The East Carolinian, September 26, 2000






er2M, 2000
tec.ecu.edu
-
eastcarolinian
NEWSA1
College crime stats now online in
accordance with law
75 NUMBER 125
73 days to go
until Graduation
NEWSBRIEFS
Election 2000
"How Will You Decide is the public pre-
sentation by Rick Shenkman, the author of The
Seven Habits of Highly Effective Voters. Shenkman
will appear at 8 p.m. Wednesday, Sept. 27 in
Hendrix Theater in Mendenhall Student Center.
APA Fellow
Rosina Chia, a professor of psychology and
interim dean of the School of Industry and Tech-
nology, has been named a fellow in the Ameri-
can Psychological Association (APA). Fellows are
chosen in recognition of outstanding contribu-
tions in the field of psychology.
Chia was the only fellow selected this year
from the association's international division.
Chia, who holds a bachelor's degree from
national Taiwan University and master's and doc-
toral degrees from the University of Michigan,
has been a member of the ECU faculty since
1970.
Recitals
Henry Doskey, a member of the School of
Music's keyboard faculty, will perform at 8 p.m.
Wednesday, Sept. 27 in the A. . Fletcher Recital
Hall. The recital is free and the public is invited.
The ECU Percussion Players under the direc-
tion of Jonathan Wacker will give a public perfor-
mance at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28 in the A. .
Fletcher Recital. The program is free.
A solo and chamber music recital will feature
Vincent DiMartino on trumpet at 8 p.m. Friday
Sept. 29 in the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall. DiMar-
tino is the Robert L. Jones Distinguished Profes-
sor of Music for 2000-01.
Family Fare
A performance series with productions
designed for youngsters will begin its season
with "Ramona Quimby Scheduled for 2 p.m.
Saturday, Sept. 30 in Wright Auditorium, the
production is based on the books by Newberry
Award winner Beverly Geary.
Tickets are $9 for adults and $5 for students
and youth. All tickets at the door are $9. For
tickets, visit the Central Ticket Office in Menden-
hall Student Center or call 328-4788 or 1-800
ECU-ARTS.
Festival
The Four Seasons Music Festival Concert is
scheduled for 8 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 30 in the
A.). Fletcher Recital Hall. Ticket information
is available by calling 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS.
Meeting
The East Carolina Communication Organiza-
tion (ECCO) will be holding a meeting at 6:30
p.m. Thursday, Sept. 28 in Room 1001 of the
General Classrooms Building.
ONLINESURVEY
Do you plan to vote
this Nov. 71
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Have you engaged in underage
drinking this semester?
69 Yes
30 No
SPORTSB5
Pirates crush Orangman's defense
leads in comeback victory
FEATURES
Sleep deprivation affects
students' performance.
TODAY'S
WEATHER
Partly Sunny
HIGH 75 LOW 56
TUESDAY, SEPTEMBER 26, 2000
WWW. I
kROI
Charlton Heston visits Greenville
Actor, gun
advocate
campaigns for
Rep. Jones
Melyssa Ojeda
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Actor and National
Rifle Association President
Charlton Heston spoke to
supporters at a fundraiser
held for Rep. Walter Jones
at the Greenville Museum
of Art Friday.
"I am so appreciative
that you are with us,
and I am so appreciative
that Charlton Heston is
with us Jones said to
the crowd of 500 sup-
porters, many of whom
paid $75-$ 125 to be pho-
tographed with Heston
and Jones.
Jones, who is the cur-
rent Republican incum-
bent for the 3rd Congres-
sional District in North
Carolina, was elected to
the U.S. House of Repre-
sentatives in 1994 after
serving 10 years as an
elected member of the
North Carolina General
Assembly. One of the
issues both Heston and
Jones discussed at the
fundraiser was the free-
dom to bear arms.
"This election is about
freedom Jones said. "If
we lose the House and
Gore becomes the presi-
dent, the first things the
Democrats will go after
will be your hand guns
Jones made a point to
also address the rights of
the Boy Scouts of Amer-
ica, whose charter has
been put into question by
Democrats by its refusal
to allow gays to become
scouts or leaders.
"How sad it is in
this country that Boy
Scouts are being threat-
ened because they've
made a decision that they
want a Scout leader who
is morally straight, like a
Scout professes to be. That
they do not want some
gay scout master
Jones also addressed
the need to reduce exces-
sive taxation and increase
restorations to the cur-
rent U.S. military. He also
emphasized the impor-
tance of voter participa-
tion this election year.
"Please do not let your
friends sit at home on
election day in Novem-
ber of this year Jones
said. "Because the conse-
quences of not participat-
ing in the electoral process
could mean the future
will be that you have a
party that will challenge
your constitutional rights
instead of electing a party
that will assure your con-
stitutional rights
Heston, who was mar-
ried in North Carolina and
spent time training for
World War II during his
Above: Jones speaks about the need for greater
voter participation to his supporters.
Left: Charlton Heston traveled to North Carolina
to address a crowd of 500 in support of Jones,
(photos by John Stowe)
youth, asked the audience
to ignore all distractions
surrounding the election
and to concentrate on
voting for the sakeof free-
dom.
"Forget the slogans,
the sound bytes; forget
all the clamor and chatter
that distracts from the
singular truth Thatj
this year, we must forget
it all and vote freedom
first Heston said.
Heston compared the
early United States colo-
nists in 1,776 to today's
constituency and stressed
the need for more partici-
pation.
"The colonists forgot
it all-all of it-except free-
dom, and thank God they
did Heston said. "Unlike
those colonists, today
only some fraction of all
those eligible Americans
even register to vote, and
only a smaller fraction of
them actually do vote. By
being here and support-
ing your fine Congress-
man, you stand as the
equivalents of America's
revolutionary heroes
Heston made one light
observation about the cur-
rent administration before
departing for Charlotte
to appear at a campaign
for Republican Rep. Robin
Hayes.
"The current admin-
istration in many ways
reminds me of Tfie Wizard
ofOz Heston said. "It's
easy to point out that the
president is the Wizard
But I can't think of which
of the White House staff
see Heston page 3
LCiSjil llcirVCy MCJN3iryi 3rd District of N.C. Democratic candidate for U.S. Congress
Here's a quick look at McNairy's platform:
EDUCATION
Supports:
� Reducing class size.
� Build accountability measures into federal support
for education to ensure that school districts and states
set high standards and help every student achieve by
building on proven reforms.
� Providing federal help to enable states and school
districts to build and renovate 6,000 local public
schools and repair an additional 8,300 schools.
� Expanding educational technology.
� Put America on the path to universal preschool
through a major expansion in Head Start programs.
VETERANS AND DEFENSE
Supports:
� The continual increase of military pay.
� Increasing child care and housing benefits for
active duty personnel.
� Honoring the commitment our service members
make to the United States.
� Not voting to kill full health care benefits for U.S.
veterans for partisan gain.
� Supports expanding veteran's health care ben-
efits.
� Stemming the tide of military assets lost and
squandered by current Congressman.
CRIME
Supports:
� The death penalty.
� Truth in sentencing; believes criminals should be
required to serve their entire sentences.
� Victims' rights.
� Federal funding for more community police.
� Extending FHA loans to municipal fire and police
personnel so they can afford to live in the areas they
serve.
ENVIRONMENT
Supports:
� The Jetties Project at Oregon Inlet.
� Beach nourishment.
� Loosen restrictive environmental regulation on
North Carolina fishermen. SOCIAL SECURITY
Supports:
� Using the budget surplus to pay down the national
debt.
� Opposing the privatization of Social Security.
MEDICARE
Supports:
� Using the $400 billion in Medicare surpluses to
meet long-term retirement challenges and prepare
these programs for the retirement of the Baby Boom
generation.
� Cutting fraud and abuse and giving the Medicare
"As a member of Congress, education will be my number one priority Leigh Harvey McNairy Democralic Canslidat�
program tools that the private sector uses to be more
competitive while keeping premiums low in the fee-
for-service program.
� Restoring funding to health care providers such
as nursing homes, home health agencies, rehabilitative
services, rural hospitals and teaching hospitals like
ECU Medical Center and others that serve the Medicare
program.
PRESCRIPTION DRUGS
Supports:
� A voluntary Medicare prescription drug benefit
see McNairy page 3
Greenville grabber on the loose
Students are
warned not to
walk alone
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The Greenville Police
Department (GPD) is
investigating four reports
of assaults that have
occurred in the area of
1st and Sth streets near
campus.
The incidents were
reported between Aug.
13 and Sept. 5, 2000.
Females walking in areas
near campus between the
hours of 8 p.m. and 2 p.m.
reported the assaults.
All victims describe
the man as a white male,
foot-eight-inches to six-
foot in height, medium
build with short brown
hair. Three of the reports
indicate facial hair such
as a mustache or a beard.
TWo of the reports indicate
he was wearing glasses. He
is estimated to be between
20 and 30 years of age.
The suspect is known
to approach a female
walking alone and asks for
directions or gives com-
plements. He then grabs
them in a sexual area.
Two victims' reports
indicate the man was driv-
ing a white, Ford truck at
the time of the assaults.
In both instances the
man reached out of the
window and grabbed the
victims as they walked
by him. Two other victims
report he was walking
and grabbed the victims
as he approached them.
During on assault the man
grabbed the female by her
bookbag and dragged her
a few feet down the road.
"It happens at times
in the evening said
junior Karen Peaden, who
was assaulted by the grab-
ber. "An officer actually
warned me about the inci-
dents occurring one night
as I was walking home
from a night class
This case is still under
investigation. The GPD
says it is doing everything
it can to find the suspect.
Females are advised not to
walk alone in the evening
and if the suspect does
confront them, to take
down the license plate
number and inform the
Greenville Police Depart-
ment immediately.
