The East Carolinian, September 21, 2000






ber19,2000
Wec.ecu.edu
n
it-
eastcarolinian
NEWSA1
COC kicks off first meeting with
Chancellor Eakin
VOLUME 75 NUMBER 124
78 days to go
until Graduation
NEWSBRIEFS
Voter registration,
Leigh Harvey McNairy
In conclusion of the voter registration drive
from 10 a.m2 p.m. in the Wright Place this
week, Leigh Harvey McNairy,the Democratic
candidate running for U.S. Congress represent-
ing the 3rd District, will informally meet and
greet students and faculty from noon-1 p.m. in
front of the Dowdy Student Stores.
University Student
Marshals
Students interested in serving as a University
Marshal for the fall 2000 Commencement may
obtain an application from Room A-16 Minges.
Students must be classified as a junior by the
end of spring semester 2000 and have a 3.0 CPA
to be eligible. Return completed application to
Carol-Ann Tucker, adviser, A-16 Minges by Oct.
16. For more information call 328-4661.
Vigil
A candlelight vigil for survivors of sexual
assault will be held at 6 p.m. tonight in the
Center for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment (Room 316 of the Wright Building). The
program, a part of the activities for Sexual
Assault Awareness Week, will provide the oppor-
tunity for sexual assault survivors, friends and
family to share, listen and offer support.
Video
"Healing the Harm a video about sexual
assault, will be shown at 7 p.m. tonight in the
auditorium of the Jenkins Fine Arts Center. A
discussion about the information presented in
the tape will follow. The public is invited.
Top teachers
Three university teaching award winners will
discuss why they teach and the techniques they
use in their classrooms from 3:30 p.m5 p.m.
today in Room 102 of the Brewster Building's
B-wing. The teachers with winning teaching
styles are Marjorie Baldwin of the Department of
Economics, Hanna Jubran of the School of Art
and Karl Wuensch of the Department of Psychol-
ogy.
Reception
A reception at the Mendenhall Student
Center Gallery will close an exhibition of sculp-
tures by Keith Bryant. The reception is from 6
p.m. until 8 p.m. tonight.
Guest artists
The Guest Artist Series will feature the New
Century Saxophone Quartet at 8 p.m. tonight
in the A. . Fletcher Recital Hall of the School
of Music. The concert is the first of four perfor-
mances that will make up the Guest Artist Series
season. Tickets for this performance are $10 and
are available by calling the Central Ticket Office
at 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
SPORTSB5
Pirates hope to avenge 56-0 loss to
Syracuse this Saturday
FEATURESB2
Phil McDaniel devotes himself to
students
TODAY'S
WEATHER
Mostly cloudy
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2000
HIGH 87 LOW 66
WWW. THEE ASK AROI INIA
Q
0NLINESURVEY
Have you engaged In under-
age drinking this semester?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Do you plan to attend Career Day?
4 Yes
95 No
New underage drinking laws in effect
Students across all N.C University campuses must now think twice before engaging in underage drinking, (file photo) Note. To TECs knowledge, all students
used in this photo were over 21 years of age.
Campus services provide counseling,
consequences of consumption
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The North Carolina Initiative to Reduce Underage
Drinking (IRUD) recently introduced a campaign to
educate college students at 16 UNC system schools
about North Carolina's new alcohol laws.
"As students begin the fall semester, it is important
for them to know about these new laws said Barbara
Alvarez Martin, project director of the N.C. IRUD.
"We want to tell students about these new laws and
their penalties, which we hope will deter some of
them from drinking and will keep adults from giving
or buying them alcohol
Under the new laws, 19 and 20 year olds caught
drinking alcohol can be charged with a Class 3
misdemeanor and a fine of up to $200. In the past,
this age group was charged with an infraction, a
non-criminal penalty that carried a $25 fine.
Adults convicted of selling or providing alcohol
to someone under 21 will receive a minimum $250
fine and 25 hours of community service. If underage
drinkers or adult providers are charged a second
time, they receive higher fines and more community
service.
The initiative, in coordination with college and
university officials, will post fliers around campuses to
inform students of the laws passed by the 1999 General
Assembly. The campaign will also launch a new Web
site to provide more information about the new laws,
the health effects of binge drinking as well as contact
information from each campus.
Currently, ECU's Center for Counseling and Student
Development offers alcohol education workshops for
underage offenders.
"We have a lot of underage alcohol drinking issues
at ECU said Robert Morphet, counselor at the Center
for Counseling and Student Development. "Sometimes
students are sent by the Dean of Students due to an
underage ticket, other times students voluntarily come
because they are concerned that they are drinking
too much alcohol
After attending the workshop, the majority of
students return for further counseling or by personal
decision to cut down on alcoholic consumption.
The health education department at Student Health
Services also provides information and individual
consultations to help students deal with underage
alcohol consumption. Alcohol Awareness Week,
scheduled for Oct. 16-20, is also provided to inform
students of the consequences of drinking.
"We have a lot of students that come in to get
information because they would have a night where
they would drink too much and are concerned said
Beth Credle, director of Health Education. "What
we try to make students realize is that they are not
invincible and drinking could have an effect on
their actions
The ECUI'D has also taken action to prevent
minors from drinking. A team of police officers
patrol the campus area bordering the downtown
vicinity to find students who may violate underage
drinking, DWI and open container laws. If a student
is caught breaking the law, he or she is given a
campus appearance ticket or state citation, which is
then sent to the Dean of Students.
"We want to discourage the glamorization of
alcohol said Capt. Frank Knight, ECU Police
Department. "What we want is people to believe
that they can have a good time without getting
drunk
The initiative is part of the Governor's Institute on
Alcohol & Substance Abuse, Inc. and is supported by
the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the American
Medical Association and the N.C. Division of Mental
Health, Developmental Disabilities and Substance
Abuse Services. Its focus is educating the community
on prevention and backing stronger laws that
provide stiffer and consistent penalties to underage
drinkers and those who provide alcohol to underage
individuals. For more information on the new
program campaign, contact www.initiative.org.or
www. rush-nc.org.
This writer can be contacted at news@tec.ecu.edu.
Project HEART kicks off for kids
Students dedicate
themselves
to N.Cs youth
Melyssa Ojeda
EDITOR IN CHIEF
Project HEART, a pro-
gram created by the N.C.
Governor's Office as an
initiative to give back to
the areas destroyed by last
year's Hurricane Floyd,
had its initial kickoff last
week.
The program, which
stands for High Expecta-
tions for At Risk Teens,
aims to provide tutors and
mentors for students in
grades four through eight
who are below state read-
ing standards or who are
involved in the juvenile
justice system.
In its first year, Project
HEART 's 48 student vol-
unteers, or members, were
recruited from ECU, Edge-
combe Community Col-
lege, Nash Community
College and North Caro-
lina Wesleyan College.
According to Betty
Beacham,
ECU'S direc-
tor of Proj-
ect HEART,
student
members
were chosen
based on
their will-
ingness to
commit to
the year-
long program.
"We want folks who
have a real desire to work
with kids who are at-risk
Beacham said. "We want
members who can stay
with the program
Beacham chose this
year's members in col-
laboration with recruiters
at each school site during
fall registration. Members
must have at least a 2.0
grade point average and
do not necessarily need
expertise in one field in
order to tutor a child.
"We use a broad men-
toring
system
that
includes
a reading
program,
mentor-
ing activ-
ities and
some
shad-
owing
Beacham said. "Occa-
sionally on Saturdays a
member and a child will
spend time together off
campus as well
Site coordinators at
each school plan to moni-
tor each member as well
as the progress of each at-
risk child over the course
of the year. At the end
of each member's year, a
$4,500 living stipend is
given, along with a $2,363
educational voucher that
a student can use for
tuition andor student
loans which is good for
up to seven years at any
North Carolina univer-
sity.
Above all, Beacham
said members earn the
recognition and experi-
ence of impacting some
480 students in four of
North Carolina's coun-
ties. Beacham said the
members recruited this
year are an impressive
group.
"It's quite a challenge
Beacham said. "I'm so
pleased with the students
that have come through
see HEART page 3
Sen. Warren visits
College Democrats
Senator Edward Warren visited ECU
last Wednesday to talk with the
College Democrats in Mendenhall
Student Center. Warren discussed the
importance of the upcoming bond
referendum Nov. 7 and answered
questions from the group in
attendance.
(photo by Melyssa Ojeda)





