The East Carolinian, September 14, 2000






nber12,2000
;@tec.ecu.edu
Pilot Mountian,
srs many options
�pert to test your-
gistration deadline
ist is $30. For more
call 328-6387.
Omega Phi Alpha
; to announce an
Sept. 12 in MSC
I and Sept. 13 in
:or more informa-
-4833.
itional Honor Fra-
their Smoker on
ip.m. in CC 1032.
ional meeting for
:s of ECU's oldest
'ligjble, you must
and 30 or more
e hope to see you
1EE registration,
iRC 128. Get your
I don't miss out on
t Ultimate Frisbee
information please
JEE registration
n in the SRC 128.
gether and don't
itement. For more
call 328-6387.
�S registration,
n in the SRC 128.
ition please call
tK Sept. 22, 7pm-
7am-7pm. Spend
jl then a day on
ddling. Cost for
and the registra-
pt. IS. For more
18-6387.
t.2-Oct.7 Mon-Fri
Sat. 8:30am-
Ireenville Tennis
ruction for adult
by the pros! The
members and the
e is
nformation please
sr League of the
ryone interested
�nhall room 212
pt. 12 at 7 p.m.
ting Southerners
heir proud tradi-
tics, and heroes.
rgam!
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km.
ssifieds
eastCarolinian
NEWSA2
SGA TO FORM CAMPUS
ORGANIZATION COUNCIL
VOLUME 75 NUMBER 127
86 DAYS TO GO
UNTIL GRADUATION
NEWSBRIEFS
PARENTS WEEKEND
Early registration for Parents Weekend
starts at 3 p.m. Friday, Sept. 15 in Room
211 of Mendenhall Student Center (MSC).
Regular registration will take place from 9
a.m. until 11:30 a.m. on Saturday, Sept.
16 in MSC. A reception, hosted by Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin, begins at 9:30 a.m.
Other activities include an open house
at the Ledonia Wright Cultural Center from
10:30 a.m. until noon. A "down east" style
pig pickin' will take place from noon until
3 p.m. at Minges Coliseum on Saturday.
FOOTBALL
The Green Wave from Tulane visits ECU
to play the Pirates. The game starts at
3:30 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 16 in Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
TAKE BACK THE
NIGHT MARCH
All student organizations are invited to
participate in a Take Back the Night March
which will begin at 7:30 p.m. on Monday,
Sept. 18 at Belk Hall on College Hill and
continues down to main campus, ending
at Joyner Library.
The march is part of the activities
planned for the Sexual Assault Awareness
Week, which runs Sept. 18-22. The pur-
pose of the march is to increase campus
and community awareness of the problem
of sexual assault. Marchers can also
bring a banner or sign with the organi-
zation's name on it. Contact Karen Kus
at 328-4173 for more information and to
RSVPbySept. 14.
NEW LATINO
ORGANIZATION
September is Latino Heritage month.
An effort is underway to involve all stu-
dents on campus in starting a Latino stu-
dent organization. There will be a meet-
and-greet social at 7:30 p.m. today in
Great Room 2 of Mendenhall Student
Center.
At 8:15 p.m. there will be greetings
from: Dr. Lathan E. Turner, assistant vice-
chancellor for Student Life and director
of Intercultural Student Affairs; Chancellor
Richard Eakin; Dr. Garrie Moore, vice-chan-
cellor for Student Ufe; Brent Queen, pres-
ident of the ECU Student Government
Association; Ty Frazier, assistant director,
Student Leadership Development and Nell
Lewis, director of the Ledonia Wright Cul-
tural Center.
For further information contact Rachel
Tucker Cherrier of Intercultural Student
Affairs in 204 Whichard Building at
328-6495 and 328-0370.
0NLINESURVEY
HAVE YOU EVER BEEN A
VICTIM OF THEFT ON
CAMPUS?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Results from last issue:
Do you plan to donate blood this week?
SPORTSB7
PIRATES HOPE TO RIGHT SHIP
WITH WIN OVER TULANE
FEATURESB2
MITCH GAYLORD SCORES PERFECT
10 WITH STUDENTS
TODAY'S
WEATHER
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
Yes: 12
No: 87
PARTLY SUNNY
HIGH 85' LOW 68
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN I
Q
ECUPD cracks down on theft
Students warned
not to purchase
stolen decals
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The ECU Police
Department (ECUPD) is
currently cracking down
on the problem of
on-campus theft since
three ECU students were
recently charged for the
possession of stolen park-
ing decal hangtags.
Students, Houtan
Kargarand Nathan Hanks,
were charged early Sept.
6 for the possession of
stolen property.
Kargar was arrested
after a stolen hangtag was
discovered in his vehicle
by an officer. Within an
hour of Kargar's arrest,
Hanks was taken into cus-
tody after a warrant was
obtained.
Channing Cobb, also a
student, was arrested late
Aug. 31 for the possession
of stolen property after
a student patrol officer
observed a stolen hang-
tag and reported it to the
ECUPD.
All three students were
not involved with the lar-
ceny of the decals but
were criminally charged
and will be sent to both
the Dean of Students and
North Carolina District
Court.
According to Thomas
Younce, ECU assistant
chief of police, the most
common crime on
campus is theft. Since
Aug. 18, there have been
14 parking decals reported
stolen.
"We have taken more
aggressive standards for
this type of theft Younce
said.
ECUPD patrols all
campus parking lots.
When decals are issued.
Parking and Traffic Ser-
vices records all valid
driver information and
the serial number of each
decal.
. When a decal is
reported stolen, its serial
number is sent to the
ECUPD and is noted
during the patrol of the
campus lots.
"It appears that stu-
dents are purchasing
these decals from people
at a lower rate Younce
said. "The big thing we
are trying to emphasize
is that if you are in pos-
session of these decals
and you did not buy it
from Parking and Traffic
Services, you are in a lot
of trouble
The jurisdiction of
the ECUPD includes all
campus areas and the
streets that surround the
campus, such as 10th and
5th streets.
According to Younce,
all decal thefts that have
been reported stolen to
the ECUPD have occurred
on campus. Generally,
the decals were taken
from vehicles that were
unlocked. In certain
instances, a vehicle Is
broken into and damage
is incurred.
"I would hope that stu-
dents don't think it is a
prank when they use these
decals they buy off the
streets because they are
in possession of stolen
property and if caught,
Itheyj will receive a crim-
inal charge on their per-
manent record Younce
said.
A fourth student has
been arrested for the
same offense. Information
regarding this arrest was
not available at this time.
ECU Assistant Chief of Police Tom
Younce says the ECUPD must take a
more aggressive role in enforcing theft
crime laws, (photo by Nancy Kuck)
Army R0TC awards ceremony held
Several cadets recognized for
Advance Camp 2000
Trisha Archino
GUEST WRITER
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Army ROTC conducted an awards ceremony
recognizing several cadets on Sept. 6. LTC George
M. Jenkins, ECU Battalion Commander, presented
cadets with awards for their completion of various
training exercises along
with recognizing several
other students as scholar-
ship recipients.
Cadets Trisha Archino,
Robert Bowling, Nikki
Davis, Frank Maxwell,
Heather Reilly, Roderick
Stevenson, David Thomp-
son, Christopher Washack
and Henry Schnedler were
recognized for their com-
pletion of Advance Camp
2000.
The five-week training
at Fort Lewis, Washington
emphasized on learning
and executing various tasks
required of an Army Officer.
Upon graduation from ECU,
these cadets will receive a
commission in the U. S. Army as second lieutenants.
Cadet Schnedler was awarded the Platoon Leader-
ship Award and the RecondoConfidence-Training
Award during his training session. To earn the Recondo
Badge, recipients must demonstrate outstanding
physical fitness under regulations outlined by the
Army Physical Fitness Test along with demonstrating
confidence and proficiency in various training obstacles
and exercises in the confidence course. The cadet must
also complete the Combat Water Survival Training
Test.
Cadets Gabriel Dicola and Jonathan Hooker were
recognized for the completion of Army Airborne
School. The three weeks of intense training resulted
in the cadets completing four daytime jumps and one
nighttime jump. Cadets Michael Crystal and Natalie
Harrison were recognized for their attendance and
completion at the Army ROTC Basic Camp over the
summer. Basic Camp challenges students to learn many
tasks relevant in today's Army.
Harrison received the Gauntlet Award, an honor
award given to few students at Basic Camp. This award
recognized above average performances at camp and
completions of all tasks on the initial try.
Scholarship recipients for William Dudley, Alisha
Hill, Lisa Stout, Bryan Vaden, Mary Vogel, Jonathan E.
Darden and Harrison were announced. These cadets
will receive scholarships valued between $20,000
and $52,000. Cadets were nominated based on their
meritorious record in academic studies, extracurricular
participation, athletic
activities and demon-
stration of exceptional
leadership potential as
well as their desire to
serve as an officer in
the U. S. Army.
The final award
presented went to
Cadet Don Glasser.
Glasser received a $
1,(XX) check from the
Civilian Marksman-
ship Program. This
scholarship is pre-
sented to deserving
JROTC and ROTC stu-
dents who excels aca-
demically, and who
demonstrate the
potential to be officer
and exemplary skills in
SERVICE FRATERNITIES
SEEK STUDENTS
i-ixiu
� Bf�
l
Alpha (Omrga I
Students Todd Morrisette, Leiza Wyrick, Leslie
Bailey, Erin Ryan and Emily Johnson of Alpha Phi
Omega are always looking for new members.
On Wednesday, Alpha Phi Alpha fraternity held
a free voter registration for students outside the
Wright Place, (all photos by John Stowe)
Army ROTC cadets were acknowleged for their achievements
in Advance Camp 2000. (photo by John Stowe)
in the U.S. Armed Services
rifle marksmanship.
"It is a great honor for me to recognize the achieve-
ments of so many outstanding students Jenkins said
during the awards ceremony. "With a corps of 87
cadets, 1 could easily recognize each of you for the
great things you do everyday, but today is time for
a few special presentations. Over the summer, you
represented yourselves, your family and ECU in an
outstanding manner
This writer can be contacted
at newi@ecupiratemail.com.
Tre Nunley, an accounting major, registers to
vote at Alpha Phi Alpha's table The fraternity
encourages all students to register this fall.





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAR0LINIAN.COM
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
NEWS�TEC.ECU.EDU
Over the last nine months,
1 have spent quite a bit of time
thinking of how to involve EVERY
student at ECU in SGA.
Most of you probably think I
sound like some fresh, young
and innovative freak and in
part, you are correct. However, 1
finally came up with an
idea that 1 believe to be
the most inclusive and
innovative of all.
My idea is simple: to
have ONE organization
that represents each of
the 250 plus campus
organizations at ECU.
At present, these
organizations work
autonomously from
SGA, the Student Union
and every other group
at ECU.
Being altruistic, I
taking credit for forming this
organization. SGA, as a whole,
is helping start-up and maintain
the group.
No longer. On Monday, Sept.
18 at 4 p.m. in Hendrix Theater,
campus organization leaders or
their representatives will be meet-
ing to discuss this new group-the
Campus Organization Council
(COC). Modeled after the SGA
Legislature, this group will help
carry concerns and potentially
legislative policy to SGA.
I want to hear the concerns of
students, via their organizations.
Every student organization was
sent a personalized letter from
me, so NO ONE can say they were
not invited.
Please understand
that this group is
unprecedented at ECU
and can become one
of the most inclusive
groups in the state.
Other schools will catch
on.
This could be big.
Unfortunately, though,
the success of the group
MlCtiael C. AIM can only be determined
SGA chief of STAFF by the participation of
campus organizations.
So, PLEASE come to the meet-
ing. Jim Sturm, the entire SGA
Executive Council and Chan-
cellor Richard Eakin will be in
attendance. Help me (but more
importantly, ECU and the SGA)
make the COC a success.