"Everybody needs to
take precaution said
Amy Clark, Greenville
police detective. "The big-
gest emphasis we can say
is not to walk alone at
night and keep an eye out
for him. A license plate
number is something that
is easily forgotten
Anyone who has infor-
mation about this man,
or who has been
approached by him,
should contact the Green-
ville Police Department at
329-4300, PittGreenville
CrimeStoppers or Detec-
tive Clark at 329-4133.
This writer can be contacted
at news@tec.ecu.edu.
ZooRama 2000 kicks off
ECU Housing along with Recreation Services hosted Zoo
Rama 2000 last Fnday. 99X's Tommy Collins helped judge
the Air Band Competition, where Triple Take (above) won
a $300 gift certificate by singing 1 Don't Want to Be Alone
Tonight (photos by Nancy Kuck)
Students enjoyed the show's games, food and prizes
before settling down to watch the competitor





2 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
newst9tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, Sept
www.theeastr.
1

-
-A student reported her purse was stolen from the reference area
r Library after she left it unattended to retrieve papers from a
Larceny-A staff member reported a central processing unit (CPU) unit
was stolen from a room in the Brody Building.
Threatening Behavior-A non-student was issued a trespass warning via
certified mail after sending a threatening letter to a staff member.
Larceny-A staff member reported that a TV had been stolen from a
room in the Austin Building.
SapL23
Damage to Property-A staff member reported a student had broken out
a fire extinguisher located on the first floor of Scott Hall.
Provisional Driving While impaired-A non-student was arrested for a
provisional DWI after she was stopped for traveling in the wrong direc-
tion on a one way street at 4th and Cotanche streets.
Damage to Property-A student observed another student scrape his
vehicle with a key while it was parked west of ones Hall. The student
was issued a campus appearance ticket (CAT) for the incident. The
student was arrested after the victim filed criminal charges for the
incident.
Disorderly Conduct-Two students were issued CATs after they were
observed picking up a bike, throwing and kicking it west of Aycock
Hall.
issued a CAT for underage possession of a malt beverage after officers
conducted a consent search per his mother's request
Handicap Parking Violation-A student was issued a state citation for
blocking a handicap curb access southeast of Scott Hall.
Harassing Phone Calls-A student In Tyler Hall reported receiving numer-
� ous phone calls in which no one would speak when she answered.
Sept 24
Trespassing-A non-student was arrested north of Clement Hall fo
trespassing after being previously banned from campus.
Recovered Stolen Property-An officer located a stolen bike leaning
against a rack between Clement and White Halls that was reported
stolen on Sept. 12 from the lobby of Clement Hall.
Hit and Run-A non-student reported her vehicle was struck by another
vehicle while it was parked in the lot north of the Bloxton Building.
Expired Registration-A student was issued a state citation for displaying
an expired registration after being stopped west of the Student Recre-
ation Center.
Sept 25
No Operator's License; Failure to Stop for a Blue LightSiren-A non-
student was arrested after an officer attempted to stop him south of
Brewster for driving without headlights. The subject was eventually
stopped on 10th Street.
DeadboltLock&
Installation
All Foreign &
Domestic Keys
1804 Dickinson Are.
Greenville NC 27834
(252)757-0075
Fax (252) 757-2476
Soft
Lock&Key
Shoppe
Fast & Friendly Service
Underage Possession of Alcohol-A student in Carrett Hall was
: ; ,
Wsm
Saturday, September 30, 2000
Briley Farms. Greenville. Gates at 10AM.
VS OFTHE NEW EVE 6 SR-71
2 SKIN NEE J'S COWBOY MOUTH FENIX IX
WXNR.COM FOR TIX & INFO.
Study exploring why blacks
avoid prostate tests
FAYE1TEVILLE, N.C. (U-WIRE)-A $316,000 Defense Department grant
has been awarded Fayetteville State University to find out why black men
avoid prostate cancer screenings.
Maxwell Twum, an assistant psychology professor, will conduct the
study over three years under a grant program that targets historically
black colleges.
Although black men older than 60 are the group at greatest risk for
prostate cancer, Twum said, they avoid screening for the disease.
"Some say they are afraid it will hurt them Twum said. "There are
some who are not willing because of finances
Twum will interview black men in Fayetteville about their attitudes
toward prostate cancer screening. He wants to find out what prevents
them from going to the doctor to have the exams done.
He will call the men back for an educational program about prostate
cancer screening and interview them again to see if greater knowledge
changed their opinions.
The 1st Annual SunCom Dream Run
5K Road Race & 1 Mile Fun Run
! I
Sunday, October 15, 2:00 P.M.
lay.
The Willis Building
Register Online at racegate.com or Race Day after 12:30
More Info: Race Director James Orr, 321-8512
?ngu
We in
Large set
Tues-Thur
Ci
From t
Exten
MfflM
JL
How will you decideP
tailor Rick Skenkman will present Ms
7 HABITS Of HIGHLY
EFFECTIVE VOTERS
6
M2
1. BELIEVE LITTLE OF WHAT
ANYONE SAYS ON THE
CAMPAIGN TRAIL
0
2. WATCH THE NEWS AS IF IT
WERE A SCENE OUT OF
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
0
3. IGNORE THE CANDIDATES
WHEN THEY START SOUNDING
AS THOUGH THEY LIVED LIKE
ABE LINCOLN
Wednesday, September 27
8:00pm Hendrix Theater
Free Admission
0
0
4. NEVER PAY ANY ATTENTION
TO THE CLAIM THAT
CANDIDATES ARE RUNNING
TO HELP THE COUNTRY.
5. BE SUSPICIOUS WHEN THEY
SAY THEY'RE HEALTHY.
Neei
Lim
?
6. BE ASSURED THAT THEY WILL
NOT BEHAVE AS BADLY IN
OFFICE AS THEY DO ON THE
CAMPAIGN TRAIL.
7. LOOK FOR
(Well, tip 7's a secret To find out
you'll have to hear the lecture)
N
Dep
Re1
Price ii
Qj
Tr
D(
Sii





ber26,2000
Mec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
The East Carolinian 3
news@tec.ecu.edu
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College crime stats now available online
Hopkins wants voice in suit
on animal research
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson 4
Extension, tooted at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Sroomilllo.



NeedaPLu&to Stay
Limited number of apartments
still available for students!
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Before they are all gone!

BALTIMORE (U-WIRE)-The Johns Hopkins University is seeking to
intervene In a lawsuit filed by animal rights groups that seek regulatory
changes which officials fear would force researchers using laboratory rats
and mice to keep individual government records on them.
University officials say that would cost millions of dollars.
The record keeping is "relatively easy for small populations of monkeys
or dogs said Hopkins spokesman Dennis O'Shea. "But it's harder when
you're talking about thousands and thousands of mice
O'Shea said 468 faculty members at Hopkins use 42,000 mice, 3,000
rats and 300 birds in their research. The university also Is investing $30
million in a facility designed to breed and maintain up to 140,000 mice
and rats. Creating a government paper trail for each animal would add
several million dollars a year in maintenance costs, O'Shea said.
The humane care of the lab animals is regulated under rules imposed
by the U.S. Public Health Service, he said.
If Hopkins succeeds in its bid, the university would gain a voice in the
U.S. District Court case in Washington, and a chance to influence any
attempt by the Department of Agriculture to settle out of court.
The lawsuit was filed last year by the Alternatives Research and
Development Foundation, a consortium of animal rights groups based
in Minnesota. Agriculture Secretary Dan Glickman was named as the
defendant.
"The animal rights groups' true motive in this case is to halt all
animal-based research in the United States, with total disregard to the
human consequences said F.stelle Fishbein, Hopkins' vice president
and general counsel.
The animal rights group petitioned the agriculture department in 1998
for a change in regulations which exempt laboratory rats, mice and birds
from regulation by the department under the Animal Welfare Act.
However, USDA record keeping for individual animals is required for
larger laboratory animals, including primates, cats, dogs, guinea pigs,
hamsters, rabbits and dogs.
In March 1999, the case went before U.S. District Judge Ellen Segal
Huvelle. I.ast month, the National Association for Biomedical Research,
a consortium of research institutions, petitioned the court to be added
as a defendant In the case.
Then, animal rights groups and the Department of Agriculture
won a 30-day stay in the case. That, according to Hopkins, was a bid
to seek an out-of-court settlement without the research association's
involvement.
The stay expires at the close of business Monday.
Hopkins decided Friday to try to intervene before any settlement
can be presented to the court.
"Johns Hopkins will not sit idly by and watch this happen Fishbein
said.
WASHINGTON, D.C. (TMS)-
The U.S. Department of Education
has made crime statistics for more
than 600 colleges and universities
available on the Internet.
The department is still waiting
on more than 6,000 institutions to
report their statistics, which will be
posted as they are received.
The goal is for parents and stu-
dents to easily review crime statis-
tics. Institutions have until October
17 to report statistics for their
campuses.
"Safety is certainly a concern
for parents and students in select-
ing a college U.S. Secretary of
Education Richard W. Riley said
in a statement. "This is the next
step in making such information
readily available
The department has made the
statistics available since the pass-
ing of the 1998 Higher Education
Amendments required it to do
so. The statistics are available at
http:ope.ed.govsecurity.
Statistics posted include crim-
inal homicide, manslaughter,
sex offenses, robbery, aggravated
assault, burglary, car theft, arson
and hate crimes. University systems
are required to report separate
statistics for each campus and
publish where each crime occurred.
Statistics also must include arrests
for possession of illegal weapons,
drugs and liquor.
from Heston page 1
would be the Scarecrow, who has
no brains, or the Tin Man who has
no heart, or the Cowardly Lion who
has no courage You also have to
realize they talk in The Wizard of
Oz about a witch, but I don't know
who that would be
For more information on
the accomplishments of Walter
Jones, visit campaign.votenet.com
WalterJones.