2 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Thursday, September 21, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
It finally happened. The
Campus Organization Council
(COC) met for the first time on
Monday, Sept. 18 in Hendrix
Theater. Full support from Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin, Jim Sturm,
director of University Unions,
greatly helped accomplish goals
at the first COC meeting
With 30 people in
attendance, the group
did not reach its full
potential but certainly
started off an effective
campaign to develop
into the all-encompass-
ing organization on
campus.
Student represen-
tatives from the fol-
lowing groups were
in attendance: Gamma
Chi Epsilon, Residence
Hall Association, Clem-
ent Hall Council,
Gamma Sigma Sigma,
Campus Girl Scouts, Student
Union, East Carolina Communi-
cation Organization, Bowling
Pirates, Alpha Kappa Psi, NAACP,
American Chemical Society, New
Life Christian Fellowship, Allied
Blacks for Leadership and Equal-
ity, Ladies Elite, Alpha Omicron
Pi, Pa n hellenic Council, Hospital-
ity Management Association and
SGA.
Without the initial support of
these organizations, the idea of
the COC would not have gotten
off of the ground. Thank you
to all of these groups and their
representatives.
"The idea of Michael (Aho)
and SGA is a good
one; it provides
an opportunity
for increased
inclusiveness on
campus Eakin
said.
"(The COC is)
a chance for you
to express con-
cerns and share
ideas Sturm
said.
Sturm also
explained that
starting an orga-
nization is a dif-
ficult process and
will take some time.
Thanks again to everyone
who assisted with the COC
start-up, especially Chancellor
Eakin. Remember to vote next
Wednesday for class officers and
SGA Legislature representatives!
MichaelC. Aho
SGA CHIEF OF STAFF
MfW@�
U. of Arkansas student arrested in
fondling incident similar to Penn State case
University of Arkansas (U-WIRE)-Three days after a Penn State student
was arrested for harassing female students after entering their dorm rooms,
a disturbingly similar situation arose at University of Arkansas.
Campus police arrested Mark Andrew Robinson, a 21-year-old student
from Port Byron, N.Y after he entered three female students' dorm
rooms and indecently fondled one student as she slept, said Lt. Gary
Crain, UAPD public information officer.
One woman awoke to Robinson rummaging through her dresser at
4:08 a.m. Friday, Sept. 14, and screamed for him to get out of the room.
She then called police, who arrived minutes later and saw Robinson
in another room. When police told Robinson to step out of the room,
he replied, "No at which point the two females in the room woke
up. The women said they did not know Robinson, and police then
entered and arrested him.
While police held Robinson in the hallway, another female student
exited her room and identified Robinson as an intruder who entered
her room as she slept and fondled her minutes before, Crain said.
Police arrested Robinson for burglary, criminal trespass, harassment
and public intoxication, but he has not been formally charged by the
Washington County Prosecutor's Office, a spokeswoman said. He faces
a commercial burglary charge at his Oct. 24 arrangement and has been
released on $5,000 bond.
Oklahoma State U. student busted
for distributing copyrighted material online
Oklahoma State U (U-WIRE)-Oklahoma State University officials
confiscated a student's computer after a watchdog group told the school
that the student was distributing copyrighted material over the school's
Internet server.
Campus police entered a 19-year-old male student's dorm room and
confiscated a computer Sept. 5 after the Recording Industry Association
of America (RIAA) notified the school about the student's alleged
distribution, said Nestor Gonzales, manager of the Oklahoma University
news bureau.
The University awaits an analysis of the student's computer before
deciding if it will take disciplinary action. If the school finds the student
was illegally distributing copyrighted material it may also turn the case
over to the Payne County District Attorney for formal charges.
This is not the first time a student has allegedly used the University's
Internet server to illegally distribute copyrighted material, though it is the
most drastic action the school has taken, Gonzalez said.
"Our computer center often warns students if they see that there's a
problem, and a lot of time the students just stop Gonzales said. "Mostly
students don't know that they're doing something wrong
"The large amount of material that the student was allegedly
distributing caused campus police to take such forceful actions
Gonzales said.
The student's recent alleged distribution of copyrighted material over
the OSU's Internet server is hot unusual, RIAA Spokeswoman Amy Weiss
said. The RIAA sends out about 12 "cease and desist" letters a day to
various college and universities.
"We send out dozens of letters a day and we ask that the materials
be taken down, but we don't instruct the school on how to do it
Weiss said.
The RIAA has a large anti-piracy division that also scours the offline
music market, generally at street corner vendors and flea markets,
Weiss said. Most notably, however, the RIAA recently sued Napster for
alleged copyright infringement by enabling the distribution of music
on the Internet.
Watch for the September 28th
issue of the Fountainhead
Thursday, Se
rfww.theeast




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Stage Ti
2000-200, vmi
Gypsy,
Book by Arthur Uwrwrts Musk by Jute Styrw lyrics by Staptnn Sondrwfcn Oaoeei 5-10,2000SEASON SUBSCRIPTIONS Getienl Public ECU Faculty !
Senior Citizens i
A Sense of Place1 youth 530 11
By Unford Wilson NavtMHK 16-21,2000en 252-328-6829
Monday-Friday,
Spring's Awakening10:00 a.m4:00 p.m
Du r. �iifc ML -t-i� A By rrann wretJetuiwfor ticket information.
ftUIUAKY 8-1, 2001
Sunrf.iy performam il
A Doll's House2-00 p m ; all other p
By Item Hi lbs�nances begin 8 oo p m
Anil s-10,2001
Dance 2001
Choreofraphy by fatuity and guest Mtlsts
Ana 26-M�r 1,2001
EAST CAROLINAPLAYHOUSE
(All CMOIIMA UNIVIIIITr � HCCINNIS TMfAHI



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Important Instructions Regarding
Voting Procedures for Homecoming
King and Queen!
When: September 26-28 (Tues-Thurs)
Where: All Computer Labs on Campus & Personal Computers
How: Access www.homecoming.ecu.edu
and follow instructions.





ber21,2000
Ptec.ecu.edu
r28th
iead
Thursday, September 21, 2000
tfVww.theeastcarolinian.com
The East Carolinian 3
news@tec.ecu.edu



BULLET
J Door. Open: 7:30 p.m. 'KTowAOfCtass
I
tortri.ition.









Stai Tim: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
FRIfcSAT
Silver Bullet Eiotk Dancer
UoMilWatfCi��ilMtt.(MMilWaiItninftUMt


A
Need a massage?
lie E.C.U. Physical Therapy dub is sponsoring a nigl
I

The E.C.U. Physical Therapy Club is sponsonng a night of
massages. All you have to do is purchase a ticket!
WHEN: Thursday, September 21, 2000 5:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.
WHERE: EX.0. Belk Health Sciences Building on the comer of Charles
Blvd. and Greenville Blvd.
H MUCH ARE TICKETS: ONLY $4.00 for 10 min. and you can buy up to 20 mirU!
ICHASE TICKETS: Ask any PT student you see! We will also be
selling tickets around campus (in front of bookstore and
at Belk. OR, you can get a ticket AT THE DOOR for
$5.00 for 10 mini!)
So come on, bring your friends and relax with a
Great Massage
All Now All Yours: All Free
Sorority undergos race sensitivity training
ATHENS, Ga. (AP)-A University of Georgia sorority accused of
evaluating a potential pledge on the basis of race will undergo sensitivity
training, according to an agreement with the university.
A resolution released Monday said Alpha Gamma Delta and the
university agreed that some sorority members "may hold personal
attitudes toward African-American women which do not reflect the
values of Alpha Gamma Delta or the university
It also said one or more members "may have made unacceptable
comments concerning racial issues
The sorority agreed to educate Its members in racial sensitivity and to
ensure that its members feel comfortable in confronting and reporting any
inappropriate comments they might hear within the chapter.
In turn, the university lifted an interim suspension that prohibited
the sorority from holding any social functions.
Details of educational sanctions have not been worked out, said
Richard Mullendore, vice president for student affairs.
In an Aug. 29 letter to university officials, Alpha Gamnia Delta
member Allison Davis accused her sorority sisters of having said, "If we
had a black girl in our sorority, none of the fraternities would want to
do anything with us and of questioning why a black wanted to attend
rush at an all-white sorority.
Davis, who is from Brentwood, Tenn has since withdrawn from
the university.
see RACE page 6
HEART from page 1
my door that have said, 'yes, I want
to do this
Members and coordinators gath-
ered last Tuesday for a kick off
luncheon. Approximately 100 indi-
viduals participated in the kickoff,
which Beacham said far exceeded
expectations.
Even though all of this year's
members have been chosen,
Beacham said any students who are
currently interested in donating
time to the project can still apply
as alternates.
"Even though we have our
recruits for this year we welcome all
applications Beacham said. "We
want to create a pool of alternates
who may want to get involved in
Project HEART but who may not
have the 20 hours a week to give
Next year's application deadline
will be different from this year's.
Beacham said recruitment will
begin in March or April, so that
students can finalize their class
schedules before applying.
Project HEART is a three-year
grant created this year through
the Office of North Carolina Gov.
Jim Hunt's AmeriCorps program,
a national organization which
focuses on giving back to the state's
regions through community ser-
vice.
The project is the Governor's
way of rebuilding the communities
of eastern North Carolina that
were greatly affected by Hurricane
Floyd. Beacham said she hopes
to increase the number of Project
HEART members in the next few
years.
"We will increase our numbers
every year she said. "I would like
to have 96 members working with
at-risk kids in N.C. by the year
2003
To find out more about Project
HEART, contact Betty Beacham at
328-4357.
9
Get your Senior Portrait
taken in your cap and
gown, tuxedo or dress
shell - all will be provided
to you
Take proofs home with
you that day
Present your parents with
a professional portrait
commemorating this
important milestone
Commemorate
Your Graduation
Quality graduation portraits in an instant-
that's Collegiate Reflections by Jostens
� Collegiate Reflections Offers
� An easy & convenient way to
take your senior portrait
� 2 unique ECU portrait borders
Jostens)

� $15.00 setting fee includes
proofs
� Packages available
Senior Portraits
Dates:
September 19-21
Time:
19th: 10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
20th: 10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
21th: 10:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Location:
Mendenhall Student Center

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4 The East Carolinian
k www.theeastcarolinian.com
DIVERSIONS
Thursday, September 21, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
W$MW

How will you decideP
Author Rick Shenkman will present his
7 HABITS Of HIGHLY
EFFECTIVE VOTERS
cd&yt.
Wednesday, September 27
8:00pm Hendrix Theater
Free Admission
Crossword
ACROSS
1 Blunders
5 Intellectual ability
10 Sister of Osiris
14 Be inclined?
15 Rodeo rope
16 Astronauts' grp.
17 Peak in Thessary
Ifl Guam port
19 Teheran's land
20 Treated
23 Galahad's
mother
24 Vertical fishing
nets
26 Sublease a flat
27 1224 or 1231
30 Long-handled
spoon
31 Willingly
34 Singer Falana
35 Boxing great
38 Perforated
40 Journalist
Hentorf
41 Actress Hatcher
43 Acted as a go-
between
45 Racetrack
shapes
47 Ernie of the PGA
48 Repairs
52 Head cushion
54 Persian Gull
country
55 Ohio tributary
59 Employ a hand
signal
60 Teachers" star
Nick
61 Cheerio!
62 Elevator man
63 Spotless
64 Bridge team
65 Berry and Griffey
66 Laughs heartily
67 Puts in turf
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granary
3 Scalawag
4 More serpentine
5 Cutting edge
6 Italian sauce
7 Quickly, please!
8 "It
Romantic?"
9 Berry and Wyle
10 First
11 Susan of
"Atlantic City"
12 Actress
Rossellinl
13 Luis Obispo,
CA
21 Go in
22 Moray
25 Resting spot
27 Van Halen or
Arcaro
28 Author of "Burr"
29 Writer Peters
32 Be ill
33 You betcha!
35 Resting on
36 Float in deliance
of gravity
37 "Rosemary's
Baby" author
39 Evidence
scruples
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Sokjtion to this puzzle win be in Tuesday's issue
42 Indisposition
44 Clinton and
Wallace
46 Abel to Adam
49 Hopi's neighbor
50 Counted
Ocalories
51 Lost sheep
53 Peasant girl
54 Laments loudly
56 Go it alone
57 0ffed
58 & others: Lai
59 Stir-fry pan
I H. llll
G
Ef
1. BELIEVE LITTLE OF WHAT
ANYONE SAYS ON THE
CAMPAIGN TRAIL
H
2. WATCH THE NEWS AS IF IT
WERE A SCENE OUT OF
ALICE IN WONDERLAND
J&rf
3. IGNORE THE CANDIDATES
WHEN THEY START SOUNDING
AS THOUGH THEY LIVED LIKE
ABE LINCOLN
0
0
4. NEVER PAY ANY ATTENTION
TO THE CLAIM THAT
CANDIDATES ARE RUNNING
TO HELP THE COUNTRY.
5. BE SUSPICIOUS WHEN THEY
SAY THEY'RE HEALTHY.
?
6. BE ASSURED THAT THEY WILL
NOT BEHAVE AS BADLY IN
OFFICE AS THEY DO ON THE
CAMPAIGN TRAIL.
7. LOOK FOR
(Well, tip 7's a secret To find out
you'll have to hear the lecture)
Thursday
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Dear Editor,
This is my f:
your site so you
addressed this issi
for taking up yot
First, let me say
it is a students
Greenville issue.
I attended a
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Hill Alumni alon
kids. We swap ti
attend games to
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I can assure yo
of "partying" at E(
Is unique to Greer
a drink on occasi
of alcohol was so