Do not forget to vote on Sept.
27 in the fall legislative elections.
Thanks to all of you who have
registered to run. I wish you the
best of luck.
am not
COASTAL WEATHER
UPDATE
Hurricane Florence is a tropical storm again. The National
Hurricane Center (NHC) downgraded the system at approxi-
mately 5 p.m. (EDT).
Florence continues to idle off the southeast coast of the
United States, showing very little movement.
Although it is not directly affecting the coast, high surf
associated with the storm is blamed for two drownings in North
Carolina.
At 5 p.m. (EDT), Florence was centered about 345 miles
soutjhriputheait of Cape Hatteras, N.C. Maximum sustained
winds were measured at 70 mph. The storm remained nearly
stationary throughout the afternoon Wednesday, but the NHC
said it could gradually drift towards the east over the next 24
hours.
The NHC cautioned interests in Bermuda that once Florence
begins to move away from land, it could regain strength.
Though far from land, Florence claims two victims. On Tues-
day, a man and a woman drowned at Kure Beach, N.C. and
seven others were rescued from strong rip currents generated
by the hurricane. Another man was missing after falling out of
a kayak at Carolina Beach.
"Apparently, these waves are a result of Florence although
it is a rather small hurricane said Richard Pasch, a hurricane
specialist with the National Hurricane Center in Miami.
Two North Carolina beaches were closed Tuesday because
of the rip currents. Florence is the sixth named storm of the
Atlantic season.
(Information from Kevin Chambers, weather.com)
y.
xj
Saturday, September 30, 2000 ,
Brtley Fatms, Qeenvllle. Gates at 10AM.
ms or thc New eve sn-71
2SKINNEEJS COWBOY MOUTH FENIXTX
WXNR.COM FOR TIX & INFO.
Stew Is
tomwg
October 5, 4, 5
BUS
UNIVERSITY
CSS CARE
ECU General Classroom Building
September 20, 2000 8:30a.m1:00p.m.
Organizations attending as of 9700
DAY
Updates at www.ecu.educareer
This event helps everyone learn about various employers. Those graduating in Dec. 2000 or MaySummer
2001, you can sign up through your account at www.ecu.educareer. The'dates in parenthesis indicate when
you need to have submitted your online resume to Career Services and specifically to the organization with
which you would like to interview. For some of the employers, this may be their only visit this year. Check under
other majors to see if you qualify for other interview schedules.
Applied Manufacturing Technology, Inc. (1011)
ARAMARK Corporation
ASMO
Bank of America
BFJ&T (104)
Beasley Enterprises
Biltmore Estate
Bojangles' RestaurantsTands, Inc.
Burlington Industries (926)
Catalytica Pharmaceuticals
CBIZ Kaufman Davis Business Services
Cooper Lighting, Retail Market Division
Cooper Tools
Davenport Exteriors
Dialog Corporation
Disability Determination Services
Dixon and Odom, CPA (920)
DLJ Direct (1012).
East Carolina Farm Credit
ECU Career Services
ECU Cooperative Education
ECU Graduate School
ECU Human Resources
ECU School of Business Graduate Prog.
Eli Lilly Co. (1017)
Enterprise Rent-A-Car (111)
Fastenal Company
Ferguson Enterprises, Inc. (106)
Fidelity Bank
First Citizens Bank
Food Lion
Geico Direct
GMAC Insurance
Golden CorralWinston Group Management Co.
Hooters of America, Inc.
Hubbell
Hyatt Hotels and Resorts
IBM Corporation (97)
IBM Global Services (97)
IRS-Criminal Investigation Division
Jefferson-Pilot Financial (927)
Sponsored bv ECU Career Services and the School of Business
JHM Hotels Management, Inc.
Lowe's Stores
Marriott International�
Maxim Healthcare Services, Inc.(111)
McGladrey & Pullen, LLP(920)
Metl.ite Financial Services
Miller & Long Concrete Construction
Modem Woodmen of America (1012 & 1031)
Navy Civilian Jobs
Northwestern Mutual Life
NVR, Inc.Ryan Homes (928)
Office Depot
Olde Discount Corporation(103)
PCMH Volunteer Sen ices
Perdue Farms Incorporated
Pinehurst Resort
Pittard Perry & Crone, Inc.
Precision Fabrics Group Inc.
Primerica
Red Lobster
Regional Acceptance Corp.(117)
Sara Lee Corporation
Southern Bank and Trust Co.
Staples, Inc.
State Farm Insurance(1024)
Strickland Insurance Group, Inc.
Target
Texas Steakhouse & Saloon
The Sanderling Inn Resort & Spa
The Sherwin-Williams Co.(1020)
lowers Perrin (929)
TruGreen ChemLawn
Tyson Foods, Inc.
Tyson Insurance Services, Inc.
U.S. Air Force
U.S. Marine Corp Officer Program
Wachovia (105)
WCTI-TV
Wells Fargo Financial
Western-Southern Life ,
Hints to help you make a Career Day more productive include:
1. Dress as you should for an interview, but "nice casual" is OK too.
2. If you are particularly interested in certain organizations, do some research
at Career Services, Joyner Library, or the Internet.
3. Don't exclude visiting an organization just because you haven't heard of it.
4. Greet the employer with a firm handshake, ask pertinent questions, and
express your interest in their organzation.
Career Services Workshops
All workshops are held in room 103, Career Services at 4:00 PM
Connections to Career Services, Mondays
Resume Writing, Tuesdays
Exploring Careers, Wednesdays
Interviewing Tips, Thursdays
are you connected?
www.ecu.educareer
EH
Career Services
701 East Fifth Street
. Greenville, NC 27858-4353
Carolina (252)328-6050
��� (252) 328-6425 fax
THURSDAY,
WWW.THEE
Sept If
Damage to I
aged when sh
Belk Building.
Larceny-A st
from her desk
Larceny-A st.
were stolen fn
at Brody Scho
Larceny-A nc
the patient ro
Larceny-A sti
rack southeast
Solicitation;
banned from
student. The ii
stopped east c
Greenville Poli
Communical
Umstead Hall,
threats.
Sept. 12
Auto Accidei
the parking lot
Larceny-A sta
laboratory in tl
Larceny-A stL
rack northeast
Breaking ant
items were tak
lot south of So
Breaking anc
phone was slol
soccer field at I
Hit and Run
north of Aycocl
Larceny-A stu
rack on the sot.
Sept. 13
Expired Regis
displaying an e
Failure to Cai
state citation fc
ing a motor vel
SI
STUDE
Don





IBER 14,2000
TEC.ECU.EDU
1
I
I
less
ces
J
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
THE EAST CAROLINIAN 3
NEWS@TEC.ECU.EDU
Sept 11
Damage to Property A staff member reported her tire was dam-
aged when she ran over a bottle left in the parking lot at the Carol
Belk Building.
Larceny-A staff member reported an amount of money was stolen
from her desk in a room in the Speight Building.
Larceny-A staff member reported her checkbook and other items
were stolen from a filing cabinet in her office at the Pediatrics Clinic
at Brody School of Medicine (BSOM).
Larceny-A non-student reported her key chain was missing from
the patient room at the Pediatrics Clinic at BSOM.
Larceny-A student reported his secured bike was stolen from the
rack southeast of Scott Hall.
Solicitation; Harassment of a Student-Two non-students were
banned from all ECU properties after soliciting and harassing a
student. The incident occurred off campus, but the subjects were
stopped east of Umstead Hall. The matter was turned over the
Greenville Police Department.
Communicating Threats-A student, Elizabeth Landauer of 343
Umstead Hall, was arrested based on a warrant for communicating
threats.
Sept. 12
Auto Accident-Two students were involved in an auto accident in
the parking lot south of the Athletic Ticket Office.
Larceny-A staff member reported a digital scale was stolen from a
laboratory in the Howell Science Complex.
Larceny-A student reported his secured bike was stolen from the
rack northeast of Jenkins Art Building.
Breaking and Entering; Larceny-A student reported several
items were taken from his secured vehicle while it was parked in the
lot south of Scott Hall.
Breaking and Entering; Larceny-A non-student reported his cell
phone was stolen from his vehicle that was parked near the practice
soccer field at the Sports Complex.
Hit and Run A student reported his vehicle was struck while parked
north of Aycock Hall.
Larceny-A student reported his secured bike was stolen from the
rack on the south side of the Ragsdale Building.
Sept. 13
Expired Registration-A non-student was issued a state citation for
displaying an expired registration.
Failure to Carry Operator's License-A non-student was issued a
state citation for failure to possess his operator's license while operat-
ing a motor vehicle.
Williamston woman delivers
eastern N.Cs first sextuplets
(The Daily Reflector)-A Wil-
liamston woman gave birth to
three boys and three girls Monday
evening, the first set of sextuplets
ever in eastern North Carolina.
One boy was stillborn- The five
other babies were in critical condi-
tion late Monday, according to a
hospital spokeswoman.
Michelle Taylor, 29, gave birth
beginning at 8:48 p.m. Doctors
at Pitt County Memorial Hospital
used two delivery rooms, one to
deliver the babies and another to
treat the infants. A team of 40
medical professionals delivered the
babies in 4 minutes. The birth was a
first for the hospital and the first in
eastern North Carolina, according
to the hospital.
Taylor, a cost accountant, and
her husband, Mike, an electrician,
also have a son, Chase, 2. The
Taylor babies ranged in weight from
1 pound, 13 ounces to 2 pounds,
5 ounces.
Dr. John Wimmer, neonatolo-
gist with the Brody School of Medi-
cine, said that they were responding
well to treatment.
"We have every reason to be
hopeful for a positive outcome he
said in a written statement.
Taylor was in her 28th week
of pregnancy, it was not known
whether she had taken fertility
drugs. She had been in the hospital
for more than a month before the
delivery, according to the hospital.
The babies were delivered by
Dr. Hale Stephenson of Greenville
Obstetrics and Gynecology. He was
assisted by Drs. Thomas Kramer,
Edward Newton and Susan Bane.
New math method
adds up for professor
BETHLEHEM, I'a. (AP)-A Lehigh
University professor found a new
way to solve an old problem. A
mathematical problem, that is.
Asha Jitendra, associate pro-
fessor of human services at the
University, has developed a new
method to teach math to children
with learning disabilities.
"1, myself, have a child with a
learning disability, that's why I got
in the field she said.
Rather than focus on computa-
tion, the traditional method of
teaching math, Jitendra helps chil-
dren learn math by solving word
problems. The method stresses
higher order skills like reasoning
and finding relationships.
It all started when Jitendra
observed students in the classrooms
learning word problems through
ATTENTION
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS!
Student Leadership Development Programs
has important information for you which includes:
� Homecoming Details
� "Get A Clue" Information
� Organization Registration Forms (due September 15)
� Leadership Opportunities and Resources for Your
Group
All this and more can be found in your mailbox
(YES, YOU HAVE ONE)
at
STUDENT LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS
109 Mendenhall Student Center
328-4796
Don't let fun times, deadlines, and prospective members
pass you by. Come in and see us today!
two methods-general, where the
teacher reads the problem and asks
the students what calculation they
must use to solve it, and specific,
where the teacher explains each
step taken to solve the problem.
Children using the specific
method did better than those using
the general method, she said.
"My concern was that not
everybody in the specific strategy
did well, some just didn't under-
stand it she said.
Jitendra then ran across a
method used with adults by a
researcher at San Diego State Uni-
versity in California and realized it
could be applied to children.
Jitendra has conducted five
studies since 1994, using groups of
students from five area elementary
and middle schools.
Ball State student hospitalized
after being beaten at frat house
MUNCIE, Ind.(U-WIRE)-A Ball State University student was hospital-
ized in serious condition with severe head injuries Sunday, a day after he
was beaten outside a fraternity house.