Jones' Democratic running mate
Leigh Harvey McNairy will be in
Greenville along with U.S. Senator
John Edwards from 2 p.m4 p.m.
Sunday, Oct. 1 at the Boys and Girls
Club on Flretower Road.
Tifits writer can be contacted
at editorStec.ecu.edu.
from McNairy page 1
that would begin in 2002.
� The optional benefit of providing negotiated discounts that would
ensure that Medicare beneficiaries no longer pay the highest prices
in the marketplace.
PATIENTS' BILL OF RIGHTS
Supports:
� A bill that would guarantee patients the right to see a specialist,
guarantee access to emergency rooms and ensure that pregnant women
and cancer patients do not have to change doctors in the middle of
treatment.
� The right women should have to designate their OBGYN as their
primary care physician.
� Allowing physicians, not insurance companies, to make medical
decisions.
, (All information from the Leigh Harvey McNairy official campaign
Web site.)
Thanksgiving Trip to
New York City

Departs: Tuesday, November 21
Returns: Sunday, November 26
Price includes round-trip bus transportation and
3 nights hotel in the "Big Apple
StudentNon-Student
Quad Occupancy$199$230
Triple Occupancy$220$250
Double Occupancy$270$300
Single Occupancy$440$475
Deadline to sign-up: November 2, 2000
Call the Central Ticket Office @
328-4788 for more information.

www.ecu.edustudentunion
lTTJ
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Ltd
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
ECU School of Business
Summer Study Abroad
2001
Uitdenrradaate Mid Graduate Studies � Iatenttoaal Context
AH Majors Welcome. Academic requirements apply.
"Summer Session: 2"1 Summer Session:
Australia Italy
Germany Scotland
PURPOSE:
The challenges and opportunities of working aid managing examined in an international context This cross cultural
experience will expand your understanding of the forces shaping the world eamomy and prmide an opportunity to
examine issues shaping global competition and US competitiveness. Lectures will be supplemented by professors
from visited universities, and by trips to nationally recognized businesses. There will also be excursions to broaden
the cultural experience. All courses and activities will be conducted in English. No foreign language skills are
needed.
Visit this web site for more details: http:cxre.eoi.erJumgmtsimerlvrhp2.htrn
Courses that may be offered: (Ail
Biermiie
POLS 2010 & 2020 Government & Politics
GERM 2420 German Culture
INTL 3852 Culture of Intl Business
MGMT 3352 International Business
FIN A 4454 International Finance
MKTG 4992 International Marketing
MGMT 4242 Organizational Behavior
MKTG 4972 Special Issues and Topics
3 s.h. each) You may take up to 6 s.h.
Graduate
MGMT 6322 International Management
MGMT 6722 lntematiol Finance
MGMT 6992 Global Marketing
MGMT 6102 Comparative Management
MGMT 6802 Organizational Behavior
MGMT 6500 Special Issues and Topics
MGMT 6652 Special Issues
CHm offim� kpnd on demand
Approximate Total Costa: S3000 - No Tuition Charges
Australia total costs: $4500
Scholarships are available
For additional information or registration details on the stuoN abro program, contact
Pmf Bnvl B,Ot�Sasa�Ml l31ll Of�-Hi��;��l:senWaiav.n
Prof. Tope Bcilo. Dept rfMaoagetnent, Rm 3123, GOB, Ph 328-4856, Email: aPJJRRls
Prof. Rot FrankeL Dept of Marketing, Rm 3127, GCB, Ph 328-6607. Email: frankclntfrraileqi edn
Oass sizes arc limited Plan earhReserve your place early!





4 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
DIVERSIONS
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, Sej
ivww.theeas
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Cicatrix
5 Quantity of yam
10 Tom ticket
14 Encryption
15 Tremble
16 Gigantic
17 Building wings
18 Remove stitches
19 Stanley
Gardner
20 Ark builder
21 Swallowed
22 Last name in
Communism
23 Tentatively
advanced ideas
27 Mas' mates
28 Addictive drugs
31 Mint
34 Tennille and
Braxton
36 Actress Lupino
37 Historic times
38 Become one
39 Pitch symbol
40 Ames and Koch
41 Yawns
42 Peace goddess
43 Immature
45 Spanish gold
46 Certain derby
participants
52 University where
Galileo taught
54 Thurman of
"Pulp Fiction"
55 Applaud
56 Landed
57 "The Life of "
59 Flag down
60 Airplane head
61 An Astaire
62 Mediterranean
peak
63 Brief times
64 Earth
65 Experiment
DOWN
1 Odor
2 Shade
3 Dwight's
opponent
4 Models anew
5 Unfledged
pigeons
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portrait?
8 Man with an
alibi?
9 Original
10 Singer Easton
11 Subway gate
12 Jamaican fruit
13there, done
that
22 Lane of the
"Daily Planet"
24 Racer's circuit
25 Yearns (for)
26 Andy's young 'un
29 First garden
30 Umpire's signal
31 Military vehicle
32 Pakistani tongue
33 Digital recording
34 Plains shelter
35 Lode load
38 Shopping center
39 Whimsical
notion
41 monster
Solution from last Thursday
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42 Author Levin
44 Sales trails
45 Approved
47 Monarch
48 Get a noseful
49 Fill with high
spirits
50 Actor Claude
51 Wet impact
52 Kitchen
utensils
53 vera
57 Unrefined
58 Wedding vow


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Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday
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Tuesday, September 26, 2000
1vww.theeastcar0linian.com
OPINION
The East Carolinian 5
opinion9tec.ecu.edu
eastcarolinian
Newsroom252328.6366
Adwtttsirj252.326.2000
Fa�22.328.6558
EmaledtortMec.ocuodu
, News Editor
i Sports Editor
, Photo (Ma
Brki Matffa, iju Designer
mk. Features Editor
Lava liaiairt, Head Copy Editor
Eatty UMhf EouMntiead Editor
I Hoftmaa, tajoi Desigriei
Serwirj ECU smce 1925. The East Carumran prrts 11.000 rapes w�y Tuesday
and Tdurrrtiy dung mn mauttr aradnmr. yrar arm 5,IXX on WrxWrtiys duriig
the summer. t)ur tfteW is tfu upriun o( lie �Jlori8l board and is wH wn hy Mm
board members the East CaroMan welcomes letters to the editor much are
Mled 10 25 �Ords (wHrii may be erjlor) lor drjfflncy or brnviiy) We rrasryn
the rroht to ecu or rqect letters and all letters must be srgnea and Include a
trirjwnc runhnr UJimi may be son c rrrt to ortmnffleainioit or in The
Fast Carotnun. Student PuUcabore IMing. Grew. NC 27858-4353 Ca�
252 :)28 B3B5 to mom cilnrmarjoa
There ore ony 4 more
days urrt trie 2000
election. As a citizen of
the United States, a res-
ident of North Carolina
and a member of ECU, it is
your duty to participate.
OUR VIEW
This year's upcoming election is filled with many issues at the national,
state and local level that we should all pay close attention to.
The race to become president has, once again, gotten down and dirty.
Vice President Al Core and Cov. George W. Bush have brought their plan
for education, technology, health care, social security, guns, abortion and
of course, taxes to the platform. Education is not all about college. Primary
and secondary schools are in desperate need of reform, and if something is
not done about it soon, our future children will rank far below today's lack
expectations. Humans continue to embrace the e-world and we cannot be
left behind; technology is changing the economy and we need to understand
and manipulate it to fit our needs.
Keep in mind that the next president will be able to appoint another
Supreme Court justice. That person's rulings on the law will affect your rights.
At the state level, governor, lieutenant governor and attorney general are
only a few of the positions up of grabs during this election. How will the new
governor of North Carolina affect you?
One of the issues that hits closest to home is the UNC bond referendum.
We at TEC suggest you vote in favor of the referendum, that is unless
you enjoy detouring around the construction site of the new Science and
Technology Building.
The money ECU expects to gain will go toward bettering the campus.
This money will be used to purchase land to house our ever-growing
student body and to create classroom space-think of how crowded your
last science class was.
There are only 41 more days until the 2000 election. As a citizen of the
United States, a resident of North Carolina and a member of ECU, it is your
duty to participate. Let your voice be heard and stop letting other people
make decisions for you. On Nov. 7 be sure to cast your vote.
QoH&tUaH (loltitiAal
IN MY OPINION
Nader proves best for presidency
The Daily Cougar (U.
Houston)-In this election, I am
voting for Ralph Nader.
In the last campaign, Nader
spent $55,000 and received 800,000
votes, which represents about 1
percent of the total votes. This is an
impressive result considering that
Nader was not on the ballot in most
states and only campaigned part-
time. This time, Nader is campaign-
ing in all 50 states.
Nader is not running on
in intense ideological platform.
George Bush is not ideologically
driven either, but he seeks to
increase the influence of businesses
an government. Nader simply seeks
to make democracy more open
to the non-wealthy people (the
majority of Americans).
Nader wants to heal the dem-
acratic system and make sure
it stands against possible future
threats. To do so, Nader encourages
people to feel that one's status
is a citizen is as important as
ane's status as a family member
�it employee. Nader would like
to see each person devote about
10 hours a month toward civic
involvement.
Nader outlines his approach
to governance in his concord prin-
ciples:
1. Government should encour-
age citizens to organize into watch-
dog groups, facilitate the flow of
information to these groups and
ease communication among them.
2. Citizens should be trusted
with reasonable control of publicly
owned resources, such as airwaves,
federal and state lands.
3. Citizens should have the
power to limit the convergence of
government and industry.