�mber21,2000
vs@tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, September 21, 2000
www.theeastcaroliniart.com
OPINION
The East Carolinian 5
opinion@tec.ecu.edu
eastcarolinian
Nawoom2523286368
AAertfsno252.328.2000
Fax22328.6558
E-malafb�taucu�du
NewsEoltur
span am
Photo Editor
Layout Designer
fifty
features Editor
Head Copy Editor
��y UMte, Fountamliead Editor
Layout Designer
S�g ECU arra I �25, Die Easl CauMsn prints 11.000 cook every Tuesday
art Thursday r�iiig the ropjjar nrannmr yr� am f,jn) on tWtfnosc&is nliina
It summer 0� Vwfs lha oprton ol theajlurial board and is unlMn by niiorrt
Hoard members. He Easl Carolinian welcomes letters to the alter wtuctt arc
hnilwl lo 25 words (nhHi may Iti odiorj tor decency or tmnMv) mww
the right to edit or ieect letters and a) letters must be Sgned and delude a
KtnrtKwe iunr�. Lrslrre may ho snm w o mall In rattor��liy:cni.orlu or m The
East CaroWan, Sludeni PuWualruns EUtfnj. Greeny. NC ?7658-43S3 Cal
252 mtniiti to imrii mtormtion
While these actions should
help stem the tide of under-
age drinking, it will not
stop the flow.
The fact remains, college
students will drink and as it
is right now, the age limit
does not stop too many
students from drinking.
OUR VIEW
'
There are certain things that are unique to the short time one spends
in college. Dorm life, exams and research papers are some of the things
that make the college experience what it is. Alcohol is also one of those
things.
Especially at ECU, alcohol consumption is part of life. At a school where
students go clubbing on a Tuesday night, it is ever present. It is there at
parties. It is there when you tailgate. It was probably there the first week you
stepped onto campus as a bonafide student.
However, for much of the student population at ECU it is illegal.
For a long time, college has been a haven for underage drinking. Every
once in a while, someone would get a ticket and have to pay a small fine
or spend one evening in a alcohol education class, but nothing serious
would happen.
Now the North Carolina General Assembly has stepped up their efforts
to stop underage drinking.
They have passed laws instituting stiffer penalties for underage students
caught drinking. The university has put more police in high traffic areas to try
to catch minors as they travel from campus to downtown. They have increased
the penalties for adults who supply minors with alcohol.
They have also devised more intensive education programs designed to
steer minors away from drinking.
While these actions should help stem the tide of underage drinking,
it will not stop the flow.
The fact remains, college students will drink and as it is right now, the age
limit does not stop too many students from drinking.
These changes are a start but to keep underage drinking from being so
common an occurrence, the focus needs to shift from laws that can be hard to
enforce to making underage drinking a less glamourous activity.
ku IN MY OPINION
Media not to blame for violence
�, IN MY OPINION
Women hating women is unjustified
Daily Collegian (Pennsylvania
State U.)-At 14 years old, 1 was
a fanatic feminist, as fanatic as
one can be at 14 about anything.
I owned plastic Dr. Martens, read
Sassy magazine and spewed off the
facts I knew about wage inequality
and bra burning at any opportu-
nity. I was a sister. 1 was a fighter.
And now, I'm not. It's not, as
one of my more sensitive male
friends suggested, because I learned
to cook. Nor do I disagree with
my radical adolescent ideals. But
somewhere between here and 14,
my need for fanaticism waned and
my priorities shifted.
While I ditched my plastic shoes
for some incredibly un-liberating
Kenneth Cole kitten heels, I was
OK with that, believing that I still
possessed the politics if not the
passion. But last year, I had a very
disturbing revelation.
1 hated girls. I was all for
women, the theoretical sociopoliti-
cal group of which I was a member
and whose advancement and rights
had been my entire girlhood pur-
pose. I loved my girlfriends who
had seen me through that stage
and many others.
But girls-the ones who walked
ahead of me to class, the ones I
bumped into at frat parties, the
ones who used to date my boy-
friends-I couldn't take. I was pass-
ing judgment on girls 1 didn't
know, calling names at girls I had
just met and criticizing girls 1 was
friendly with.
I also realized, unfortunately, I
wasn't alone. In fact, I was just as
hated-and by girls I barely knew.
A girl who dated my boyfriend,
I was told, was talking smack about
me. A girl who dated one of my
male friends was talking smack
about me as well. It seemed all the
girls I knew were out for, basically,
each other.
Girls who were thinner than us
were anorexic. Girls who competed
with us for power were bitches. And
when our boyfriends lingered too
long in conversation with a girl
at a party, it wasn't his wandering
eye that angered us, but the man-
stealing tricks of the slut he was
talking to.
We make assumptions. We
assume the worst. And in doing
so, we make things worse for our-
selves. We were being catty. We
were making unfair generalizations.
But we were also speaking from
experience, because the fact was
that many of us were throwing up,
starving ourselves and compulsively
exercising.
Sesame Street and our teachers
taught us that Girls Rule. We could
do anything we wanted because we
were smart, creative and talented.
At the same time, we learned
from the jokes made about women
on prime time TV, from the amount
of time and attention teachers spent
on boys, that girls were stupid,
untrustworthy and Inferior. Sure,
we can do anything we want, but
these other chicks?
They don't really know what
they're doing.
When we get to the classroom
or the boardroom or the social
arena, we can't help but recognize
that there are fewer women in
prestigious positions.
There are no official quotas as
to how many spots are open for
women, there is no acknowledge-
ment of preferential treatment
toward men, but based on what
we see and what we have learned
we instantly start competing with
women for the few spots we think
have been endowed to us.
Other women become our outlet
for the frustrations we face in soci-
ety, and by beating these women we
try to make up for the fact that we,
in the year 2(KH), still aren't quite so
equal as they say we are.
We spend all our time trying
to be thinner then one another
instead of questioning on why we
need to be so damn thin in the
first place. We squabble for the few
positions allotted to us instead of
working together to create more.
Instead of working together, we
set out to beat each other, and in
the process, we all lose.
Iowa State Daily (Iowa State
U.)-Today, let's try something new.
We'll play a guessing game. I'll
list some works of literature, and
you tell me what the common link
is. Here's your first set: The Bible,
"Hamlet The Odyssey ma Beowulf.
Give up?
The common link is that these
works of literature, considered
essential now, would probably be
banned by Al Gore and Joseph
Lieberman from being marketed as
movies, since they all depict some
kind of graphic violence.
Talk about striking a blow for
overprotective parents everywhere.
If Al Gore keeps on being a soccer
mom, we'll have no violent movies,
video games or music and, accord-
ingly, we'll never see violence
again-except for on the streets, in
our schools, on the domestic front
and abroad.
The fact is, Gore and Lieber-
man's use of the media as a scape-
goat for violence in the United
States is a pathetic attempt to
satisfy those parents who want the
government to watch over their
children.
If Gore is looking to incite vio-
lence, this plan may work. Frankly,
the idea of the government regulat-
ing what an industry can produce
based on shaky sociological data
and a couple kids in trench coats
getting trigger-happy makes me
scarlet with rage. I'm feeling more
furious because of this than I did
after seeing The Matrix.
If Gore wants to encourage gun
control bills, request more detailed
movie ratings and do all the things
that will make 13-year-olds angry,
fine. But not this much. Gore and
Lieberman are shaking their fist at
the movie industry and threatening
to bust some chops if they don't
reform.
Of course, what's most pathetic
about this is that Gore can't even
claim to be the first to pioneer this
idiotic idea. Four years ago, Bob
Dole was suggesting a plan that was
roughly the same.
In Tuesday's New York Times,
an unidentified marketing chief
of a movie studio bemoaned the
situation, asking how they were
supposed to market R-rated films to
their core audiences on shows like
WWF Wrestlemania, since much
of the audiences for such shows
are composed of children. He has a
point. Frankly, marketing to easily
influenced people is the point of
advertising.
Ironic, really, that the Federal
Trade Commission complains about
advertising during such shows.
They can't see the forest OR the
trees. They're so frantic about
children seeing TTie Matrix that they
don't notice the violence, hatred,
condescension, chauvinism and
bad theatrics involved in profes-
sional wrestling.
Everyone wants to aim the
blame away from the children and
their parents. But it's time to face
the truth. People are ultimately
accountable for their own actions.
Maybe the first-grader in Flint,
Mich, who shot his classmate didn't
understand the consequences of
his violence, but considering the
environment he lived in, I doubt
he got his idea of a cold-blooded
killing from any movie. In his case,
it could easily have come from
his version of family values. The
entire community looked like a
reenactment of Boyz in the Hood.
But in the interest of garnering
political support, Gore can just
ignore sociological factors such
as the environment and personal
attitudes and go for the common
enemy of overprotective parents
everywhere: the media.
Even more frightening, we see
another similarity between Bush
and Gore. In this case, the only
distinction is that Bush would
prefer to take guns off televisions
and put them in the hands of the
public so they can exercise their
rights to the utmost extent.
Whether or not parents in
America actually watch their chil-
dren, I can't say. But to revoke
an industry's right to create based
on a couple of mentally unstable
children going on killing sprees is
on the verge of totalitarianism.
Violence is a part of life for
many who don't even have access
to violent movies, just ask any
anthropology professor. There is
homophobia where people have
never heard Eminem, there is vio-
lence where no one's seen American
Psycho, and there is vulgarity where
people can't see "South Park
In Japan, people see cartoons
that are filled with violence and
promiscuity, and there is remark-
ably little crime. Why? No, Mr.
Gore, not because of the media.
It's because people are personally
accountable for their actions, and
there's not a line of people making
excuses for them.
It's easy to blame the disenfran-
chised and take legislative action
against them-far easier than it is to
take away the rights of Americans
who actually have rights. But a line
needs to be drawn.
After we eliminate Shakespeare
from our schools because of the vio-
lence in "Macbeth" or the hatred
in "Hamlet we'll have nothing to
blame, but the body count won't
go down. After we've prevented
Hollywood from making Saving
Private Ryan, people will still shoot
each other. But whafs the loss of
a little culture?
buMuU IN MY OPINION
Gates' monopoly on language
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Drinking at games embarrassment to all
Dear Editor,
This is my first time visiting
your site so you may have already
addressed this issue. If sol apologize
for taking up your time needlessly.
First, let me say that I don't think
it is a students only issue. It is a
Greenville issue.
I attended and recorded the
ECU-Va Tech game and was very
disappointed at the amount of
alcohol consumed at the game.
I had both of my children with
me and a very close friend and Uni-
versity of North Carolina-Chapel
Hill Alumni along with one of his
kids. We swap tickets at times or
attend games together whenever
we can.
I can assure you that the amount
of "partying" at ECU football games
Is unique to Greenville. I like to take
a drink on occasions but the smell
of alcohol was so strong where we
were sitting that it almost made me
sick. Also It was quite embarrassing
to me to take the company 1 had
into such an environment.
When I watched the video of
the game at home I was dismayed
again as on national TV there was a
fan (not a student) clearly pouring
a drink in the stands.
Also, why is it important to
finish the drink in hand along the
way to the stadium?
Somehow these cups, cans and
bottles end up on the stadium
grounds. I don't know how to
nicely describe the impression this
leaves to visitors and guests. In all
reality, there is no viable excuses
for either concern. All this leads me
to ask the following questions:
1. What can ECU do to lead
the way in addressing and hope-
fully curbing the drinking in the
stands?
2. What can ECU do to tackle
the worse problem of alcoholism
in our youth and adults in Green-
ville?
I know that ECU can and
repeatedly does tackle tough issues.
Believe me, this is a tough issue.
I would like to be as proud
when I take my family and friends
to ECU as they are when they take
me as a guest to their stadiums.
More so, I would like to know that
as a community we are attempting
to address the problems that have
plagued us more many years.
I was in Charlotte last year
when I asked a store clerk if he
had ever heard of ECU. His reply
shocked me. He said "I attended
that school for awhile but had to
leave. There was too much drink-
ing going on there Please let me
know what you think.
Mike Fitzgerald
Washington Square News (TMS)-
Bill Gates is the richest man in the
world. He has grown so wealthy
that he has immodestly installed
a billboard outside of his home:
"Billions and billions made He
is the man who has brought the
world things like "Microsoft" and
practically every other technological
innovation since the cotton gin.
I certainly wouldn't think this
man-this seemingly immortal
being-to be an idiot. But, alas,
Bill Gates keeps opening his damn
mouth.
First, there was the whole
monopoly controversy last year.
Bill says that Microsoft does not
have a monopoly over the computer
industry. Well, Bill, if you would
poll the average American today, he
would probably think that LINUX
was the latest probe sent to Mars,
and that Netscape is what Monet
painted. You have a monopoly. The
courts have proven it.
But now, he has confirmed that
geeky ignorance of his with a recent
statement he made in Melbourne,
Australia. The statement was made
to Asian nations, specifically China.
The message: "Welcome to the
Internet: now speak English
According to the Associated
Press, China will have the largest
online population in less than 10
years. But in spite of this, until
machine translation shows up, it's
very likely that English will be used,
Gates said. To be polite, this is an
idiotic idea on Bill's part.
Not that his company needs
any more money, but to isolate
the language of the Internet to
English precludes billions of poten-
tial customers. Not only that, it
inhibits the ever-flourishing world
of e-commerce, as well as various
forms of communication that could
benefit international relations,
especially from a sociopolitical
standpoint.
Countries could work toward a
better understanding of each other,
and maybe even make advances in
science, entertainment, even world
peace-together.
Gates' statement, however,
sounds like something out of 1950s
McCarthyism-don't let the Reds
know of our latest technology! It's
bigoted and outdated.
Gates sounds like he has no
regrets about the lack of technology
for Far Eastern nations. And when
Bill Gates doesn't care, computers
don't care. And when computers
don't care, we Internet surfers are
left in the dark. The "World Wide
Web now takes on a twisted tinge
of irony, doesn't it?
If Microsoft has the technology
to produce new super-computen
fast enough to make last week
computers antiques, then I highly
doubt that there Is no way tc
include the Asian languages, not
only within the country itself, but
also translated when posted world-
wide. Now that would be software
that could be beneficial to everyone
across the world.
With all due respect for software
developers, if they could: put halj
the energy into this translation
project as they do into something
like "Tomb Raider countries woulc
have the capacity to speak in each
other's languages, technically speak-
ing, in no time at all.
But for the time being, Gates
word is law. And until that voice
recognition translator is createc
(which Gates predicts being more
than a decade away from develop
ment), half the world will be left
out in the cold, which speaks very
poorly for the technology that was
supposed to unite the Free World.
For Bill Gates to cut off most
of Asia from "the language of the
Internet" is tunnel-sighted, poot
business sense and bad karma in
general (although I doubt Bill ever
knows what karma is).