Police suspect that Paul J. PJ Henderson, 23, was beaten with a golf
club or a large piece of wood outside the Lambda Chi Alpha fraternity
house early Saturday as a party was in progress inside the home
He was taken to Ball Memorial Hospital, where he was listed in serious
condition in the intensive care unit Sunday morning.
Authorities said Henderson was paralyzed on the left side of his
body when he was taken to the emergency room with severe head
injuries.
Police said they had two suspects in the beating.
Henderson, a senior from Elkhart, was beaten shortly after 2 a.m
Saturday outside the Lambda Chi Alpha frat house as a large party was in
progress with several off-duty police officers working security.
Police received two calls, one of a fight in progress and another of
a battery with injury. When on-duty officers arrived at the scene, they
found Henderson behind the house.
Skidmore student sentenced
three years to life for selling cocaine
Skidmore College (U-WIRE)-Even on the posh upstate New York
campus of Skidmore College a student may seem a bit suspicious tooling
around in a Lexus LS400. Even more suspicious when he's delivering
$2,150 in cocaine to undercover police officers.
Saratoga County Judge Jerry J. Scarano sentenced Gardner G.
Cummings to three years to life Monday, Sept. 11th, after he pled
guilty in June to a criminal sale of a controlled substance in the
second degree, a felony charge. A police investigation discovered that
Cummings had sold large quantities of cocaine to Skidmore students
over a several month period, said Saratoga County District Attorney
James Murphy.Through two anonymous informants, undercover New
York State Police propositioned Cummings, an undeclared junior at the
private college, and arrested him after he made two separate cocaine sales.
On April 2, Cummings delivered $750 in cocaine, and on April 19th,
Cummings sold $1,400 in cocaine to the undercover officers.
"Drug dealing apparently was an attractive life style for this young
man, but now he will be held accountable said District Attorney
James Murphy.
WED 13THUR 14FRI 15SAT 16






4 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
DIVERSIONS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
NEWS@TEC.ECU.EDU
THURSDAY
WWW.THE
Crossword
CAPTAIN RlBMAN
by John Sprengelmeyer & Rich Davit
this week's titillating episode:
"tears of a clown"
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comic
strip
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ACROSS
1 Total
6 Not pro
10 Weakling
14 Hotelier Helmsley
15 Parakeet staple
16 Field of study
17 Genealogical
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27 Garments
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31 Gets wind of
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35 Army mascot
36 Stand of trees
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38 Doctors' org.
39 Braxton and
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40 Doughboy's
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48 Solomonic
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50 Arboreal ape
56 Tied
57 Vocal inflection
58 Strives
59 Requirement
60 Nolices
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2 Narcs
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18 Fashion designer
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22 Swine
23 Beta follower
24 Intense hatred
25 Southern state
capital
26 S-shaped
molding
27 Crude
29 Lukewarm
31 Bee product
33 Condor's claw
34 Lock of hair
36 Stockpiles
37 Abets
39 Ballerina's
garment
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42 Scale
43 Breathing: abbr
44 Putting surface
45 Toss
46 Citrus fruits
48 Beaujolaisor
Bordeaux
51 Gardener's
implement
52 Chartton
Heston's org.
53 Sharp turn
54 Sniggler's catch
5b Wind dir.
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offers viewers
music videos tc





MBER14, 2000
�TEC.ECU.EDU
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
OPINION
THE EAST CAROLINIAN 5
EDITOROTEC.ECU.EDU
eastcarolinian
Newsroom252.328.6386
AcVertisng2523282000
fax22.3286558
E-mailodnmtteCiicij.edu
LOIHt, News Editor
Sports Editor
, Photo Editor
Erin Mwlgi layout Designer
Editor
Features Editor
Head Copy Editor
Ltttto, EountMiead Editor
I ayout Designer
Sen�j ECUsree I92S. ThetaslCarrtnanrt�a 11.UOOctpesevery Tuesday
an) Thursday during un myiiar kutImk year ard MOO on Wednesdays rJurrig
9k summor Uu VIW rs tie opnon oi mo corona board am rs mltoi by eUtJnai
board mombcis Tnc East Carrtmian wretrarnos Irtlnrs In the orlilor whwi am
�nmeo to mm fnhion may be edited tor decency or brevity)- We nserw
ihn right in oil or reject rriKn and all loiters must In sirjnod and roriulo a
ruHJn�ie number Letters may be sert w e-rtai to eoterfaet eumJu or lu The
East Gmtrian, Student PuMhmb Butriig, Green, NC 27I1M A'Xa Cm
?K-328-6366 lor more Womwion
SGA has taken the first
step in the involvement
process. Now it's time
for students and orga-
nizations alike to follow
through and contribute.
OUR VIEW
The Student Government Association (SCA) is proposing that each
organization come together as one in a singular organization entitled Campus
Organization Council (COC) encompassing all of the 250 campus organizations.
Participation is crucial to making this new system work.
Michael Aho, SGA chief of staff, has sent letters to each organization,
personally inviting them to this meeting.
We at TEC think that this is a great idea. SCA is striving to meet all of the
concerns of all students. As we have attempted to include students more into
our biweekly publication, SGA is doing the same thing through the voice of
student leaders as well as student organizations.
COC would be a wonderful way to have open-communication between
the student body, the government that represents them and the institution
that they attend.
In order to create a more unified daily existence at ECU, we need to start
taking the incitive to change, one group at a time. Realistically, students who
care participate in campus organizations. Thus, those people will take an active
role in making the system a success.
Undoubtedly, as much as you love to attend ECU, there are things about
this establishment that you don't find fair, warranted or necessary, and this is
the perfect venue to make those concerns public.
SGA wants this idea to come to life, so does TEC, and so should you.
Campus organization leaders or their representatives will be meeting to
discuss this new group-the COC at 4 p.m. Monday, Sept. 18 in Hendrix
Theatre. If you are a part of an organization, be sure to pass on the idea of the
proposal. We would like to see a representative from all of the 250 campus
organizations in attendance for this discussion.
We appreciate the hard work that the SGA is putting forth to promote
everything from equality to unity on this campus. They have taken the first
step in the involvement process. Now it's time for students and organizations
alike to follow through and contribute.
SepAe KUuudund IN MY OPINION
Knight possesses basketball history with university
It seems to me that Indiana
University President Myles Brand
has gone a little too far this time by
dismissing Head basketball Coach
Bobby Knight. For those of you
not familiar with Bobby Knight,
he has been a part of Indiana bas-
ketball history since 1971. He has
given Indiana numerous National
Championship titles, as well as
many Big 10 titles.
Knight led the U.S. Olympic
team to the gold medal in 1984 and
has been voted National Coach of
the year four times. But it seems
that in the past, Coach Knight
has been known for his colorful
behavior, which includes his world
famous temper tantrums.
This past spring, Indiana Uni-
versity issued a zero-tolerance
policy about his volatile behavior,
in which he promised to follow. It
was last Thursday when IU student
Kent Harvey was picking up football
tickets, after passing the Coach that
night he greeted him by saying
'Hey, what's up Knight? At that
point, Knight grabbed him on the
arm and gave him a quick lecture
about common courtesy and eti-
quette, in which he said, 'Son, my
name is not Knight to you. It's
Coach Knight or it's Mr. Knight. I
don't call people by their last name,
and neither should you
I hardly call this a situation,
much less a crime that is deemed
serious enough to dismiss one of
most winning coaches in basketball
history. After almost three decades
of excellent coaching, one of the
highest player graduation rates
in the country (98 percent) and
for keeping the team without any
NCAA violations, is this how IU
should reward Bobby Knight? IU
students are mad.
It took police in riot gear to
disperse the crowd of nearly 2,000
students who had assembled on
campus to protest 'the firing of
Coach Knight. It seems that once
again, a university president is so
concerned about his own "legacy"
that he took it upon himself to
single handedly dismiss the biggest
institution at Indiana. Could you
imagine the riot that would be
created if Carolina had ever gotten
rid of Dean Smith?
What are we to do for our
coaches and administrators if the
first time somebody throws their
liberal activism at the university,
they start getting rid of their most
prized facets?
Should Coach Steve Logan
worry about lecturing his players
against the evils of dnig use if it isn't
politically correct or if it offends
somebody? Should he be afraid to
correct somebody if they call him
by his first name and start flashing
gang signs at him?
Hell no! Coaches have to be
tough in times like these. Discipline
yields results on the courts and the
classrooms, and I feel that Coach
Knight has an exemplary record
for both. It is time that universities
start standing up for their people,
instead of throwing them out like
yesterday's garbage.
fjam&i lioofeb
IN MY OPINION
I don't want my MTV
T
Columbia College (TMS)-Listen
up, music fans! In case you haven't
heard the news, the Box Music
Network, described as "the world's
only interactive all-music cable
channel will soon be wiped out
of existence by Its music video rival
MTV.
For those of us who turned
from MTV to the Box to fulfill
our growing need to watch music
videos 247, the news that the
one channel that "exactly" serves
the needs and wants of its viewers
will soon be gone for good, leaves
many people 6 myself included 6
wondering why?
According to an article pub-
lished on Billboard's Web site late
last month, the Miami-based Box
Music Network will be downsized
and folded into the operations of
MIV2.
MTV2 was created several years
ago to play more videos after MTV
itself decided to turn its attention
to game shows and reality series
like "The Real World" and "Road
Rules. "Launched as the Jukebox
Network in March 1989, the Box
offers viewers a large variety of
music videos to chose from via a
900 number for $1.99 per video
giving them the power to program
their television. MTV Networks
purchased the Box in 1999.
Their "music television you
control" approach made the Box
a fan favorite among teens and
18-to-25 year-olds. It's that core
constituency advertising execu-
tives covet and in this case, the
group MTV and its parent company
Viacom wants to control.The Box
reaches 24 million homes (double
the number homes it reached in
1990) and showcases a large and
vast sampling of new music videos
each week.
Reportedly, MTV adds fewer
than 20 videos a week.And probably
the most important factor in this
"so-called" merger, is that the Box
caters to genres like punk, death
metal, hardcore rap and country,
which is something you would
likely never see on MTV.
And to no one's surprise, there
is no reported guarantee that once
the Box and MTV2 become one
network, you, the viewer, will be
able to have any say in what you
see.Iet's face Itif this was about
cutting cost and saving money.
why not shut down MTV2? The
network is mainly available on
satellite TV and reaches less than
half the households of the Box.
This seems to me to be the
smartest decision to make, but the
almighty powerhouse that is MTV
would rather have absolute control
over our choice in watching the
music videos we want when we
want to. And because of this, we
are faced with the strong possibil-
ity of being forced to watch the
music videos MTV wants us to see.
Not to mention, putting an end to
having to compete with any other
channel, leaving viewers with only
one choice to choose from.
How fair is that?l'm not anti-
MTV, but rather, I'm against the
idea of eliminating a viewer's choice
in want they want for no apparent
reason at all. Since both the Box
and MTV have developed a loyal
following since their inception
and provided a service to a large
number of people, why is there a
need to change anything at all?
To put it simply, it makes no
sense whatsoever. So to the people
at MTV I say, "if it's not broke,
don't fix it
JedaftvLtoMal IN MY OPINION
Security should increase due to Duke U. suicidal gunman scare
The Chronicle (Duke U.)-When
a gunman entered Duke University
President Nan Keohane's office
early Wednesday afternoon, the
clock was clearly ticking. As David
Patrick Malone held three hostages
at gunpoint and asked to see the
president, Keohane was in the
process of returning from an off-
campus meeting.
And, as she was returning, mem-
bers of the Duke University Police
Department were on their way to
the scene.
With Malone threatening to kill
himself at any moment, the scene
was-five minutes from becoming
a disaster. But officers from DUPD
arrived in time and were able to
stop Malone without the use of
excessive force and without gunfire
or injuries to anyone involved.
