like someone else and walk
out the door, leaving our "true"
selves behind.
Many women awake to this
routine every morning. They may
also go to bed every night hoping
some physical aspect of themselves
will be different tomorrow. Not only
do women, like men, worry about
their future, past, mistakes and
their relationships everyday. Many
women have an extra dilemma to
deal with on a daily basis: body
image.
Men may have problems with
the way they look too, but it is
not a hot topic in today's society.
Therefore, men's bad body image
problems are almost never, if ever,
discussed. Women's, on the other
hand, appear in magazines, day to
day conversations, newspapers and
many other kinds of propaganda.
Women are exploited in our
society. We always hear how "thin
is beautiful You only have to turn
to any page of a magazine to see
that this is the truth. Actually, you
don't even have to go that far. Just
look at the cover of the magazine.
You see the typical model that is
5-foot-10-inches and weighs around
110-120 pounds, if that. You only
have to flip the channel on the
television and see actresses that
wear a size 4 to see what society
deems beautiful.
Very rarely do you see a larger
female model. And if you've ever
looked in a "women's" clothing
catalog, which is for larger size
women, you probably noticed that
thin models were used. How are
you supposed to know what the
clothing looks like you, when you
just see it on someone five times
smaller than you? Let's be realistic
here! What about those women
who are 5-foot-4-inches and weigh
140 pounds? What about those
who are 5-foot-4-inches and weigh
200 pounds?
What about them? Are they not
seen as beautiful? Are they not
prized in a world where all humans
are supposed to be accepted and
loved. How does it make them feel
to always have to look at a person
who is much thinner and always
hear, "She is so beautiful? Don't you
(generally speaking) wish you could
have her body? I know I do?"
This is absolutely pathetic.
Women and men, whether large
or small, are people. Their size
shouldn't matter. But for some,
who are overly conscious of the
way they look, their self-esteem
and confidence is shot because of
societal expectations of beauty. I
know 1 care about my size. I know
how it makes me feel.
Almost every person is self-
conscious to an extent and that
is normal. Do what you need to
make yourself feel good. If you
want, try going to the gym and
watching your caloric intake. If you
are unsure how to begin a workout
program or don't know how to plan
healthy meals, there are classes
readily available for just that. For
those that are doing all they can
to attain that desired body image,
remember, results don't happen
overnight. You've got to give it
time.
Also remember, your attitude is
really important to how others see
you and how you ultimately see
yourself. If you're walking around
cocky all the time, you're going to
wonder why you are alone and why
people stare at you. They're not
just looking at the physical you,
but observing how you perceive
yourself in relation to how they
feel about you.
How you see yourself is totally
up to you. It doesn't matter how
I feel about you, or how Joe or
anyone else sees you. You have to
do what makes you happy. If you
think you would be happier losing
a couple of pounds, go for it. If you
think you need to pile on a couple
of pounds, do that. Just don't go
overboard and go to extreme mea-
sures.
Happiness lies within you. You
have to be confident within yourself
to know you are making the right
decision about your life and your
well-being. As long as you know
that, no-one or anything can bring
you down, unless you allow it to.
This writer can be contacted
at njones@tec.ecu.edu.
Vimuf. Betala
IN MYOPINION
AnStenu StoA&i
IN MYOPINION
Bush no poster child for morality
Can we believe anything
that either candidate has to say?
(U-WIRE) BOSTON Northeast-
ern News (Northeastern U.)-After
a frat party sin, fiduciary infidelity
and life served up on a silver platter,
the prodigal son returns home.
This bad boy found a good
woman who set him straight and
he did not stray.
George W. Bush has seen it all
in terms of youthful indiscretion,
and he'll tell you he is a more moral
man for it. This self-styled moral
macho man claims his passion is
to return honor and dignity to the
White House.
Many have questioned if the
good governor has the aptitude to
be president. I believe he does. Yes,
that's right, I, an unabashed Bush
basher, thinks the shining son of
Texas has the skills to be
president. What he lacks are
the morals.
A president's ability to turn
down a seductive intern does not
determine his or her moral forti-
tude. The true tests are when the
president makes public decisions
that affect the moral climate of
the
nation. These decisions consti-
tute public morals; such determina-
tions include when to go war, how
to treat the nation's disadvantaged,
and generally doing what is in the
best Interest of America.
An examination of Bush's record
proves he is far from prepared to
make such decisions.
As governor of a state that ranks
among Iran and China in terms of
state-sponsored execution, Bush
signed a death warrant for a men-
tally retarded man. After refusing
to commute the man's sentence
to life imprisonment, Bush also
did not support a bill approved by
the Texas
State Senate that would ban
such executions. Because Bush did
not support the bill, it did not pass
the House.
No matter what side of the
capital punishment debate you may
be on, execution of the mentally
retarded is repulsive. Bush's own
brother, Florida Gov. Jeb Bush,
supports a ban on such executions.
The governor was condemned by
the F.uropean Union for supporting
an execution that clearly violated
international human rights norms.
This is a man who is to be trusted
to decide when the United States
should sacrifice the lives of our own
and of others for a greater
good?
The compassionate hand of the
Texas governor, it seems, is unwill-
ing to reach out to state's children
and offer them the health care they
need.
In the second debate, Vice Presi-
dent Al Gore berated Bush for his
state's persistent worst in the nation
rankings for children and families
with health insurance and child
health care standards. Last
year Bush fought to limit the
number of children allowed to
participate in the Children's Health
Insurance Program.
Only under pressure from a
true "moral majority" (you know,
people who believe children deserve
health care) of state lawmakers did
he yield. Bush is fond of speaking
of his ability to bring the parties
together, and health care is a good
example. In 1997, it was only with
a bipartisan legislative override
that Texans had their right to legal
recourse against insurance compa-
nies assured.
Ultimately, every citizen needs
to believe that his or her president
will do what is best for America.
Bush cannot be trusted on this
count.
The greatest threat to America's
democracy is the current campaign
finance system. The bipartisan
McCain-Feingold campaign finance
reform bill has been guaranteed a
signature by Al Gore. Bush claims
Gore has no legitimacy on the issue
because of past indiscretions.