6 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarotinian.com
RACE from page 3
NEWS
Thursday, September 21, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
"This issue has spawned an incredible amount of conversation on our
campus Mullendore said. "It's an issue many of us feel strongly about,
and it goes beyond the Greek system. How do we, as an institution,
educate our students and prepare them for the world beyond the
University of Georgia?"
According to the resolution. Alpha Gamma Delta also agreed to take a
leadership role in increasing "awareness and appreciation" for the value
of racial diversity in social organizations on campus. The resolution
was signed by Mullendore and Suzanne Spicer, international president
of Alpha Gamma Delta.
"The biggest question here Is how do we encourage persons of one
ethnicity to at least consider joining organizations whose membership is
almost entirely composed of persons of another ethnicity?" Spicer said
in a news release. "It is an extremely difficult topic, yet one which we
are committed to addressing
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FOR RENT
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HELP WANTED
PART-TIME Library Assistant
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Cypress Glen Retirement Com-
munity. Cypress Glen is close
to campus for students. Inter-
ested applicants need to apply
in person at Cypress Glen at 100
Hickory Street.
SPRING BREAK reps needed
to promote campus trips. Earn $
travel free! No cost. We train you.
Work on your own time. 1-800-
367-1252 or www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
PART-TIME library page (3
positions available). Monday
through Friday and some wee-
kends. Shelving books, assisting
librarians as needed. Complete
application and take shelving test
at Sheppard Memorial Library,
Children's Library, 530 Evans
Street, Greenville. No phone
calls.
LOOKING FOR therapeutic
foster parents. Applicant must
have high school diploma or
GED. Salary and incentives pro-
vided with training completion
Male, female, single, married
and graduate students encour-
aged to apply. Call 561-8556 or
717-8005.
GO DIRECT-$savings! 1
Internet-based Spring Break com-
pany offering Wholesale Spring
Break Packages (no middle-
men)! Zero traveler complaints
last year! Lowest price guaran-
tee! 1-800-367-1252 www.spring-
breakdirect.com
PART-TIME Positions now
available at Hong Kong King Buf-
fet (corner of Memorial Dr. 8t
Village). Call 758-9331 or apply
in person!
SOCCER COACHESReferees
needed to coach and referee
youth soccer games for the Win-
terville Recreation Department.
Games will be on week nights
at the Wintervilfe Recreation
Park. This is a paid position. For
more information contact Greg
Gregory at 756-2221, ext. 21.
GET PAID while studying,
watching a video with friends or
just hanging out. 2-way radios
allow unparalleled mobility when
not on a delivery for Restaurant
Runners. Part-time positions
($8-13hr) salary, order bonuses
plus tips. Any lunch availability
andor knowledge of Greenville
streets beneficial. Call 756-5527
to arrange an interview or visit
www.restaurantrunners.com for
more info.
GREEK PERSONALS
LIFE SKILLS for Greek
women. Together, we'll study
the Bible to learn practical skills
needed for a full life. Wednes-
days at 9:30 p.m beginning Sep-
tember 27. Questions? Call Amy
752-9982.
DELTA ZETA'S Annual
Spaghetti Dinner will be held on
October 3 from 5-8p.m.l Tickets
are available for $5 in advance
and $6 at the door! For more
information, call 758-7530.
THERE WILL be an Order of
Omega meeting Tuesday Sep-
tember 26th in Mendenhall at
6:00. Please have excuse in
before the meeting.
ALPHA PHI, thanks for helping
make Parent's Weekend the best
one yet. It couldn't have been
done without your hard work.
The brothers of Sigma Alpha
Epsilon.
SPRING BREAK 2001
Jawwle Csmcm. Horta�. tJlhiilm. ��ham�
Now HhwM Campus nost CJwn 2 wt99 Trtp.
FimDM lootIlkMUWFMIMb
pack or vit on-Mn� � unaptashtours-com
1 -800-426-771Q
TO THE sisters and pledges
of Epsilon
Sigma Alpha: Have a wonder-
ful week and keep smiling!
DELTA ZETA would like to
thank Sigma Phi Epsilon for an
unforgettable Parent's Weekend!
Thanks again.
How to advertise in
The East Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4 00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional words Se each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer wordsadditional word 5e each
Must present a valid ECU I. D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse this rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE$1.00
add to above line ad rate for either bold or ALL CAPS type
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a busi-
ness must be prepaid unless credit has been established.
Cancelled ads can be removed from the paper if notifica-
tion is made before publication, but no cash refunds are
given. No proofs ortearsheets are available.
The Personals section is intended for non-commerical
communication placed by individuals or campus groups.
Business ads will not be placed in this section. All ads are
subject to editing for indecent or inflammatory language
as determined by the editors.
CLASSIFIED DEADLINE4 P.M. THURSDAY
for the following Wednesdays paper
Listen up! We need help!
The east Carolinian needs designers. We need students to
design ads, create centerpieces, & layout pages of the
newspaper. Apply at The East Carolinian office second floor,
Student Publications Building. Must have a 2.0 GPA