DUPD's quick thinking and
acting confirms its status as well-
trained and capable enforcer of the
law equal to any municipal police
force.
While DUPD and the actions of
its officers are to be commended.
one is still left with a nagging case of
"What if? Although the gunman
insisted he was intent only on kill-
ing himself, might it not have been
a different story if Keohane had
been in her office?
Malone carried a loaded revolver
with 32 additional bullets, more
than enough to wreak a savage
vengeance on a university that he
had a long-standing, unreasonable
complaint with.
The presence of a handgun, a
weapon used for the sole purpose
of killing, in a traditionally safe and
sacred place, whether it be a high
school, church or the administra-
tive office of a university, is an
unfortunate occurrence that the
American public has sadly become
accustomed to seeing. .
The fact that Keohane and the
other administrators and employees
who occupy the space in the Allen
Building have to wake up to the
memory of this incident and the
fear that it may happen again is
ridiculous. But it is the price we all
will continue to pay in a nation
that continues to tolerate a culture
of death and violence.
Admirably, Keohane's office is
open and allows a close proximity
to her, if not instant access to
the president herself. However, it
also could have put her in serious
danger. The Office of the President
should seriously consider adding
to its security measures by at least
posting at the door to the building's
second floor a receptionist who
would actively encounter every
visitor to the office.
Granted, such an individual
could not have stopped an armed
man from getting to his target, but
this measure could give the police
a few more seconds in getting to
the scene.
It is clear that Wednesday's
incident was isolated, but it remains
one that should make the university
think harder about its campus
security measures while being care-
ful not to make the president less
accessible.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Athletic ticket fiasco disappoints fans
Dear Editor,
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium has
nearly a 50,000 seating capacity.
This means the stadium can easily
accommodate the 18,000 students
who attend F.CU plus Pirate Club
members, alumni and the general
public.
How does it work out that after
waiting four hours in line, I walked
away without a ticket?
I was told by the Athletic Ticket
Office, at 8 p.m. on game day, I
could purchase my ticket for $25.
Why should I and all the other
students who wanted tickets have
to pay for them when included in
our tuition is a required student
athletic fee?
As I understand, granted I could
be wrong, certain student groups
are allowed to pick up their tickets
early before the rest of the students
have a chance to pick up their
tickets.
I find this unfair because all
students should have an equal
opportunity to pick up their tickets.
I also find it absurd that students
should even be standing in line for
4 hours when we have classes to
attend. Basically it all boils down
to the fact that tickets should be
available to all students.
Meredith Watkins
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Students take easy way out of work
Dear Editor,
This letter is in response to the
editorial written in TEC entitled
"Some professors' attitudes discour-
age learning Turn the table. For
the past several years, students have
come to college (not necessarily
just this one) for one reason-to
have fun.
A larger number than most want
their grades handed to them on a
silver platter. They want handouts,
freebees and excuses instead of
results from hard honest work.
While this isn't Harvard, it is a
university level institution.
These professors are not
mechanics by day and instructors
by night-they are doctors in their
respective fields. This isn't anytown
community college. And believe
me, 1 have been to a community
college that had some excellent
teachers.
Students these days want things
the easy way.
"Just tell me exactly what's
going to be on the test 1 hear
them say.
How about coming to class on
time, being prepared, ready to learn,
listening to lectures, taking good
notes and STUDYING OUTSIDE OF
CLASS (yes, even if it means not
going to the Tech game).
Now I realize that in spite of all
this you will still have professors
who treat the course and those who
choose to take it like children.
But instead of writing a generic
article on a nameless, faceless pro-
fessor, why don't you go to the head
of the department with all the other
scorned students that obviously
don't fit my generic description of
some students today and demand
something be done about it? If that
doesn't work, work your way up
the chain-this is a state-funded
university.
The dean of the school must be
accountable to someone, possibly
you or your parents who pay North
Carolina state taxes each year. If
you're going to cry foul, that means
you're in the game. Play all four
quarters, not just one-half. No
results come of that.
Mike Hadden
junior, pre-nursing





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
NEWS@TEC.ECU.EDU
U.S. medical schools are still
short of minority students, study says
(Knlght-Ridder Tribune) - There
still aren't enough African-Ameri-
cans, Hispanics or American Indi-
ans in United States medical
schools, and that shortage could
hurt the quality of the nation's
overall medical care, according to a
recent report from the Association
of American Medical Colleges.
Blacks, Hispanics and Indians
made up about 15 percent of medi-
cal school graduates in 1998, but
they account for more than 25
percent of the U.S. population,
according to an association report
titled Minority Graduates of U.S.
Medical Schools: Trends, 1950-98.
"The stark disparity between
the number of practicing minority
physicians and the increasingly
diverse U.S. population is becoming
more acute and presents unique
challenges for the future delivery of
quality health care said associa-
tion president Dr. Jordan J. Cohen.
The number of U.S. physicians
who are African-American, His-
panic or Indian is already too low
- about 6 percent - and the low
number of medical students from
the three groups won't help make
up the gap.
One minority group - Asians -
is over represented in medicine in
comparison with its percentage of
the general population. In 1998,
about 18 percent of doctors practic-
ing in the United States were Asian
or Asian-American while 4 percent
of the population was of Asian
origin. The number of Asian doc-
tors has increased rapidly in recent
decades. In 1950, only 1 percent of
U.S. doctors were Asian, according
to the association report.
Other findings include the fol-
lowing: Most minority physicians
practice in states with large minor-
ity populations such as California,
Texas and New York. Twelve of
the 125 U.S. medical schools have
graduated 30 percent of all minor-
ity physicians since 1950. Medical
schools at Howard University in
Washington; Meharry Medical Col-
lege in Nashville, Tenn and the
University of Illinois graduated the
most black physicians.
The most American Indian and
Alaska natives graduated from the
University of Oklahoma School of
Medicine. The University of Puerto
Rico schools of medicine at Ponce
and Caribe graduated the most
Hispanic physicians.
The University of Hawaii, the
University of Lorna Linda in South-
ern California and the University of
California at I.os Angeles graduated
the most Asians. Among medical
schools' teaching ranks, minority
representation has grown, but pro-
motion rates of minorities continue
to lag behind those of whites,
according to a second association
study published in the Journal of
the American Medical Association.
"The results highlight the need
for medical schools to examine the
reasons racialethnic disparities
in promotion exist in their institu-
tion according to the article, writ-
ten by Dr. 1)1 Fang, Or. Krnest Moy,
Lois Colburn and Jeanne Hurley.
The study looked at promotion
rates among medical school faculty
members who became assistant or
associate professors between 1980
and 1989.
Why is TIAA-CREF the
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The TIAA-CREF
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Centre College president hosts "Save the Debate" rally
DANVILLE, Ky. (AP) - Centre
College plans a rally on Tuesday to
encourage Republicans to attend
a vice presidential debate slated
for October.
Centre College President John
Roush will host a "Save the Debate"
rally on campus at 11:20 a.m. EDT
in response to an announcement
last week by Republican presidential
nominee George W. Bush that he
might refuse to accept the debate.
The debate between Democratic
Vice President nominee Joseph
Lieberman and Republican Dick
Cheney at the college was slated
for Oct. 5.
The rally is set for the lawn of
Ihe Norton Center for the Arts on
Walnut Street in Danville.
Meanwhile, Democrat Al Gore's
campaign chairman sought to pro-
tect the Danville debate in a letter
to the Commission on Presidential
Debates. William Daley said the
central Kentucky community had
spent considerable time and raised
money to host the debate.
"While we support all of the
plans of all of the proposed com-
munities to host their debates, the
hardship on this small town will be
particularly great if the debate that
they are planning to host is canceled
as the Bush campaign has urged
Daley said in the letter, dated last
Priday but released Monday.
Daley said the Danville event
carried a symbolic significance by
giving small-town America a direct
role in the debates.
"Rural America deserves a
chance to participate in this great
quadrennial event Daley said.
Roush said the college has raised
$750,000 for the debate, all from
outside donors. Of that, $55(),(MX)
was paid to the Commission on
Presidential Debates. If the debate is
canceled, "we would try to .recover
some of that money appropriately
Roush said.
On Sept. .i, Bush proposed an
alternate schedule for the debates
and it eliminated the vice presiden-
tial debate at Centre scheduled for
Oct. 5.
Lieberman has confirmed that
he would be in Danville oh debate
night.
If weather does not permit the
rally to be outside it will be held in
the Norton Center lobby.
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V1BER14, 2000
3TEC.ECU.EDU
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
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monthly, utilities included, respon-
sible for own long distance phone
calls. Quiet mature male graduate
student only. Call Bill, 746-2103.
201 N. Summit Street: charming
3-4 BR, 2 B home completely remod-
eled for rent. Many amenities. Must
seel Call 752-9816 before 9 p.m. for
availability.
1 BR-2BR, water fit cable included.
DW & disposal. ECU bus line, pool
& pvt. laundry. On-site mgmt. &
maintenance. 9 or 12 mo. leases. Pets
allowed. 758-4015.
ROOMMATE WANTED
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3BDR house with
theatre student and 901b. Labrador.
Washerdryer, dishwasher, fenced-in
yard. $300month. Must like dogs.
Call (essica at 695-0358.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom & Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
Ibedroom apartment close to campus.
$237 per month plus 12 utilities
and phone. Call 830-4857, ask for
)rew.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed
SAP to share 3 BR! spacious condo
n Dockside. S275mo. 13 utilities,
pall Ashley ASAP @ 695-0537.
MALE OR Female roommate
keeded to share 3 bedroom town-
louse with male & female. 3 BR,
12 bath, spacious townhouse in
fjfcvin Oaks off of Greenville Blvd. &
th St. Rent is $200 per month plus
9f3 of the utilities, cable & phone.
Call 758-7642.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE - digital satellite
stem, $79. Free installation. Call
1-8514.
AAAAI SPRING Break Specials!
ancun & Jamaica from $389!
ir, hotel, free meals, drinks!
,ward winning company! Group
leaders free! Florida vacations
$129! springbreaktravel.com 1-800-
678-6386.
COMPAQ PRESARIO 2200 com-
puter, 15" monitor, 56k
modem. Upgradeable 64mb. RAM
includes $800 software, Office 2000
professional, Visual Basic 5.0. Asking
only $1,000. Call Jud 754-2435, after
3 p.m.
Dapper
Dan's
Retro mul intiip t I111� � iv.
Hiinilniiitlv Sili r Ji-wi'ln More.
I IT Evans St. Mull T.vl To
PITBULL PUPPIES, champion
blood lines, first shots, dewormed,
UKC, ADBA, registered. Parents on
site. Great companion pet. Males and
females available. Many colors avail-
able. Deposits accepted. 412-1908.
AAAA! EARLY Specials! Spring
Break Bahamas Party Cruise! 5 days
$279! Includes meals, parties! Awe-
some beaches, nightlife! Departs
Florida! Get group - go free!
springbreaktravel.com 1 -800-
678-6386.
GOOD QUALITY desk, computer
table, and twin size bed for sale. Real
cheap $20 for each item OBO. Call
Mark, 329-2862. Must sell!)
WATERBED, KING - six drawers,
headboard with mirror and lights.
$100 or best offer. Must go. Call
756-7053.
SERVICES
PHOTOGRAPHY. HAVE a pho-
tographer at your event, or party.
View and order photos on the
web. Call Coastal Photography
at 252-641-1600
www.coastal-photography.com
ez101 @rocketmail.com
ENGLISH TUTOR. Retired Prof,
will tutor you in English. Reasonable.
(252) 627-9082. Exact, 111 E. 3 St
Greenville.
THE ECU PT program is holding a
massage clinic Thurs. Sept. 21 from
5-9p.m. at the Belk Bldg. on Charles
Blvd. Advanced tickets are $410 min.
or $510min. at the door.
