The East Carolinian, October 12, 2000






berl 0,2000
3Hec.ecu.edu
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1.13-15 at Ocra-
iss Eastern North
ort of choice. The
15 and the regis-
Oct.6. For more
all 328-6387.
ication deadline.
in applying for
School of Social
to submit appli-
16. Applications
de of Ragsdale
iny questions or
ill Mrs. Patricia
ARED" The ECU
ng on its annual
Haunted Forest
to have sweet
ht in the forest,
seball field. Oct.
n. $3.00 admis-
en under 10.
QSAVINGS
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57 days to go
until Graduation
NEWSBRIEFS
Homecoming
Activities tor Homecoming begin with
"Freeboot Friday an outdoor event at
Reade Circle and Cotanche Street, spon-
sored by the Uptown Greenville Associa-
tion and the ECU Alumni Association. It
begins at 5:30 p.m. Friday, Oct. 13 and
continues until 7 p.m. Admission is free.
Afterwards, the Alumni Association will
honor Outstanding Alumni at its dinner
and awards ceremony in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. This event requires tickets.
For information call: 1 -800-ECU-CRAD or
328-4902. Visiting alumni are invited to a
brunch that starts at 8:30 a.m. Saturday,
Oct. 14 at the Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
Center. The Homecoming Parade is at 10
a.m. along 5th Street.
Pirate football
The ECU v. Army football game will
kickoff at 7 p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14 at
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium.
Presentation
For over 25 years, Jane Elliot, a former
teacher from Iowa, has led a fight against
prejudice. Her work has been the subject
of three award-winning films: Eye of the
Storm, Eye of the Beholder and Blue Eyed,
and she has been featured on such televi-
sion programs as "Oprah NBC's "Today
"The Tonight Show "ABC News" and
PBS' "Frontline
She will bring her live presentations-
"The Anatomy of Prejudicewhich con-
tends that a white person who has been
raised and socialized in America has been
conditioned to be racist, to ECU'S Wright
Auditorium at 6 p.m. tonight. The pro-
gram is open to the public. Contact: Toya
Sanders at ECU department of human
resources at 328-0119.
Recital
Paul Tardif, a member of the ECU piano
faculty, will perform at 8 p.m. tonight in A.
). Fletcher Recital Hall. The concert will rec-
ognize Tardif as the recipient of the Career
Award for Excellence in Research and Cre-
ative Activity and his designation as an
ECU Distinguished Professor of Music. The
public is invited.
Male auction
Gamma Sigma Sigma, a national ser-
vice sorority, will hold their 10th Annual
Pick-A-Pirate male auction at 8 p.m. Tues-
day, Oct. 17 at the Attic in downtown
Greenville. All proceeds will go to the
American Diabetes Association. Tickets go
on sale beginning at 11 a.ml p.m. today
through Tuesday, Oct. 17 in front of the
Wright Place. Tickets are $3 in advance
and $4 at the door.
0NLINESURVEY
Will you vote on
the upcoming bond
referendum?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Would you take part in the Peer
Mentor Program?
50 Yes
50 No
SPORTSA9
Local prodoucts thrive in Pirates
Programs.
FEATURESA6
Health wellness: Learn to alleviate
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Homecoming Court 2000 introduced
King and Queen
to be announced
during Army game
The members of this
year's Homecoming Court
were announced at a
reception Wednesday eve-
ning.
A group of candidates,
nominated by several reg-
istered ECU student orga-
nizations for King or
Queen, were narrowed
down to the final 10 who
are now officially mem-
bers of the F.CU Home-
coming Court. The five
men and five women are
all either currently reg-
istered, full-time under-
graduate or graduate stu-
dents and have a cumula-
tive grade point average
of at least 2.5.
The court will also
be introduced at 1'iratef-
est, the Homecoming pep
rally, at 8 p.m. Friday,
Oct 13 in the Menden-
hall Student Center (MSC)
Brickyard. The King and
Queen will be announced
at half-time during the
upcoming Pirate football
game against Army at 7
p.m. Saturday, Oct. 14.
The King and Queen
will be the male and
female court members
who receive the highest
number of votes.
To find out more about
Homecoming activities
check out www.ecu.edu
Homecoming.
DeborahJustin M.JustinJonathanNicole C.
AndersonBaileyBrownCyrusFarrell
Undecided, currentlyEnglish major, wasExercise physiologyExercise physiologyAudiology speech pathol
serves on the leadershipnamed the ECU Ambas-major, is a member ofmajor, has been varsityogy major, has been a
team of Campus Crusadesador of the YearChi Omega Social Soror-captain of the F.CUvarsity member for two
for Christ and also vol-(1997-1998). He hasity and Sigma Alphacheerleaders for the pastyears and has partici-
unteers at the Unitedaccumulated over 500Epsilon fraternity.two years and donatespated in local parades
Cerebral Palsy Center.hours of community service.time to the Boys and Girls Club.and appearances.
Celeste
Lassiter
Communications major,
is a member of Chi
Omega. She has partici-
pated in March of Dimes.
Jennifer
McCloskey
Occupational therapy
major, is a member of the
ECU Ambassadors and
has been an active par-
ticipant in the Walk for a
CURE.
Mike Orr
Financephilosophy pre-
law major, is the soph-
omore class president
and the Chi Phi frater-
nity president. He also
donated time to the Red
Cross Hurricane Relief.
Daniel
Shrade
Physics major, is a
member of the Campus
Crusade for Christ Stu-
dent Leadership Team
and a member of Gamma
Beta Phi honorservice
fraternity.
Christina
Yarbrough
Marketing major, is
currently the ECU
National Panhellenic
Council president and
helps out at Cypress Glen
Retirement Community.
Big Money
A Blanket of Banners
Wednesday morning, Chancellor Richard Eakin
accepted a $100,000 contribution to the Community
College and University Bond Campaign provided by
Blue Cross Blue Shield of North Carolina. If passed,
the bond will upgrade all 59 community colleges and
all 16 North Carolina universities. ECU would receive
$190.6 million of the $3.1 billion Community College
and University bond, (photos by John Stowe)
1. Students admire this year's entries for Homecoming banners. The banners were displayed Wednesday at the
Mendenhall Brickyard for judging. The winner will be announced on Friday evening at Piratefest.
. All organizations were eligable to enter a banner with their interpretation of this year's theme "H2K ECU
Celebrates Cartoons Here, quarterback David Garrard and teammates watch their cartoon pregame show
. Campus Crusade for Christ submitted their entry of the Rintstones doning proper ECU attire (photos
by John Stowe)





2 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
NEWS
Thursday, October 12, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday,
www.thee
ECU employer accused
of sexual harassment
Investigation into
charges remains
on-going
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
A sexual harassment charge is
currently under investigation after
an employee claimed she was fired
for a report claiming her supervisor
made sexual advances toward her.
Geraldine Teel, a housekeeper
at ECU, alleges that her supervisor
sexually harassed her several times
and that she was terminated for
filing a complaint. Teel claimed
that she made a verbal complaint to
Richard Highsmith of Housekeep-
ing Services on Sept. 18. According
to ECU officials, she was fired on
Sept. 21 for poor performance. A
letter of termination was sent to
her that she claims was a result of
her complaints.
The letter stated that the super-
visor pointed out several respon-
sibilities that Teel needed to
improve.
"While you completed these
tasks, you also complained to a
senior supervisor that you consid-
ered the instructions to be a form of
harassment the letter said.
On Sept. 22, Teel filed a com-
plaint with the campus Equal
Employment Office. Since then,
she has also filed complaints with
the University Equal Employment
Office and the North Carolina State
Commission.
"Ms. Clayton received the com-
plaint from Ms. Teel the day after
her termination said University
Attorney Ben Irons. "The case is
under an on-going investigation
and we absolutely do not terminate
people on actions related to sexual
harassment
Teel is the second employee
in the past year to file an official
complaint against this supervisor.
Janice Spellman, another house-
keeper, claimed that the supervisor
on several occasions touched her
breasts, pressed his groin against
her and made sexually explicit
remarks. Both women said that
he reminded them several times
that their jobs depended on him
and wrote them up or gave them
extra work when they resisted his
advances.
After allegations made by Spell-
man were not substantiated, the
University's Equal Employment
Opportunity Office transfered her
to a different work area where
she would work under a different
supervision.
Spellman requested that the case
be reinvestigated and additional
witness interviews be conducted.
After the thorough review, it was
concluded that the supervisor was
innocent.
Housekeeping Services declined
to comment on either issue.
"I think it's important to keep
the two cases separate said Taffye
Benson Clayton, University Equal
Employment Officer. "They are
separate issues even though they
involve the same individual
"It's about my dignity Teel
said. "It's about my respect as a
woman. They're not going to take
that from me. I'm not going to let
them take that from me
(Mm
0cL9
Larceny-A staff member reported her purse was stolen from an
unsecured office in the Messick Building. The purse was later found.
Larceny-A staff member reported an amount of money was stolen
from a safe in Mendenhall Student Center.
Larceny-A non-student reported a class ring was stolen from a
display table set up in the Wright Place.
Damage to Property-A student reported the driver's side of her
vehicle was damaged while parked in Lot 3 on Reade Street.
Larceny-A staff member reported his parking decal was stolen
from his vehicle while it was parked in the lot south of Christenbury
Gymnasium.
Harassing Phone Calls-A student in Clement Hall reported
receiving a harassing phone call that was sexual in nature.
Expired Registration-A student was issued a state citation for
displaying an expired registration.
OctIO
Expired Registration-A non-student was issued a state citation
for displaying an expired registration during a traffic stop at the
Intersection of 10th Street and College Hill Drive.
Health Professions Career Information Seminar
Thursday, October 19,2000
244 Mendenhall Student Center
3:30-6:00 pjn.
Ai Students Interested in Health Professions Should Attend!