8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Thursday, September 21, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
7:00 PM, SRC OUTDOOR POOL
AIR BAND PRELIMINARIES ARE
WEDNESDAY SEPT. 20, 7:00 pm
TOP 10 BANDS MAKE THE THURSDAY NIGHT FINALS.
WHAT IS ZOORAMA?
Zoorama is a huge party where games and prizes can be won and free food for all.
THE AIR BAND CHALLENGE?
Lipsync, dance, and pretend play your way to cash prizes. Can't sing or play NO PROBLEM! Students can form a band and
enter to win cash. No musical skills needed. Air bands will be judged on creativity, lipsync skills, showmanship, and fan
support. NO LIMIT TO BAND SIZE. Stage and musical instruments will be provided
$
$
THIRD PRIZE
$100
I
T-SHIRTS �
THE JUNGLE BAND CHALLENGE ENTRY FORM?
1: SsHw
I?
RETURN TO STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
MAIN OFFICE BY SEPT. 15
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mber21,2000
ts@tec.ecu.edu
"Drunkeness is nothing
but voluntary madness"
-Seneca
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday: Friends can help your
career, and getting a better job could lead to
more friends. Experience and luck are major
factors in your success.
Aries
(March 21-April 19)
You could get a burst of energy, but be
careful. You could take off in the wrong
direction. Think about your priorities again
and rearrange them, if necessary.
Taurus
(April 20-May 20)
Some days your brain just works better,
and this could be one of them. Reassess a
problem that's had you stymied. You may
think of a way around it.
Gemini
(May 21 -June 21)
If you're buying something for your
home, you may have to spend more than
you planned. Only do that for the highest
quality. Don't buy on a whim even if hurried.
Cancer
(June 22-july 22)
You should get a lucky break, so watch for
it. Something you've recently learned could
come in handy, especially in an argument.
Confidence doesn't equal being right.
Leo
(July 23-Aug. 22)
Don't be distracted by a person you'd like
to know better. There'll be time for that over
the weekend. Meanwhile, finish something
you promised.
Virgo
(Aug. 23-Sept. 22)
Others admire you for your wit and dis-
cretion. Your courage is being talked about,
too. They'll be glad to help if there's work to
be done. Let them know what you need.
Libra
(Sept. 23-Oct. 22)
Take care of details and keep a low profile.
The more you finish, the better. An older
person could ask for an accounting, and you
want to be ready when that happens.
Scorpio
(Oct. 23-Nov. 21)
Place that long-distance phone call now,
instead of waiting for tomorrow. Your con-
versation could make a difference in the
plans both of you make.
Sagittarius
(Nov.2-Dec. 21)
Over the next few days, conditions will
ease. Meanwhile, a test must be passed.
Schedule your celebration for this weekend,
but don't relax yet.
Capricorn
(Dec.22-Jan. 19)
A partner may get through where you
tried and failed. If so, don't feel bad. There's
more than enough to keep you busy; del-
egate as much as possible.
Aquarius
(Jan. 20-Feb. 18)
Get serious. You have to finish some work
before you can play. You should have big
plans for this weekend. Don't get distracted
from a job that must get done.
Pisces
(Feb. 19-March20)
You might feel shy, but you can power
through it. Don't let worries interfere if
action needs to be taken. Follow the lead of a
person you trust�and your heart.
the east Carolinian
Features B2
Phil McDonald devotes himself to
students
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 21, 2000
A Pirate' We for we
ECU students took
a break from their
studies last Saturday
and spent their time
enjoying the sunny
day cheering on
Pirate football and
relaxing on their
weekend off from
classes.






2 The East Carolinian
wvyw.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, September 21, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
FEATURESBRIEFS
What was your favorite
children's book?
Laura Cambell and
Kimberly Suttle
Freshmen
"Ramona Quimby We loved Ramona.
Mike Broderick
Freshman
Cat In The Hat"
Ashley Kennedy
Freshman
"Boxcar Children"
Kenton Ross
Senior
Green Eggs and Ham"
Michael Hawkins
Sophomore
"Clifford, The Big Red Dog"
William Craft
Junior
'Curious George'
Germaine Cordano
Sophomore
"Sex education it was a book I read In Midd
School. It wasn't really about sex.
Zonnelly
Above and Beyond: Phil McDaniel, Belk Hall Coordinator
Maura Buck
FEATURES EDITOR
Phil McDaniel accepted the position of Coordinator
of Belk Hall in the fall of 1998 and has continued his
commitment to the on-campus residents ever since.
"The greatest thing about Phil is that he makes
himself accessible to students at any hour said
junior resident advisor Bill Hoffman. "He offers help
to anyone who needs it with an objective and fair
point of view
As a coordinator, McDaniel has devoted himself
to students living on campus relentlessly for the past
three years.
"The most rewarding part of my job is getting to
work with the students everyday McDaniel said.
In the past, McDaniel has organized a number of
successful events that have affected hundreds of people,
both students and those those in the community who
are less fortunate.
Not only did he organize the Alternative Spring
Break trip to Boca Raton, Fla. last year, he is also
responsible for putting together an Easter egg hunt
for the Girls and Boys Clubs for the past two years.
He also coached the ECU'S Women's Club Volleyball
for the past two years.
"Last season our record was 24-2 and we were
ranked as high as 10th in the nation said McDaniel,
a task unachievable without a mentor in place to bring
"There is an infinite pool of information and
resources right outside your door. Find your niche
here and run with it
Phil McDaniel
Belk Hall Coordinator
out the best in all those involved.
In 1999, McDaniel was the recipient of the Chan-
cellor's Synergy Award for his participation in the
Mardi Gras events while he served on the Major Events
Committee for the Student Union for both Mardi Gras
and Midnight Madness.
"Phil has organized an abundance of programs for
us said sophomore Kelvin Stroupe, a resident of Belk
Hall. "Ust year, I attended an event that taught me to
listen to what others have to say before interrupting
them or contriving a preconceived opinion. After that
program, I think that I developed a better relationship
with both my roommate and peers
Although McDaniel has already accomplished a
great deal, he is still working continuously to keep his
tradition of excellence in volunteering alive. This year,
he plans on implementing stronger ties through the
Residence Hall Association with Habitat for Humanity
of Greenville in addition to coming up with another
Alternative Spring Break trip.
"Currently, we are working on Homecoming activi-
ties but also this year, there has been talk of starting up
a street festival on College Hill said McDaniel.
One piece of advice that McDaniel would like to
share with all students is that they should be aware
of their surroundings. He believes that there are
more opportunities available here than most students
partake in.
"I encourage everyone to get involved in a variety
of endeavors while they are here at ECU McDaniel
said. "There is an infinite pool of information and
resources right outside your door. Find your niche
here and run with it
Before coming to ECU, McDaniel attended Culver-
Stockton College in Canton, Mo. where he attained a
degree in criminal justice. Then, he moved on to the
University of Wisconsin-Platteville, where he earned
a master's in counselor education, before ending up
at ECU.
There is one quote by an unknown source that
McDaniel firmly believes in and truly lives by: "Don't
let making a living prevent you from making a life
This writer can be contacted at features@tec.ecu.edu.
Childhood classic opens Family Fare
Beverly Cleary's "Ramona Quimby" will
come to life next weekend as the first
Family Fare production of the 2000-01
season. Audiences young and old will love
her childhood innocence as she battles
through some of childhood's most difficult
problems.
"Ramona Quimby"
comes to life in play
Maura Buck
FEATURES EDITOR
Do you remember reading your favorite child-
hood book? This year, ECU'sFamily Fare season
will soon be underway, with a childhood classic
opening up the season.
"Ramona Quimby" is this year's first production,
a selection that will surely leave children and adults
alike recalling just how hard it was to be a kid.
At 2 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 30 the cast of
"Ramona Quimby" invites
audiences to join in as Ramona tackles some
tough childhood feelings. The play, adapted by
Len Jenkin, combines and brings to life stories
from several of Beverly Cleary's books, including
"Ramona the Pest "Ramona and her Father" and
"Ramona Forever
Throughout the play, she thinks that her teacher
hates her and as a result drops out of school for a
few days. When her father loses his job, she and
her sister Beezus try to get him to stop smoking and
finally she deals with the fact that her favorite aunt
is getting married and is moving to Alaska.
"If I were a student, I would get together some of
my girlfriends or suite mates and through a Ramona
Party and go to the play the next day said Carol
Woodruff, marketing director. "It is a great way to
just relax and connect yourself with something you
remember as a child
Despite the fact that the series is more children
and even family oriented, it shouldn't discourage
students from attending the event. These stories have
been enormously popular, as they have appeared in
14 languages in 20 countries, and Ramona pieces
have been made into both videos and television
productions. PBS aired the Ramona stories as a
10-part series.
Despite the fact that you are college student, the
Family Fare will prove to be relevant for all ages.
"I think that most students will find that attend-
ing one of these events will provide them with a
wonderful encounter from childhood Woodruff
said. "These are very special memories from child-
hood
If you are interested in this production, advance
tickets are now available for a student rate of $5.
Simply contact the Central Ticket Office to join in
on what promises to be a great adventure. All tickets
at the door will be sold for $9.
The production is put on by TheatreworksUSA, a
company celebrating 40 years in existence, delighting
audiences all over the country. The company has
performed everywhere from The White House, to
Lincoln Center in New York, to the Music Center
in Lbs Angeles.
The Family Fare program will bring to life "Aesop's
Fables "Robin Hood "Anne of Green Gables
and "Freedom Train" this school year. Contact the
Central Ticket office at 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS
to attain infonnation on acquiring tickets.
This writer can be contacted at fealures9tececu.edu.
Word of the day:
appendage
Pronunciation: a-PEN-dij
n: something joined onto a larger or more important
thing.
"Despite having important attractions and institu-
tions of its own. The area was seen as simply an
appendage to the neighboring city
Today's Word ot the Day is courtesy of www.usetessknowledge.com.
Madd Vibe
Rebel performance
scheduled at Peasant's
Earline White
FEATURES WRITER
"The world is really a
big bucket of shit
can't help but smell it I'm
not the kind of person to
ignore that kind of stuff,
unlike some people who
cover it up with singing
about doughnuts and dai-
sies. What I see-i put
it right in (the audience's)
face. I'm a rebel, you
might say
Angelo Moore
Dr. Madd Vibe, saxophonist
Angelo Moore-lead singer and saxophonist�
the alternativeska band, Fishbone, will perfo
a spoken � cWf Jl't
Madd Vibe, at 9:30 p.m. on Monday, Sept.
Peasant's Cafe. Admission is $5 and it is an
and older show.
Spanning two
decades in the
music scene, Fish-
bone has influ-
enced such bands
as No Doubt, the
Mighty Mighty
Bosstones, 311
and Sublime. The
band's social com-
mentary accom-
panied by fren-
zied music and
a frantic show,
gives rise to one
of the best live
acts in America.
Angelo's emer-
gence into writ-
ing and perform-
ing poetry began
in 1995. Writing
poetry based on
his experiences growing up a "fly in the but-
termilk" in the white suburbs of the San Fernando
Valley, he reflects the politics of relationships in
Amercia. Racism, social corrosion, family matters,
and the human condition in "a world gone mad"
will be the focus of his performance.
"The world is really a big bucket of shit Dr.
Madd Vibe said. "1 can't help but smell it. I'm
not the kind of person to ignore that kind of
stuff, unlike some people who cover it up with
singing about doughnuts and daisies. What I
see-I put it right in (the audience's) face. I'm a
rebel, you might say
On stage, Dr. Madd Vibe is full of energy,
passion and honesty.
"It was a journey said one listener of a
performance of Dr. Madd Vibe. "A beautiful,
terrifying, hilarious, amazing, magic journey
I didn't know whether I wanted to keep my eyes
closed and just follow him in my head, or not
even blink for fear of missing something
Moore brought his work to stage throughout
the world, including New York, Los Angeles, Paris
and Tokyo. He independently released a successful
book of poetry in 1996, followed the next year
with a CD and video with the same title, Dr. Madd
Vibe's Comprehensive Linkotogy.
"Fishbone frontman Angelo Moore spins
dazzling, busy psychedelic street-preacher raps
said one recent review that appeared in the
Chicago Reader. "He certainly isn't the first black
poet to take fiendish glee in the resonance of the
word nigger, but he might be the first to repeat it
so often and with such wild energy that it truly
loses all meaning-probably his point
Angelo is currently supporting Fishbone's
latest album, Fishbone's Familyhood Nextperience
Presents The Psychotic Friends Nuttwerx. Another
Dr. Madd Vibe CD, video and book are
to be released this year.
For a healthy dose of k
quick shot of cynicism. Dr. Ma
the ailing.
This writer can be contacted at ewhiteOteu