Centralia College (The Blue &
Gold)-So it's finally come down
to violence. I knew it was just a
matter of time, but the headline in
last week's newspaper said "Gore,
Bush trade shots in Midwestern
states
Although I suspected it would
come down to a shoot-out, my only
real concern is for the innocent
bystanders. Considering they are
trading shots over a number of
entire states, there are probably a
whole bunch of people in the way.
And if these guys are not better at
shooting than they are of being
truthful, all those folks should be
diving out of the way!
Oh wait. Oops. My mistake.
I guess I should always read the
article first. It turns out they weren't
actually shooting at each other
after all. They were (as usual) just
calling each other miserable liars
who will say and do anything to
get to be president.
Aw, c'mon! You mean that
someone would actually lie in order
to become the head of the most
powerful nation on the planet?
Somehow I don't find this surpris-
ing. In fact, about the only thing
that does surprise me is that anyone
would believe anything these char-
acters have to say.
It could be just me, but if my
admittedly faulty memory serves
me correctly, every four years we
have been told a great many won-
derful things by a variety of differ-
ent candidates that makes them
sound like the next best thing
since the invention of twist-tie
garbage bags, only to find that
when they actually end up in their
respective offices their actions are
virtually diametrically opposite of
the promises they made. Anybody
else out there notice this?
Now, normally, I stay away from
anything regarding politics, because
I don't believe that anything I
happen to say or do will make the
slightest difference in the ultimate
outcome of history, but since I do
have a simple answer to what most
folks consider an insurmountable
problem, I thought I'd share it with
you.
Everyone agrees that the big
problems in government are greed,
corruption and special interests.
With this kind of temptation, is
it any wonder that opportunistic
scoundrels plot and scheme for
years to get into a position that
allows them to capitalize on what-
ever office they are seeking? Of
course not.
Now consider that these char-
acters are by and large lawyers in
the first place. That by itself should
bring the picture clearly into focus.
The question is, what do we do
about it? Ah, now that's why f
can be so crucial to the fate of our
country. I have the answer.
Make all public offices in all
forms of government strictly mini-
mum wage. Add in a provision that
no one in public office can accept
any sort of "gift" from anyone for
the duration of their office under
penalty of immediate execution,
and presto! Problem solved. No
opportunistic scalawag in his or
her right mind would even think
about running for office.
On the other hand, those indi-
viduals who are truly committed to
public service would be willing to
sacrifice fortune and fame for the
good of the country. They would be
the only ones that would run. I see
no flaws in this solution, so I'm left
with the conclusion that I am either
(a) a genius, or (b) may have taken
too much of my medication.
What do you think? In the inter-
ests of finding out, I would like to
conduct a simple poll. The question
is this: can we believe anything that
either presidential candidate has to
say? Answers: of course we can are
you nuts? not a chancel, who cares,
it's fishing season or you need to
lay off that medication.
I thank you for your support,
and will publish the results as soon
as the final votes are in.





6 The East Carolinian
(Www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, October 19, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
FEATURESBRIEF!
Today's Birthday: You've got the
advantage this year, so use it. Talk your
way into, or out of, anything this month.
Aries
(March 21 -April! 9)
You and a close friend or relative have
a lot to talk about. Don't let it happen on
company time, however.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Something a loved one's been nagging
you about is your motivation. A tedious
chore could be your means to the end.
Gemini
(May 21-June 21)
As the day goes on, your luck improves.
Somebody else wants to go to an exotic
restaurant you've been thinking about.
Cancer
(June 22-July 22)
If you can't get to your errands first
thing, don't worry; you will eventually. A
candlelit chat could lead to romance. All it
takes is planning, and you're great at that.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
You can point out an obvious problem
in afhends me. A book yoti're-readii
or aMII you've been learning could help.
Offer a Plan B that will work.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept 22)
A quiz is likely, so you'd better know
what you're doing. Now that you've been
tipped off, do some research.
Libra
(Sept 23-Oct 22)
A mishap pertaining to travel is pos-
sible. You're agile, both mentally and phys
ically but pay attention to where you're
going and wear your safety belt.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You should hear what people are
saying. Informants will sing like birds for a
few crumbs.
�&� :���
Sagittarius
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
Your competition has an advantage
Pick the battles you can win and save your
energy. Whatever works.
Capricorn
(Dec.22-Jan. 19)
Things are running smoothly, due to
your intervention and you can bet some-
one notices. You could profit nicely from
your efforts.
STILL OTESSED?
LEARN TO COMBAT
TEST ANXIETY
Decrease exam-time
nervousness, tension
Bridget Hemenway
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
According to the ECU Center for Counseling
and Student Development (CCSD), most students
experience some level of nervousness or tension
before taking a test. Although it is believed claim that
a little nervousness can actually help to motivate an
individual, too much anxiety can create a problem
if it interferes with the ability to prepare for and
perform on tests.
"I can not take tests said junior Rob I.ee. "I
freak out right before, and even if I know the
material I freeze up. This has happened to me since
high school
"The first step is to distinguish between two
types of anxiety said Dr. Nancy Badger, a counselor
at the CCSD. "If the anxiety is a direct result of lack
of preparation, it is a normal, rational reaction. If
a student is prepared for a test but still panics or
overreacts, the reaction is not rational
Preparation is the best way to minimize rational
anxiety. Although most college stunts make a habit
of cramming for tests, Badger wants students to
know that they should avoid this technique if at
all possible.
"Trying to master a semester's worth of material
the day before the test is a poor way to learn and can
easily produce anxiety Badger said. "This is not the
time to try to learn a great deaf of material
Improving one's perspective of the test-taking
experience can actually help them to enjoy studying
and may improve their performance.
"Students should not overplay the importance of
the grade, it is not a reflection of their self-worth nor
does it predict their future success Badger said.
According to the CCSD, students should remind
themselves that a test is only a test, there will be
others.
"I always promise to rent a movie I have been dying
to see or I buy a new shirt or something after taking a
test said sophomore Katie Williams.