Sponsored by OKce of Undergraduate Studies and ECU Academic Departments
University
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tober12, 2000
K@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolirtian.com
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@tec.ecu.edu
T.FI I I II AR Z PAfMf-
WO WIRES CONSULTANTS
"My RooM(V)ae VeVer No Credit, Cellular & Paging
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Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Monday - rndjy: 7:30 am 700pm � SalurOjy �00a m. - 30p.m
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HOMECOMING SPECIALS
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Class Ring Sale
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No coupon necessary. Discounts not valid with any
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Join Us For
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Think about it.
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For a free article on this ad, please call
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Sponsored by Every Student's Choice
Duke to look again at same-sex ceremonies in chapel
DURHAM (AP)-A committee
will study whether Duke University
should allow same-sex commit-
ment ceremonies in the campus
chapel after student leaders say bar-
ring them violates school policy.
Duke President Nan Keohane
announced the formation of the
committee following the fall meet-
ing of the board of trustees last
weekend.
The Rev. William Willimon,
Duke Chapel's dean, said Monday
the committee would consider
whether Duke should allow the
unions at the Gothic chapel, and
under what terms they should be
celebrated.
Only alumni or those affiliated
with the university can rent the
chapel for a wedding ceremony.
Gay and lesbian commitment cer-
emonies can be held in other areas
of campus such as Sarah P. Duke
Gardens. Same-sex ceremonies are
not recognized as marriages in
North Carolina.
Duke's current policy toward
same-sex unions contradicts the
university's nondiscrimination
policy, which specifically includes
sexual orientation, said Duke stu-
dent government president Jordan
Bazinsky.
"Duke cannot lead the nation in
its educational and diversity merits
without granting every individual
on campus equal rights to its facili-
ties he told the Duke board of
trustees Friday.
Duke student government
released a report on same-sex
unions last week advocating for a
change in chapel policy "so that
all students have access to chapel
usage
The report cited Emory, Harvard
and Stanford universities, all of
which now allow the ceremonies
within their religious facilities.
Duke is historically affiliated
with the United Methodist Church,
although the denomination now
has little control over the univer-
sity. Methodists meeting earlier this
year voted against church ministers
officiating at same-sex ceremonies.
The Duke chapel conducts non-
denominational services. Duke
recognizes 20 different religious
groups on campus, two of which-
the United Church of Christ and
the Unitarians-have experimented
with conducting same-sex unions,
Willimon said.
College kids flunk life's lesson in money matters
CHICAGO (TMS)- This year
Dierdre Kelleher paid off the credit
card debt she ran up while attend-
ing Loyola University in Chicago.
She graduated when she was 21;
she is about to turn 31.
With Discover, MasterCard, Visa
and a handful of department store
credit cards, she peaked at $12,000
in debt.
"I started getting solicited in my
sophomore year she said of credit
card offers. "Then when I moved
into an apartment from student
housing in my junior year, that's
when I started doing the spending.
I wasn't going on big shopping
trips. It was just day-to-day stuff.
Occasionally I'd buy some clothes,
but 1 certainly wasn't dressed to
the nines
Though she often made min-
imum payments on her cards,
she never considered bankruptcy,
because after graduating she wanted
to buy a home, and besides.
Now a middle school teacher at
Emerson School in Oak Park, she
eventually did buy a condominium,
and after eight years of teaching,
she is virtually debt-free, having
sold the condo and living in a home
owned by her family.
"I don't have any credit cards,
and I throw away all credit card
offers And that's her advice to
other college students.
In the spirit of that admoni-
tion, there are moves afoot to
deal with the problem of college
students plunging into credit debt.
From a proposal in Congress to an
educational thrust by the Illinois
treasurer's office, the issue is pop-
ping up on the radar screen.
I-ooking back at her middle-class
upbringing, Kelleher said, she never
had been forced to be responsible
for money as a child.
"I didn't even have an allow-
ance she said. "If I needed it, my
parents bought it
Kelleher's story isn't unusual.
Georgetown University sociologist
Robert Manning has found that
70 percent of undergraduates at
four-year colleges have at least
one credit card, and the average
revolving debt on the cards is more
than $2,000. One-fifth of those
students carry more than $10,000
in debt.
The upshot is this: Parents and
students may agonize over college's
big tickets of tuition and room and
board, never realizing that it is small
stuff put on credit cards that could
sabotage the whole experience.
The Georgetown study found
that in some cases, a parent will
step in to pay off the debt, but in
other cases a student may have to
cut back on classes and work longer
hours to pay off the debt. In the
extreme, students have committed
suicide because they were so deep
in consumer debt, according to the
Consumer Federation of America,
based in Washington, D.C. Large
debt also can handicap a graduate
looking for a job, because employers
conducting background checks will
flinch if the job involves entrusting
large amounts of money to a heav-
ily indebted person, according to
the study.
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The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
DIVERSIONS
Thursday, October 12, 2000
comics@tec.ecu.edu
Thursdaj
www.the
Crossword
mum
You can always accepl j 3jI
whaf you believe Is frue I m
�mi MM i mm
imnmlminwt wwtm(Mltom
But sometimes You need lo concede
to the' jnkn iwn" Ihe 'fatfedfo
lenfion i moment; life may present
gOfherwIse who know
kindofhcfr
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mlghf coococlf
CAPTAIN RlBMAN � Falling In Love
by John SprengclmcyerS Rich Davis
FOWTUNATBLV. AMBRKA'S
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20 Rabble-rouser
22 Male cats
23 Strait of Magellan
archipelago
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29 Superman's
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31 Lakeside
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36 Sci classes
37 In the meantime
38 Be apparently
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39 Be in poor health
40 Unskilled
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51 Reversion of
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52 Ogle
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� 2000 Tntum MMa SarvlCM. Inc
All tights
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1 Own up to
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Speaks candidly about
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4ra�te$s
Monday, October 16, 2000
8:00 pm Hendrix Theater
Free drinks for those who attend
5c
it
7
Tu
University!
Racism is evei
schools, the res
and the streets
A friend ai
with our serv
about its reput
clean dining ai
as friendly as
freely admitti
of the reputa
displace the b
staff "just coul
the clientele. I
rowdy teenager
her eyes and :
"And it's not ju:
It's the punk-ro
After lifting
table, I ignored
stunned for a i
this was not the
made a racist r
ence, but this ti
different. My fi
eyes, raised his
his chin and tilti
to the right: tl
when hearing so
ibly ignorant o
recover.
After a few n
comparison, mj
they think that
Sguz Situ
Dt
Did you knoi
month, Republi
nominee George
by a Pennsylvai
supported the
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states stop domes
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stalking of wome
Not yes or no. He
to send him iniorr
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what this imports
Is this the kii
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Women need a s
and passionate vo
the Democratic pi
need AI Gore!
Did you know
showed that wo
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expand opportunl
He will support lej
this earnings gap.





. jm � BHH I
ctober12, 2000
iics@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
OPINION

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30



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The East Carolinian 5
editon9tec.ecu.edu
Newsroom252.328.6366
Adwrthng252.328.2000
Fax22.328.6558
E rial oDf�i1ec ocu.edu
SpcrtsEOta Uw �widlct, Head Copy Editor
Photo Editor Eatfy Uttft, FouMhead Editor
LmitDesHm lUcht Hofh�, LwiDesfr
Serins FOJ m� 19?5. Ihe Bat Cwukw urns 11.000 cum every Tuesday
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inn ijmnw. XX� W is iho n���i o( ihe cilkw iy�nl and t, wni ion by kUtoi
tod rnerntien. The Cast CaroMan wfcoms letters to Ihe editor when are
wared h) 25 mortis (riMi may he �iier) In necwy or tarty), we reserve
�W� to erjt of meci tetters and all letters must be signed and mode a
wnpnonc rurtmr. lottus may ho am via o mm in orlBfSter.m odu or to Tnc
25 ?Sv.?ukn, H" Huttig. Grwrr NC ?858-43ffl Cat
252C8.Kt(ifi in mor Mrynuton.
OUR VIEW
Some people think
that college stu-
dents don't have
stress. We here at
TEC beg to differ.
Does this sound
familiar
Some people think that college students don't have stress. We here at TEC
beg to differ. Does this sound familiar?
First off I've got a test tomorrow. I've got a project due early next week
and two month's worth of journal entries I've got to write in the next
three hours.
Rent is due. The dog upstairs won't quit barking and my girlfriend is not
helping. I've got friends coming up this weekend and I still don't have enough
football tickets. Where the hell is my ECU One Card?
What is a senior summary, should I have done that by now? And where
do I get one of those?
I hope this class doesn't have an attendance policy. I hope my car has
enough gas to take me to work, and back. Speaking of work, I've got to
be there in 10 minutes.
When I finally come home studying won't be much fun, neither will be
keeping my eyelids open. I hope I can catch the gist of "King Lear it can't
be all that complicated.
What do I need to get to raise a 2.015 to a 2.018?
Seriously I wish that dog would shut up. Hey isn't this how the Son of
Sam guy went nuts?
How do I explain an underage drinking ticket to my parents? "Uh mom,
someone spilled their Bud Ice on me and then asked me to hold it while
they went to get some paper towels I hope that will hold up in court.
It's has to.
Next week I've have to go to the library and figure out where the hell
Proquest is, what the hell it is and how to the hell use it.
My car got towed again, and my friends just think it's funny. I don't have a
Halloween costume and the store is all out of Mullet wigs. Shoot.
I think I bounced some checks somewhere along the way. Who knows, I'll
find out later. What do they mean by 'introductory' rate?
Oh crap, will I get a job after college?
When is registration? I haven't had a declining balance in three years. Do
wings go bad if they've been in the fridge since Hurricane Bonnie?
Now I've got to write this damn column
nu��1o IN MY OPINION
Why good girls like bad guys
MelUAaJueU IN MY OPINION
Turning a deaf ear won't cure ignorance
University of Cincinnati (TMS)-
Racism is everywhere. It's in our
schools, the restaurants we frequent
and the streets we walk on daily.