)er21,2O00
�tec.ecu.edu
lore important
is and institu-
as simply an
Thursday, September 21, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 3
features@tec.ecu.edu
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Widow of NFL
running back arrested
Charlotte, N.C. (AP)-The lawyer
for Deidra Lane disapproves of
the way FBI agents arrested his
client last week on a bank larceny
charge.
Lane, handcuffed and arrested
in front of her family, was taken
into custody Friday and held over
the weekend. She is expected to go
before a federal magistrate Monday,
who could decide to grant bail.
The 25-year-old widow of NFL
running back Fred Lane has been
free on bond on a murder charge
In the July 6 shooting death of
her husband, a Franklin, Tenn
native.
She also had a hearing sched-
uled Monday at which a judge
was to decide whether prosecutors
can seek the death penalty if she's
convicted of murder.
Federal authorities said the bank
case is under seal and they can't
discuss details, but her lawyer said
the matter is two years old.
They knew the children were
there. It was done in a way that
had to have been calculated to
inflict pain
Henderson Hill
Defense Lawyer
Henderson Hill complained
about the way Lane was arrested.
The lawyer said his client had left
his office after a two-hour confer-
ence when FBI agents pulled over
the car in which she was riding
with her mother and two children,
ages 11 weeks and 4 years.
"I do find disturbing the manner
in which she was arrested Hill
said. "They knew the children were
there. It was done in a way that had
to have been calculated to inflict
pain
Chris Swecker, who heads the
FBI office in North Carolina, said
there was no intent to inflict pain
on Deidra l.ane.
"It was a routine arrest, designed
to be done in the safest manner
possible he said. "And that's
the way it was done. Subjects are
always handcuffed when they are
arrested
Swecker described Lane as polite
and cooperative during die arrest.
Also arrested Friday in connec-
tion with Lane's case was Watosha
Watson, 22, on a bank larceny
charge.
Lane had been free on a
$100,000 bond in the murder
case since days after her Aug. 23
arrest on the murder charge. It
was unclear how Lane's latest legal
trouble would affect her bond in
the murder case.
Prosecutors contend Deidra
Lane killed her husband to collect
a $5 million life insurance policy.
She has denied the claim, and said
in a 911 call after the shooting
that her husband had choked and
hit her.
Professional fund-raisers
collect more, distribute less
Raleigh, N.C. (AI')-North Carolinians gave less
to charities that use professional fund-raisers last
year, but they got more bang for the bucks, the latest
report on charitable giving shows.
Charities using state-licensed professional fund-
raising services collected $1.34 million less from
May 1999 to June 2(KX) than from the previous year.
Of the more than $75 million collected, nearly $40
million actually reached the charities.
That 53 percent mark was a 12 percent increase
from 1998-99. In 1997-98, charities received 38
percent of the total collected. The rest of the money
goes to paying professional solicitors or for other costs
such as advertising or postage.
The latest report examined 411 contracts where
charities used the services of professional fund-raisers.
Officials said the change in charitable donations
might have been altered by Hurricane Floyd relief efforts.
Those efforts saw plenty of direct charitable gifts-such
as person-to-person or through church efforts-that
would not qualify in the report because a professional
solicitor was not used.
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4 The East Carolinian
�ww.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Thursday, September 21, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Who wants to get rich
and drop out of college?
Think you're smarter than all of those people on television?
Of course you do. And now the rest of the world can find
out just how right or wrong you are.
ABC's "Who Wants to be a Millionaire which is to television
ratings what lead is to water filter sales, is holding tryouts for a
special college edition, to be aired Dec. 19-21.
The five-city tour hit Boston over the weekend and lands in
Washington, D.C. on Tuesday, followed by stops in Atlanta, Chicago
and Los Angeles.
Interested students must be U.S. residents, 18 years of age and
working toward an undergraduate degree. In addition, students
must produce a photo ID, proof of age and a copy of their current
tuition bill.
Three separate testing sessions will take place at each stop,
at 9 a.m 2 p.m. and 7 p.m. local time. The first 125 eligible
students in line will be allowed to take a 30-question exam. And
if you're the 126th eligible person in line? Try again next time
or go home.
It should also be noted that lines will not open until an hour
before test time, so camping out is fruitless.
Students will receive one chance at the exam, those who pass
then face a taped interview with the show's producers. The decision
is then in the hands of the show's sponsors, who will pick 10
finalists for each episode, to be taped Nov. 8-11 in New York. In
other words, dress nice and brush your teeth.
Sessions are scheduled for
the following dates and locations:
Washington, DC: Tues Sept. 19 at Loews IEnfant Plaza's
Renoir Room, 480 L'Enfant Plaza, S.W.
Arante:Thurs Sept. 21 at the Ritz Carlton's Salon III-IV Room,
181 Peachtree Street.
Chicago: Sat Sept. 23 at the Chicago Marriott Downtown's
Avenue Ballroom, 4th Floor, 540 North Michigan Ave.
Looking For a Church Home?