4. Laws are needed to protect
whistle-blowers, people who inform
the public of government and
industrial fraud, environmental
disaster and abuse of power.
5. Students need to learn their
civic responsibilities. Democratic
principles should be presented in
their historical context and present
relevance. A well-educated student
body would serve as a reservoir
against threats to democratic values
in the future.
Nader is now responsible for
many improvements in our lives,
from consumer protection laws and
safer vehicles to a more open and
responsible government.
If Nader Is elected president, his
accomplishments will guarantee
that he will be remembered as an
active reformer of government and
industry corruption.
Nader will work to strengthen
labor and workplace safety laws. He
will also crack down on corporate
welfare and corporate crime.
Nader not only has more experi-
ence than other candidates in fight-
ing corruption, but he is also free to
act on his convictions because he
is not indebted to anyone. Nader
has relied mostly on volunteers
and small donations to drive his
candidacy. He has neither big-
name advisors nor large corporate
sponsors.
He will be free to fight the con-
vergence of big government and
big businesses that no longer need
nor want the input of the majority
of the public.
Brandon. Aiemeye
IN MY OPINION
Gay rights are also human rights
Daily Mississippian (U.
Mississippi)-While I am not gay,
I feel truly disgusted when fellow
Americans are not allowed to
snjoy some freedoms and privileges
simply because of their sexual
srientation.
Both discrimination against and
hatred of homosexuals are common
in America today.
Privileges denied to gays include
things we often take for granted
such as donating blood, adopting
:hildren, marrying and even serv-
ing in the military.
One such discrimination bans
gays and lesbians from adopting
children, becoming foster parents
ar receiving custody rights. All
the while, thousands of American
children live without a permanent
home.
One argument that attempts to
bar gays and lesbians from becom-
ing foster parents is that they do not
maintain stable relationships. Like
heterosexuals, gays and lesbians are
often in committed relationships,
of course, these relationships have
problems, but all relationships do.
The adoption process Is a very
rigorous process that include in-
depth interviews and home visits,
designed to root out those who are
not qualified to take care of a child.
There is no proof to say that gays
or lesbians are not able to create
a loving, nurturing environment
for their children. Good parenting
is based on that environment, not
sexual orientation.
Another discrimination that
recently came to light was the Food
and Drug Administration's (FDA)
decision to not ease the ban on
gay men donating blood. In times
when our national blood level has
dipped at times to below critical, we
are keeping people from donating
blood.
The FDA cites concerns that
evidence wasn't conclusive about
how the HIV rate in blood banks
would be affected. All donated
blood goes through a test for the
AIDS virus, and AIDS is not carried
by just gay men. It is a disease that
affects everyone.
One other type of discrimina-
tion against gays and lesbians exists
in the U.S. armed forces and the
"don't ask, don't tell" policy. This
policy forbids openly gay men
and women from serving in the
military, and if it is discovered that
a soldier or sailor is gay, he or she
is given a dishonorable discharge.
When I think of dishonor in the
military, I think of such people as
Benedict Arnold.
Many have argued against this,
saying an openly gay person in the
army would ruin morale and cause
other discipline problems. However,
such concerns could be erased if
they could see that homosexuals
are different from heterosexuals in
only one way.
Perhaps the worst discrimina-
tion, and the one that affects most
gays and lesbians, is the ban in
most states on gay marriages or
even civil unions.
Marriage is not simply a reli-
gious service that unites a man and
a woman, it is a legal recognition
of a relationship. When denying
the rights for gays and lesbians
to marry, homosexuals are denied
basic, simple dignities like obtain-
ing joint health, home insurance,
filing joint tax returns or taking
sick leave to care for a partner or
partner's child.
Even more tragic is that with-
out the benefits of a legal union,
lesbians and gays are denied the
right to make medical decisions
on behalf of a partner, choose a
final resting place on behalf of a
deceased partner, determine child
custody, obtain Veteran's discounts
or even visit a partner or a partner's
child in a hospital.
To have discrimination exist
in our country is to not allow
American citizens basic ideals of
equality and liberty. Gay rights are
human rights, and nothing should
bar us from denying fellow humans
these rights.
r-xm
BtioHbaaU
IN MY OPINION
fTTTTTHTTTTTm
Democratic
Issue: Health Care
Tufts Daily (Tufts U.)-PTosperity.
Many would agree that the United
States is currently experiencing a
time of prosperity. But, what is
prosperity? Our dear friend Mr.
Webster tells us that to prosper
is "to fare well" or "to cause to
thrive I would certainly agree that
a large number of Americans are
"faring better" or "thriving" more
so than they were 10 years ago.
Yet, a large number of Ameri-
cans are not prospering at all. What
does a country do to improve In a
time of prosperity? Do we allow the
rich to get richer and the poor to
stay the same? It is at these times of
prosperity that the less wealthy in
this country get a chance to catch
up with their fellow Americans and
join in their prosperity.
In this presidential election,
there are two opinions on what
to do in this time of prosperity.
The Republican candidate, George
W. Bush, seems to be borrowing
from the economic theory know
as Reaganomics, by proposing a
tax cut for those in the top income
bracket. Like Reagan, Bush believes
that allowing the wealthy to keep
more of their income will, in turn,
transfer money into the U.S. econ-
omy.
As history has shown, this is
practical in theory alone. During
the 1980s, when this type of policy
was implemented, the rich got
richer and the poor got poorer. Not
only that, the tax cut instituted by
Reagan is the major reason why
our national debt accumulated to
what it is today.
So, here we are, faced with a
large national debt and a distinct
class of poor citizens in a time
of prosperity. Do we do as the
conservatives will have us and let
the wealthy keep more of their
money? I say no.
Instead, let's let those who do
not earn that much money keep
more of their incomes, so they
may provide for their families,
send their children to college and
improve their quality of life. In
doing this, we do not make the
higher income families in America
any less wealthy. They will continue
to be wealthy, and, in my judgment,
have no obstacle in their way of
becoming wealthier.
As for the national debt, why
hang on to it? Debt does not give
America its charm. Debt is not
something we hang on to so Alan
Greenspan has something to do.
Debt is a problem that we now have
a chance to solve in some degTee. It
is time to pay for the mistakes made
in previous presidential terms. If it
is not paid now, it will only be an
even larger debt for our generation
to pay when we become taxpayers.
These are the policies of our
Democratic candidate Gore. He
wants to continue the prosperity
that he helped create during his
two terms as vice president. He
wants to lessen the load of our
national debt, so the citizens of
future generations will not have
to pay for it.
He wants to give every American
a chance to prosper at a time when
it is entirely possible. He wants to
allow students from all economic
backgrounds to attend any college
to which he or she is accepted.
In checking his track record as
a congressman, senator and as the
vice president, it is evident that
Gore puts in all his effort to get
what he wants. The most poignant
example of this is Gore's work on
protecting our environment.
In other words, I believe that
these are not hollow liberal propos-
als that Gore has set out in his
campaign. I am confident that he
will do as he says. And continuing
prosperity is not all that Gore
wants.
If you visit
www.algore2000.com, you can see
what else your vice president wants
to and will do as president. For this
issue of prosperity and many others
in this election, it is obvious to
me that the Democratic ticket has
a stronger and more appropriate
policy.
joncMuut Pele
IN MY OPINION
Issue: Health Care
Tufts Daily (Tufts U.)-This year's
presidential contest promises to pit
two competing ideologies against
each other. On the one hand is Al
Gore and the liberal philosophy
of big government, which would
have us believe that government
knows best and if you surrender
just a little of your power and a
little bit of your money to Gore and
his associates, you will be rewarded
with a series of benefits (all at no
cost) from universal health care to
the halting of urban sprawl.
On the other side of the coin is
George W. Bush, a man who offers
a decidedly different ideology. Bush
promises a smaller, less-intrusive
government that allows individuals
to make decisions on their own, but
that also expects them to behave
more responsibly and do more for
themselves.
This coming election will also
be about policy issues. A vote for
Gore is essentially a vote for a
continuation of the Clinton social
programs. Despite Gore's newfound
earth tones and alpha-male status,
nearly all of his proposed programs
are repackaged Clinton programs.
He offers nothing original. Bush,
by contrast, has, whether you agree
with him or not, placed a number
of bold, new initiatives on the
table. His ideas about school choice
and the partial privatization of
Social Security represent a desire
to change the basic structure of
American social programs that
are failing or that will fail in the
foreseeable future.
And the future is what this
election will truly be about. The
decisions that presidents make
today will have repercussions last-
ing years beyond their tenure in
office. For those of you leaning
toward voting for Gore, 1 urge you
to take a look at how the future
promises to shape up under his
leadership versus Bush's.
At first glance, Gore is a tempt-
ing man to vote for. He offers a
wide range of benefits (such as
universal health care), all with
apparently no cost to anyone. But
like everything else in life,
Gore's programs have to be
paid for somehow. As is usually
always the case with government
programs, they will be paid by tax
dollars, yours and mine. In general,
Gore presents a Norman Rockwell
picture of what life could be like if
you just trust the government to
make all your decisions. In Gore's
world, government is your parents,
and there is no problem it cannot
solve.
Bush, by contrast, does not
offer such a rosy picture of govern-
titttitiit:
Republican
View
ment or its benevolence. What
he does offer is reality. Instead of
promising that the government
will solve all your problems, Bush
says that you need to solve your
own problems; the government
will help, but only if you work
too.
Bush and his staff want to see
an America where people rely on
themselves, not somebody else, to
accomplish things. His policy calls
for tax cuts, school choice and
the partial privatization of Social
Security, all programs which place
responsibility with individuals,
not the government. While his
type of government may seem
harsh at first, it is by far the more
responsible of the two.