A friend and I were speaking
with our server at a restaurant
about its reputation of a less-than-
clean dining area. This server was
as friendly as she could be and
freely admitted to the validity
of the reputation. She tried to
displace the blame and said the
staff "just couldn't keep up" with
the clientele. I thought she meant
rowdy teenagers until she lowered
her eyes and said with a smile,
"And it's not just the blacks, either.
It's the punk-rockers, too
After lifting my jaw from the
table, I ignored the server and sat
stunned for a minute. Certainly,
this was not the first time someone
made a racist remark in my pres-
ence, but this time something was
different. My friend squinted his
eyes, raised his eyebrow, dropped
his chin and tilted his head slightly
to the right: the universal look
when hearing something so incred-
ibly ignorant one must pause to
recover.
After a few moments for shock
comparison, my friend said, "Do
they think that just because I'm
white it's okay to say that to me?"
I was not sure which statement
stunned me more. When people I
know utter these types of remarks, I
argue with them, but with strangers,
I've always ignored the situation,
thinking that by remaining silent, I
was actually saying something.
"Maybe I'm just non-confron-
tational I thought.
I tried to convince myself I was
right not to say anything and that
it was the smart thing to do.
Then a few weeks later at an area
McDonald's, I realized my silence
was not a form of protest but tacit
consent. I was waiting for my order
when two white men placed a large
order. After five minutes of wait-
ing, the men started to become
annoyed. Soon, one of the men
peered behind the counter into the
kitchen. He saw a group of more
than 10 people standing around
with only one man working.
The guy mumbled under his
breath, looked at me and said,
"Look at all those brothers back
there watching that one brother
work
My jaw didn't drop, and I didn't
ignore him as I normally would
have.
Instead, I asked him a simple
question, "Do you think because
I'm white that I'm not offended by
your remarks?"
The man started to smile that
awkward kind of smile where you
realize you've made an idiot of
yourself, then he became flustered.
He demanded a refund, he said,
because he waited too long. His
friend said, "We'll just get our
money and go to the McDonald's
by your house
1 felt an overwhelming sensa-
tion of relief as he left the store,
but I realized the true implicaUons
of my actions when a teenager said
to me, "I've never heard a white
person stick up for us to another
one before
I realized those times when
I said nothing, others may have
interpreted my silence as consent.
This is not just about racism. When
we are silent, we contribute to the
propagation of sexism and every
other -ism.
I'm sure that man at McDon-
ald's is still spouting words of hate,
but I believe he might think twice
before sharing his views with a
stranger. We can't let the only voice
be the one of hate and discrimina-
tion. Speak up.
I've been hearing this question
asked a lot lately amongst various
groups of people. The good guys
are trying to figure out why they
aren't getting any play and the
good girls are wondering why they
keep getting dumped on by guys.
Have you ever bothered to ask
yourself that question or ask the
good, pristine girl that is hugged
up in the corner with a guy with
his pants engulfing his thighs, his
hat on crooked, yellow unlaced
Timberlands, dirty nails and maybe
even a cigarette hanging out of his
mouth? Maybe you should.
The rap group DMX has an
answer for this question in a song
entitled "Good Girls, Bad Guys" on
their new CD And Then There was X.
In interpreting the meaning of the
song, a good girl and a bad guy are
a contradiction to the other: "Who
would ever think that the two
would go good? Big time honey,
man from the hood
The bad guy likes the challenge
of the good girl because she has
sense and won't let him treat her
just any old way. He can't call her
names and she lets him know she
doesn't need him.
She knows what she wants and
knows what she will and won't
tolerate. Yet she likes the idea of
a bad guy because he gets her to
do things she wouldn't normally
do. She will do certain things but
one stipulation she has is he has to
keep a nice appearance.
As DMX says, "She can be bad
in a good way and he can be good
in a bad way" and this is one ele-
ment that keeps her with him
she can be wild with him and do
with him what she wouldn't with
anyone else.
I believe it's all how good girls
and bad guys sell themselves. If a
girl is always going after a guy she
thinks she can possibly change,
more than likely she is going to
be disappointed. This fictitious
girl is usually looking for a guy to
challenge her. Not one to treat her
bad per se, but one who doesn't
give her every little thing her heart
desires. She may just have to work
for what she wants a little.
The bad guy is exciting and has
her constantly guessing. He shows
her a side of herself she may not
have seen before. She finds his
mannerisms intriguing and in an
essence, she is physically attracted
to him. He pushes her beyond her
preset limits of what she will and
won't do. He may even make her
break her own rules she has set for
herself.
The bad guys on the other hand
are taking all the good girls away
from the good guys, 'ihe good guys
give her everything she wants, treat
her well, buy her surprises, take her
out and then they are usually left to
rot when she moves on to someone
new after she nonchalantly tells
him, "I'm sorry. It's just not work-
ing out. You aren't what I want
Her main beef with him is
there isn't any excitement in the
relationship because everything is
so cut and dry. Now he is left to
wonder what he did wrong.
But the thing is, he didn't do
anything but love her and try to
make her happy. He next sees her
with a roughneck looking guy
with slicked down hair and she is
swooning in his arms while he is
looking the other way at someone
else.
From a good guy's perspective,
if you're treating your woman good
but she is looking at the hard-core
brother walking down the street,
it's time to reevaluate the situation:
It doesn't matter what kinds of
grades you're making in class or
what degree of common sense you
have to see that the majority of '
the good girls these days say they
want a good guy but yet they end
up with the bad guy.
She may consider the good guys
boring while the bad guys always
have something going on and have
her constantly wondering.
But not all bad guys have the
intention just to challenge the girl
outside her boundaries and make
her see another part of herself.
Some of them challenge her to the
point she loses her self-esteem and
self worth and make her feel as
if she is to blame for every little
thing. But, nevertheless, it is these
guys that will make her heart flutter
every time. It is these true bad guys
that us girls have to keep a watch
for.
Other than that, go out and
have fun with the good and bad
guys. But don't worry good guys
you're the ones we usually want
to marry.
This writer can be contacted
at njones@tec.ecu.edu.
buttwuuie IN MY OPINION
Digesting the joys of Java
ScHagmfUto IN MY OPINION
Democrats will protect women's rights
Did you know that in the past
month. Republican presidential
nominee George W Bush was asked
by a Pennsylvania woman if he
supported the Violence Against
Women Act, a measure that helps
states stop domestic violence, crack
down on sexual assault and end the
stalking of women. Bush's answer?
Not yes or no. He asked the woman
to send him information on the bill.
Governor Bush didn't even know
what this important bill was!
Is this the kind of leadership
American women want? I say no!
Women need a strong, informed
and passionate voice. Women need
the Democratic party, and women
need Al Gore!
Did you know that a 1998 study
showed that women earn only
75 cents for every dollar earned
by a man. As Vice-President and
Congressman, Al Gore has fought to
expand opportunities for women.
He will support legislation to erase
this earnings gap.
Al Gore supports quality child
care services. He is an advocate
of the Family and Medical Leave
Act, which has allowed millions of
Americans to take up to 12 weeks
of unpaid leave to care for a new
baby or sick relative.
Al Gore cosponsored the Civil
Rights Act of 1990,which attempted
to overturn a number of 1989
Supreme Court rulings that made it
difficult for women and minorities
to win discrimination cases. Sadly,
President Bush vetoed this bill.
As President, Al Gore would
increase funding for women's
health care. He was a cosponsor
of both the Breast and Cervical
Cancer Mortality Prevention Act
of 1990 and the Women's Health
Equity Act of 1991. Gore supports
a Patient's Bill of Rights, which
would allow women to choose
their obgyn as their primary care
physician.
Gore has also worked to prevent
crimes against women. He has
increased funding for battered
women's shelters, made it easier for
victims to protect their identity,
cosponsored the Domestic Violence
Prevention Act and supported the
1994 Violence Against Women
Act.
Finally, Al Gore supports the
protection of a woman's right to
choose. He realizes that no govern-
ment bureaucrat should be able to
tell a woman what to do with her
body! Only the individual should
have that choice!
Did you know that in 1998,
Texas Gov. Bush missed the dead-
line to hand out millions in funding
to women's organizations? Don't
elect a man who forgot to fund
rape crisis centers. Vote Democratic
and vote to protect women's rights!
Vote for Al Gore!
For more information log on to
www.algoK20O0.com.
Tulane University (TMS)-There's
a magnetic poetry set on my fridge.
It's the coffee edition, full of words
like "brew "java "arabica" and
"roasted It's got all the usual
magnetic racy bits: "Brew my hot
Colombian joy, you sexy barista
and it encourages semi-religious caf-
feinated rhapsody on short notice.
Brothers and sisters, the coffee
of the day is organic Sumatran.
There are exotic stains all over
my journal, and when my laptop
computer warms up it smells very
slightly like Kenya AA. I've owned
14 jumbo insulated mugs. I own
six coffee making devices. When
none are available, filtering is nice
but not mandatory. I have found
coffee beans in my pockets while
looking for change. Can you say
'Hallelujah?'
Hallelujah, brother. I've carried
a full coffee mug, lidded, for 20
miles on a motorcycle in my
jacket pocket. In strange cities, I
test my ability to find coffeehouses
without a map or directory. I've
called New York, from my car in
Amarillo, to have a friend find me
a coffeehouse on the Internet. I
drive at a hundred miles to the
cup. I write my columns at 200
words per shot. Point is, it was
probably inevitable that I'd write
about coffee at some point. Pull up
a Java and join me.
Friends, I wasn't always this
enlightened. As the Apostle Joe
said in his letter to the Sumatrans,
"When I was a child, I drank as a
child It was the stuff my parents
drank, weak and instant, during
boring conversations with other
adults.
Occasionally, in high school, I
found that the vile stuff kept me
awake precisely because I hated it
so. 1 made it through an entire year
of college with the false solace of
Pepsi and Jolt.
I began to see the light at 19. It
was after one of those failed dates
where you spent two hours trying
to think of something interesting
to say. I still wasn't ready to admit
that we had absolutely nothing in
common. We hit PJ's on Maple,
but it was too little, too late. Even
iced mocha couldn't save us from
another hour of awkwardness.