HELP WANTED
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
for lunch Monday through Thursday
and weekends at Cypress Glen Retire-
ment Community. Cypress Glen
is close to campus for students.
Interested applicants need to apply
in person at Cypress Glen at 100
Hickory Street.
BABYSITTER NEEDED - Each
Wednesday 11:30a.m5p.m. for 2
12 year-old and six year-old (after
school). Must come to my house in
Winterville. Experience and references
required. Call Pam at 355-7750.
LOOKING FOR therapeutic foster
parents. Applicant must have high
school diploma or GED. Salary and
incentives provided with training
completion Male, female, single, mar-
ried and graduate students encour-
aged to apply. Call 561-8556 or
717-8005.
PART-TIME RETAIL sales, after-
noons and Saturdays. Mature, respon-
sible individuals apply in person at
Carolina Carpet Outlet, 210-C East
14th Street, Greenville. No phone
calls please.
LOCAL ONLINE entertainment
E-line now hiring writers for features,
reviews, sports and movie columns.
Also hiring models for t-shirts and
other merchandise. Call 551-1020.
LEARN TO SKYDIVE
Carolina Sky Sports
1-800-SKYDIVE
VWWV.CAROUNASIOr5POirre.COM
Learn any style of music!
First month half price.
Call 493-0063.
Chinchilla! for laic
Cute, cuddly pets .Tk
If interested pleaso cell fipMtffc ,
752-3799 J yVT
Alica'B Chinchilla Ranch. Inc Mr F
WhotooM Print �J �
r
rebekah luther
Spanish Tu torI nsfructor
252.355.1771
bcksworUlv hoimntl com
THERMAL-GARD is currently seek-
ing highly motivated, energetic
individuals to join our growing team!
We are looking for full and part-time
employees for our Call Center. Our
benefits include: salary & bonus
checks, paid training, daily incen-
tives & weekly prizes, $50 for good
attendance. Blue Cross Blue Shields
insurance and great work environ-
ment. Better call now because these
positions will be filled soon and you
will have missed out on this excellent
opportunity. Call: 355-0210.
EXCELLENT JOB for student.
Home health care aides for the men-
tally and physically handicapped,
various days and times. Full and
part-time. Please call Howell Support
Services, 1 -888-886-4477 for more
info.
HELP WANTED at Szechuan
Express, the new location at 302A
Greenville Blvd S.E. (next to Waffle
House). Applications are available
and accepted at Szechuan Garden,
our main location at 909 South Evans
Street. Apply in person. No phone
calls, please.
PASSION ESCORTS now hiring
escorts and dancers. Earn as much
as $500 to $1000 a week. Call
747-7686.
PART-TIME Teller -1520 hrs.wk.
Must be 18 yrs. old, have typing,
computer, and cash handling experi-
ence. Must provide a criminal record
check, with resume or application.
Only those willing to work need
to apply at Checks 2 Cash, 500 S.
Memorial Dr Greenville, NC 27834.
Fax 252-41 3-0807
QUIXOTE TRAVELS is looking
for part-time help. Person needs
to be fluent in Outlook, Outlook
Express and Front Page 2000. For
interview please contact Rich Rados
@ 252-757-0234.
SALES NAT'L Marketing Co seeks
student reps to market credit cards
on your campus. Earn up to $500
or more per week! 800-592-2121
ext. 300.
DUE TOexpanding business,
Golden Corral is now hiring in all
positions, full & part-time. Benefits
available. Apply in person 2-4p.m
M-Th, 504 SW Greenville Blvd. No
phone calls please!
SPRING BREAK 2001
JMMH Csocun, FwnM. CwrbedkM, Hhtnui
How Mitaf C��ui Rapt Earn 2 f n� IHpm.
FiM mm . Joe by Nor 2nd. Cm tor FREE info
pack of vltUon-Mn �unsplaatitours.com
1 -800-426-771 O
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Take one teaspoon to
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LESS. SAVE MORE.
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
congratulate our Fall Pledge Class:
Ginger Butler, Katie Costello, Meagan
Cox Lindsay Davis, Carmel Deaver,
(ill Fraley, Melissa Hardy, Rikki Hood,
Shelley Hoyle, Missy MacKenzie,
Sarah Mullin, Liz Navarro, Brooke
Owen, Emily Parker, Becky Schmidt,
Katie Strickland, Mary Teel, ena Tew,
enna Warren, Brittany Wilson. We
love you!
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma would like
to congratulate the Pi Pledge Class
Officers: President: Emily Gaillard,
Vice-President: Amanda Featherston,
Treasurer: Amity Rowe, Recording
Secretary: Jennifer Johnson, Cor-
responding Secretary: Erin Smith,
Historian: Michelle Killian, Sister
Liaison: April BasspALPHA PHI
would like to congratulate our new
members, Liz Aeby, Amanda Arthur,
Shelly Brown, Ellen Cox, Jenny
Cress, Niki Crowell, Jules Deitrick,
Rachel Harris, Emmy Hayes, Becca
Hindin, Holly Ungerfelt, Liz Meadows,
Autumn Ngamthonglor, Dare Prid-
gen, Courtney Stone, Keri Taylor, Erin
Warfield, Patti Williams, Ali Witmer!
Love, the sisters of Alpha Phi
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, last Friday's
Pref Party was a blast! Thank you for
making it an unforgettable night.
Love, Alpha Phi
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, you guys
know how to tailgate! We had an
awesome time at the ECU vs. Tech
game with ya'll! Love, Alpha Phi
TO THE brothers of Lambda Chi
Alpha, thank you for the awesome
tailgate to kick off the football season.
We had a great time! The sisters of
Chi Omega
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Theta Chi for the use of your
stage for Bid Day!
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to
thank Dr. Schneider for your help
and generosity with rush. We really
appreciate it!
TO THE brothers of Kappa Alpha,
the sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta would like to thank you for
another unforgettable pref. party.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like
to welcome their new pledges for
Fall 2000. We are looking forward to
a great semester. We love you, the
sisters of Epsilon Sigma Alpha
DELTA ZETA wants to welcome
our new members. We are really
excited! Love, the sisters of Delta
Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS TO all the
sororities on an awesome Fall rush
and a special welcome to the new
members of Alpha Omicron Pi
THANK VOU Sigma Sigma Sigma,
Theta Chi and Phi Kappa Tau, for
a great time this weekend! We all
should do it again. The sisters and
new members of Delta Zeta
CONGRATULATIONS ANNIE and
Bea on your engagement. Love, the
sisters and new members of Delta
Zeta
TO THE brothers of Sigma Phi
Epsilon, bid night was a success!
Thanks for showing our new girls a
wonderful time. Thanks. The sisters
of Chi Omega
Buy recycled. It would mean the world to tliem.
Tlianlf to you, all sort of everyday prixlm ts aiv k-inc m.itL- fmm material
you m recycled. But to Keep recycling wurlritl� for the future, you iu-ttl to l.x.L-
for tin� products .mil buy tliem. For a free brochure, call l-800-CAIX-nDF
"aFJF
GOOD LUCK in the North Caro-
lina Debutante Ball, Holly Carroway.
We are proud of youl Love, the sisters
of Delta Zeta
SUPCRBALL DOUBLES golf regis-
tration, Sept. 19 10am-6pm. Get your
teams together and don't miss the
excitement. For information call
328-6387.
SEA KAYAKING at Bear Island
Sept.23-24. Don't miss Eastern North
Carolina's outdoor sport of choice.
Registration deadline is Sept. 15 and
the cost is $45. For more information
call 328-6387.
BRIAN NEWTON, Assistant Direc-
tor of Career Services, will be speaking
to S.A.M. (Society for the Advance-
ment of Management) on Sept. 19
at 3:30 p.m. in GCB room 1028. All
are invited and refreshments will be
served.
HEY STUDENTS, the Greenville-
Pitt County Special Olympics is cur-
rently recruiting volunteers for the
following sports: bowling, soccer,
basketball skills. Swimming, roller
skating, volleyball, power lifting, after
school recreation camp and bocce.
For more information, contact Kelvin
Yarrell at (252) 329-4844.
QUICK START Kayak Sept. 22,
7pm-10pm and Sept. 23, 7am-7pm.
Spend a night in the pool then a day
on the Cape Fear paddling. Cost for
this program is $45 and the registra-
tion deadline is Sept. 15. For more
information please call 328-6387.
ZETA PHI Beta cordially invites you to
our Winter Ball November 4th, 2000
"Saturday" at 8p.m. in
the Hilton of Greenville. For info:
Charla Blummel, 328-8676.
BEGINNER RACQUETBALL
CLINIC, Sept. 18-Oct. 9 Mondays
8:00pm-9:00pm. Learn basic skills
and rules of racquetball. All equip-
ment is provided.Registration is
through Sept. 15 and the cost is
free to members, $5nonmembers.
For more Information please call
328-6387.
TENNIS 1-2-3, Oct.2-Oct.7 Motv
Fri 6:30pm-8:00pm; Sat. 8:30am-
10:00am at the Greenville Tennis
Center. Tennis instruction for adult
beginners taught by the prosl The
program is free to members and
the registration deadline is Sept.
29. For more information please call
328-6387.
THE SOCIETY Of Physics Students
will hold a meeting on Wednesday,
September 20th at 4 p.m. in Howell
Science Complex room E-213. Non-
majors are welcome. For more infor-
mation call 328-2566.
THE ECU Chapter League of the
South invites everyone interested to
meet in Mendenhall room 212 on
Wednesday Sept. 12 at 7 p.m. to
discuss re-educating Southerners of
all races about their proud traditions,
history, politics, and heroes. Deo
Vindice! Resurgam
QUICK START KAYAK Sept. 22,
7pm-10pm and Sept. 23, 7am-7pm.
Spend a night in the pool then a day
on the Cape Fear paddling. Cost for
this program is $45 and the registra-
tion deadline is Sept. 15. For more
information call 328-6387. TENNIS
1-2-3, Oct.2-Oct.7 Mon-Fri 6:30pm-
8:00pm; Sat. 8:30am-10:00am at
the Greenville Tennis Center. Tennis
instruction for adult beginners taught
by the pros! The program is FREE to
members and the registration dead-
line is Sept. 29. For more information
please call 328-6387.
ULTIMATE FRISBEE registra-
tion Sept. 12, 10am-6pm in the
SRC 128. Get yourteams together
and don't miss out on the excite-
ment. For more information please
call 328-6387. TENNIS SINGLES
registration, Sept.12, 10am-6pm in
the SRC 128. For more information
please call 328-6387.
gometag
to
Sel!4! it tight. (We.
the east Carolinian classifieds
"BIGGEST SALE OF THE YEAR"
Kin
September 14-16
Thur-Sat 10AM-4PM
WRing "
Me Student Stores
� p j






8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
NEWS@TEC.ECU.EDU
Get your Senior Portrait
taken in your cap and
gown, tuxedo or dress
shell - all will be provided
to you
Take proofs home with
you that day
i
Present your parents with
a professional portrait
commemorating this
important milestone
Commemorate
Your Graduation
Quality graduation portraits in an instant-
that's Collegiate Reflections by Jostens
Collegiate Reflections Offers
� An easy & convenient way to
take your senior portrait
� 2 unique ECU portrait borders
m
� $15.00 setting fee includes
proofs
� Packages available
Senior Portraits
Dates:
September 19-21
Time:
19th: 10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
20th: 10:00 a.m7:00 p.m.
21th: 10:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Location:
Mendenhall Student Center
Jostens

COLLEfilATEflfftfCro'iV,
By Jostens
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3ER14,2000
EC.ECU.EDU
"I HAVENT FAILED, I'VE
FOUND 10,000 WAYS THAT
DON'T WORK
-THOMAS EDISON
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
HOROSCOPES
Today's Birthday: Once you clear a few
hurdles, you'll be on your way. Use what
you're learning, plus what you already know,
to attain your goals.