Gore will promise to make
you smarter, richer, run faster
or anything else in order to get
elected. He will try to trade you
a few social programs for a lot of
your liberty. In the end, however,
he will simply continue the same
old Clinton social programs, which
have not fixed Social Security,
health care or schools. Bush may
not have all the answers, but he is
willing to try something different,
something that does not involve
government. And that is what we
need.





'6 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Tuesday, September 26, 2000 Tuesday
news@tec.ecu.edu www.thet
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8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Tuesday, September 26,2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, S
www.thee,
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday: Don't ignore the
details this year; they'll be important. Play by
the rules you've been taught, and the wise
moves will become obvious.
Aries
(March 21-April 19)
Your job is demanding. A new skill you're
learning, or a tool you're using, isn't working
yet. Your partner is in the mood to argue.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Your mind may be on romance, but it
ought to be on business. Let your supervisor
have the benefit of your advice, get some-
thing in return.
Gemini
(May 21-June 21)
Proceed with caution. The outcome
seems positive if you follow through with
a plan that's already underway. The worst
should be over.
Cancer
(June 22-july 22)
A recent windfall could mean money in
the bank for you. Move on a real estate
investment or a purchase for your home, too.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
You're apt to buy books that will help you
learn new skills and that could save you more
money. Hint: Try how-to books.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
You're forceful, dynamic and darned
good-looking! You may even figure out the
answer to a problem that's had you stymied
Libra
(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Stop worrying and keep sorting and
filing. The more you get done, the better you
look. Tomorrow should be lots of fun.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
You're getting luckier, although it may
not be noticeable yet. You're getting smarter,
too. Let your friends know what you need,
for starters.
Sagittarius
(Nov. 22-Dec. 21)
The burden may seem almost too much
to bear. Complaining to friends and thinking
about making a break for it are not good
ideas.
Capricorn
(Dec. 22-jan. 19)
Far horizons beckon, and you might be in
the mood to take a risk. You're making too
much money to take time off, however.
Aquarius
(an. 20-Feb. 18)
Finish work you've started. Pay attention
to the details, too. Something you overlook
could come back and bite you later.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March20)
You may find another way to achieve a
dream. Having your fantasies turn Into reality
is always exciting. A partner's help is pivotal.
Here, senior Jessica
Alexander takes a nap
between classes.
Alexander is double
majoring in psychology
and philosophy.
According lo Dr.
Thomas DeBeck of the
Student Health Center,
students typically do not
get enough sleep. He
recommends getting
seven to eight hours of
sleep a night, (photo by
John Stowe)
Sleep deprivation affects
performance, can be dangerous
Jason Cox
STAFF WRITER
you
"Put on your coat before you go outside
"Always wear clean underwear "You need a good
nights rest to be your best These are all things
that our mothers preached to us growing up, but
studies show that mom was probably right, at least
about one thing.
Experimentation and research have shown that
sleep plays a huge role in personal wellness. The
amount of sleep you get at night could be a very
large factor in your day-to-day routine and without
enough sleep you can even be a fatal accident
waiting to happen.
"I usually get only five hours of sleep a night
said sophomore Tali Robich. "1 have practice
everyday at 5:30 in the morning and d.op't have
time to take naps to catch up
This loss of needed sleep, referred to as sleep
debt, accumulates after each night of poor sleep
habits.
"People who do not get adequate amounts
of sleep experience "microsleeps" during their
conscious waking hours said Dr. Thomas deBeck,
a sleep specialist at the ECU Student Health Center.
"They are brief moments in which your body can
not function or absorb information correctly. If
you can imagine your brain as a tape recorder,
snooze,
you could lose
microsleeps would occur when the player is playing
but the record button is not pressed. You can (unction,
but may not be able to take in and absorb information
successfully
DeBeck reports that most college students are in
fact sleep deprived and can not concentrate as well as
they should due to a lack of sleep.
According to deBeck, lack of sleep can actually
harm a student's grades, make them irritable and make
them a threat to others.
"1 have had many students who were extremely
intelligent and capable, but received a lower GPA just
because they didn't gel enough sleep lo concentrate in
class and study on their own deBeck said.
Students have been known to turn to alternative
methods of staying awake. Sleep debt can be masked by-
caffeine or other outside stimulants. These stimulants
do not cure a loss of sleep; they are simply making
I he body disregard its need for slumber.
DeBeck points out that inadequate sleep can
min a person's alertness, as well as short napping or
caffeine can impair their ability to sleep at night.
"Naps can help reduce sleepiness, but they are
best when kept to a brief one or two hours after
lunch time deBeck said. "Napping late in the
afternoon or evening can hinder your ability to go
to bed at a usual time and starts the horrible cycle
ol sleep loss
Junior Emily Cozzi also admits to not getting
enough sleep.
"I know that I'm not getting enough sleep,
but with soccer and my schoolwork, it is hard to
See SNOOZE page 9
School of Music
presents Guest Series
New Century Saxophone
Quartet in fine performance
Evening at Our Hous
Ledonia Wright celebrates
cultural diversity at Bloxton
Earline White
FEATURES WRITER
Maura Buck
FEATURES EDITOR
The intimate setting of the newly renovated A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall was perfect for the enveloping
sensual sounds of New Century Saxophone Quartet
Thursday, Sept. 21, 2000.
The first in this year's Guest Artist Series, New
Century was the only group of its type lo win first place
in the Concert Artists Guild Competition.
Based in Winston-Salem, the members of the
ensemble attended North Carolina School of the Arts.
Their 1993 New York debut at Carnegie Hall was a
"virtuosic display of dexterity and keen ensemble
work said the New York Post.
New Century's repertory ranges from Baroque to
contemporary and imaginative transcriptions that have
created new enthusiasm for saxophone music. New
Century provides "a unique blend of conviction, refined
talent and a bit of damn-the-torpedoes ambition said
the Los Angeles Times.
Their latest CD "Homegrown" features brand new
commissioned works from such artists as David Ott,
Benjamin Boone and Lenny Pickett. Ben Johnston,
another internationally known artist commissioned
by New Century, was in attendance at the concert
Thursday.
"The whole series broadens one's horizons said
Jeffrey Bail, a saxophone professor. "This music New
Century) is definitely something students haven't
heard before. One of our goals at the School of Music is
to expose the students to new things. New Century is a
ground breaking group for quartets
The group performed artists such as Jean Baptiste
Singelee, Michael Torke, Richard Rodgers and Alfred
Desenclos.
The New Century Saxophone Quartet was featured
on National Public Radio's Performance Today, the
Voice of America and North Carolina Public TV.
See MUSIC page 9
Students of all walks of life are invited tp
celebrate their cultural differences at Ledonia
Wright Cultural Center (LWCC) from 5:30 p.m.
to 7:30 p.m on Thursday, Sept. 28.
As part of their continuous effort to promote
diversity and unity on campus, LWCC will host
an event dubbed Evening at Our House to bring
together all students for a night of fun as well
as relaxation. Students can go to the Bloxton
House in central campus to enjoy a home-like
atmosphere, food and games.
"It's just a diverse atmosphere said Theresa
Rawls, office assistant at LWCC who also attended
last month's event. "You get to mingle socially
with people of all different backgrounds
"The evening is fun-filled said Nell Lewis,
director of LWCC. "There's food in the kitchen
and lots of games, and of course, a cultural game
for everyone to enjoy
The purpose of the event is to bring together
students and introduce them to the director of
the cultural center.
"It's my night out with the students Lewis
said. "Students can meet and chat with me
because myj schedule is quite busy and takes
me out of the office quite a bit
In addition to celebrating different cultures,
the aim is to introduce students to other students
on campus.
"Students get to meet other students from
different cultures and make new friends in a
relaxed social setting Lewis said.
"Everyonewhocancomeshould Rawlssaid.
"It proves to be a home away from home where
you can enjoy free time, eat and socialize
This writer can be contacted
at features@tec.ecu.edu.
Students take advantage of the fun and games available at the
Evening at Our House program at LWCC. Last month's evening
was successful. Here, students stand with director Nell Lewis,
second from left, (photo courtesy of LWCC)
Board games are one activity
(photo courtesy of LWCC)
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nber 26,2000
�tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 9
features@tec.ecu.edu
senior Jessica
ter takes a nap
in classes.
jer is double
g in psychology
philosophy,
ng to Dr.
! DeBeck of the
Health Center,
3 typically do not
lugh sleep. He
nends getting
eight hours of
night, (photo by
we)
Listen up! We need help!
to
Dagos ol the
TIN east Carolinian needs designers. We
design ads, create centerpieces. & layout
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Student Publications Building. Most have a 2.0 GPA
SNOOZE from page 8
find the time to get enough sleep,
Cozzi said.
DeBeck treats students, who
with a little help and some com-
promise, can get the sleep needed
without having to sacrificing their
hobbies and activities.
I know that I am not getting
enough sleep, and I seem to get
really tired around noon each day
said junior Kevin Hardy.
"The afternoon sleepiness is
natural, as humans have a down-
time in the afternoon deBeck
said.
Gradual changes in bedtime,
setting a routine and reducing caf-
feine intake in the evenings are
all ways to have a healthier sleep
plan.
Students who feel they are not
getting enough sleep and can not
seem to fix the problem with a
healthier regimen are advised to
seek medical consultation. Taking
sleep pills or relieving sleepiness
with caffeine is not acceptable.
These remedies are not natural and
usually only vail the problem few
a short period.
DeBeck recommends attempt-
ing to sleep seven to eight hours for
a period of three days in order to
develop a healthy sleeping plan.
This writer can be contacted
at jcox9tec.ecu.edu.
MUSIC from page 8
They have also served as a
resident ensemble for two
radio stations in North Caro-
lina, WUNC in Chapel Hill
and WHQR in Wilmington.