Eventually she went home. I drank
four more coffees and directed
smoldering glances at the wall.
From my pain came joy. I was
converted.
Brothers and sisters in Joe, we
know coffee promotes staunch
moral character. It builds strong
bones and healthy bodies. More
commonly, though, it's used to
stay awake. Soon enough 1 learned
that coffee could be the key to a
superhuman schedule.
At the time 1 was rowing, waking
every day in the dark. I'd trudge
into my 8 a.m. class, covered in
mud and promptly fall asleep. I had
tried everything: chewing gum,
food and sitting in the front row.
But only those chocolate covered
espresso beans would do the trick.
I could make my PJ's run at 10:30,
stay up until 2 a.m. and live
through my classes until my eve-
ning energy kicked in. I can sleep
when I'm dead, I said. Hallelujah;
brother; sleep was for the weak.
Of course, I've since matured in
my attitude toward the heavenly
brew. Mostly, I think, because my
body has drawn the line. It hap
pens in your mid 20's, whether
you like it or not. One three houf
night, and I'm wrecked unless I can
catch up the next. So I'm forced
to concentrate on quality and not
quantity.
And, my caffeinated brethren,
that's where the coffeehouse experi-
ence comes in. Rue de la Course,
Java Grotto, the Neutral Ground
and even, God help me, Starbucks
if necessary.
But not every joint with an
espresso machine can pretend to
greatness. The rules are complex.
Wood paneling is good; fluorescent
lights are bad. Starving artists good;
lunching lady realtors bad. Punk
folk good; samba bad. Octuple shots
and bagels are good; Lavazza lattes
and focaccia are a crime against
humanity. They shall be cast into
the pit of used espresso grounds.
Can you say 'Hallelujah?'
Hallelujah, brother. Friends,
we know the story of Kaldi, the
goatherd who discovered coffee,
lo! these many years past. Let his
spirit now come upon us. Let us go
forth and open coffeehouses with
silly names like "Daily Grind Let
us go forth and war against tea.
Let us put our faith in the dark
roast and the espresso grind; Cup
without end, Amen. Let us brew.
n





& The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, October 12, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, O
www.theeas
FEATURESBRIEFS
C'mon, we were
just kidding, officer
As an on-air gag, two disc jockeys
from radio station KYLD-FM dressed up
as escaped convicts, and went door-to-
door in Millbrae, Calif asking people to
saw off their handcuffs.
Instead, shocked residents immedi-
ately called the cops who arrested Joseph
Lopez and Graham Herbert.
To their surprise, the two were
charged with violating a rather obscure
statute: falsely causing an emergency to
be reported.
The 'doctor'
will see you now
Beginning in the '80s, Gerald Barnes,
67, has been locked up on four separate
occasions for impersonating a doctor,
most recently serving a 12-year sentence
in California until he slipped away at the
end of August.
He was recaptured a month later at a
clinic in North Hollywood.
Police say he was, yet again, practic-
ing medicine.
That breeze
feels sooo good
After they found her slumped over the
wheel of her car and attempted to ques-
tion her, police say Selma Troyanoski, a
53-year-old member of the Waukesha,
Wis county board led them on a high-
speed chase through the town while
wearing no pants or undies.
Three police departments eventually .
joined the pursuit which ended when she
stopped but refused to come out, so the
cops broke her windows and pulled her
out of the car.
She said her erratic behavior was
caused by several cups of herbal tea
mixed with St John's wort. She took off
her pants and panties because it was hot
in her car.
Don't fool with
ze monkey, mon ami
Young French gang members from
the gritty little town of Aubervilliers no
longer use vicious dogs to intimidate
their enemies. They have switched to
attack monkeys.
The young thugs have smuggled
about 500 Barbary apes into the country,
and walk them around on leashes. And
woe be unto anyone who gets in their
way.
The beasts, famous for strong arms,
sharp teeth and short tempers, usually
attack by hurling themselves at people's
heads.
Rise and shine!
Geoff Marsland of Wellington, New
Zealand, has come up with a revolution-
ary way for apartment dwellers to exact
revenge upon their noisy late-night par-
lying neighbors: a compact disc featuring
64 minutes of lawn mower noise.
If your sleep has been interrupted by a
raucous soiree that extends into the wee
hours, he advises you to "get up at 7
a.m put on the CD and go out to
cafe So far, he has sold 4,000.
CORRECTION
Book signing
Lawrence C. Ross will be reading from
his book. The Divine Nine: The History of
the African-American Fraternities and Sorori-
ties in the United States and signing books
at 7 p.m. tonight in Room 244 of Men-
denhall Student Center.
OUT
Doctor examines
effects of student stress
Bridget Hemenway
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Feeling stressed out? There aren't
too many college students who
don't experience that feeling at
least once in a while.
"1 don't feel like there is ever a time
when I am not stressed said junior
Jamie Thompson.
According to Webster's Dictionary,
stress, In its broadest sense, is defined
as the nonspecific response made by the
body or mind to an event. The perception
of stress is different for everyone. What
one person views
All possibilities
for managing
stress require
effort toward
change: changing
the source of the
stress andor
changing your
reaction to it
Dr. Nancy Badger
CCSD
as a stressful situa-
tion, another may
see as an everyday
event.
Stress occurs
when a person
is not adequately
prepared for a
situation, Accord-
ing to the ECU
Center for Coun-
seling and Stu-
dent Develop-
ment (CCSD).
There are a
number of ways
in which stress
evolves, said Dr. Nancy Badger a counselor
at the CCSD.
"Two of the most common sources of
stress are situations that college students
are forced to deal with on a daily basis
Badger said. "First, when there is a sudden
loss of personal control over one's life,
such as having a roommate who plays
music until 2:30 a.m. Or second, when
we feel challenged or threatened by an
external event which would include a
confrontation with the roommate
According to CCSD, the causes of
stress are most often financial problems,
competitiveness, feeling powerless in
a situation, school, illness, time pres-
sure, disappointments and major life
changes.
When faced with one of these cir-
cumstances, there are basically three
ways to deal with stress. A person can
put up a defense and fight it, run from
the stress or learn to adapt. A different
set of results may occur depending on
which of the three ways one chooses to
deal with stress.
Badger says that there are three areas
that can be used to assess whether or
not stress is present: cognitive (within
the mind), behavioral (the actions taken
regularly) and physiological (how the
body responds).
Cognitive signs include everything
from fear of failure to feelings of anxiety,
irritability and moodiness. People with
cognitive signs of stress constantly
worry about the future, show signs of
forgetfulness and have an inability to
concentrate.
Behavioral signs include isolation,
difficulty in communication and disrup-
tive eating patterns. Some additional
signs include crying for no apparent
reason, acting with a repetitive nervous
behavior or becoming increasingly
dependent on drugs or alcohol.
Physiological signs of stress can
include perspiration, exhaustion,
fatigue, headaches, muscular tightness,
trembling, increased heart rate or sleep-
ing disorders, according to CCSD.
If one of these problems sound
familiar, it is important to seek the help
of a physician.
One way a person can start to deal
with stress is by developing a support
system. Having someone to talk to
about problems in a time of need is very
important.
The next step, Badger suggests, is to
get organized. Making a schedule or a
list of priorities can help to dissipate the
unexpected and plan for the future.
It also very important for a person
to take breaks.
"I like to read a good book said
senior Dave Stambaugh. "Right now I'm
reading the Bible
Finally, make time to take care of the
body and mind. With proper exercise
and nutrition, the body will be able to
overcome stress when necessary.
"When I'm stressed I wash my car
said junior Rita Jeffreys. "It really
helps
According to Badger, popular outlets
such as nicotine, caffeine, drugs and
alcohol produce a heightened sense of
stress-often causing illness which can be
a stressor on its own. Having a time for
relaxation is very important.
Identifying unrelieved stress and
being aware of its affect on daily lives is
not sufficient for reducing its harmful
effects.
"Just as there are many sources of
stress, there are many possibilities for its
management Badger said. "However,
all require effort toward change: chang-
ing the source of the stress andor
changing your reaction to it
See STRESS pg 7
Organization highlight: Financial Management Association
Bridget Hemenway
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
For well over 10 years the ECU chapter
of the Financial Management Organiza-
tion (FMA) has provided an opportunity
for students and professionals to learn
about the field of finance and the world
in which it exists.
The FMA is a global organization
available to students of all majors, profes-
sionals and professors who share the
common interest of wanting to promote
the development and understanding of
basic sound financial practices. They
strive to enhance the quality of education
in finance.
"We want to give the students an
opportunity to experience finance out-
side of the textbook said FMA Faculty
Adviser Mark Weitzel. "We believe it
helps to create the whole student, by
providing real world experiences. F,ven
someone who doesn't wish to pursue
finance as a career option can gain valu-
able knowledge of the finance world by
participating
The FMA is a non-profit organization
that publishes research and holds annual
local and national conferences. The
organization also believes that financial
management is a fundamental key in
the lives of everyone.
"FMA meets every other week to
either discuss and plan up coming
events as well as listen to guest speakers
talk about their lives in the business
world said FMA President Doug Yale.
"We just had a financial analyst from
Jefferson Pilot come in and talk to us
about his position and the opportunities
his company provides. This really gives
you an idea about what is out there
before you graduate"
"We are planning two trips for this
year Weitzel said. "One to Washington
D.C. to see the U.S. Treasury and the
U.S. Mint and the other to the New
York Stock Exchange in New York City.
We are hoping to be able to pair the
students up with a trader on the floor
of the stock exchange. An experience
like that isn't just for finance majors.
I feel that any student can take away
something valuable from participating
in FMA
"We have a lot of great things
planned for this year said FMA Trea-
surer Anna Kirby. "At our next meeting
we will be discussing our Student Shad-
owing program. This program is an
opportunity for students to be matched
up with professionals in the business
world. It gives them a chance to research
future career options by getting a first
hand look at what a certain position
may entail.