�Moral
Sunday Morning ft
Evening Services
8:30 AM, 11:00 AM & 6:00 PM
Bible Study (10:00 AM)
Cross Bearers (A College & Career
Ministry)
Couples Classes (Ail Ages)
Wednesday Night Supper
ft Service
GROW series & Bible study
(&30 PM)
Praise ft Worship
A wonderful Wend of tradi
hymns & praise & worship choruses!
Leagues
Basketball (Men & Women) - Fall
Softball (Men & Women) - Spring
Tons of other planned
activities including:
ECU Campus Outreach
ECUVan Ministry
Kings Dominion
Skiing (Water & Snow)
Volleyball
Shopping outings for the ladies
Golf for the men
Cookouts (taitgating at ECU games)
and lots, lots more
Attention College
Students!
Cant find the right church or
Bible study group? Need to get
things right with God? Look no
further. Unity's College ft Career
Ministry (Cross Bearers) may be
just what you are looking for. We
discuss issues you are dealing
with including relationships, drugs
ft alcohol, God's will for your life,
evangelism, and holiness.You will
find solid preaching and teaching
of God's word here at Unity.
Please come and join us! We look
forward to meeting you.
ECU VAN SCHEDULE
9:20 AM Mendenhall bus stop
9:25 AM Cotton Dorm
9:30 AM Slay Dorm
9:35 AM College Hill bus stop
9:40 AM Unity Church
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women at 13 to 12 off retail.
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Division of I .15
Thanksgiving Trip to
New York City
Departs: Tuesday, November 21
Returns: Sunday, November 26
Price includes round-trip bus transportation and
3 nights hotel in the "Big Apple
StudentNon-Student
Quad Occupancy$199$230
Triple Occupancy$220$250
Double Occupancy$270$300 .
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Deadline to sign-up: November 2, 2000
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www.ecu.edustudentunion
Thursday, Se
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Thursday, September 21, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Led by a second
half surge by Ruthie
Bolton Holyfield, the
United States Women's
Basketball team stayed
unbeaten in Olympic
play Wednesday. The
team had to comeback
to beat Russia 88-77.
The team moves on to the quarterfinals
behind 18 points by Lisa Leslie and 16 from
Sheryl Swoopes and Yolanda Griffith, who
added 11 rebounds. Bolton Holifield scored
many of her 12 points in the crucial final
minutes to keep the United States in front.
The Russians were dealt their first toss
despite shooting 59 percent in the second
half.
Women's soccer
heads to semifinals
The defending Olym-
pic Champion United
States Women's soccer
team got one step closer
to winning gold Wednes-
day. The team defeated a
pesky Nigerian team 3-1.
The United States got
goals from Brandi Chas-
tain, Kristine Lilley and
Shannon MacMillan to secure the win.
The team improves to 2-0-1 and will
face Brazil in the semifinals.
In the other semifinal matchup, Norway
will take on Germany.
U.S. baseball
tops South Korea
if United
States Baseball
team took over
the top spot in
Olympic compe-
. tition thanks to
Jf Jfl a win over South
L 3 j: 9 I Korea and a loss
to rival Cuba.
Former Minnesota Twin, Doug Mientki-
wicz hit a grand slam to help the U.S. beat
the Koreans 4-0.
Meanwhile, Cuba had their 21-game
winning streak snapped by the Nether-
lands. The Dutch team led by some ex-
major leaguers, defeated the Cubans 4-2.
The loss is the Cubans first in Olympic
play in over a decade.
Sprinter fights flu
Canadian Sprinter, Donovan Bailey, may
not be able to defend his 1996 gold in the
100 meters. Bailey, 32, has been suffering
from the flu for the past two days and cur-
rently is taking IV.
The sprinter has an outside shot to
defend his gold. He would become only the
second sprinter to do so in the 100 meters.
Carl Lewis won the 100 meters in the 1988
and 1992 Olympics.
Aikman cleared to play
Three weeks after being sidelined with a
concussion and a few days after his backup,
Randall Cunningham led the Cowboys to a
win over the Redskins, Dallas quarterback,
Troy Aikman looks to become the starter
again this Sunday.
Team doctors cleared the former Super
Bowl MVP to play Wednesday and Aikman
becomes the favorite to start at QB for
Dallas' game with the 49ers.
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 5
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Nemov wins
all-around gold
Russian gymnast, Alexi Nemov won the
men's all-around gold medal Wednesday
night with a score of 58.474. Nemov missed
the gold by less than a point in Atlanta four
years ago.
SATURDAY a NOON - SYRACUSE ORANGEMEN
Seeing
ORANGEMAN - Morion Greenwood
Jersey : 52 Height: 61" Weight: 231 Position: Linebacker Origin: Freeport, NY Noted for: Named first team All-Big East, by three preseason publications
j
hV
ECU prepares for
home date with Syracuse
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
The last time ECU and Syracuse were on the field together, it wasn't
much of a game. In 1997, the Pirates traveled to Syracuse and were
dealt their worst defeat in 19 years, a S6-0 thumping at the hands of
the Orangemen.
Head Coach Steve Logan will not let his Pirates forget.
"He already started on that said linebacker John Williamson. "He brought
in a couple of the players that were in that game and he was telling us how
it felt to lose like that
A handful of players remain from the 1997 team that lost in the Carrier Dome.
The loss, the most lopsided of their careers, still resonates.
"It does said offensive lineman Sherwin lacewell, who was a freshman
in 1997. "You've always got to reflect on that. We just need to prevent that
from happening this year
In the four years since the two teams met, much has changed. Syracuse, once
a BCS Bowl staple, has waned, while F.CU, 5-6 in 1997 has posted back-to-back
winning seasons.
"Our team has improved considerably since then Logan said. "We did not
have a very good football team then, and that was one of the best teams they
have had. They were potent, particularly on offense where they had the great
quarterback (Donovan McNabb), running back (Rob Konrad) and wide receiver
(Quinton Spotwood). Since then we have been fairly competitive for a number
of years, but if we don't get off to a good start, then this football team can do
They are the fastest Syracuse defense I've seen since we started playing them,
and will probably by the end of the season rank as one of the top defenses in
that school's history, so touchdowns will be few and far between.
Steve Logan
Head Coach, ECU football
what Virginia Tech did to us two weeks ago
The team that Syracuse will bring to Greenville, while not as powerful as
in years past, is dangerous.
"They are very efficient in what they are doing Logan said. "They know
how to run the option and throw the play-action pass off of it. So its going
to be a test
The offense is centered around tailback Dee Brown. Brown is Syracuse's
leading rusher with 212 yards this season and averages 6.1 yards per carry. Joining
Brown in the backfield will be senior fullback Kyle Johnson.
While the offense could pose problems, it is the Syracuse defense that has
garnered the most attention from the ECU coaches.
"One thing that jumps out at you when watching the Syracuse film is their
defense Logan said. "They are the fastest Syracuse defense I've seen since
we started playing them, and will probably by the end of the season rank as
one of the top defenses in that school's history, so touchdowns will be few
and far between
Leading the way on the Orangemen defense is senior linebacker Morion
Greenwood. Greenwood ranked third on the team in tackles in 1999 with 91
and serves as the leader of the defense.
Meanwhile, the Orangemen feature an experienced defensive line that returns
three starters from a year ago. Defensive end Duke Pettijohn anchors the unit.
The senior led the Orangemen in sacks with 10.5 last season. Fellow seniors Rickie
Simpkins and Eric Downing join Pettijohn to form a potent line.
"Defensively, it's probably the best team we've faced all year Lacewell
said. "We have to focus on the fundamentals and technique and coming off
of the ball
"It's not just what they do, it's their players Logan said. "They're not
doing anything schematically that's difficult, they're just really, really good
football players
Last week, after stumbling early against I'ulane, the ECU offense found it's
groove in the second half, scoring 24 second-half points on the gambling Tulane
defense. This week, with a much more talented defense coming to town, the
offense faces a stiffer challenge.
"It just comes down to us against them said halfback Marcellus Harris.
"Whoever makes the most plays wins, that all
This writer can be contacted at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
Pirates Continue Sydney Games lack magic
their Big East tour
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Three members of
conference on Pirate schedule
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
When ECU
Head Coach Steve
Logan got a look
at the 2000 Pirate
football schedule,
he may have felt
like his Pirates had
a realistic shot at
their first Big East
title. Odd because the Pirates are still
members of C-USA.
"Having lost to Virginia lech I think
we're in second place now Logan joked.
"At least
Saturday's game with Syracuse marks
the second of three games the Pirates
will have with members of the Big East
Conference.
"In reality we're playing the top
echelon of the Big East and a full Confer-
ence USA slate Logan said. "That's a
heavy task
Earlier this month, the Pirates hosted
1999 Big East Champion Virginia Tech.
In November, they travel to West Virginia
to take on the Mountaineers to round out
the trio of Big East opponents.
"You can take it as 'we're facing
another Big East team, one of the better
teams in their conference said offensive
"It's good to play teams from a big con-
ference like the Big EastIt shows us how
we rank against other conferences
Marcellus Harris
Hallback, ECU Pirates
lineman Sherwin Lacewell. "You can
take it as motivation
Though rare, this has happened
before. In 1991 and 1992, the Pirates had
three games with Big East opponents.
In 1991, the Pirates topped Syracuse,
Pittsburgh and new Big Fast member,
Virginia Tech en
route to a win in
the Peach Bowl.
In 1992 the
Pirates faced
these same three
teams. In the first
week they lost
42-21 to Syra-
cuse. The next
week they turned around and beat
Virginia Tech 30-27. In November of
that year thev lost to West Virginia
41-28.
The Pirates repeated the feat in 1996
when they took on West Virginia, Miami
and Virginia Tech.
However, this will mark the first
time since ECU joined C-USA in 1997,
that it has been the case.
"It's good to play teams from a
big conference like the Big East said
halfback Marcellus Harris. "It shows us
how we rank against other conferences.
Playing ACC schools and other teams,
it's just a way to let us know where
C-USA is
rjs writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
How 1out them Cowboys! Wow,
it's about time that a Redskins-Cow-
boys game meant something. Hey
what about those pennant races? Mets
and Braves are always fun, and that
AL Wild Card race is coming down to
the final days.
Don't forget about college football,
you've got the PAC-10 on the way
up, Notre Dame playing with a pas-
sion not seen In almost a decade and
traditional powers Penn State and
Alabama just a few losses away from
rock bottom.
Did I forget anything? Oh yeah
aren't the Olympics going on? Is
anybody missing them?
Every four years, the Olympics
captivate the sports world. While there
are pundits out there who charge that
it's too commercial, there are too
many sports and all the athletes are
all doped up.
They may be right, but there's just
something about seeing a kid from the
U.S. or Ecuador or East Jimbuckdoo see
their dreams and hard work realized,
stand on that podium with their flag
and their anthem. If you've got a heart.
It beats a little faster.
The Olympic games are the one
event in any genre of life that reaches
the entire world on such a basic level.
It is winning and losing. It is country
versus country in a celebration of
athletic competition,
Or so I've been told.
Honestly, have you found yourself
tuning In to watch the preliminaries
of the women's 300 meter indivi
medley, the results of which we
Sportscenter this morning, and
the Internet all day?
The answer is probal
Rating are down fo
Olympics. NBC opted to carry
their coverage on taped delay
not one event live becati
time difference.
though slickly edited, the c
age lacks the drama that makes
games so riveting. Unless you
to read a newspaper, turn on th
or get online you already know
is going to win and despite a!
the network's effort, that hi
telecast a great deal.
Also the lack of live
takes away the warm and hi
of a moment shared with the
When the pistol fires for the
the men's 100 meter sprint fi
you know the world is
year you will know th
was watching early that mot
and that the guy In lane five
It's just not the same.
NBC gambled that peopl
willingly eschew Oh
until prime time. CB
same choice for the W
two years ago in Nag
watched then either.
then their is the pr
time of year. Because su i
start down
months, the game
mid-summ;
there t
football sea