"Rewarding themselves is very important Badger
said. "They should also remember to avoid thinking in
the negative sense. This means discipline yourself but
without degrading or putting yourself down
Students preparing for tests often neglect basic
biological, emotional and social needs. To do their best.
students must think of themselves as a total person,
not just a test taker.
"By continuing habits of good nutrition and
exercise, and continuing recreational pursuits and
social activities the student is balancing out their lives
and are better able to handle their anxiety Badger
said. "The most important thing is to remember to
get enough sleep the night before the test, take breaks
while studying and once adequately prepared for the
test do something relaxing
Once the day of the test arrives, begin with a
moderate breakfast, this will prevent lightheadedness
and jitters.
"I always eat before a test said freshman Chris
Hale. "There is nothing worst than being distracted by
New laws put end to unwanted phone calls
Solicitors required
to nix consumers
from list
Aquarius
(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Does your sweetheart or child want
something you'd have to pay dearly for?
Don't say no yet. Look around.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March20)
No doesn't mean never; it means not
now. You'll find something everybody can
live with if you keep looking-together.
Maura Buck
FEATURES EDITOR
As of Oct. 1, North
Carolina residents have
some new protection for
an old problem: unwanted
telephone calls.
Most people can iden-
tify the atypical situation
of sitting down to a family
meal only to be inter-
rupted by the ringing of
the telephone. In most
cases, that telephone call
is actually a solicitor trying
to sell a specific product.
"Already this year I
have had a telephone and
credit card company call
my dorm room to try to
attain my business said
freshman Jason Loos.
Under the new law,
approved by the 2(XK)
General Assembly (GA),
telephone solicitors must
do three things.
First, they are to clearly
identify themselves and
their organization at the
start of the telephone call.
Next, they must end the
call if the consumer does
not consent to the solicita-
tion. Finally, the solicitor
is to remove the person's
name and phone number
from their call list at the
request of the consumer.
"1 cannot count the
number of times my con-
stituents have asked me
to do something about
unwanted phone calls
said Sen. Bob Martin, who
supported the new law. "I
think that this law will go
a long way toward helping
folks stop these calls
The law, which has
been in effect for about
two weeks now, also pro-
hibits telemarketers from
calling homes before 8
a.m. and after 9 p.m. Also,
the solicitor is not permit-
ted to block any person's
caller identification ser-
vice or call a customer
who previously asked to
be removed from their
listing.
"1 think it's necessary
to implement such a law
Loos said.
Telemarketing compa-
nies that violate the laws
set by the GA could be
subject to an investiga-
tion headed by the Attor-
ney General's Office or
perhaps taken to court
by the consumer, not to
mention a possible $500
civil penalty fine.
"I hope people will
educate themselves about
how the new law works
and demand their tele-
phone solicitors stop call-
ing Martin said.
The law also requires
consumer information to
be included within the
phone books consumer
information pages, as well
as in residential tele-
phone bills at least once
a year. Consumers who
have been called by some-
one violating the law can
call the North Carolina
Attorney General's office
at 919-716-6000.
"I have received a lot
of phone calls in the
past said Jordan Might,
sophomore. "It's not only
annoying but also a waste
of my time
So if a peaceful dinner
without any interruptions
sounds good, simply tell
the solicitor that you are
not interested and would
prefer to be taken off their
list. It's as simple as that.
Things to do
over Fall Break
Students give suggestions
for vacation activities
Earline White
FEATURES WRITER
ECU students will be out of class from Saturday,
Oct. 21 through Tuesday, Oct. 24 in observance
of Fall Break.
What are most students planning to do during
their Fall Break? For all students who need a
vacation from test-taking and studying, there are
plenty of ways to spend the time off, whether it
be in Greenville or elsewhere.
Some students, as usual, plan on catching up
on rest and relaxation. When asked, senior Amy
Hedgecock said, "Sleep, a lot
"I plan on racing cars, like I do every week-
end said Jason Baldwin, graduate student.
Although some plan on having fun, others
need to focus their efforts to meet future dead-
lines.
"IJ have to fill out law school applications
SeeBREAK pg
your stomach growling "an mfOTgfTlhe te$fTt'really
ruins my concentration
Arrive to class early and avoid classmates who
generate anxiety and tend to upset stability.
"If a student tends loget nervous waiting for the
test to be handed out, they should read a magazine
or a newspaper while waiting Badger said.
According to the CCSD, there are a number of
steps to take once you are administered the test to
relax and do well. With test in hand, the first thing
to do is take a few minutes and review the entire
lest. Read the directions twice and try to think of
the test as an opportunity to prove the knowledge
gained from the professor thus far. Work on the
easiest portions of the test first.
For essay questions, construct a short outline,
then begin the answer with a summary sentence,
this will help to avoid the rambling and repetition,
which can irritate the person grading the test.
For short answer questions, answer only what is
asked-short and to the point.
"If they have difficulty with an item involving
a written response, the student should show what
knowledge they can' Badger said. If the proper
terminology evades them, they should show what
they know in their own words
For multiple choice questions, read all the
options first, then eliminate the most obvious.
"If a student feels unsure, they should rely
on their first impression, then move on quickly
Badger said. "Watch out for tricky words such as
only, always or most
See STRESS pg 7
Thursday, O
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Thursday, October 19, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 7
features@tec.ecu.edu
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STRESS from 6
Do not rush through the test.
Wear a watch and check it fre-
quently following a pace. If it is
impossible to finish the entire
test, concentrate on those por-
tions which can be answered well.
Recheck answers only if time per-
mits and anxiety is not present.
If it anxiety persists throughout
the test, distraction is the best way
to escape it, according to the CCSU.
Get a drink or go to the bathroom,
if allowed. Eat something. Break the
lead on the pencil and go sharpen
it. Think about the post exam
reward. Tense and relax all the
muscles throughout the body. Take
a couple of slow deep breaths and
try to maintain a positive attitude.
If students prepare themselves
for a test well ahead of time and
are able to use these methods,
they should be able to somewhat
overcome their test anxiety.
This writer can be contacted
at leatures@tec.ecu.edu.
BREAK from 6
said senior Renae York.
Regardless what plans may be,
one thing is for sure, students will
enjoy a few days to catch up on a
project, go shopping, read, go to
the beach or just relax.