"The students interview the person
they are shadowing which enables them
to ask questions they may not always
have the opportunity to ask in a profes-
sional interview she said.
The next FMA meeting will be held
at 5 p.m. on Thursday, Oct. 12 in Room
1029 of the General Classrooms Build-
ing.
Anyone interested in learning more
about FMA can e-mail the organization
at malltodsy0406@mail.ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted
at features@tec.ecu.edu.
Hurricane
Safety Tips
It's never too
early to be prepared
Earline White
STAFF WRITER
Most Greenville, N.C. resi-
dents, including ECU students
and faculty, experienced the dev-
astating effects of a hurricane last
year when Floyd ripped apart our
state. Greenville residents nor-
mally have plenty of time to pre-
pare for a storm, but it's never
too early to start thinking ahead.
PREPARE A DISASTER SUPPLIES
KIT:
� Battery-operated radio
� Flashlight with extra batteries
� Do not include candles, which
cause more fires after a disaster
than anything else
WATER:
� 3 gallonsperson, minimum, in
food-grade, plastic containers
� Additional water for sanitation
FOOD:
� Minimum three-day supply of
non-perishable food that requires
no refrigeration or preparation
and little or no water
� Dry cereal
� Canned fruits, vegetables and
juice
� Ready-to-eat soups
� Peanut butter
� Quick energy snacks, such as
graham crackers
FIRST AID KIT:
You should have one for your
home and one for each car.
� Scissors
� Thermometer
� Needle
� Latex gloves (two pairs)
� Moistened towelettes
� 2 inch and 4 inch sterile gauze
pads (four to six)
� 2 inch and 3 inch sterile roller
bandages (three rolls)
� Band-aids
NON-PRESCRIPTION DRUGS:
� Laxative, aspirin or non-aspirin
pain reliever
� Anti-diarrhea medication
� Antacid
70015 AND SUPPLIES:
� Whistle
� Crowbar, pliers, screwdriver
and hammer
� Paper, pencil and tape
� Signal flare
� Nails and wood screws
� Cash or traveler's checks,
change
� Aluminum foil
� Plastic sheeting
� Matches in a waterproof con-
tainer
� Needles, thread
� Non-electric can opener, utility
knife
� Mess kits or paper cups, plates
and plastic utensils
ENTERTAINMENT:
� Games and books
Be sure to also prepare for
baby, pet and the family medical
needs.
IMPORTANT NUMBERS:
National Flood Insurance Pro-
gram 1-888-CALL-FLOOD ext.
445
FEMA 1-800-462-9029
Disaster Unemployment Assis-
tance 1-800-462-9029
Disaster Recovery Center 1 -800-
525-0321
Students living on campus can
call the ECU Hotline at 328-0062
to find out about school closings
and updates on storms.
(1st courteiy of The American Red Crou)
WED
11
THUR FR
12 Mi





ber12,2000
�tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 7.
features@tec.ecu.edu,
Tailgate
with
Wi IKI II Cljuumm
Chef's Deli Platter
�Roaw beef. Smoked Turkey Brewt tt Honey Baked Ham
�Assorted Kaiser Roll Basket
�Lettuce, Tomato, Vidalia Onion, fit Pickle Spears
�Dijon Mustard, Herb Mayonnaise tc Vidalia Onion Spead
Choice of One
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STRESS from 6
If students need help changing
their reactions to stressors, the
CCSD will be offering a Stress Man-
agement Workshops at 1:30 p.m.
on Oct. 19 and Nov. 15 in Room
316 of the Wright Building. An
additional workshop will be held
at 3:30 p.m. on Dec. 4 at the same
location. For more information call
the CCSD at 328-6661.
All materials used to compile this
article were courtesy of the CCSD.
This writer can be contacted
at features@tec.ecu.edu.
Pumpkin Pie Crunch
What you'll need:
1 pound solid pack pumpkin
1-12 cups evaporated milk
3 eggs
1-14 cups sugar
1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon pumpkin pie spice
112 teaspoon salt
1 package lowfat yellow cake mix
1 cup chopped pecans
1 cup unsalted butter, melted
2 cups fat-free frozen dessert topping
Preheat oven to 350 degrees Fahrenheit. Com-
bine the first six ingredients in a food processor or
bowl. Mix thoroughly. Pour into a buttered 9x13
inch baking pan. Sprinkle dry cake mix evenly over
pumpkin mixture. Top with pecans. Drizzle with
melted butter. Bake 50-55 minutes or until golden.
Cool completely and serve with whipped topping.
Serves: 16 (1 pan)
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8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, October 12, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Newspaper catches flak over cartoon
NEWPORT NEWS, Va.(TMS)-
Christopher Newport University's
community Is buzzing over a con-
troversial comic published this
Week in the campus' student news-
paper.
Staff members at The Captain's
Log expected readers to view the
cartoon as a joke about the service
at the university's dining hall.
Harbour Lights. Instead it drew
criticism from students, administra-
tors and dining service employees
as being racially offensive.
The comic pictures a white
waiter saying to a white customer,
"Would you care to try the chef's
surprise, sir?" The customer's
responds, "No thank you In the
cartoon's background, a monkey
wearing a chef's hat is stirring a
bowl of food in the kitchen.
The words above the illustra-
tion read: "Harbour Lights Read-
ers-especially the dining service
employees-failed to see the humor.
They viewed the monkey as a derog-
atory depiction of Harbour Lights'
all-black staff.
"I tried to make sense of the
joke without it being racial, but I
couldn't said Raymond Joyner, a
CNU student who works at Harbour
Lights. "There's a monkey cooking
the food, but that's not funny
I was angry for a while that
something like this could get in the
paper Joyner said, "but it sort of
passed and I was more ashamed
Bennie Lewis, a food production
worker at the dining hall, said it
surprised him. He and a few co-
workers raised their concerns to
CNU Executive Vice President Kill
Brauer Tuesday, the day after the
newspaper was distributed around
campus. Brauer, in turn, told the
Captain's Log staff.
The paper's editor in chief, Hugh
Spain, and managing editor, Nick
Thomas, visited Harbour Lights
Wednesday to apologize to the
dining staff.
But Lewis said he wonders about
the sincerity of the editors' apolo-
gies.
"This has been an experience
of not only not being appreci-
ated Lewis said, "but also of being
denigrated, being made to look
like fools in a capacity where we
are essential to this college's well
being
President Paul Trible sent a mes-
sage to the university community
Wednesday night saying the comic
did not represent CNU's views. He
also urged an apology. The editors
said an apology would be written
in their next paper, which will be
distributed Monday. The Captain's
Log is an independent student
newspaper and the staff is paid
through student activity fees.
The severity of the comic issue
hit the Captain's Log staff just
hours after the paper's distribution,
Thomas said.
He acknowledged seeing the
cartoon late Thursday night as the
staff worked to put the newspaper
together, but he said he never even
considered the monkey would be
an insult to blacks. He looked at
it, thinking it should not go in
the paper because it mocked the
school's dining services. However,
he got busy and never raised the
issue again.
"It was my job to be more asser-
tive Thomas said, "and say it
shouldn't be in the paper
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:ober12, 2000
s@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 9
sports@tec.ecu.edu
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SPORTSBRIEFS
Yankees even series
Behind eight strong innings from
starter Orlando Hernandez, the New York
Yankees evened the ALCS at one game
apice with a stirring 7-1 win over the Seat-
tle Mariners.
Hernandez improved his postseason
record to 7-0 with a 1.22 earned run
average. "El Duque" pitched eight innings
allowing one run and striking out seven.
"Down 2-0 going into Seattle would
have been devastating said Yankees
second baseman Chuck Knoblach. "Now
we're riding high with the eighth inning
The Yankees didn't score until Bernie
Williams broke a 21 -inning scoreless streak
with a run-scoring single in the bottom of
the eighth, three outs and six runs later,
the Yankees head back to Seattle for game
three with the series tied 1 -1.
"We didn't make very good pitches
and they swung the bats said Mariners'
Manager Lou Pinella. "We accomplished
what we wanted here. We split with them
in New York and now we go to our home
ballpark. It's a shame because we had
seven good innings of baseball and in the
eighth they exploded
Staley out for season
Philadelphia Eagles
running back, Duce
Staley will sit out the
remainder of the
season following sur-
gery on a broken bone
in his foot.
Staley went down
with a Lisfranc fracture
in his foot during the
Eagles' 38-14 win over the Atlanta Falcons
on Oct. 1. He was placed on injured reserve
Tuesday.
Fregosi fired
Toronto Blue Jays manager, Jim Fregosi
became the sixth manager to get fired this
season. Fregosi and the Blue Jays just fin-
ished their second straight season finishing
third in the American League East.
"It is my belief that it's time to take this
club to the next level said team President
Paul Godfrey. "That's our goal. It's not that
Jim couldn't do it. I'm just hoping we can
get someone who can do it a little quicker
Fregosi took over the job two years ago,
midway through Spring training. Since
then the Blue Jays have gone 167-157 and
have failed to make the playoffs both years.
Texas drops QB rotation
Texas Longhorn Head Coach Mack
Brown announced that the quarterback
rotation he has used for much of this
season has been scrapped, for now.
Following a 63-14 drubbing at the
hands of Oklahoma, Brown decided to go
with junior Major Applewhite instead of
the tandem of Applewhite and sophomore
Chris Simms. With the duo, the Longhorns
have gone 3-2 and are 1-1 in the Big 12.
Roy two wins away
With the
Colorado Ava-
lanche's victory
Tuesday, goalie
Patrick Roy
moved one
step closer to
breaking Terry
Sawchuk's record for most wins. Roy now
stands at 445 career wins, two short of
Sawchuk's 447.
Colorado posted the 3-1 win over Cal-
gary, with goals from Adam Deadmarsh,
Peter Forsburg and Shjon Podein.