ARIES
(MARCH 21-APRIL 19)
Something that you thought would work
could fall flat. Errands could take three times
longer than usual. Relax. Take it slow and
easy. Better late than never.
TAURUS
(APRIL 20-MAY 20)
You have some good people on your side.
A lot of temptations are out there, however.
Keep your eye on long-term goals and keep
your pockets buttoned.
GEMINI
(MAY 21-JUNE 21)
Changes are underway, and some are big.
You probably have to explain what's going
on, and that may not be easy. Even if this
takes a while, you're doing fine.
CANCER
(JUNE 22-JULY 22)
Travel is not a good idea. You may even
have trouble making a long-distance connec-
tion. Packages in the mail could be delayed,
too. Stay close to home.
LEO
(JULY23-AUC. 22)
A supposed done deal could fall apart.
Money you thought was in the bank may
have been gobbled up by finance charges.
Go over notes and check your resources.
VIRGO
(AUG. 23-SEPT. 22)
If your partner is nuts and your boss is
off base, guess what? You're right, but don't
make a big deal of it. If you're nice instead,
they'll all realize how much they need you.
LIBRA
(SEPT. 23-OCT. 22)
A struggle's still going on between the
way you want things to be and the way they
are. You don't have to be inhibited by the
way others think things should be, but take
gravity into effect.
SCORPIO
(OCT. 23-NOV. 21)
If you're having trouble reaching an
agreement, an arbitrator could help. You
and your adversary may be too emotionally
involved to be objective. A Cancer is ideal.
SAGITTARIUS
(NOV. 22-DEC. 21)
There's enough controversy to make the
day interesting. Although you're right in the
middle of the action, you may want to keep
a low profile. Let others do the talking, and
you'll appear wise.
CAPRICORN
(DEC.22-JAN. 19)
Confusion reigns again. Even if you're the
boss, you may find it difficult to keep track of
changes. You may need a score card to tell
the good guys from the bad, too.
AQUARIUS
(JAN. 20-FEB. 18)
The chances of misunderstandings or
errors concerning money are high. Count
your change and read the fine print before
you sign any contracts. Spending a little
extra time now could be a valuable invest-
ment.
PISCES
(FEB. 19-MARCH20)
You'll find expressing your thoughts and
feelings is easier. Don't let others intimidate
you, especially if you don't agree. Your point
of view is just as important. Listen, too, and
you'll have another advantage.
FEATURESB2
COLD MEDALIST MITCH CAYLORD
MOTIVATES STUDENTS.
(Above) Some things look a lot cooler when you win. (photo
by John Stowe)
Left: ECU cheerleaders display their school pride, running
the touchdown banner up and down the end zone.
Above: PeeDee holds his bearing while cadets from Army
and Air Force ROTC present the colors before kickoff.
Below: ECU quarterback Richard Alston warms up on the
sidelines during Thursday's loss to Virginia Tech by pitching
around the pigskin, (photos by John Stowe)
TALES FROM THE
(Above) Virginia Tech's Andre Davis celebrates with Hokie teammates following his punt which was
returned for a touchdown.
(Right) The ECU Marching Pirates play their famous rendition of the national anthem. The band is now the
largest organization on campus with over 200 members, (photos by John Stowe)






2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
FEATURES
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
FEATURES@TEC.ECU.EDU
FEATURESBRIEFS
DO YOU PLAN TO
WATCH THE OLYMPICS
THIS YEAR?
Lauren Colbert
JUNIOR
"No, I know I won't be watching the
Olympics-I'll be too busy studying
Sarah Starnes
FRESHMAN
"Yea, I will be. I'm sure that I'll be flip-
ping through and I'll probably stop to
watch
ahWaddlH
FRESHMAN
"When is it going to be on? If I knew
when it aired and on what station then I
would probably see some of it
Ian Altschul
FRESHMAN
"Probably not-there are too many events
and too difficult to keep track of things
Elizabeth Smith
FRESHMAN
"Yes because I like the gymnastics and
sports in general
Mitch Gaylord scores perfect 10 with students
Alexandra Zevalking
SENIOR
"I actually don't have a television; so I
doubt it
John Metcalf
FRESHMAN
"I'll only watch certain events. I really like
swimming, but I know that I won't have
enough time to watch it
TEC sits down to find out more
about the Olympic gold medalist
Maura Buck
FEATURES EDITOR
Bridget Hemenway
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Mitch Gaylord, the first male to ever score a perfect 10 at the Olympic
names in gymnastics, sat down to speak with us about life, motivation and
his many accomplishments. At 23, he won a gold medal at the Los Angelos
Olympics which led to a starring role in the film American Anthem and a
stunt double role as "Robin" in Batman Forever. He serves on the President's
Council for Physical Fitness and now travels across the country delivering
motivational speeches.
TEC: When did you start training heavily?
GAYLORD: I would say when I hit college. I see a lot of people that
put their kids in training programs at 5 or 6 years old for the Olympics
and that's not the way to go.
TEC: How old were you when you decided to go to the Olympics?
GAYLORD: Well, the dream was there when 1 was 12 but when I
actually thought it was a possibility was when 1 was a senior in high
school. I competed nationally for the first time and saw the rest of the
country in my age group and realized that this was the group that was
moving up for the Olympics that I would be in. And, of course, I blew
every routine and came in like 16th; but the following year I beat all of
them. That's when 1 really started to train and I realized that I had talent
and I had to put the talent to use.
TEC: What was a training routine like?
GAYLORD: This was the last 2 or 3 years, intense training. 1 would
practice and hour-and-a-half in the morning, go to classes and then the
afternoon work out was four hours, study, eat dinner and then go to a
midnight strength rally which was about IS minutes and that was it for six
days a week. Then 1 actually left UCIA for a six month period of time to
train with Kurt Thomas and then returned to school.
TEC: What did you get your degree in?
GAYLORD: I didn't get my degree, I actually left. The timing was
one year left of school and we won a gold medal so that meant travel
around the country, endorse products. You know it's like a whole world
opened up to me. I was studying history and then after that year I thought
that's not what I need to be doing. Then I did a movie and it took me
in a whole different direction.
1 tried to go back, though, I did and I think it lasted maybe a week.
I thought too late! I've already seen the world. Here's where all the
opportunities are and here's what I used to do and it didn't make any
sense. I have no regrets. I have nothing against education, it just wasn't
right for me.
TEC: Who would you regard as a specific individual in your life who
has helped you become who you are today?
GAYLORD: There's so many people. It's hard to pinpoint one. I have
several inspirational figures in my life, people that didn't even know it at
the time or didn't even know me. Kurt Thomas was the gymnast that I really
looked up to, who 1 trained with for six months and continued to train
with him once and a while after that, once I got back to UCLA. My brother
who became my coach for the last year-and-a-half, towards the Olympics. 1
couldn't have done it without him and various other people.
TEC: While competing in the Olympics, was it accessible to meet
other Olympians from other countries and carry on a conversation
with them?
GAYLORD: Definitely. English is a common bond. Before we get
to the Olympics, you are traveling for four years prior to that and we
usually have dual meets prior to that where it's just your country against
their country and that's when you get to know them as people, and
you stay there for a week and travel to where they trained and where
they sleep. It's one of the best experiences. Those are friendships that
you will take on forever.
THURSDA
WWW.TH
Gel
ton
fat
ei
We
Frli
Froi
Ex
Abovo: Mitch Gaylord delivers an
oration on success to students
Tuesday night.
Right: Motivational speaker, and one
time gold medalist, Mitch Gaylord
high lives students after a series
of push-ups, encouraging them to
push themselves as far as they can,
toward success, (photo by Desire
Lunsford)
F
TEC: As a 23-year-old Olympian representing your country, are there pressures
that are unbearable?
GAYLORD: (laugh) Well the good news was that we weren't expected to win so we
didn't have that pressure on us. We didn't have expectations to live up to other than the
ones that we put on ourselves which was in all honesty to win a bronze medal. That's
what we thought we could do. After the first day, we realized that that wasn't the case,
we definitely had a shot and that's when the pressure set in.
see GAYLORD pg. 3
Writer Reading Series returns
Morgan to give
reading on campus
Bridget Hemenway
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
The Writers Reading Series of Eastern NC is
kicking off the 2000-01 school year in a big way.
Since 1995 they have been bringing influential
contemporary writers from all walks of life to the
campus of ECU. This year is no exception.
The series begins Thursday, Sept. 14 with New
York Times bestseller Robert Morgan. Morgan,
a poet and novelist, has published nine books
of poetry and his novel, The Trust Pleasure, was
named a Publishers Weekly Best Book of the Year.
He has won numerous awards, including four
NEA Fellowships and the North Carolina Award
for Literature. His most recent novel. Gap Creek,
is even on Oprah's Book Club list.
Founded by Professor Julie Fay, the Writers
Reading Series provides an enriching opportunity
for writers to meet their readers and develop
new ones as they give a public reading, sign
books and attend a public reception in their
honor.
Randall Martoccia, English department
lecturer and one of the series organizers explained
the direction behind the series.
"Our mission is to invite six or more high
quality writers to eastern North Carolina each
year to allow readers and emerging writers in an
underserved community to appreciate and better
understand contemporary lit by allowing
them to meet and hear writers in person
Martoccia said. "This in turn can instill a
respect for the craft "
Angel Savage, department of English
administrative supervisor and committee
member for the Writers Reading Series said
that the program serves the community as
well as students.
"I believe it has not only benefited the
school but the community at large as a
grassroots and developmental program
Savage said. "It has been a very effective
multi-cultural organization. It has brought
in people who would normally have not had
the opportunity to experience meeting a
published author
Martoccia encourages students to become
interested in the literary community.
"People interested in writing should hear
the writers speak as a tool to motivate and
inspire Martoccia said. "Everyone needs to
come be a part of the literary community. If
not to trade ideas and ambitions then just to
experience the pleasure of actually hearing
the author discuss his own work
Morgan will speak in a meet-the-author
question and answer session today at 3 p.m.
in Room 1024 of the General Classroom
Building (GCB). He will then give a public
reading at 7 p.m. in Room 1032 of GCB. It
will be followed by a reception and book
signing. Admission is $2 for students and
seniors, $3 for the general public.
This writer can be contacted
at featuressec.ecu.edu.
WRITERS READING SERIES
(FALL LINEUP)
Sept. 14
Robert Morgan
3 p.m. Meet the writer; General Classroom Building (GCB) 1024
7 p.m. Reading, reception and book signing GCB 1032
Author of Gap Creek and New York Times Bestseller
Oct4
lulle Fay and Robert Siegel
7 p.m. Reading, reception and book signing; Greenville Museum
ofArt(GMA)
Author of three poetry collections including. The Woman Behind
You, playwright of "Overlooking the Park" and "Night into Winter"
Oct. 25
Kelly Cherry
3 p.m. Meet the writer; CMA
7 p.m. Reading, reception and book signing
Author of "Death and Transfiguration 77? Society of Friends and
The Poem.An Essay
Nov. 16
Linda Beatrice Brown
3 p.m. Meet the writer; CMA
7 p.m. Reading, reception and book signing
Author of Rainbow Roun'Mah, Shoulder and Crossing Over Jordan
Dec. 4
Barbara Braveboy Locklear
3 p.m. Meet the writer, GMA
7 p.m. Reading, reception and book signing
Freelance writer, poet and American Indian studies consultant
The Ma
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TEC.ECU.EDU
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GAYLORD from page 2
TEC: What was your first thought or emotion when you discovered that you had scored a perfect 10?
JASSli? - overwhelmin8 i�y- � was exciting and it was almost disbelief. 'Hey
wait That doesn t happen for an Amencan gymnast It changed my mentality. From that point on we aU
knew we were capable of posting those scores.