For those who have no plans,
here are some suggestions from
other ECU students:
� Rent movies all weekend.
� Read magazines and drink
cappuccino at Barnes & Nobles.
� Get together with two other
friends and rent a stripper.
� Adopt a kitten (the love will
last long past vacation).
� Buy a new outfit from Dapper
Dan's.
� Go on a picnic.
� Get something tattooed or
pierced.
� Go to the Greenville Museum
of Art (located on Evans Street
across from Ham's) and see the
latest exhibition.
� See Almost Famous starring
Billy Crudup and Kate Hudson.
� Blackwood Salon offers the
trendiest of hairstyles and massages
to renew one's whole aura. Prices
are reasonable.
� The Travel-Adventure Series
continues on Tuesday, Oct. 24 with
a trip to the Falkland Islandes. Buy
tickets 3 days in advance. Film
tickets are $6, Dinner tickets are
$12. Call the ECU Central Ticket
Office for more information.
� Be creative at the Fired Works
Cafe. Paint a picture frame, vase,
plate or teapot prepare to spend
at least $20.
� Write all of those people that
haven't heard from you in a while.
�Work on Halloween cos-
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For those people who decide
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8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
Thursday, October 19, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Mutumbo
out with malaria
Atlanta Hawks
center Dikembe
Mutumbo will sit out
the first few games of
the season with a case
of malaria.
"It's not life threat-
ening; it's not career '
threatening, said Hawks
General Manger, Pete
, Babcock. It sounds terrible, but it's really
. like a bad case of the flu
It is suspected that Mutumbo con-
tracted the disease during a trip to the
Congo in September. The disease is not
contagious and is spread by mosquitoes.
The Hawks open their season on Oct.
31 against Charlotte.
Van Horn out
Fourth-year New
Jersey Nets star, Keith
Van Horn will miss 4-6
weeks with a broken
leg suffered in Tuesday
night's exhibition game
versus Orlando.
The former Utah
standout was going for
a rebound in the second
quarter when he landed awkwardly on his
left leg, breaking his fibula.
Van Horn averaged 19.9 points per
game and 7.8 rebounds last season for the
Nets.
Indiana U. Student
leaves school
Kent Harvey, the Indiana University stu-
dent whose altercation with former Head
Basketball Coach Bobby Knight caused
the coaches ouster, has left Bloomington,
opting to transfer. Harvey and his broth-
ers, Kyle and Kevin, as well as his mother
and step-father have left the state follow-
ing death threats aimed at Kent.
"Let that kid be a student Knight said
during a town hall meeting following his
firing. "Let him get on with life. That kid
is not responsible for me not coaching at
Indiana, and make sure you understand
that
Tyson to
fight tomorrow
Troubled heavy-
weight, Mike Tyson will
step in the ring against
troubled heavyweight
Andrew Golota, Friday
in Detroit. The fight
pairs two of boxing's
dirtiest fighters.
briefs Pirates to take on potent Cardinals
Beamer says Vick could
use one more year
Va.Tech Head Coach
Frank Beamer said
Monday that Heisman
candidate quarterback,
Michael Vick could use
one more year as a
Hokie.
"I don't want to
speak for Michael, but I
think that the decision is
going to mean more than just pure dol-
lars Beamer said. "I think from our con-
versation, he understands that he needs
to continue to improve as a quarterback
before he's ready to use his talent's at the
next level
Vfck is considered among the elite
quarterbacks in all of college football. After
gutdxing the 1999 Hokie team to an 11 -0
record and a spot in the Nokia Sugar
Bowl as a freshman, Vick entered the 2000
season as a Heisman favorite.
Thus far, the redshirt sophomore has
not disappointed as the Hokies are 6-0
and ranked No. 2 in the nation.
Defense in for long
night after short week
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
The last time ECU took the field on
a Thursday night, the result was a 45-28
loss to Va. Tech. The last time the Pirates
went up against a conference foe on
the road, the result was a 17-10 loss
to Memphis. Tonight, the Pirates get a
chance to redeem themselves on both
counts with a trip to Louisville, Ky.
"I think this is just a good time for us
to come out, Thursday night, conference
game, make some things happen, try to
erase some of this, Thursday night 'we
can't win stuff said quarterback David
Garrard. "If we keep our heads straight,
we'll come out to a good start and we'll
come out with a victory
The second loss, to Memphis, was
costly because it put the Pirates a game
behind the leaders in C-USA. If the
Pirates want to return to Memphis for
the Liberty Bowl with a conference title
in hand, the loss gives them no margin
for error.
"We need to stay right on the win-
ning side of things if we're going to try
to do something in this conference
said Head Coach Steve Logan. "We
don't have any room for error after the
Memphis loss
Louisville is third in a stretch of five
straight conference games on the Pirates'
schedule.
"No more errors, especially no more
losses said linebacker Antwane Yelver-
ton. "We're trying to stay in it. We know
we can't come up short anymore
In addition to exorcising the demons
of Thursday night games and road tests,
the game will also give the Pirates an
opportunity to get the fast start that has
eluded them in their last few games.
"We're just going to have to get out
there to a good game early Garrard said.
"A fast start is going to be key this week.
Hopefully we can keep their offense off
the field as far as our defense, try and
help them out a little bit, try to run the
ball a little bit and keep the clock on our
side. Probably the best way to stop them
is to keep the offense off the field
Getting off to fast starts has not been
a problem for Louisville. In their five
wins, the Cardinals have averaged 41.8
points per game.
"When you watch Louisville on film,
you think that you'd better score some
points Logan said. "It's not going to
be a low scoring game. You're going to
have to match the points that they put
on the board
Behind quarterback Dave Ragone,
who was named C-USA Offensive Player
of the Week after a 227-yard performance
against UAB, the Cardinals have bolted
to a 5-1 record. Their quick start is due in
part to their use of a wide open passing
attack.
"They're going to complete their
passes Logan said. "They're going to
complete 60 percent against whoever
they play. You've just got to be patient
and not panic
The Cardinals will also test the Pirate
defense with their no huddle offensive
set. With only five days since the Pirates'
last game, the offense should be a test
for the defense's legs.