As the recipient of grants
from the National Endow-
ment for the Arts and Cham-
ber Music America, New
Century has been heard in
major venues internation-
ally, including Los Angeles,
New York, Amsterdam and
the White House.
"This is a great oppor-
tunity to see a world-class
group right here where I practice
everyday said Charlene Wilson,
a music major.
"These performances during
this series are special additions
not only to music majors, but to
everyone in the community said
Toni Blood, who works in public
relations and publications for the
School of Music. "Being able to see,
hear and talk to top-notch perform-
ers in a variety of fields-what better
way to spend an evening?
The Guest Artist Series continues
with Chamber Music for Strings
and Piano played by renowned
artists Andre-Michel Schub (piano),
Ara Gregorian (violin) and others
on Wednesday, Nov. 15; the
New York Vocal Arts Ensemble
with Artistic Director Ray-
mond Beegle on Saturday, Jan.
20, 2001; and the ever-popu-
lar western Brass Quintet on
Wednesday, April 18, 2001.
Also, this year's distin-
guished visiting professor,
Vincent DiMartino, will be
giving a performance at 8 p.m.
Friday, Sept. 29 in the Recitaf
Hall. He is a renowned trumpet
player apt in classical and jazz.
Make sure you check it out
All performances begin at
8:00 p.m. in the Recital Hall. For fur-
ther information, contact the ECU
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788.
This miter can be contacted
at ewhite@tec.ecu.edu.
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10 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Johnson repeats as
400 meter champ
Sprinter Michael Joh
first runner in history to repeat a victor
in the 400 meter champion at th�
Olympics on
, Monday. In
what he has
said would be
his last Olym-
pic race,
Johnson fin-
ished first in
the finals with
a time of
,43.84, beat-
ing his near-
est competi-
� tor Alvin Har-
rison by 0.56 seconds.
"I didn't want my last Olympic race
to be bronze or silver or anything other
.than gold Johnson said. "That was the
big motivator that I was thinking about all
day. Basically just keeping my reputation
intact
Johnson won his first gold in the 1992
Barcelona Olympics in the 400 relay. At
the Atlanta Olympics, Johnson won gold
and set world records in both the 200 and
400 meters.
Celtics' Pierce stabbed
Boston Celtics' forward
Paul Pierce was stabbed
early Monday at a club
in Boston. Pierce, 22, was
stabbed in the face neck
and back at the Buzz Club
in Boston's theater district.
The former Kansas Jay-
hawk is reported to be in
fair condition at a Boston hospital.
jets' Chrebet
gets revenge
After a week of being verbally blasted
by former Jet and current Tampa Bay Buc-
caneer, Keyshawn ohnson, the New York
Jets and their receiver Wayne Chrebet had
.the last laugh.
' Down 17-14 with 52 seconds left,
;Chrebet caught a pass from Jets running
;back Curtis Martin to seal the victory
121-17 victory.
; Johnson finished the day with one
Icatch.
: Bengals' coach resigns
! Cincinnati Bengals
�Head Coach Bruce Cos-
;lett, resigned Monday
latter a 37-0 loss at the
�'hands of the Baltimore
jRavens.
Coslett coached the
'� Bengals for three seasons
;amassing a 14-34 record.
:His best season came in 1996 when the
� Bengals went 7-9. This season they are
J0-3. The team has not made it to the
; playoffs in 10 years.
"It was hard for me because he's a
good man, a good friend and a good
;coach" said Bengals owner Mike Brown.
"That was his call and he made it. It's
�behind us now
McNair saves the day
Injured Tennessee Titans quarterback,
Steve McNair, stepped in for replacement
Neil O'DonneH to save the day in the
Titans 23-20 win. After a sack that left
O'Donnell dazed and bleeding from the
lip, McNair entered the game, bruised
sternum and all, with 2:35 remaining in
the fourth quarter. McNair went three-for-
three with a 18 yard touchdown pass to
win the game with 1:25 left.
Seniors gain revenge on 'Cuse
Comeback win erases
memories of '97 loss
PIRATES - 34
SYRACUSE - 17
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
All last week, the entrance to the ECU practice field was adorned with
pumpkins. Pumpkins laid out in large numbers on the grass, the numbers read
56-0, the score of the Syracuse win over the Pirates in 1997.
Friday after practice, the Pirate players, led by the seniors that were on the
1997 team, smashed the pumpkins.
On Saturday, they smashed the Syracuse Orangemen and their memories of
the worst ECU loss in almost 20 years with a 34-17 win.
"It's been a long time said senior running back Jamie Wilson. "They finally
came and now it's over with
The loss though four years old, served as motivation to the team in
preparation for the game.
"Before the game we have a little team meeting said senior halfback
Marcellus Harris. "There are five of us that played in that game, it was the worst
game we've ever been involved with. That gave us a reminder of that game and
we just came out played harder
In addition to getting the bad taste of the 1997 loss out of their mouths,
the win also helped purge frustrations from this season's loss to fellow Big
East member, Virginia Tech.
"It's big because the last time we played on ESPN, we got embarrassed
said senior defensive lineman Mbayo Ahmadu. "The last time we played
Syracuse, we got embarrassed. It's just good to come out with a victory. We
really redeemed ourselves and we just showed everyone in the nation what
Pirate football is all about
The win may have shown the true colors of Pirate football, but the Pirate
defense left the Orangemen black and blue. After allowing the Orangemen to go
8-for-ll passing for 117 yards in the first half, the ECU defense clamped down
in the second as Syracuse went 4-for-ll for 62 yards.
The only place the Orangemen had much success moving the ball was on the
ground. Junior tailback James Mungro was able to rush for 107 yards on the wet
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium turf. Meanwhile, teammate Dee Brown also rushed for
79 yards as the Orangemen amassed 273 yards on the ground.
"To step up the way our kids did on defense today was incredible because t hey
were pounding the devil out of us with that power running game said Head
Coach Steve Logan. "They've got some big strong boys up front
The power running attack resulted in the games first touchdown. After the
two teams traded field goals, Syracuse began an eight play 63 yard drive that
resulted in a Mungro touchdown to put the Orangemen up 10-3.
On Syracuse's next drive, ECU safety Antwan Adams delivered a bone-jarring
"During the week, before it was raining, I thought we would be
able to throw deep But once it started raining, I thought we
were going to rely more on the run. But we didn't. We called a
couple of takeoffs that were there for us
David Canard
Quarterback, ECU Football
hit to Syracuse receiver Maurice Jackson. The hit electrified the team and the
crowd, resulting in a defensive stop and a blocked punt by ECU's Travis Heath.
The punt rolled into the ECU end zone where freshman Terrance Copper dove
on it resulting in FCU's first touchdown.
I.ater in the quarter, as the Pirate defense held the Orangemen scoreless, ECU
quarterback David Garrard connected with Harris on a pair long touchdown
passes, 46 and 65 yards.
"During the week, before it was raining, I thought we would (be able to
throw deep) Garrard said. "But once it started raining,T thought we were
going to rely more on the run. But we didn't. We called a couple of takeoffs
and they were there for us
Like the Tulane game, the long pass was there for the Pirates. Garrard
and his receivers were able to get big gains at the expense of the Syracuse
secondary.
"Everybody was saying that my receivers wouldn't be as well as I have had
in the past Garrard said. "But 1 thought, coming into this season that they
would. They're stepping up every week. I knew this would happen, but I'm
glad to have everyone see it now
After a 21-point second quarter by the Pirates, the Orangemen responded by
driving 71 yards for their second touchdown. Oee Brown found the end zone on
a 3-yard run to give the Orangemen their final score of the afternoon.
ECU kept the pressure on the Orangemen, getting points on a Kevin Miller
field goal, his second of the day, with 1:56 left in the third quarter.
Rashon Burns scored on a 3.3-yard pass with 10:22 left in the fourth quarter.
While the long bombs helped to subdue the Orangemen, it was some stops by
the Pirate defense on fourth down that finished Syracuse.
"In the second half we came out and made some big defensive plays on
fourth down Logan said. "I don't know if they could have gotten any bigger,
those kind of things can make or break your season, or make or break your
program. They are that big
The defense stuffed Mungro on a fourth-and-one and forced quarterback Troy
Nunes into throwing an Incompletion on a fouth-and-three.
This writer can be contacted at iports@tec.ecu.edu.
Pirates pound Spartans
Pirates one win
from last season's total
Pirates over Norfolk State, 15-1, 15-2, 15-3; 8-4 for season
Ryan Downey
SENIOR WRITER
The ECU volleyball team opened their home
season with an easy victory over Norfolk State
Sunday at Minges Coliseum. The 15-1, 15-2,15-3 win
gives the Pirates eight wins and four losses this season,
which puts them one win away from last seasons win
total, the Pirates were able to use all of their players in
a very one sided contest.
"We are pleased to get our first home win said
Head Coach Colleen Farrell. We executed well and
dominated the match. We were also able to utilize our
depth. We were loose and ready to play, we were smiling
and having fun, and that's
"We didn't play
down to their level
and that was a
problem last year
Linda Mason
Captain, ECU Volleyball
what's important
The Pirates got a great
performance from senior
Cinta Claro, who had eight
kills getting the team off
to a fast start in each of the
contests. Junior Whitney
Brawner added seven digs.
Her gritty game play and
efficient serving gave the
Pirates an early edge in game one against the out-
manned Spartans.
"It's good to open with a win Brawner said. "This
is the first time we played at home and we had to get
the jitters out. They had a lot of injuries, but any time
you can come out and play well, it is a positive
One of coach Farrell's goals for the Pirates is for the
team to think and act as a unit, and so passing is a key.
Lisa Donoven, who led the team in assists with 17, set
up teammates for multiple scoring opportunities.