Dunhill Cup kicks off
The prestigious Dunhill Cup opens
today at the Old Course at St. Andrews
in Scotland. The Scots were given the top
seed in the tournaments.
The American team enters the tourna-
ment unseeded. The trio of Tom Lehman,
John Daly and Larry Mize will take on
Argentina, Australia and Japan in the
United States' group.
at
Homegrown homecoming
Local players
call ECU home
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
For most of its history, the ECU
football program has relied on talent
from Pitt County and Greenville to fill
its rosters.
This weekend's game with Army will
highlight ECU's homecoming festivities.
For these players the idea of homecoming
rings truer.
When it comes to recruiting, there are
a few truths. One of the most important
is keeping local talent at home.
"If you've got a local kid who doesn't
want to come to your program in town,
then you've got a problem said ECU
Head Coach Steve Logan. "It's imperative.
We've got to think he can play first of
all, but we've got to go get him. He's got
to be part of this program
Staying near their home can be ben-
eficial to the players as well. Adjustments
are fewer and the scenery is familiar.
"(The player) can still be away from
home, even if it's just six blocks Ixgan
said. "But he can have the luxury of
eating mama's cooking anytime he wants
and not getting homesick. And that's
what happens most of the time. The
kids feel like they're away at school,
and yet they can go home. Kids from
Clinton, kids from Williamston, they
can go home anytime that they want.
It's a real advantage
Another advantage to being a home-
grown player is the celebrity status they
attain in the community.
"I see people around town and if you
have a good game said tight end Rod
Emery said. "They want to talk about
that or if you have a bad game, they want
the scoop on what's going on. I'm kind
of like the town commentator
With five high schools in Pitt County
fielding football teams, the Greenville
area has been fertile ground for the ECU
program.
On this year's squad there are five
Greenville products.
"It's a good group, they've won a lot
of football games over the last three or
four years Ixgan said.
Emery, safeties Antwan and Anthony
Adams and linebacker Carlos Ochoa all
played at Greenville's J.H. Rose High
School. Running back Jamie Wilson
played his prep football at cross-county
rival D.H. Conley High School.
During his four seasons at D.H.
Conley, Wilson played many roles for
the Viking team.
"It was the first game of our senior
year, Conley, they were all right that
year but pretty much all they had was
Jamie said Emery. "I remember looking
out there and sometimes they had him
at running back and sometimes they
had him at quarterback, they had him
doing everything
As one of the few Greenville natives
to play at ECU that did not attend J. H.
Rose, Wilson carries the torch for the
rest of Pitt County.
"I'm the only guy from Conley, Farm-
ville Central, North Pitt or any of those
other schools
ECU VS. ARMY 0 7 P.M. SATURDAY
" went to the
games but I
never pictured
myself being
there on the
field. It's kind of
a dream
Carlos Ochoa
ECU Football
Wilson said. "So
it's pretty good
for the fans to
come out and see
somebody they
know
While
Wilson is one
of the few
Vikings to ever
play at ECU, J.H.
Rose has sup-
plied more talent
to the program
than any other
school. This year the Pirate squad fea-
tures four J. H. Rose products.
"All the guys from Rose, all the guys,
are really tight Adams said.
The Adams twins were standouts in
the secondary for much of their Rampant
careers. Anthony and Antwan were key
members of the J.H. Rose squad that
went 13-1 in their senior season.
While they played a lot of football
on Friday nights, Saturday afternoons
had not yet become as important.
"Well 1 didn't really keep up with
college football at that time Anthony
Adams said. "Me and my brother, we
were doing a lot of working. So, we really
didn't keep up with football
While the brothers followed schools
like Florida State University and Univer-
sity of Michigan, they followed ECU
because of the team's local ties.
"I paid attention to them due to
the fact that Troy Smith was from our
leeHOMEGROWN pg 11
ECU runningback Jamie Wilson played prep football at Greenville's D.H. Conley High School.
He and many other players on the ECU team call Greenville home, (file photo)
Black Knights bring familiar faces back to Greenville
Pirates take on
winless Army team
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
In 1983, ECU head
coach Steve Logan, then
offensive coordinator at
Tulsa, took a chance on a
21-year old graduate assis-
tant, Todd Berry, pro-
moting him to receivers
coach for the Golden Hur-
ricanes. Seventeen years
later, that move gives
Saturday's homecoming
game added meaning.
Logan and Berry
worked closely together
at Tulsa and later at
ECU where Berry served
as offensive coordinator
from 1992 to 1995.
After leaving ECU,
Berry took a head coach-
ing job at Illinois State
before taking over at Army
this season.
Berry returns to ECU
with an 0-5 Army squad
to square off with Logan
for the first time since the
two shared the sideline.
"It's going to be emo-
tional Berry said. "Many
times as a coach, you play
against somebody that
you consider a friend.
Steve is a very close friend.
My family and I consider
Greenville my second
home. We still remember
how well people treated
us down there. I think the
world of Steve for what he
has done for me in both
my career and person-
ally
During their time
working together the
coaches developed offen-
sive schemes that are used
in both the ECU and Army
systems today.
"He's so creative from
an X and O standpoint
Berry said. "He allowed
me to be creative. A lot of
times, the head coaches
don't allow their assistants
be creative. It was such a
great time for myself being
at East Carolina because
he allowed so much cre-
ativity
Berry won't be the
only familiar face return-
ing to the sidelines. Junior
Smith, ECU career leader
in rushing, will be return-
ing to Greenville as the
Black Knights' running-
backs coach.
It is that running game
that has brought Army
success in the past. Last
week, the Pirates faced a
Memphis team that prided
itself on running into the
heart of the Pirate defense.
This week, Army brings
its often confusing option
attack.
"There going to spread
us out and to be honest
with you were a little more
comfortable with that
Logan said.
Armv is at the bottom
of the C-USA standings
and is coming off of a
42-23 home loss to New
Mexico State. The Black
Knights opened the season
with a six point loss to
Cincinnati. After a loss
to Boston College, Army
lost to Houston 31-30 and
then to Memphis by ten.
"Army is a good team
ECU offensive lineman
Samien Jones said.
"They've been in every
game down into the final
minutes. We're going to
be in for a hard battle so
we have to come out and
play hard
Like Army, ECU enters
the game coming off a
loss. Last Saturday, the
Pirates lost their first con-
ference game to Mem-
phis.
"It was disappointing
because I think we let
one slip away Jones said.
"Like coach said the only
way to get rid of the taste
of defeat is to go out
there and win the next
game. Saturday we'll get
our chance to redeem our-
selves
"We had a real good
practice Logan said. "The
kids had a good hard week
and we're just trying to get
some things straight and
come out and perform a
little bit better
This writer con be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
Pirates score their first conference win
� mHmI
ECU soccer tops
UNC-Wilmington 2-1
Ryan Rockwell
STAFF WRITER
After dropping their first three
conference games, ECU picked up
their first CAA win of the season
Tuesday afternoon with a victory over
UNCW.
The Lady Pirates (8-5-2, 1-3)
defeated the Seahawks 2-1 on a game
winning goal by Kim Sandhoff with
just 10 minutes left to play in the
contest. For Sandhoff, it was her
second goal of the game.
ECU struck first in a defensive
battle that saw the score knotted at
zero at halftime. Sandhoff scored
her first goal on assists from Mindy
Nixon and Unicity Dittmer in the
50th minute of the game. The shot
to take the 1-0 lead was a chipper
over the charging Seahawks goalie from
inside the 18 yard box.
Wilmington tied the affair at 1-1 on
a 25-yard blast from Danielle Mastrogia-
vanni, assisted by Meredith l.edwell in
the 74th minute. The Pirates remained
physical and fought to regain the lead.
"We never let up in momentum,
even after Wilmington scored said
Charity McClure, senior forward and
Co-Captain of the squad.
The tied turned once and for all
when after receiving a pass from junior
midfielder Kelly Gray, Sandhoff slammed
in the game-winner. The goal came with
only 10 minutes left to go in the game.
The goal is also Sandhoff's second game
winner of the season and her sixth goal
of the season.
Sandhoff and her teammates echoed
the importance of the win over their
archrival the Seahawks (6-8-0, 0-4-0).
"The start to the season was unex-
pected, but we realized we had time to
improve. We knew we had to win this
game Sandhoff said.
After a terrific 1999 campaign that
saw the Lady Pirates go 11-5-1 overall
and 5-2-1 in conference, expectations
were high for the 2000 season. However,
the loss of seniority on defense posed
a threat to continuing in the team's
tradition of iron-clad defense.
"In the preseason we were unsure
because of so many knew players, espe-
cially on defense McClure said.
Yet surprisingly, it has been the
defense which has been the team's
fixture.
"The defense has won so many games
for us Gray said. "I'm very impressed
with the new talent and our defense
With a conference win under their
belts the Lady Pirates look to the future
optimistically.
"It's a new beginning for our team
Gray said.
On tap next for the Lady Pirates is
a road game on Oct. 17 at 7 p.m. at
Virginia Commonwealth University.
This writer can be contacted
at rrockwell@tec.ecu.edu.
Prior to their 2-1 win over UNCW, the
Pirates were winless in CAA play, (photo
by Kenny Smith)





10 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
Thursday, October 12, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Male kicker testifies
in lawsuit against Duke
GREENSBORO, N.C. � An
all-conference kicker at Duke testi-
fied Wednesday that Heather Sue
Mercer was not as good a kicker as
others on the football team.
Asked to rank her leg strength,
Sims Lenhardt told jurors: "It was
inferior to other guys out there. 1
would say 35 yards was probably
the most she could kick
Lenhardt made seven of eight
fields between 40 and 49 yards in
!l997 and one from SO yards. In
,1996, he made four of six field goals
longer than 50 yards.
Mercer, a walk-on player, is
suing Duke, contending she was
cut from the football team in 1996
because of her gender.
Duke says Mercer could have
stayed with the Blue Devils if she
had been physically able to play
on the scout team. The scout team
plays the first-string team in prac-
tice.