"It's a no huddle deal, so we're going
to be pretty busy on Thursday night. It's
going to be a lot of running because they
do a lot of passing Yelverton said.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
7 p.m tonight, Louisville, Ky.
Thursday,
www.thee
0
fc
Pit
��mMt
tonight, (file photo)
Cross country takes top two
spots at State Championships
Pernell Griffin, still suffering from a knee injury, will suit up but not play against Louisville
England, Will
go first, second
Kyle Bares
STAFF WRITER
LCU placed both the
men's and women's teams
in the top 10 at the annual
North Carolina Intercol-
legiate Cross Country
State Championships and
gained some respect with
very good running this
weekend.
The men finished third
overall behind North Car-
olina and Duke, but the
greatest story in the meet
came from two of the
Pirate runners, Seniors
Justin Kngland and Stu
Will who finished first and
second overall.
This is the second time
in three years that Eng-
land and Will have taken
the first two spots in the
"Finishing first and second is something we had
done two years ago, and coming back to do it again
this year feels really good
lustln England
ECU Cross Country
State Championship meet,
accomplishing a feat that
spotlights them in the
history of ECU running.
"Justin and Stu accom-
plished something that is
very rare in a meet such as
this one said men's and
women's cross country
Head Coach Len Klepack.
"I'm extremely proud of
the way they ran, and
think they deserve full rec-
ognition for these achiev-
ments
England's time of
25:32 was his season best,
and Will finished the race
only five seconds behind
with a time of 25:37.
"It's great to do so well
in a big meet like this
England said. "Finishing
first and second is some-
thing we had done two
years ago, and coming
back to do it again this
year feels really good
Will and England,
both seniors, have been
running together for four
years.
"It's been great having
Stu on the team all four
years England said.
"Having someone right
there in practice and
meets as well that pushes
you and is that competi-
tive definitely makes a dif-
ference. 'This was a great
race. Coming off a red-
shirt year and doing this
well has really been pleas-
ing.
The Lady Pirates ful-
filled their expectations by
finishing in a tie for fifth
overall, with Davidson
and placing two women in
the top 10 individually.
Junior Abrial Hayes
was the leading runner for
the women's team with
a time of 19:12 and a
ninth place finish overall,
a season and career best
for Hayes in the 5k event.
Sophomore Kay Livick fin-
ished in 10th place overall,
seven seconds behind her
teammate, 19:19.
"Against the compe-
tition that we faced, it
was very satisfying to see
our runners do so well
Klepack said. "I was very
pleased with the perfor-
mance of both of our
teams and the overall
results
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu
Women's golf
gets second
place
Krasny leads Pirate
charge at Cougar Invitational
Central T
R E TI R f M EI
Scott Lange
STAFF WRITER
Volleyball has mixed results on road trip
The Lady Pirates golf team continued their
inaugural season with a second place finish at
the Cougar Invitational Tuesday, Oct. 10 In
Mt. Pleasant, S.C.
The team fought hard in the cold and windy
weather while they
We don't have
enough experience
to beat a top-SO
team like Charles-
ton on its home
course
Kevin Williams
Head Coach, ECU Golf
ECU beats CAA's top team,
falls to George Mason
Ryan Downey
SENIOR WRITER
The Pirate volleyball team had a tough loss and a
victory this weekend, losing to George Mason on the
road but beating American, the CAA's top team.
The mixed results on the road trip pushed the Pirates
to 12-6 in the season.
The win Friday night over
the 32nd ranked Eagles was the
first in 10 matches against, and
featured a heroic come back.
After being down two games to
none, the Pirates were able to
battle back and win the match
3-2. In that match, the Pirates were forced to only their
second, fifth game tie breaker match.
"This was a great victory for this program and
especially for our seniors, who had never beaten
American said first-year Head Coach Colleen Farrell.
"To go on the road and fall behind 2-0 and then win the
final three games is amazing. We played as well as any
time this season and it was a total team effort
The loss to George Mason, the first to a ,CAA foe
this season, came the next morning with the Pirates
fighting fatigue and another road crowd.
"We didn't play well early in the match and by the
time we started to come around, It was too little too
By the time we started to
come around, it was too little too late,
Colleen Farrell
. Head Coach, ECU Volleyball
late Farrell said. "I think we were still thinking a little
about last night's win and it affected us. But give credit
to George Mason, as the Patriots played a greal match
and have some outstanding players
This was an important stretch for the Pirates. It was
their second road weekend out of three. The Pirates
will be on the road again this Friday to playJMU whom
the Pirates defeated in Greenville earlier this season.
The team remains positive.
"We had a pretty decent weekend. I was proud
of our win over American and I was also proud of
our performance against American said middle
hitter I.ucinda Mason. "1 think
fatigue played a factor in the
loss against GMU
The win over American was
the first for the four seniors,
who have been part of a rebirth
for Pirate Volleyball this year.
They have been exorcising
many demons along the way this season. After this
weekend, which will be their last on the road until
mid-November, after which the team will be home for
six of seven games.
"I thought we took a big step up when we beat
American, then we kind of back tracked against George
Mason when we play them at home on Nov. 3 said
senior outside hitter Cinta Claro.
The Pirates will be in action Friday and Saturday in
Virginia against JMU and Radford.
This writer can be contacted at rdowney@tec.ecu.edu
were there. The team
was only one stroke
back when entering
the final round but
the host school, the
College of Charles-
ton, was able to pull
away on the last
day. The Cougars,
the defending tour-
nament champions,
finished 16 strokes
ahead of the
Pirates.
"As a team we struggled a little in the end, but
I was pleased with how we competed overall
said Head Coach Kevin Williams. "But we don't
have enough experience to beat a top-50 team
like Charleston on its home course
The team was led by freshman Jessica Krasny
who is from Summersville, S.C. right outside
of Charleston. She was able to take home her
first-ever individual title shooting an even par
72 on the final day.
"I struck the ball well and on the back nine
of all three rounds putts started to fall for me
Krasny said. "It was great winning near my
home on a course I am familiar with
"1 am pleased for Jessica to do so well,
especially here because this is her home
Williams said.