"We played well as a team and got our first home
game jitters out of the way. We were all hitting good
and passing well. We will have to get more focused for
Campbell Donovan said.
The Pirates stayed focused throughout the match
never letting up long enough for the inexperienced
Spartans.
"I think we stepped up to the challenge said senior
captain Lucinda Mason. "We didn't play down to their
level and that was a problem last year
This writer can be contacted at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
ECU setter Lisa Donovan
feeds a teammate during
ECU win over Norfolk
State Saturday. The win
puts the volleyball team
one win away from
equaling their win total
of last season, (photo by
John Stowe)
Catch upcoming home games
James Madison University, Sept. 30 @ 2 P.M.
University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill, Oct. 2 @ 7 P.m.
Virginia Commonwealth University, Oct. 27 @ 7 P.M.
University of William and Mary, Oct. 28 @ 4 P.M
Campbell University, Oct. 31 @ 7 P.M.
i





Tuesday, September 26, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 11
sports9tec.ecu.edu
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Defense cues Pirate comeback
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Adams hit, fourth
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Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOH
Early in the second quarter,
facing a second-and-ten on his own
14-yard line, Syracuse quarterback
R.J. Anderson dropped back and
sent a pass to receiver, Maurice
Jackson.
Before the junior could bring
the ball in, ECU safety Antwan
Adams hit Jackson, jarring the
ball loose, making the pass fall
incomplete.
Adams' hit, as well as a pair
of stops of fourth down, served
to swing the momentum in the
Pirates' favor as well as deflate the
Orangemen and earn ECU it's third
win of the season, 34-17.
"That momentum thing
it's real said Head Coach Steve
Logan "Who hits hardest really
does matter in football. Today we
hit harder
The play energized the Pirate
defense as well the soaked Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium crowd.
"Anytime you're at home and
you can get the stadium to rocking
around like that, it tends to build
and thaf s exactly what took place
there Logan said. "Long about
that time everybody was about like
me. Everybody's just trying to stay
dry, and all of a sudden everybody
realizes there is a football game
going on
Two plays later, ECU's Travis
Heath blocked a Mike Schaffer punt,
that Terrance Copper recovered
in the end zone to knot the game
at 10.
Before the hit by Adams, the
Orangemen had success against the
Pirate defense. In the first quarter,
Syracuse amassed 118 yards of total
offense. A James Mugro 3-yard
touchdown run on the second play
of the second quarter, gave Syracuse
a 10-3 lead. The score came at the
end of an eight play, 63 yard drive
that saw the Orangemen rushing
game flex their muscle and silence
the ECU crowd.
If Adams' hit was the shot that
gave the Pirates the upper hand,
then it was the fourth-down stands
in the fourth quarter that floored
the Orangemen.
Down 27-17, the Orangemen
faced a fourth-and-one on the ECU
5-yard line. The Orangemen gave
the ball to tailback James Mungro.
This time it was Adam's, among a
host of Pirate tacklers, who stuffed
Mungro for a loss of one yard.
"The fourth down plays were
huge said defensive lineman
Ty Hunt. "They were the turning
points in the game. It was really
when our defense bowed their
back and showed them. They had
a stronger offensive line and were
smaller, but we showed them, were
not pushovers. Everybody was
flying to the ball. It was a great hit,
a great stop
After an ECU three-and-out,
the Orangemen attempted another
drive. After just three plays, they
again faced a fourth down. This
time, quarterback Troy Nunes'
fourth-and-three pass to tailback
Dee Brown fell incomplete, again
the Pirate defense had held.
"It was really big said defensive
lineman Mbayo Ahamadu. "It really
turned the whole thing around. We
just stopped them. You could see
that they were just deflated
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tececu.edu.
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CHICAGO (AP)-Jerry Man-
uel's eyes and instincts told him
a year ago what others could
not see. The Chicago White
Sox were not far from being a
contender.
At a meeting with general
manager Ron Schueler and
owner Jerry Reinsdorf follow-
ing two losing seasons, Manuel
sought an opinion on where his
team was. Then he gave one of
his own.
"I asked them, 'How close
do you think we are?' They said,
'Well, X think we are about 2001
or 2002 All-Star break I said,
'OK Manuel said.
"They said, 'Well, What do
you think?' and I said, 'I think
we are closer than that I think
we are one or two pieces from
being a very good team. I saw us
as being competitive Manuel
said.
Maybe it's the wisdom
Manuel has garnered from his
years as a coach under Felipe
Alou in Montreal or his experi-
ence as a bench coach with the
1997 World Series champion
Florida Marlins: The White Sox
were ready to go to the next
level. Quickly.
They played well from the
outset, took the AL Central lead in
mid-April and clinched the division
title with a week remaining.
The White Sox left spring train-
ing with a payroll of about $32
million and were tied with the
Twins for the youngest team in
the AL.
They made their marketing
slogan of "The Kids Can Play" come
true, although it took a great come-
back season from Frank Thomas
and the addition of experienced
players such as Cal Eldred, Jose
Valentin and Herbert Perry.
"Those players didn't just drop
out of the sky. Schueler did a good
job of putting it together Reins-
dorf said.
It's been just more than three
years since their highly criticized
"White Flag" trade, in which the
White Sox sent three of their best
pitchers to San Francisco for six
prospects�even though there were
still in a pennant race, just 3 12
games out. Now, the White Sox are
back in the playoffs for the first
time since 1993.
"1 didn't boo Schu, I cheered
him when he made that trade
Reinsdorf said. "The people who
criticized that trade were White Sox
fans who just thought we were
doing the wrong thing. Now,
they can all realize that trade
started us on the way
Chicago moved into first
place on April 19, several days
before a bloody brawl with the
Detroit Tigers.
The White Sox scored the
most runs in the majors and
have been baseball's best 'road
team. In June, they went to
Cleveland and swept a three-
game series from the five-time
AL Central champions, then
went to New York and won four
straight over the Yankees, the
two-time defending World Series
champions.
"That was probably our best
stretch of baseball. We didn't
just beat them, we basically
dominated them at that time
Manuel said, noting that both
the Indians and Yankees were
slowed by injuries.
Pitching is a question mark
for the White Sox now. Eldred
and James Baldwin reached
double figures in victories before
getting hurt, and rookies Kip
Wells and Jon Garland have
pitched inconsistently.
2000-2001
SEASON
Gypsy
Book by Arthur Laurents
Musk by JuleStyne
Lyrics by Stephen Sondheim
Ocroeit 5-io, MOO
A Sense of Place
By Lanford Wilson
Ncvtmix 16-21,2000
Spring's Awakening
By Frank Wedeklnd
FtMUAKY 8-13, 20O1
A Doll's House
By Henrlk Ibsen
Ami s-10,2001
Dance 2001
Choreography by faculty and guest artists
Ami 26-AUY1, 2001
EAST CAROLINA
SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS
General Public $45 and $40
ECU FacultyStaff
StudentYouth S30 and $25
Call 252-3286829
Monday-Friday,
10:00 a.m4:00 p.m
for ticket information.
Sunday performances begin at
2:00 p.m al! other perform-
ances begin at 8:00 p.m.
MAJOR IN CAREER
SUCCESS THROUGH
AIR FORCE ROTC.
tB " Whether you're majoring
LMHHF in a highly specialized area or
RfURr seeking a broader liberal arts educa-
P tion, you can build a higher level of total
W career potential: Join Air Force ROTC.
That one step distinguishes you above all others
in your field. It shows that you're serious about culti-
vating greater long-term opportunities. It gives you the
chance to develop leadership skills that will serve
throughout your life. Call
Esau Waters 328-6597
PLAYHOUSE
latT caaoiiN umvinsiTV . acomms rHcarail
Leadership Excellence Starts Here





12 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
201 N. Summit Street: charm-
ing 3-4 8R, 2 B home completely
remodeled for rent. Many ameni-
ties. Must seel Call 752-9816 before
9 p.m. for availability.
1 BR-2BR. water & cable
included. DW & disposal. ECU bus
line, pool & pvt. laundry. On-site
mgmt- & maintenance. 9 or 12 mo.
leases. Pets allowed. 758-4015.
PRIVATE ROOM available: walk-
ing distance from ECU. Large room
(15'x15") with private phone line,
cable TV. Washerdryer on prem-
ises. Newly renovated older home
with character and modern con-
veniences, (central heat and air).
Call Mike at 830-3735.
FOR SALE
Dapper
Dan's
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom & Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
APARTMENT FOR rent in Pirates
Cove. Fully furnished, deposit
and rent for one month free.Call
752-7593
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
2 bedroom, 1 bath apartment.
$227.50month plus 12 utilities.
Washer and dryer, close to campus.
Call 561-8163.
FEMALE ROOMMATE still
needed to share 2 bedroom apt.
�Very spacious. No deposits needed.
$220 per month plus 12 utilities.
On ECU bus route. Call Shellie @
329-1342.
RESPONSIBLE MALE or female
roomate needed to share spacious
house. $275 per month. Call Dawn
at 830-8828.
FOR SALE
PITBULL PUPPIES, champion
blood lines, first shots, dewormed,
UKC, ADBA, registered. Parents on
site. Great companion pet. Males
and females available. Many col-
ors available. Deposits accepted.
412-1908.
AAAAI EARLY Specials! Spring
Break Bahamas Party Cruise! 5
days $2791 Includes meals, par-
ties! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
Departs Florida! Get group - go
free! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386.
AAAAI SPRING Break Spe-
cials! Cancun & Jamaica from
$389! Air, hotel, free meals, drinks!
Award winning company! Group
leaders free! Florida vacations
$129! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386.
PIONEX COMPUTER system
for sale. Package includes CPU
monitor, printer, keyboard, mouse,
speakers and software. Will take
best offer. Call 329-1257. Serious
inquiries only.