TEC: Will you be watching the Olympics?
GAYLORD: Yea, I'll be watching.
see GAYLORD pa 5
siop gy 10 pick-up your, voiez
zeGm&moN form





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4 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
FEATURES
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
NEWS@TEC.ECU.EDU
THURSD
WWW.TI
'West Wing' stuffs The
Sopranos' at Emmy ballot
LOS ANGELES (AP) -Once again, crime didn't pay
elbcSK "iV1��3 "eW US' presidenthe Ards
elbowed aside the mob-focused "The Sopranos" to shower honors on the
White House drama "The West Wing
wi T SOTleS WOn a record-setting nine Emrnys on Sunday,
including best drama. Only James Gandolfini's best acting trophy
prevented a shutout for "The Sopranos" after 18 nominations
I wish we had done a little better Gandolfini said after the show
potntnnf " "� m�St'y Emm?
He suggested the surreal drama may be a little too dark and violent
for many Emmy voters. Some of Hollywood's old guard also may be
nehSta hesd6 f�r a "bIe $h�W inStCad �f �ne �" the broadcast
hvWeSt Wlng' " a VCry good show' &om what 1 understand
ne said. "I've never seen it
ABC was thrilled with ratings for the Emmys. The show drew an
average audience of 21.6 million people, a 23 percent increase over 1999
St TV a.Udiln?e Si"Ce at leaSt ,986- ABC att"b��ted the (ump
at least partly to its ability to promote the show on the popular "Who
Wants to Be a Millionaire F�yuidi vvno
"West Wing" is an uplifting look at political life not weighed down
with cynicism. Its characters try to do the right thing, even if they
don t always succeed. Real Washington leaders are constantly thanking
producers for their portrayal. 8
"By and large in movies and television shows, the country's leaders
IZfT-u IT d�ltS �r Machia�ian' ��� creator Aaron
Sorkin said Here, they are neither. They're very bright, committed
and energetic people 6 ��
hkSKS ahElTy f�lhlS Witing; Th�mas Schlamw for directing.
Richard Schlff who plays the grim aide Toby Ziegler, and Allison Jannev,
awarf se fh h'te "T T P� " won supporting acj
awards. Hie show won four other technical awards
Asked whether "The West Wing" educates viewers about politics
Sorkin replied: "We're not asking anyone to eat their vegetables " But
he said he was pleased that some people have credited his show with
exciting people about the political system.
Martin Sheen, President Josiah Bartlet in "The West Wine " was
w1h�L75' 'T the FmmyS With his Pcaon that Gandolfini
would beat him for best actor, but his show would win best series
James was selected MVP, but we won the game Sheen said "That's
the most important thing
Emmy voters showed their sentimental sides Sunday. Michael I Fox
won best actor in a comedy for his final performance in "Spin City"
before rearing because of Parkinson's disease. Jack Lemmon won best
XMorneT5 " " " "�Pfah Winfrey PreSe"tS: Tuesdays
Both veteran actors drew standing ovations.
"Will & Grace" was selected best comedy, boosting the show as it
moves to Thursday nights. Its supporting actors, Sean Hayes and Megan
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TIMBER 14, 2000
VS@TEC.ECU.EDU
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THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
FEATURES
THE EAST CAROLINIAN 5
FEATURES@TEC.ECU.EDU
You drank.
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vaAYLOR D from pages 2,3
to ytrTelr? ma"y differences in the athletes OI today as opposed
�f rfG� Vf s?: Yea' W almost mixed out the risk foctor, like the degree
of difficulty that you can do. We did some crazy stuff back then that still
SH,rfiyea,?nater' L�r example'the Gay'ord fflPis considered one of the
most difficu fltps after 16 years. It's so cool. I enjoy that more than the
medals and I've made a mark on the sport which is cool
Hie thing that's changed though because they couldn't go much
further with r.sk taking because that wouldn't be smart is they have
become better trained athletes and, much stronger than we were, much
more endurance. They do longer routines. They do much more difficulty
in their routine. We did one or two difficult things per routine whereas
they do six or seven.
TEC: How do you get from an Olympic athlete to a Hollywood
actor or stunt double? 7
wan (,aUgh!) TheyuCa" UP y0Uf agent and hey�� he
want to act? Its very strange how it all happened. I had no dreams in
doing that but what really happened was that the director of American
Anthemwas.researching gymnastics and they were going to use lorn
Cruise. The director saw me and liked me a lot and said that they couldn't
get lorn Cruise, he was busy and he wanted to shoot the movie right
now, do you want to do it? v
-P How was the movie experience in comparison to the Olym-
GAYLORD: Well there's no comparison at all. It was a different
world that I was in and I was trying to make sense of it. There was so
much hype surrounding it. The biggest thing that I learned that as an
athlete you have so much control over your destiny it's you out there
doing it but as an actor, no way. It's the public, it's the producers
directors, it's everything. H '
s eater?' N�W' h�W d� y�U 8et fr0m the aCt0f t0 the motiva��nal
, �?V.LORD1! lt'S What'avoided at aU costs after the Olympics because
I didn t have the desire or the confidence to do it. It scared me I could
compete in front of the world in gymnastics but not stand in front of an
audience and talk for an hour. Then in '96, I wanted to reconnect with
he sports, with the Olympic world. I was done with acting and doing
hat whole thing and decided that this was a good way to get back in
I actually enjoy it very much.
TEC: What direction do you see yourself going now?
GAYLORD: My life is heading in a different direction now through
fitness and I have a product with Suzanne Somers called the torso track
that s on the air. That led me to the Home Shopping Network and they
want me to do my fitness line now and write a book to reconnect people
see GAYLORD pg. 6
VASQUE BACKPACKING BOOTS. For times when vou
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PARENTS
WEEKEND SALE!
Thursday, Sept. 14 - Saturday, Sept. 16
SAVE 25
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MOM or DAD APPAREL
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Centrally located on campus, in the Wright Buildins, just off Wright Circle
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4





6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
FEATURES
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
FEATURES@TEC.ECU.EDU
GAYLORD from pages 2, 3, 5
with the recreational roots of what it meant to enjoy working out and
doing it for the fun of it.
TEC: So while you are out there motivating people, who motivates
you?
GAYLORD: My kids and my wife too. Both of us have learned so
much from them and you know In what I want to he as a father for them
and what I want their lives to be like when they grow up, that's a major
motivation (laughs) and just being a provider to all of them.
TEC: For those people that couldn't make to your speech, what
message would you want to get to them?
GAYLORD: I think that we all have something special and that we're
all destined, where it's in the Olympics or in your local community or
a family, it doesn't matter. It's that there is something that is driving
you toward making that happen in your life, and I think that that's
the key to life is the motivation and inspiration toward any dream
you may have.
These writers can be contacted at features@ecupiratemail.com.
East Carolina
Uni
lversitv
Official Alumni Association Ring Collection by Jostens
ORDER.TOD AY!
Tuesday, September 14 12PM-5PM
Wednesday, September 20 10AM-4PM
Thursday, September 21 10AM-4PM
U.B.E. 51b S. Cotanchc Street
Now hiring for
Ad Sales positions
The East Carolinian is now hiring responsible students for part-time
work as Advertising Representatives. Apply for positions at the Student
Publications Building (across from Joyner library).
WORKOUT WITH YOUR
PARENTS
FREE
FRIDAY � SATURDAY � SUNDAY
PARENTS WEEKEND
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tiniklvNAL
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j





JER 14,2000
EC.ECU.EDU
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
IP!
ems to
i of the
d floor.
0 GPA
R
0 bring
jent
ee
1 The
panied
vorkout
ORTS
SPORTS
THE EAST CAROUNIAN 7
SPORTS�TEC.ECU.EDU
sportsbriefs Green Wave sweeps into Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
OLYMPICS OPEN FRIDAY
The 2000 Summer Olympics opening
ceremonies will be held tomorrow night in
Sydney, Australia.
The event kicks off 17 days of competi-
tion in 28 sports.
IP'ir:
OLYMPIC SOCCER GETS
HEAD START
While the games will not officially begin
until Friday, soccer has begun early. Wednes-
day, the U.S. Men's team tied heavily
favored the Czech Republic squad 2-2.
The Czechs got an early goal by Marek
jankulovski in the 28th minute. The Amer-
icans responded with two goals by Chris
Albright and josh Wolff.
Up 2-1 at halftime, the Americans lost
momentum down the stretch. The Czech
Republic's Lukas Dosek scored on a penalty
kick to tie the game in the second half.
MASON NAMED PLAYER
OF THE WEEK
ECU volleyball mainstay, LuCinda Mason
received the CAA Player of the Week Award
last week for her performance in the Hamp-
ton Inn Jayhawk Classic.
Mason, a senior, collected 51 kills, 40
digs and 21 blocks in the Pirates four
matches in the tournament.
She currently leads the Pirates in kills with
97.
MULLIN WAIVED
BY INDIANA
Five-time All-Star, Chris Mullin was
waived by the Indiana Pacers. The 37-year-
old forward joined the Pacers in 1997.
In three season with the team, Mullin
averaged 9.4 points. He leaves the Pacers
with the records for three-point percentage
(.441) and free throw percentage (.912)
Mullin has played 15 seasons in the NBA
after being drafted by the Golden State War-
riors out of St. John's.
Mullin won two Olympic Gold medals in
1984 and with the Dream Team in 1992.
GRIFFEY OUT ONE WEEK
Ken Griffey jrs frustrating season just got
worse. The oft-criticized Reds slugger, will
be out 5-7 days with a sprained hamstring.
Griffey suffered the injury in Tuesday's 7-6
win over Chicago.
Griffey has struggled in his first season
with Cincinnati. He has hit 39 home runs
and is currently batting .269.
Pirates look for
a repeat of history
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Last season, Tulane
Head Coach Chris Scelfo
brought a Tulane team to
Greenville that thrived on
a vertical passing attack,
a team that was breaking
in a new quarterback and
timed its visit directly after
the Pirates' first loss.
This year, he brings a
Tulane team to Greenville
that thrives on a vertical
passing attack, with a few
tweaks, that is breaking
in a new quarterback and
doing it all directly after
the Pirates' first loss.
last year ECU won
52-7. This year the Pirates
hope for a similar result in
their C-USA opener.
"We want to come out
just like we did last year
said quarterback David
Garrard. "We're going to
try to give it to them as
many times as we can.
Hopefully they'll bend
towards the end and we
can really start to let loose
on them
While the 52 point
outburst of last season was
a showcase for the offense,
it overshadowed a strong
defensive showing. Tliiane
came into Greenville with
a high-powered passing
game that garnered much
attention from the ECU
coaches.
The Pirate defense
held the Green Wave to
20-for-35 passing for 150
yards.
i
(Above) ECU quarterback
David Garrard threw for
271 yards in last season's
52-7 blowout of Tulane.
The junior also rushed for
97 yards in the win. (photo
byJohnStowe.)
(Below) The ECU defense
clamped down on the
Virginia Tech offense of
last week's loss. This
week they face an
explosive Green Wave
offense, (photo by Ryan
Bradshaw)
"They're going to
throw the ball all over the
park said Head Coach
Steve Logan. "They're
going to come out throw-
ing, go home throwing,
that's what they do. So
we've got to go defend
it
This season, Scelfo and
the Green Wave bring a
slightly different offensive
scheme.
"They've got a little
more conventional stuff
in their offense Logan
said. "They've added a
tight end from time to
time, two backs from
time to time. Last year
they were almost exclu-
sively four or five wideout.
They've constricted their
offense some
In addition to the dif-
ferences in the passing
game, Tulane also looks to
run the ball more.
Tailback Mewelde
Moore nished for 82 yards
on 16 carries in the Green
Wave's season opener
against Ole Miss.