Also turning in strong performances were
freshman Ashley l.eornard who tied for third,
and freshman Alyssa Hayes who finished 19th
overall.
The strong finish comes after the Pirates
captured their first-ever tournament title at
the Lady Pirate Fall Intercollegiate tournament
in Greenville the week before. They were able
to finish two strokes ahead of Weber State for
the victory.
The Lady Pirates will next be in action Oct.
23 and 24 at the Great Smokies Women's Golf
Championship in Waynesville, N.C. Western
Carolina University will be hosting the tourna-
ment.
This writer can be contacted at slange@tec.ecu.edu
Year in
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ctober 19, 2000
rts@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 19, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 9
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Open tryouts
for Lady
Pirates
Basketball
Thursday, October 19th
2p.m. Minges Coliseum
Crevelier's wins highlight
Pirate performance
Men's tennis squad takes on Wolfpack
Ryan Rockwell
STAFF WRITER
The men's tennis team had a
solid performance this past week-
end in the N.C. State Invitational
tournament. The weekend was
highlighted by freshman Julien
Crevelier's outstanding play against
his nationally ranked opponents.
Crevelier finished the weekend
third in the Flight A singles bracket
with a win over Eric Jackson of
N.C. State on Sunday. Crevelier also
won over Andreas Mardbrink of
Campbell University, and Jackson,
the number one and two seeds of
the tournament, respectively.
Crevelier defeated Jackson,
ranked 73rd in the nation by the
Intercollegiate Tennis Association
(ITA), in straight sets (6-3), (6-0).
On Friday, the opening day of
the tournament, Crevelier defeated
the ITA'S 71st ranked Mardbrink.
ECU also received top-flight
performances from sophomore
Brad Sullivan, who finished third
in the Flight C bracket and senior
Oliver Thalen, who won three out
of four matches for the weekend.
Seniors Dustin Hall and Michael
Huez played their way into the
finals of the Flight D bracket. How-
ever, Coach Tom Morris declined
to have them play.
Hall, the team's captain, and
Huez have not lost in singles com-
petition since the September ECU
Invitational Tournament.
In doubles, Crevelier and Sul-
livan finished fifth in Flight A with
an 8-1 win over Maryland's Chris
Chiv and Larry Choa.
ECU'S Jon Walton and Thalen
defeated UNC-W's Lee Bailey and
Scott Curry to win the Flight C
doubles.
In Flight D doubles, Hall and
Huez finished second after losing
to Elon's Mike Prelec and Chad
York.
Coach Morris was very pleased
with the team's performance in the
N.C. State Invitational. The Pirates
finished the weekend with an 18-7
record in singles and 7-2 record in
doubles.
"I was very pleased with the
way we played up and down the
lineup Morris said. "It was a very
solid performance
Morris singled out Crevelier as
being "the most outstanding in
beating the number one and two
seeds in the tournament
The native Frenchman, Crev-
elier is having a great fall and is
already considered the team's top
player according to Morris.
Crevelier revealed that he was
not at all intimidated by the highly
ranked opposition of the past week-
end.
"Since I am a freshman and this
is the beginning of the season, I
didn't really know their level. So It
was just another match Crevelier
said.
With senior leadership from
Thalen, Huez, and Hall and the:
emergence of Crevelier, Morris Is:
optimistic about his team's chances:
for a good season.
"We've done some things well"
this fall Morris said. "I feel we will
be better than last year's team
The team squeaked out a win
ning season last spring with a 16-15:
overall record and a 2-6 CAA mark.
The team now looks forward to.
the start of the regular season in.
January optimistically.
"Our goals are to improve in.
the conference standings from last.
year and improve from last year's
record Morris said.
The team finishes preseason
play at the Clemson Invitational
Oct. 27-29.
This writer can be contacted
at rrockwell@tec. ecu. edu.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
MARCUS DOfiffiTS TJ510
against Louisville
PIANIST MAOCUS BOMS OCUMMtD JASON MACSAIIS
BASSISI BOUND GlIUIN 0N( COM NIUIT01 JAZZ
Friday, October 20, 2000 8:00 p.m.
Wright Auditorium
Discount rtdem available mrli a valij ECU One Cud until 6 p.m.
on day of event, providing tickets retrain.
ADVANCE SIUMNMIO
(ACUtTY STAKS17
WMlCAI llff 00011 U0.M
CVnirai Ticket Office 2S2-S2S-47&H, I -800-bCU-AKTS VTTY: 252-328-47.16
ut l-HOO-ECU-AKI'S, Monday - Friday. &30 a.m. 6:00 fun.
www.cai.cdiimcndenliaUt'aiamshtml
Society for
Advancement of
Management (JAM)
will be pre-selling barbeque plates from 1019
to 10 i. Cost isa plate and they con be
picked ip at the BB&I leadership patio area in
�( on Nov. J from 12-2.
Travel - Adventure Film and Theme Dinner Series
The I a I k lands Refuge in the Sea
,
(oil UUU ti place orders or see any SUM member ir
e-mail HflrrisMi@mdilmedi
It's a wild life out
there, but somebody's
got to live it.
All-You-Can Kat Menu: Crisp
mixed green salad with cucum-
ber, lettuce, and tomato, and
C jtalin.i dressing, grilled seabass
with dill butter; chicken breast
with confetti peppers, vegetable
medley with assorted herbs;
Potatoes Anna (casserole with
parsley); raisin scones; creme
orulee Deadline to make dinnet
reservations October 19.
Mendcnhall Student Center,Tuesday, October 24, 2000 p.m. & 7:10 p.m
HendrixTheatre; Dinner 6 p.m Great Room
Central Ticket Office
rilnu arc free to students with a valid fcCU Onr !