1994 VOLKSWAGEN Jetta GLS
Black, Auto, PW, PL, Keyless Entry,
well maintained. 87K miles. $7400
756-2817.
SERVICES
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
WWW.CAR0LINASKYSP0RTS.COM
26.95
Quick Tabs 1 Hour SOC Qi
Emergency Flush �U.�7
� Hi altl
I :
New-I
ENGLISH TUTOR. Retired prof-
will tutor you in English. Just
$18hrlocal 561-7358 or
(252)617-9082. Or visit Exact, 111
E. 3rd St Greenville. E-mail: proof-
read1@earthlink.net
PHOTOGRAPHY. HAVE a pho-
tographer at your event, or party.
View and order photos on the
web. Call Coastal Photography
at 252-641-1600 www.coastal-
photography.com ez101@rocket-
mail.com
HELP WANTED
AD AGENCY seeks graphic
designers. Full & part-time. Seniors
or above. Experience preferred.
HELP WANTED
QuarkXPress, Photoshop, Illustra-
tor required. Fax resume & refer-
ences to 321-0125.
GET PAID while studying,
watching a video with friends or
just hanging out. 2-way radios
allow unparalleled mobility when
not on a delivery for Restaurant
Runners. Part-time positions
($8-13hr) salary, order bonuses
plus tips. Any lunch availability
andor knowledge of Greenville
streets beneficial. Call 756-5527
to arrange an interview or visit
www.restaurantrunners.com for
more info.
PART-TIME RECEPTIONIST
wanted in medical office. Must be
friendly and have basic computing
skills. Call Dr. Andy 756-8160.
PART-TIME RETAIL sales, after-
noons and Saturdays. Mature,
responsible individuals apply in
person at Carolina Carpet Outlet,
210-C East 14th Street, Greenville.
No phone calls please.
WE ARE Looking for energetic
and enthusiastic students who
want more tharj a job. We offer
excellent positions, pay and ben-
efits. To join a growing company
call Sybille: (252)578-0020.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation
8i Parks Department is looking for
officials for the Adult Winter Bas-
ketball League. Pay will range from
$15-$20 a game. Clinics will be held
to train new and experienced offi-
cials. However, a basic knowledge
and understanding of the game is
necessary. The first training meet-
ing will be held Monday, October
16 at 7:30 p.m. at the Elm Street
Gym. Basketball season will run
from January thru March. For more
information, please call 329-4550
between 2p.m. -7p.m. Monday
through Friday.
SPRING BREAK reps needed
to promote campus trips. Earn $
travel free! No cost. We train you.
Work on your own time. 1-800-
367-1252 or www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
THE GREENVILLE Recreation
and Parks Department is looking
for a person for the position of
Part-Time Athletic Assistant.This
individual will assist the Athletic
Staff in the supervision of athletic
facilities and programs. Individual
should have a sports background
and the ability to communicate
with the public. Applicant must
be able to work a flexible work
HELP WANTED
schedule of about 20-30 hours per
week. Pay will be $5.50-$6.00hour
depending on experience. Inter-
ested applicants should call the
Athletic Office 329-4550 between
the hours of 2p.m6p.m Monday-
Friday for further information.
THERMAL-GARD is currently
seeking highly motivated, energe-
tic individuals to join our growing
team! We are looking for full and
part-time employees for our Call
Center. Our benefits include: salary
& bonus checks, paid training, daily
incentives & weekly prizes, $50
for good attendance. Blue Cross
Blue Shields insurance and great
work environment. Better call now
because these positions will be
filled soon and you will have
missed out on this excellent oppor-
tunity. Call: 355-0210.
GO DIRECT$savingsl 1 Inter-
net-based Spring Break company
offering Wholesale Spring Break
Packages (no middlemen)! Zero
traveler complaints last year! Low-
est price guarantee! 1-800-367-1252
www.springbreakdirect.com
FULL-TIME OR part-time teach-
ing position available for person
interested in working with children
in a child care setting. Need early
childhood major or related field.
Call 756-8250 for appointment.
EXCELLENT JOB for student.
Home health care aides for the
mentally and physically handi-
capped, various days and times.
Full and part-time. Please call
Howell Support Services, 1-888-
886-4477 for more info.
V "V "V V �
SPRING BREAK 2001
Jamaica. Cancun, Florid. Barbados. Bahamas.
Now Hiring Campus Raps. Earn 2 f rea Trip
Faas Masts. Book by Nov. Jnd. Call lor FREE into
pack or vtsrton-ana sunaplaihtoura com
1 -800426-771 O
� a-i St. a�i
HELP WANTED at Szechuan
Express, the new location at 302A
Greenville Blvd S.E. (next to Waffle
House). Applications are available
and accepted at Szechuan Garden,
our main location at 909 South
Evans Street. Apply in person. No
phone calls, please.
WAREHOUSE ASSISTANT
sales associate needed. 18-24
hours per week. Applicants must
be willing to work nights and wee-
kends. Due to the need for deliv-
HELP WANTED
ery, an excellent driving record and
working experience driving a high
cube delivery van are necessary.
Apply in person at Trader Kate's,
714 East Greenville Boulevard
(outside Colonial Mall).
SZECHUAN GARDEN needs
part-time waitstaff. No phone calls.
Come after 2:00p.m. in person
only, 909 South Evans, Greenville
NC, 27834. (10th & Evans).
CLEANING CREW needed. Part-
time Monday-Friday 6-11p.m.
cleaning medical offices near hos-
pital. Criminal background infor-
mation required. Must be detail-
oriented. $6-7hr. 321-1181.
LOCAL ONLINE entertainment
E-line now hiring writers for fea-
tures, reviews, sports and movie
columns. Also hiring models for
t-shirts and other merchandise.
Call 551-1020. � �'
GREEK PERSONALS
THETA CHI, thank you for the
fun social on Thursday. Love Alpha
Delta PI
ASHLEIGH HOOKS, pledge
Olympics was a blast! Thanks for
doing such a great job. Love,
Gamma Sigma Sigma.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the
new members on their pinning:
Sarah Seligson, Allison Graver,
Laura White, Melissa Wood, Jes-
sica Lang, Stephanie Rackley, Erin
Shaulus, Kelly Frey, Meredith Mey-
ers, Chris Gebhardt, Julie Hough,
Emily Cox, Jennifer McClausky,
Ashley Jay, Stephanie Simcox,
Heather Gaskill, Kristy Satphun,
Jamie Vanlear, Lindsay Adcox and
Nichole Trotter. Good job on Roo-
kie of the year to Emily Cox and
Jennifer McClausky.
CONGRATULATIONS MEAGAN
Cox and Liz Navarro for a great job
in Pledge of the Year. Love, your
Alpha Delta PI sisters.
DELTA ZETA'S Annual Spaghetti
Dinner will be held on October 3
from 5-8p.m.l Tickets are available
for $5 in advance and $6 at the
door! For more information, call
758-7530.
LIFE-SKILLS Bible study for
Greek women. First meeting Wed-
nesday, September 27 at 9:30p.m.
at Alpha Omicron Pi house. Ques-
tions? Call Amy, 752-9982.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank
Kappa Alpha for a wonderful.tail-
gate! We always have a great
time!
Tuesday, September 26, 2000
ads@tec.ecu.edu
GREEK PERSONALS
THE SISTERS and new mem-
bers of Delta Zeta would like to
thank all of their dates to last
Thursday's grab-a-datel We all had
a blast.
THERE WILL be an Order of
Omega meeting Tuesday Septem-
ber 26th in Mendenhall at 6:00.
Please have excuse in before the
meeting.
CONGRATULATIONS JENNI-
FER Zinn on 3rd place in Rookie of
the Year! Love, the sisters & new
members of Delta Zeta.
GOTTA D.J.? Cakalaky Enter-
tainment has just upgraded its
system! Better lights, better sound,
same great price! Call Jeff today at
531-5552 and book your eventl
LAMBDA CHI Alpha, thanks for
sharing Parent's Weekend with us.
We had a great time! Love, the
sisters and new members of Alpha
Delta PI.
BRIGITTE, GREAT job once
again on Rookie of the Year! You
did wonderful bringing the greek
system together! Love, your Delta
Zeta sisters.
OTHER
FREE MASSAGE class for
beginners. Thursday nights @
6:30. Contact Julie for details.
756-8160.
Chinchilla for lal
Cute, cuddly pets
If interested please cell
752-3799
Alice's Chinchilla Ranch, Inc.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ALL ECU freshmen who live
off campus are invited to a social
on September 27 from 7-9 p.m. in
Great Room 3, Mendenhall. Spon-
sored by Orientation and Adult and
Commuter Student Services. Call
328-6881 or 328-4173.
TENNIS 1-2-3, Oct.2 - Oct.7.
This program is tennis instruction
for adult beginners taught by the
pros. The times are M-F 6:30pm-
8:00pm; Sat. 8:30am-10:00am at
the Greenville Tennis Center. Tennis
1-2-3 is FREE to members and the
registration deadline is Sept.29
at the SRC main office. For more
information please call 328-6387.
Partners In Campus Life
We Relish Students!
THE AIR BAND CHALLENGE
WINNERS
TRIPLE TAKE
RAMSEY CONNER
CHRISTOPHER OWENS
JASHON GAODY
MATERIAL GIRL
LYNNE DRY
MOTOR KID
THIRD PRIZE
ESTON DICKINSON
JUSTIN LUQUIRE
FORD MATHEWS
NEWS
Training i
Monday
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Big Mamc
p.m. and 10
Theatre. Big I
p.m. Saturda
Oct. 1. 77fus
Oct. 1.
The ECU F
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 26, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 26, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1428
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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