6 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
Thursday, September 21, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Thompson wins seventh gold medal
SYDNEY, Australia (AP)-Sweet
revenge for the U.S. swimmers fol-
lowed a Dutch treat at the Sydney
Games.
Jenny Thompson set a women's
record for career swimming gold
medals with seven Wednesday,
anchoring an American 800-meter
freestyle relay that nipped Australia
in 7 minutes, 57.80 seconds.
Thompson's performance came
minutes after Misty Hyman shocked
world-record holder Susie O'Neill-
another Aussie-in the 200-meter
butterfly.
The U.S. victories avenged men's
losses to Australian hero lan Thorpe
and his teammates, who beat the
Americans by a fingertip in the
men's 400 freestyle relay earlier in
the week, then blew them out in
the 800 freestyle relay.
Thompson, who has won all
her golds in relays, surpassed the
six swimming golds won by Kristin
Otto of Germany.
The United States was in second
place when Thompson jumped in
the pool. But she overtook Petria
Thomas, pulled away down the
stretch and brought the relay home
in Olympic record time.
Hyman seemed as surprised as
the Australian fans that she won.
"Oh my God she screamed. "Oh
my God
Hyman led from the start and
clocked an Olympic record 2:05.88,
narrowly missing O'Neill's world
mark. Later, she threw back her
head and drank in the moment as
she stood on the medal podium
and sang along with the national
anthem.
The Netherlands also had its
flag raised on a magic day for the
small European country.
Pieter van den Hoogenband
won gold in the 100 free, his second
of the games, and denied Russian
Alexander Popov an unprecedented
third straight Olympic title in the
event.
That's not all the Dutch did
Wednesday.
The Netherlands stunned Cuba
4-2 in baseball, the first Olympic
defeat ever for a Cuban team, and
Inge de Bruijn topped it off by
breaking her own world record
in the semifinals of the women's
100m freestyle.
De Bruijn finished in 53.77 sec-
onds and beat Thompson, who will
need an amazing race in the 100
freestyle final to win the individual
gold she's chased unsuccessfully
through three Olympics.
The United States and Australia
stayed on top of the medal count
after competition Wednesday. The
Americans led with 23 medals (10
gold, 7 silver, 6 bronze) while
Australia had 22 (7-8-7). China was
third with 17 (6-4-7).
BASEBALL: The guys from the
low country stayed low key after
pulling off the biggest upset in
Olympic baseball's brief history.
There were no pennant-clinch-
ing pile-ons after the Netherlands
beat Cuba 4-2, just an orderly line
of Dutch players high-fiving each
other like it was any other win.
But it wasn't.
Cuba had won 21 straight at
the Olympics and ran away with
the gold medal in the first two
baseball tournaments at Barcelona
and Atlanta.
Ken Brauckmiller, who pitched
for San Francisco 12 years ago,
held the tough Cuban lineup to
seven hits over eight innings and
Hensley "Bam Bam" Meulens hit
a bases-loaded double to lead the
Dutch.
"This is one of the biggest
accomplishments in all of Dutch
sports shortstop Robert Eenhoorn
said.
The United States stayed
unbeaten in Sydney, thanks to
Doug Mientkiewicz. His eighth-
inning grand slam gave the Ameri-
cans a 4-0 win over South Korea.
The United States defeated the
Netherlands 6-2 on Tuesday and
plays Cuba on Saturday in the
preliminary round.
SOFTBALL: After winning 112
games in a row, the U.S. team
dropped its second straight.
This time it was an excruciating
2-0 loss to China in 14 innings.
Japan beat the United States 2-1 in
11 innings Tuesday.
Zhang Chunfang lined the ball
off U.S. pitcher Michelle Smith's
leg in the 14th inning to score one
run. Then second baseman Jennifer
McFalls threw wide of first, allowing
another run to score.
CYCLING: Lance Armstrong
isn't the only U.S. cycling star.
Marty Nothstein won America's
first gold medal in the sport since
1984, beating Florian Rousseau of
France in the finals of the men's
match sprint.
DRUGS: A positive drug test
cost a Bulgarian weightlifter his
silver medal.
Ivan Ivanov took second place
in the 123-pound class but tested
positive for furosemide, a diuretic,
and the IOC stripped him of his
medal Wednesday.
Athletes sometimes use diuret-
ics to help them lose weight, and
they can mask the presence of
performance-enhancing drugs.
The IOC also disqualified a
hammer thrower from Belarus,
Vadim Devyatovsky, who tested
positive for steroids.
BASKETBALL: The Cold War is
over. The basketball rivalry between
the United State and Russia isn't.
The United States women trailed
Russia at the half, but took the
lead for good on Nikki McCray's
3-pointer with 16:45 left and went
on to win 88-77.
Russia was the last team to'beat
See ROUNDUP pg 7
To Check Out the
iottegt Films
SEPTEMBER 21 AT 10 P.M. AND
SEPTEMBER 24 AT 7:30 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
High Fidelity (R) Follow
Rob, a thirty-something
record store owner
played by John Cusack,
as he faces the specter
of growing up. This hilari-
ous homage to pop music
explores modern relation-
ships and modern music
from the male perspec-
tive. Present your valid
ECU One Card to get in
free with one guest.
Join a
li$v?peeJ
Chase
SEPTEMBER 21-23 AT 7:30 P.M
SEPTEMBER 24 AT 3 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
Gone in 60 Seconds (PC-13) Randall
"Memphis" Raines has to steal 50
cars and have them ready to go by
Friday at 8 p.m. and he got the
assignment on Monday night. With
thugs threatening to kill him and the
police breathing down his neck, he
attempts the impossible mission. A
valid ECU One Card gets you in free
with one guest.
To ote Effectively
SEPTEMBER 27 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Rick Shenkman helps you cut through the campaign
hype and make your election year decision based on
the straight facts. Admission to this humorous and
highly informative lecture is free.
ToVi
iety
Fine Art
MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER
GALLERY
Today is the last day
to view Charlotte-
based artist Keith
Bryant's "A Loan @
ECU a collection of
wall sculptures on dis-
play in the gallery. A
closing reception will
be held this evening
from 6 until 8 p.m.
To Find
Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality,
Adult and Commuter Services, Banking,
Central Ticket Office, InterFraternity
Council, Operations and Reservations,
Panhellenic, RideRiders Board, School
Supplies, Student Fund Accounting
Office, Student Government Association,
Student Leadership, Student Locator,
Student Union, Transit, Technical
Services, WZMB Radio
To iuake
Connections
SEPTEMBER 27 AT 7 P.M.
IN MSC CREAT ROOM 3
The Adult and Commuter
Student Services is offering an
Off-Campus Freshmen Social
to allow 1 st-year off campus
students to meet and get to
know each other.
ToStaJ In The Know
Subscribe to the ECU adult student list serv to
receive campus information directly to your personal
e-mail account. To subscribe send an e-mail to
listserv@ECUMAIL7.ECU.EDU with Sub Adultstu and
your full name in the text.
To Score Football Tickets
SEPTEMBER 21 FROM 11 A.M. 6 P.M. IN STU-
DENT ORGANIZATION BOOTH
Pick up one free ticket and one discounted ticket
with your valid ECU One Card. Tickets subject to
availablility. Check and cash payments accepted.
On the Web: www.ecu.edumendenhall
Hours: MonThurs. 8 am-11 pmFri 8 am-midnightSat noon-midnightSun noon-11 pm
You drank.
You danced.
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Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
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Thursday, September 21, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 7
spojts@tec.ecu.edu
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Attention First-Year Students
The Office of Orientation and the First-Year Experience presents
Water Wilderness Weekend
When?
September 29th - October 1st
Where?
Ocracoke Island
How Much?
Only $20
Including transportation, meals,
and equipment rentals.
Call the Office of Orientation to register.
What?
Get away from the books and
classes on this fun weekend trip.
You will be hiking, sea kayaking,
playing on the beach, and
meeting new people.
328-4173
Registration deadline is September 22nd. Space is limited.
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4
ROUNDUPtrome
the United States in the Olympics,
doing so as the Unified Team in
1992. The Americans (3-0) secured
a berth in next week's quarterfinals
with Wednesday's victory.
BOXING: The American boxers
aren't just beating their opponents,
they're punishing them.
Ricardo Williams Jr. became the
latest American to advance easily
through his first fight, routing
Australia's Henry Collins in a bout
stopped in the fourth round under
the mercy rule.
The U.S. team has now won all
nine of its fights in Sydney.
TENNIS: The men's singles tour-
nament Is history for U.S. Open
winner Marat Safin. Showing the
strain of an eventful month, the
20-year-old Safin lost to Fabrice
Santoro of France 1-6, 6-1, 6-4 in a
first-round match Wednesday.
Things aren't much better for
the U.S. men-make that man.
Michael Chang lost to Canadian
Sebastien I.arcau 7-6 (6), 6-3 in the
first round, leaving Jeff Tarango as
the lone American in men's singles.
Tarango beat Diego Camacho of
Bolivia 6-0, 6-1 to advance to the
second round.
In women's singles, top-ranked
Lindsay Davenport began her gold
medal defense with a 6-2, 6-2 win
over Paolo Suarez of Argentina.
SOCCER: The U.S. women
locked up a spot in the Olympic
semifinals with a 3-1 win over Nige-
ria. Brand! Chastain, Kristine Lilly
and Shannon MacMillan scored for
the United States, which took con-
trol of the game midway through
the first half.
The Americans' toughest rival,
Norway, also advanced with a 2-1
victory over China.
GYMNASTICS: The world's best
male gymnast is Russian Alexei
Nemov. Nemov took the men's all-
around title with 58.474 points,
while China's Yang Wei won the
silver and Ukrainian Oleksandr
Beresh got the bronze.
GAMES from 5
Thus on Sunday when the NFL
juggernaut rules the airwaves, the
Games will occupy a spot just above
the log rolling competition of the
Great Outdoor Games or the final
round of the LPGA's Greater Topeka
Open.
It may be the television. It may
be the fact that in an event that
bills itself as amateur competition
I see athletes hawking everything
from cell phones to ovens. I don't
know. But whatever it is the games
just don't have the magic that they
used to.
East Carolina
University

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8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Thursday, September &, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
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it's possible.
I
Call for Entries September 21, 5-9 pm upstairs in the Mendenhall Student Center auditorium 244.
Winners will be notified September 24 Closing reception October 6, 6-9 pm.
Categories: poetry, fiction, nonfiction painting&drawing, printmaking, sculpture, multimedia, surface design, metal design,
ceramics, graphic design, illustration, image design, wood design . Three entries per category and three dollars per entry.
laqay am Aq noA 01 mCnoJH
NEWS
College crh
accordana
III
"How Will
sentation by B
Seven Habits c
will appear at
Hendrix Theat
Rosina Chi;
interim dean
nology, has b�
can Psycholog
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Chia was tl
from the asso
Chia, who hoi
national Taiwa
toral degrees f
has been a m�
1970.
Henry Dosl
Music's keybo.
Wednesday, S
Hall. The recit;
The ECU P
tion of Jonathc
mance at 8 p.i
Fletcher Recita
A solo and
Vincent DiMar
Sept. 29 in the
tino is the Rob
sor of Music fc
A performa
designed for y
with "Ramona
Saturday, Sept
production is I
Award winner
Tickets are
and youth. All
tickets, visit th
hall Student C
ECU-ARTS.
The Four Si
scheduled for
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is available by
ARTS.
The East G
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p.m. Thursday
General Classr
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 21, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 21, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2816
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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