Gttrd Student dinner tickets arc $12.00, Staff and
Faculty film tickets arc $6 00. and Staff and Faculty 252"328'4788. 1-800-ECU-
dmncr tickets arc $18.00 To reserve student dinner ARTS VTTY; 252-328-4736
tickets visit the CTO in Mendenhall Student Center m , -SooECU ARTS, Monday
hy August 31 and pay with cash, check, credit card, I
mca! card, or declining balance �' 8:3� ���� ' P �"��
RETIREMENT INSURANCE MUTUAL FUND
V.iHiH.MIH
tional
nucd their
:e finish at
Oct. 10 In
and windy
1't have
wience
top-SO
harles-
home
'iams
;CU Golf
e end, but
I overall
: we don't
)-50 team
ca Krasny
t outside
lome her
even par
ack nine
for me
near my
so well,
home
ces were
or third,
led 19th
! Pirates
title at
rnament
'ere able
State for
Ion Oct.
n'sGolf
Western
tourna-
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Thursday, October 19, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian 10
ads@tec.ecu.edu
1 BR-2BR. water & cable included.
DW & disposal. ECU bus line, pool &
pvt. laundry. On-site mgmt. & main-
tenance. 9 or 12 mo. leases. Pets
allowed. 758-4015.
ONE BEDROOM, one bath apartment
for rent $325. Park West take over
lease. Dishwasher, ceiling fans, and
icemaker included. Please call Renisha
329-1034 or 353-3984.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom & Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Spring Break
Bahamas Party Cruise! 5 days $279!
Includes meals, parties! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Departs Florida!
Get group - go free! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAA! SPRING Break Specials! Can-
cun & Jamaica from $389! Air, hotel,
free meals, drinks! Award winning
company! Group leaders free! Florida
vacations $129! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
SERVICES
201 N. Summit St Charming home
completely remodeled 3-4 BR. 2B
fenced in yard for rent. $800month.
Must see! Available, call 752-9816
before 9pm
ROOMMATE WANTED
ONE BEDROOM own bath. $200 plus
13 utilities close to campus and
downtown Please call 752-5886
MALE OR Female wanted to share
three bedroom luxury apt. on top of
BW-3s Rent $333 and Portion of
Utilities. No Deposit. 412-1908.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed begin-
ning January, one-half rent and utilities
at Pirate's Place. Contact Elizabeth
252-823-1882.
US DIVERS Scuba Equipment: Ladies
BC, matrix, regulator, octopus, knife,
bag. majk. fins, snorkel, weightbelt.
Perfect Christmas gift! $800obo.
Call Meg at 329-1022.
1-2 NONSMOKING female room-
mates for house near ECU. Fenced
in backyard with washer and dryer
Upperclassmen or graduate preferred
Call 757-2556 after 5pm.
FOR SALE
COMPAQ PRESARIO 2200 computer,
15" monitor, 56k modem. Upgrade-
able 64mb RAM. Includes $800 soft-
ware. Office 2000 professional. Visual
Basic 5.0. Asking only $600. Call Jud
754-2435. after 3 p.m.
PITBULL PUPPIES, champion blood
lines, first shots, dewormed. UKC,
ADBA. registered Parents on site
Great companion pet Males and
females available. Many colors avail-
able Deposits accepted. 412-1908
f
ARE YOU AN
ORGAN DONOR?
MOT f TOO HAVEH-T T01B YOU FAJWRT
f fltwvyntiriiirt rwg ' 800 339-SHAfK
BO
PROFESSIONAL TYPING: Attention
Professors, students and staff. Will do
all typing, last minute, term papers,
and manuscripts etcReasonable
rates. All work is letter perfect Please
call 439-0088
PHOTOGRAPHY. HAVE a photog-
rapher at your event, or party.
View and order photos on the
web. Call Coastal Photography at
252-641-1600 www.coastal-photogra-
phy.com ez101@rocketmail.com
ENGLISH TUTOR Retired prof will
tutor you in English. Just $18hr.local
561-7358 or (252)617-9082. Or visit
Exact. 111 E. 3rd St Greenville E-mail:
proofread 1 Wearthlink.net
HELP WANTED
YOUTH BASKETBALL Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting 12 to 16
part-time youth basketball coaches
for the winter youth basketball pro-
gram. Applicants must possess some
knowledge of the basketball skills and
have the ability and patience to work
with youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 7-18,
in basketball fundamentals Hours
range from 3 p.m until 7 p.m. with
some night and weekend coaching.
This program will run from the end
of November to mid-February. Salary
rates start at $5 15 per hour. For
more information, please call Ben
James, Judd Crumpler or Dean Foy
at 329-4550 after 2 p.m.
GOLDEN CORRAL is hiring part &
full-time in all positions. Benefits
available. Apply 24pm. Mon-Thur at
504 SW Greenville Blvd. No phone
calls please!
FEDEX GROUND Package Handlers.
AM sort positions starting at $750hr
Guarenteed Periodic Advances. Apply
at 2410 United De. Greenville. NC
27834 (Off Staton Rd )
SPRING BREAK reps needed to prom-
ote campus trips Earntravel free!
No cost. We train you. Work on
your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www.springbreakdirect.com
RAISE $1600-$7000 Get free caps,
T-shirts 6 phone cards! This one week
fundraiser requires no investment and
a small amount of time from you or
your club. Qualified callers receive a
free gift just for calling. Call today at
1-800-808-7442 x 80.
HELP WANTED
GO DIRECT-$savings! 1 Internet-
based Spring Break company offering
Wholesale Spring Break Packages (no
middlemen)! Zero traveler complaints
last year! Lowest price guarantee!
1-800-367-1252 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
SEEKING FIELD Hockey coach for
Girls' Varsity team (7-12th grade)
at Parrot Academy in Kinston. Paid
position If interested, please call
Lydia Rotondo at 329-8080
PART-TIME waitress and hostess
positions now available at Hong Kong
King Buffet. (Corner of Memorial
and Village.) Apply in Person or call
758-9331.
PART TIME help needed for local
cleaning company. Must be reliable
and dependable and have transporta-
tion. Valid driver's license required.
Night hours, some travel to Kinston
required. 321-6599
COMPUTER LAB Assistant needed
for maintaining the Athletic Student
Development computer labs located
in Ward Sports Med building and
Scales Field House. Responsibilities
include: serve as contact for servicing
needs, troubleshoot the labs, assist
students in the use of computers and
software programs, maintain com-
puter and printer supplies, and keep
labs neat and orderly. Qualifications:
Must be proficient in Windows NT, 95.