Jim Mills, another walk-on
kicker, testified that he never got a
chance to play in a game. However,
he stayed with the Blue Devils for
four years, in part, because he was
on the scout team.
As a scout team member, Mills
had to play other positions. He
recalled the first-team defensive
line blocking his punts.
"You can imagine them coming
at you, out of control he said.
The kickers' testimony followed
that of former coach Fred Gold-
smith. He said Tuesday that he cut
Mercer because she wasn't good
enough.
"She was evaluated like a man
would have been he said. "1
decided to judge her like a man
who was not making a contribution
to the team
Mercer testified last week that
Goldsmith told her she should give
up kicking footballs and perhaps
give beauty pageants a try.
On the stand Tuesday, Gold-
smith said he couldn't recall making
that statement. He acknowledged
saying Mercer was "pretty" when
asked by reporters to describe her
looks.
Even though Mercer was unim-
pressive in her kicking tryout as
a freshman walk-on in the fall of
1994, Goldsmith said he admired
her for her spunk.
"It was obvious she was trying to
do something special Goldsmith
testified. "I probably would have
been a lot more brutal with a male.
I would have said, 'Sorry son, you
just don't have it
After her 20-minute tryout,
Goldsmith said he offered Mercer
the chance to be a manager, which
would give her a chance to prac-
tice kicking. He said he thought
Mercer was better than her tryout
indicated, especially since she was
a starting kicker on a high school
team that won a New York state
championship.
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THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FBI & SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
Thursday,
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From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 IIS Hwy. 13, Greenville.
P
OPEN 7 DA
EXTENDED
To Travel
On A Budget
OCTOBER 17 FROM 6 UNTIL 8 P.M. IN
THE MSC UNDERGROUND
Gretchen Van Dyke's workshop addresses valu-
able ways to travel on a limited student orga-
nization budget and still have funds for the
rest of the semester. For information call Stu-
dent Leadership Development Programs at
328-4796.
To Catch a
Free Flick
OCTOBER 13 AT 10 P.M OCTOBER
14 AT 3 P.M. AND OCTOBER 15 AT
7:30 P.M. AT HENDRIX THEATRE
Mercury Cinema presents Princess Mono-
noke, a celebrated masterpiece of japani-
mation. Present your valid ECU One Card
to get in free with one guest.
To Recapture Tout
Childhood
OCTOBER 13 AT 7:30 P.M OCTOBER
14 AT 1 P.M. AND OCTOBER 15 AT 3
P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
This week's Blockbuster Movie is Disney's
Toy Story 2, a cartoon classic that will
bring out the child in everyone. Your
valid ECU One Card will get you and a
guest in for free.
To lear A Jazz Giant
OCTOBER 20 AT 8 P.M.
IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Don t miss jazz pianist Marcus Roberts and his trio
when they bring an evening of cool jazz and classic
American Standards to Wright Auditorium. Present your
valid ECU One Card at the Central Ticket Office before
October 20 at 6 p.m. to receive your half-price ticket.
All tickets purchased at the door will be full price.
ToVi
lew
Fine Art
OCTOBER 10 UNTIL
NOVEMBER 3 IN THE
MSC GALLERY
Come check out "Bodies:
From a Simple Life an
exhibit featuring paintings by
Charlotte-based artist Kim
Stimpson. Stimpson's paint-
ings reflect an interest in con-
trast, texture, and simplicity.
To Visit
An Island
Iaradise
OCTOBER 24 AT 4 P.M.
AND 7:30 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
join Dr. Richard Kern on a
cinematic adventure when
he presents The Falklands
Refuge in the Sea, his excit-
ing documentary featuring
the wildlife on these wind-
swept islands. Show your
valid ECU One Card to
receive two free film tickets.
You can use your declining
balance to purchase tickets
for a theme dinner to com-
plement your film. Dinner
tickets must be purchased
no later than 3 days in
advance.
On the Web: www.ecu.edumendenhall
Hours: MonThurs. 8 am-11 pmFri 8 am-midnightSat noon-midnightSun noon-11 pm
Wilson Acres
Now pre-1 easing for
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tober12, 2000
ts@tec.ecu.edu

oils
-6278 j


Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 11
sports@tec.ecu.edu
lllJHl

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FOR THE HOTTEST LICENSES
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK ��
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PITT INSURANCE AGENCY
Doug Woolard, Agent
� Free Quotes
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� Buy here & pay here
3205 S. Memorial Dr Suite 16
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(252) 251-1234 (Local)
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Attention First-Year Students
The Office of Orientation and the First-
Year Experience presents
THE REAL WORLD-ECU
When: Sunday, October 15th
Where: Mendenhall Student Center
What: A FREE diversity experience. Participants
will receive dinner, materials, and a present to re-
member the evening by. Come and enjoy this infor-
mative and fun evening and learn more about the
'real world
Call the Office of Orientation (328-4173) to register.
Registration deadline is October 12th (space is limited).
high school, and so we saw a lot
of him. Kevin Monroe as well and
Carols Ochoa, he came up here too,
so I followed the Rose guys pretty
much
Playing alongside the Adams
twins was Ochoa.
Ochoa came to Greenville from
Chihuahua Mexico, one year before
enrolling at ECU. He played his
first year of organized football at
J.H. Rose, where he lettered in
his senior year. During his senior
year he attended a handful of ECU
home games.
"I went to the games but I never
pictured myself being there on the
field. It's kind of a dream Ochoa
said. "You never picture yourself
out there playing with all those
people. Before you know it, you're
out there playing. I would go to
the games here and I was always
like 'Wow
Without a scholarship and with
one year of football under his
belt, Ochoa walked onto the ECU
football team in 1996.
"ECU opened the doors for
me so I took advantage of the
opportunity
Along with Ochoa and the
Adams, Emery also made the jump
from J.H. Rose to ECU.
Originally from Chattanooga
Tenn Emery moved to Greenville
in the fifth grade. He soon became
an ECU fan, attending games regu-
larly. As a standout at J. H. Rose,
which college Emery would attend
soon became a Greenville issue.
"There was always a lot of
excitement from a lot of the home-
town people Emery said. "Into
my junior and senior year (of high
school) there were little hints, like
people saying: 'You thinking about
ECU?
Soon Emery was hearing good
things horn former J. H. Rose and
then-Pirate standouts, Troy Smith
and Kevin Monroe.
"I didn't see Troy so much when
I was senior in high school because
he was traveling, but Kevin Monroe
was redshirted so he came to a lot
of our home games Emery said. "I
would talk to him after the games
about ECU and he told me how
much he liked it and what a good
experience it was
Another former Rampant that
has made an impact on the Pirate
program is Chris Howell. Coming
out of high school as one of the
state's top linemen in 1997, Howell
played but did not see significant
action until last season. Howell
played in all 11 games and started
against Southern Miss.
This year the senior has played
in all five games and collected 18
tackles, 12 unassisted, as well as
1.5 sacks.
D. H. Conley and J. H. Rose face
off each year in Greenville's most
heated football rivalry. Though
now they are on the same side,
memories of the games linger.
"I hated Rose actually said
Wilson, who's Vikings went 0-4
against Rose during his tenure.
"They beat us pretty bad so there
weren't very many good memories.
We always gave them a good game
at first but they came back and
beat us
Vestiges of the rivalry can still
be found on the practice field.
"I remember here my freshman
year Jamie was playing running
back and Kevin Monroe was playing
cornerback on the scout team and
Jamie just ran Kevin Monroe over,
just flat over Emery said. "The
coaches were like, there's Conley
running Rose over again
"Kevin Monroe's gone, but
we've still got the twins over there
and they still know they can't mess
with us on offense Wilson said.
"But it's just a friendly rivalry
While Wilson and the Rose
players used to square off once
a season on the gridiron, now
they share the same sideline. Now
instead of playing for different
schools in the same town, they are
playing for the one team that the
whole town follows.
"Everybody comes from other
high schools but now we're all
here, working for ECU and we're all
happy to be here so it's all working
out now Ochoa said.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
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2800 E. 10th St.
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Join us at our Teacher Job Fair
FAIRFAX COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
2001- 2002 school yoor
ElcHilary, Secondary, and
Special Education
All candidates must pre-schedule an
interview. Please call 703-75O4533
between October 16 and November 3.
November 11,2000
Help Us Buildjhe Future
CHIID
by CHILD
$1000
signing bonus
in selected fields!
The Job Fair is being held at:
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2900 Sultan Rood, Vienna, Virginia
from 8"AM to 3'30 PM
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Thursday, October 12, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian 12
ads@tec.ecu.edu
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom & Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
1 BR-2BR, water & cable included.
DW & disposal. ECU bus line, pool &
pvt. laundry On-stte mgmt. 6 main-
tenance. 9 or 12 mo. leases. Pets
allowed. 758-4015.
FOR SALE
PITBULL PUPPIES, champion blood
lines, first shots, dewormed. UKC
ADBA. registered Parents on site.
Great companion pet. Males and
females available. Many colors avail-
able. Deposits accepted. 412-1908.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Spring Break
Bahamas Party Cruise! 5 days $279!
Includes meals, parties! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Departs Florida!
Get group - go freel springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
CD CHANGER 6-disk with all parts.
Includes remote control. Great Condi-
tion. Call 252-752-5218.
AAAA! SPRING Break Specials! Can-
cun & Jamaica from $389! Air, hotel,
free meals, drinks! Award winning
company! Group leaders free! Florida
vacations $129! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386.
SERVICES
ENGLISH TUTOR. Retired prof will
tutor you in English. Just $18hr.local
561-7358 or (252)617-9082. Or visit
Exact. 111 E. 3rd St Greenville. E-mail:
proofread 1 �earthlink net
PHOTOGRAPHY. HAVE a photog-
rapher at your event, or party
View and order photos on the
web. Call Coastal Photography at
252-641-1600 www.coastal-photogra-
phy.com ez101@rocketmail.com
Earth Share
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is looking for officials for
the Adult Winter Basketball League.