98. Microsoft Office. Internet. Adobe
PageMaker 6.5, Adobe Photoshop
5.5. and various other applications
Evening work required. Mon-Thur
7-10pm 7$hr Contact: Jennifer
Sawyer 254 Ward Sports Mod Build.
328-4550.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS open imme-
diately at Cypress Glenn Retirement
Community. Hrs. 11-2pm (MonFn.)
Pay is above minimum wage and is
close to ECU campus (off 5th St.)
Gam lots of skills and experience. If
interested please call Jim Sakell or
Anna Williams at 830-0713.
THERMAL-GARD is currently seeking
highly motivated, energetic individ-
uals to join our growing team! We
are looking for full and part-time
employees for our Call Center. Our
benefits include: salary & bonus
checks, paid training, daily incentives
& weekly prizes, $50 for good
attendance. Blue Cross Blue Shields
insurance and great work environ-
ment. Better call now because these
positions will be filled soon and you
will have missed out on this excellent
opportunity. Call: 355-0210.
GREEK PERSONALS
CHI OMEGA, thanks for all the hard
work that was put into Homecoming!
You girls managed to pull off another
excellent week. The brothers of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Epsilon
Sigma Alpha on first place in the
float competition and second place
in the banner competition. "Who let
the dogs out?"
ALPHA XI Delta, last Thursday at
Cabbana's was a blast Thanks for the
good times and we look forward to
the next one The brothers of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like to
thank Aelisch. Amanda, and Aaron for
all their hard work with Homecoming
2000!
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like to
congratulate all their new members
on Pledge Pinning. Great job and
keep smiling!
OTHER
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: come check
out Circle K, community service organ-
ization. Mondays at 7p.m. in room
221 in Mendenhall Student Center;
e-mail: Mebette@hotmail.com
$100 REWARD for information lead-
ing to return and prosecution of
removal of three Wrought Iron lawn
seats from yard in Ayden Please con-
tact M J House at (252)756-0148.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
JUST A reminder that the next
National Society of Collegiate Scholars
chapter meeting is Thursday, October
19th at 6:30pm in the General Class-
room Building Room 1026.
OPEN TRYOUTS for Lady Pirates Bas-
ketball. Thursday Oct. 19th 2pm at
Minges.
INTENDED CSDI Majors: All General
College students who intend to major
in the Department ol Communication
Sciences and Disorders and have
Mrs. Meta Downes as their advisor
are to meet on Wednesday. Novem-
ber 1 at 5:00pm in room 101 of the
Carol Belk building Advising for
early registration will take place at
that time Please prepare a tentative
class schedule before the meeting.
Bring Taking Charge. Your Academic
Planner, and use the worksheet to
develop your schedule.
One environment.
One simple Way to eare for it.
Earth Share
www.earthshare.ore
INTERMEDIATE RACQUETBALL CLI-
NIC Oct.30-Nov 20, Mondays
8:00pm-9:00pm Come and enhance
your current skills and learn new ones.
All equipment is provided The cost
is FREE to members. $5nonmem
and registration is Oct.9-30. For more
information please call 328-6387
ADVERTISE HERE. IT WORKS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
CLIMBING Oct.27-29. Linville Gorge.
Table Rock in Linville Gorge will be
focused on multi-pitch climbs to get
you even higher off the deck. Cost of
the trip is $65 and the registration
deadline is Oct.20. For more informa-
tion please call 328-6387.
REGISTRATION FOR General College
Students: General college students
should contact their advisers the
week of October 30November 3 to
make arrangements for academic
advising for Spring Semester 2001.
Early registration week is set for
November 6-10.
SUMMER ADVENTURE. Give yourself
Italy and Greece in Summer 2001 and
earn ECU college credits in the pro-
cess Inexpensive group rates. Schol-
arships available. For more informa-
tion, email mercerc@mail.ecu.edu or
call 3284310 and leave a message.
MOCK MCAT presented by AED on
Nov 4th from 9am-1pm. If interested
call 328-3234 by Oct. 25th. Cost
$5.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing,
Handmade Silver
Jewelry k More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-1750
Dunn Iriuiiulihin li.uk door
in n.irkin lot .11 rim Irnm I In Elhu
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
WWW.CAROLINASKYSPORTS.COM
OOOWmnero'Bl.f Ow trwprttt Artrd t ol s
bum UfWH Ret09nj� iar 0MHM f Ik, by CB88 � 1�f
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
S UW - MM MUM � t'tt PWW � MCMM Ivtt
Florida $119
r ghb � nm c. tartm. Swti Bum
Jamaica $439
Cancun $399
7 light, � ft HMrt � Fret fod A 30 Hr� el Dtwto
springfareaktnvcl.com - Our 14th Year!
1-800-678-6386
Quick Tabs 1 Hour $0� QC
Emergency Flush LJ.iJyJ
Available at Healthy Habits Health
Food Store. 111 W Firetower. Rd
New-Massage Therapy-1 hr (
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SPRING BREAK 2001
Jamaica, Cancun. Florida. Barbados, Bahamas.
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ALL INCLUSIVE TRIP TO EXPLORE
OBX SURFING AT ITS BEST!
DATE: NOVEMBER 17-19
COST: $65
REGISTER BY NOVEMBER 10.
am
Ti?rTiiTv3
328-8387
East Carolina
University
Dining
Services
We Need Your Help!
The Campus Dining Team
is Looking for
Grill Cooks,
General Utility Help and
Catering Waitstaff
Enjoy Flexible Schedules,
Free Meals and
Extra Cash!
Apply at Mendenhall
10 am - 4 pm Mon-Fri
For people
who cant see
well, here are
some things
to look into.
There are services and devices
that can help people make the
most of the vision they have
Call for a free booklet:
1-877 LOW VISION
(1-877-569-8474)
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Women with Irregular
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'Acne
If you are interested, please call Jennifer at Down East Medical Associates at
247-2013, ex 3002 for addiuonal information about this study.


Title
The East Carolinian, October 19, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 19, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1437
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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