Pay will range from $15 $20 a game.
Clinics will be held to train new and
experienced officials. However, a
basic knowledge and understanding
of the game is necessary. The first
training meeting will be held Monday.
October 16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Elm
Street Gym. Basketball season will run
from January thru March. For more
information, please call 329-4550 bet-
ween 2p.m. -7p.m. Monday through
Friday.
WAREHOUSE ASSISTANT sales
associate needed. 18-24 hours per
week, applicants must be willing to
work nights and weekends. Due to
the need for delivery, an excellent
driving record and working experience
driving a high cube delivery van are
necessary. Apply in person at Trader
Kate's, 714 east Greenville Boulevard
(outside Colonial Mall)
THERMAL-GARD is currently seeking
highly motivated, energetic individ-
uals to join our growing team! We
are looking for full and part-time
employees for our Call Center. Our
benefits include: salary �r bonus
checks, paid training, daily incentives
& weekly prizes. $50 for good
attendance. Blue Cross Blue Shields
insurance and great work environ-
ment. Better call now because these
positions will be filled soon and you
will have missed out on this excellent
opportunity. Call: 355-0210.
SPRING BREAK reps needed to prom-
ote campus trips. Earntravel free!
No cost. We train you Work on
your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www springbreakdirect com
FEDEX GROUND Package Handlers
A.M. sort positions starting at $7.50hr
Guarenteed Periodic Advances. Apply
at 2410 United De. Greenville. NC
27834 (Off Staton Rd.)
GO DIRECT'$savings! 1 Internet-
based Spring Break company offering
Wholesale Spring Break Packages (no
middlemen)! Zero traveler complaints
last year! Lowest price guarantee!
1-800-367-1252 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
A PERFECT PART-TIME job. -3
hours per day. M-F. $7.00hour, no
nights, weekends or holidays required.
Must have own transportation, gen-
eral business skills, willingness to
learn. Call Lynette. 353-2141 for an
interview.
Find buried
treasure in
vour attic
TAU KAPPA Epsilon. thanks for the
graffiti social last Friday! We had a
blast! Love Gamma Sigma Sigma
ALPHA OMICRON Pi would like to
wish the football team good luck in
their upcoming Homecoming game!
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA on win-
ning your volleyball game against Chi
Omega. Love, the new members and
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma.
KAPPA ALPHA, thanks for the social
at Ham's. Let's get together again
soon! Love Alpha Delta Pi.
PI LAMBDA PHI would like to con-
gratulate the winners of our "Goddess
of the Night" lingerie contest. Jes-
sica Harweger. Kelly Sullivan. Teresa
Cavlier. and the other participants.
We would also like to announce our
recruitment Interest Meeting on Sun-
day October 15th at 2pm in GCB
2019. Thanks again ladies.
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma announces
its Founders Day; congratulations on
48 years of service!
GAMMA CHI Epsilon. you ladies really
know how to have fun. Thanks for
such a good time last Thursday The
brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
ALPHA OMICRON Pi. it was nice to
see everyone again last Friday Night
We look forward to the next one. The
brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA would like to
congratulate Tiffany Call on being the
Delta Chi of the month.
LIFE-SKILLS for Greek women
Together, we'll study the Bible to learn
practical skills needed for a full life.
Wednesdays at 9:30 p.m beginning
September 27 Questions? Call Amy
752-9982
ALPHA PHI, you ladies rock the mic!
Last Saturday was a blast We hope
Niki had a great 21st birthday! The
brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
PHI TAU. the middle school social
was lots of fun Thank You! Alpha
Delta Pi.
"PREPARE TO BE SCARED" The ECU
RCLS Dept. is putting on its annual
Halloween event: Haunted Forest
2000. We dare you to have sweet
dreams after one night in the forest.
Next to the ECU baseball field. Oct.
268-27. 6:30-10:30pm. $3.00 admis-
sion. $2.00 for children under 10.
VOLUNTEERS NEEDED: come check
out Circle K. community service organ-
ization. Mondays at 7p.m. in room
221 in Mendenhall Student Center:
e-mail: Mebette@hotmail.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
INTERMEDIATE RACQUETBALL CLI-
NIC Oct.30-Nov.20. Mondays
8:00pm-9:00pm Come and enhance
your current skills and learn new ones.
All equipment is provided. The cost
is FREE to members. $5nonmem
and registration is Oct.9-30. For more
information please call 328-6387.
HANG GLIDE, Oct. 29. This day trip
will take us to the dunes of Kitty Hawk
for a 5 flight beginner lesson. Register
before October 13 and the cost of
the trip is $85. For more information
please call 328-6387.
PI LAMBDA Phi would like to invite
all interested to join us for our recruit-
ment "Interest Meeting" on Sunday
October 15th at 2pm in GCB 20019.
Come see what joining a fraternity
is all about.
"PREPARE TO BE SCARED" The ECU
RCLS Dept. is putting on its annual
Halloween event: Haunted Forest
2000. We dare you to have sweet
dreams after one night in the forest
Next to the ECU baseball field. Oct.
266-27 6:30-10:30pm. $3.00 admis-
sion. $2.00 for children under 10.
EVERYONE WELCOME to an informal
discussion on the Unity of World
Religions- A Baha'i Perspective. Guest
speaker Roy Simerly PhD. GCB room
1011 5-7pm. Oct. 18.
THE CAMPUS Humanist Organization
is seeking a staff or faculty advisor. For
consideration or information, please
e-mail Mike @ mge0201@ecu.edu
Quick Tabs 1 Hour SOC QC
Emergency Flush �.J.JJ
Available at
Food Store. 11 i '
SPRING BREAK 2001
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
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re you a political animal?
i Doesn't matter. You gotta
JOoaklop
JlMvCornputer
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HardDnvaC
rRom! I
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X:Drive
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CjMislory Suidv Qoup
ClPrmw
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nPhotos
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get this. X: Drive, the world's
first free Internet hard drive on
the desktop. You'll get the kind
of power you can always use.
Anywhere, anytime access from any Web ready computer.
Let's say you've got a private enterprise (like a term
paper, essay, or resume) and you don't want anybody
ripping off your intellectual property. Relax. X:Drive files
are password-protected. Even if you're mooching off your
roommate's computer. Or, let's say you're doing a group
project and feel like sharing. Think how much easier it'll
be if everyone on the team has access to the same files,
notes, and timetables. No matter where they are on cam-
pus (or the planet).
More good news. X:Drive gives you 25 megs of
space free (that's about the same as the 17 virus-infected
floppies you won't have to schlep around anymore).
Which brings up another nifty feature. X:Drive has this
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MP3s, video, and groovy pics from the Web in seconds
while you keep surfing.
So join the Party
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X: Drive. It's the best
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INTERMEDIATE RACQUETBALL CLI-
NIC Oct 30-Nov 20. Mondays
8.00pm-9:00pm. Come and enhance
your current skills and learn new ones.
All equipment is provided. The cost
is FREE to members. $5nonmem
and registration is Oct.9-30. For more
information please call 328-6387.
HANG GLIDE. Oct. 29. This day trip
will take us to the dunes of Kitty Hawk
for a 5 flight beginner lesson. Register
before October 13 and the cost of
the trip is $85. For more information
please call 328-6387
WILDERNESS COOKING WORKSHOP,
Oct. 18. Take advantage of this FREE
workshop for SRC members. This
workshop will meet at Adventure Out-
fitters. Limited spots are available so
get your name in the hat early. Reg-
istration deadline is Oct. 17. For more
information please call 328-6387.
ECU FITNESS EXPO 2000. Oct.20-21.
Attention group fitness exercise
leaders, personal trainers, and par-
ticipants. Join us for a weekend of
energizing workshops, state of the
art choreography, fitness education
and the hottest trends. Cost is $60
and registration forms are available
in the SRC Main Office.
CLIMBING Oct.27-29. Linville Gorge.
Table Rock in Linville Gorge will be
focused on multi-pitch climbs to get
you even higher off the deck. Cost of
the trip is $65 and the registration
deadline is Oct 20. For more informa-
tion please call 328-6387
SEA KAYAKING Nov.5 at Pea Island,
Hatteras NC. Don't miss Eastern
North Carolina's outdoor sport of
choice. This trip will leave at 7am and
return between 5pm- 7pm. The cost
of the trip is $25 and the registration
deadline is Oct.27. For more informa-
tion please call 328-6387.
SOCIAL WORK application deadline.
Students interested in applying for
admission into the School of Social
Work Program need to submit appli-
cations by October 16. Applications
are available outside of Ragsdale
104-C. If you have any questions or
concerns, please call Mrs. Patricia
Green at 328-4628.
MflVVM
www BlwimyoulMw rug 1-fluO-nVi-SHAHF
ISuri CcAflttl at. Oqm a TWHua Donanc"
Chinchilla for al
Cute, cuddly pets
If interested please call
752-3799
Alice's Chinchilla Ranch, Inc.
D.J. FOR HIRE
NYC D.J. HEADY TO HYPE UP
YOUR PARTY
For all functions & campus organi-
zations
Call J.Arthur � 252-258-2722
Dapper
Dan's
Retro and Vintage Clothing
Handmade Silver
Jewelry fc More.
417 Evans St. Mall 752-1750
in parking lot across Irmii
HALLOWEEN
IS COMING
For people
who cant see
well, here are
some things
to look into.
There are services and devices
that can help people make the
most of the vision they have
Call for a free booklet:
1-877 LOW VISION
(1-877-569-8474)
fff " National
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�aiiomi msmutis 01 huuh
NEWS.
Find out t
on campu
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A demc
Do Club w
Student Re
will feature
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Exposition
3 p.m. Wed
Student Cei
This proi
who are usii
resources fo
vices. Inforn
at www.ecu
Schwartz at
The "Tak
was postpor
ness Week w
Oct. 18. Man
on College I-
van Reede at
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A New M
at 8 p.m. We
Fletcher Recil
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 12, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 12, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1427
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58944
Preferred Citation
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