"Tulane rushes more
this year than they have
in the past couple years
said linebacker Pernell
Griffin. "So it will be on
the front seven to hope-
fully stop the running
game and help stop their
passing
At the helm of their
offense last season was Pat-
rick Ramsey.
The junior
entered the
season as
one of the
more prom-
ising signal
callers in the
conference.
In their loss
to Ole Miss,
Ramsey went down and
is questionable for Satur-
day's game.
In his place will be true
freshman J.P. I.osman.
"It doesn't matter to
me Logan said. "The
guy they've got coming in
is just as capable. We've
just got to worry about
Tulane
For the Pirate offense,
the worry will be the
dangerous Green, Wave
defense.
"They gamble quite a
bit, as far as putting eight,
nine men up on the line of
scrimmage Logan said.
"They've been very effec-
tive with it. If they guess
right, they can make you
look bad. We've got a do
a good job at the line of
scrimmage
This writer can be contacted
at sports9ecupiratemail.com.
Stephen Schramm IN MY OPINION
Goodbye Knight, good riddance
Pirate Notes
Bobby Knight may very well break Dean Smith's
record for the most wins by a college basketball
coach. He will probably find a job at some school
that is willing to put up with his
childish behavior. Bobby, you've got a long way to go
He'll find an athletic director , , . . � v , ,
that will take his bullying and to close to Dean Sm,th' YoU d
a school that will look past the belter keep that in mind,
physical and emotional abuse he Stephan Schramm
puts on every person in his pro- SPORTS EDITOR
gram and revere him as merely a
coach that wins.
Despite his antics,
he will probably catch
Smith. Knight sits 116
wins behind the former
North Carolina coach
and needs about six
good seasons to equal
Smith's 879 victories.
Tuesday he baited
ESPN's Jeremy Schaap,
son of respected sports-
writer Dick Schaap, by
saying, "You got a long
way to go to become
as good as your dad,
you better keep that in
mind
Bobby, you've got
a long way to go to be
close to Dean Smith.
You'd better keep that
in mind.
If Knight does
become the winningest
coach in college basket-
ball, he will do it with a
tremendous shadow.
In his 32 seasons on
the bench in Chapel
Hill, Smith was a force
of change in the com-
munity. He fought for
integrating the team,
the university and the
town. He ran a clean
program, genuinely
cared about the welfare of his players, past and present,
and oh yeah, he won too. He did it all and kept an
air of humble respectability about his program and
his life.
His modesty was so strong that in the early 80s he
bristled at the idea of naming the new basketball arena
after him. Eventually he relented.
When he retired in 1997, Smith left the program
in good shape as well as the school and the town
better off.
After 29 seasons in Bloomington, what is Knight's
Bobby Knight was fired by Indiana University Sunday for violating
the University's "zero-tolerance" policy. (AP Photo)
legacy? Sure there are three championship banners,
and countless donations he made to the school.
But along with the accomplishments comes a
multitude of baggage.
There is too much foot-
age of chairs being thrown,
referees and reporters being
chastised and players being
kicked, head butted and
choked. There are too many
stories of students being
grabbed and lectured and
IU officials being
verbally abused,
not to mention
secretaries dodg-
ing flower pots.
Woody Hayes
was the highly
successful head
coach of the
Ohio State foot-
ball team for
decades. For all
the titles he won,
what most
people remem-
ber him for is
the night in 1979
when he threw a
punch at a Clem-
son player in
the closing min-
utes of a Buckeye
loss in the Gator
Bowl.
Hayes was
fired the next
day and never
coached again.
Now Knight
joins Hayes on
the list of
coaches who
could not con-
trol their demons.
One more
thought. Isn't it
ironic that Knight's final action as head coach at
IU ends with him lecturing a student on politeness
and respect.
This from a man who once allegedly used a
soiled piece of toilet paper to inspire his team?
For all intents and purposes, Knight was a
hypocrite. He demanded more from those around
him than he did from himself.
Maybe, if Knight had followed the rules he set
forth to IU freshman Kent Harvey last week, he
would still be employed.
EXTRA DOWN
Both ECU and Tulane have had plenty of time
to get ready for each other.
The Green Wave last played on Sept 2nd in a
49-20 loss to Ole Miss in Oxford, Miss. Meanwhile,
the Pirates are coming off of a 45-28 toss to Vir-
ginia Tech last Thursday.
"Whenever you have a couple of extra days,
your chances of winning greatly improve said
ECU quarterback David Garrard. "You get some
reps under your belt and get some of the soreness
out from last week's game and concentrate on the
next game
With a full two weeks to prepare for the Pirates,
players and coaches are expecting a rested and
ready Tulane squad.
"I'm sure they're going to have some trick
plays, some different things in their defense Gar-
rard said. "I'm not sure how much they can do to
us. If they blitz, they Witt. If they don't, they don't.
There aren't too many things unless they come out
with a whole new defense
THE RAMSEY FACTOR
While Tulane may be without their veteran
starting quarterback, Patrick Ramsey, the ECU
coaching staff is not concerned.
"Ifs a non-event to us which quarterback
plays said ECU Head Coach Steve Logan. "We've
got our scheme. We're going to run our scheme
against their schemes and see how we hold up
DISTANT MEMORIES
With Shaun King leading the Buccaneers in the
NFL and Tommy Bowden roaming the sidelines at
Clemson, the 12-0 season of 1998 is now a distant
memory.
Two years removed from the perfect season,
Tulane Is a program in a rebuilding phase. Since
their win in the 1998 Liberty Bowl, the Green
Wave has gone 3-9.





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
THURSDAY
WWW.THE
Knight set to move, still wants to coach
BLOOMINGTON, Ind. (AP)-The General has no intention of just
fading away.
Bob Knight, fired after 29 years at Indiana, says he will coach again,
and hell do It the way he always has-his way.
"I've always felt I've got to be me, I can't be something that someone's
trying to construct he said Tuesday night in a live, sometimes
contentious Interview on ESPN.
"I try to be fair, try to be honest. My philosophy and approach to
things is Just different than some people and situations Knight said.
Ousted for a pattern of "unacceptable" behavior that violated a
"zero-tolerance" behavior policy, Knight admitted he was surprised by
the school's decision. But he said perhaps it was time to move on anyway
and that he still wants to coach "in the worst way
"I thought I'd stay here till I was done coaching Knight said. "I
haven't retired. I'm an unemployed teacher right now, and I'm looking
for a place to teach. There are too many things that I have yet to explore
about the game of basketball
Knight said he thought about leaving Indiana at times, but his love
of the basketball team was too strong. He had wanted the Hoosiers, who
haven't advanced past the second round of the NCAA tournament since
1994, to become a powerhouse again.
"I kind of hung on to that thought for several years now, four or five
years, and probably should've gone somewhere else the 59-year-old Hall
of Fame coach said, "And there would be somebody that was a better fit
for this administration and these people than I am. And there's a place for
me where there's a better fit for me as a basketball coach
Knight repeated that he did nothing wrong when he grabbed freshman
Kent Harvey by the arm last week to lecture him about manners after the
student said, "Hey, what's up. Knight?"
The coach also disputed some of the other reasons University President
Myles Brand cited in firing him.
Brand said Knight violated a zero-tolerance policy that had been
in place since May. But Knight said he was never told exactly what
"zero-tolerance" meant, a claim University officials denied.
Knight said one episode cited by Brand, verbal abuse of a University
lawyer, occurred during a meeting about the $30,000 fine levied against
him by Brand in May. But Knight said he never used profanity and
didn't raise his voice.
After the ESPN interview, university officials said they stood by
Brand's earlier statements.
"I certainly think he did have a chance. In fact, his job was saved by
this administration in May and they gave him another chance, a new
lease on life said Stephen Backer, a school trustee. "It appears, from his
own interview, that he was angry and resentful, and instead of taking
advantage of the opportunity, he failed to do so
Dive!
The men's and women's diving teams are
looking for a few hard working and talented
athletes to join their squad. Experience in
diving or gymnastics is preferred. If you
would be interested in being a part of a
Division l program please contact Rich
MacDonald at 328-4614 or stop by the pool
at Minges.
Parents Weekend
Fantastic
A Tribute to Elton John
Caution: You might catch your parents dancing in the aisles.
"Get back, honky cat - don't let the sun go down on you"
until you've seen Fantastic: A Tribute to Elton John.
Wright Auditorium, 8:00 p.m.
He's not the man you think he is at all. No, no, no, no � he's rock impersonator,
Even Stephen � and he looks, sings, and sounds astoundingly like Sir Elton.
Backed up by a six-piece show hand and laser special FX piano, this featured star
of Legends in Concert at Vegas and Myrtle Beach brings the best of Elton to G'Vegas
$7.00 Advance Tickets
$12.00 Advance Tickets
$15.00 Tickets
ECU Students (with One Card) and Youth
ECU FacultyStaff and Subscribers to the
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Public and all tickets at the door
Central Ticket Office (main floor of Mcndenhall Student Center)
Monday-Friday, &30 a-m. - 6:00 run 252-328-4788, 1-800-ECU-ARTS
www.ecu.edumcndcnhallecuarts.shtml
Football Season
Massage Special!
ECU Students,
Faculty, staff
Welcome back to GreenulUci
to celebrate Pirate Football
2000, f am offering one-hour
therapeutic massages for $t),
2� heknu regular prices. This
special runs through BCl's lost
home game on Nou 11.
Abbott Hunsucker
Natural Remedies
223-F Commerce St.
Greenville, NC 27858
Call 355-2138 EX1. 3 for
an appointment.
a Member
I American Massage
I Therapy Association
Now Hiring
Copy Editors
Call the east Carolinian at 328-63661
D-TV Satellite Systgms
$79.00
Installed
Call: 561-8514
Attention First-Year Students
The Office of Orientation and the First-Year Experience presents
Water Wilderness Weekend
When?
September 29th - October 1st
Where?
Ocracoke Island
How Much?
Only $20
Including transportation, meals,
and equipment rentals.
Call the Office of Orientation to register.
What?
Get away from the books and
classes on this fun weekend trip.
You will be hiking, sea kayaking,
playing on the beach, and
meeting new people.
328-4173
Registration deadline is September 22nd. Space is limited.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SEPTEMBER 19
AT 3 P.M. IN
MENDENHALL
STUDENT
CENTER,
ROOM 15
Don )oyner
presents "I Will
Not Be A Career
College Student
featuring tips on
how to avoid
prolonged college
days and
extended tuition
costs by planning
now.
ToVi
To Check Out Woody
Allen's Latest
SEPTEMBER 14 AT 10 P.M. AND
SEPTEMBER 17 AT 7:30 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
Small Time Crooks (PG) Small time crook Ray
Winkler and some fellow bumblers open a cookie
store next door to a bank with robbery in mind.
Wealth, and a curse to go along with it, come
from an unexpected direction. Present your valid
ECU One Card to get in free with one guest.
lew
Fine Art
MENDENHALL STUDENT
CENTER GALLERY
Charlotte-based artist Keith
Bryant's "A Loan @ ECU a
collection of wall sculptures,
will be on display through
September 21. A closing
reception will be held
September 21 from 6
until 8 p.m.
To?tay In The Know
Subscribe to the ECU adult student list serv to
receive campus information directly to your personal
e-mail account. To subscribe send an e-mail to
listserv@ECUMAIL7.ECU.EDU with Sub Adultstu and
your full name in the text.
To Catch A
?umttier
BlockWter
SEPTEMBER 14-16 AT 7:30 P.M
SEPTEMBER 17 AT 3 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
Gladiator (R) Roman General Maximus
has been forced into slavery and exile by
the jealous Emperor. Intent on revenge,
Maximus sets out to murder the Emperor
and become the greatest hero in the
Empire. A valid ECU One Card gets you
in free with one guest.
To Play
To Find
We've got cyber-stations, block-
buster movies, bowling, billiards,
foosball, video games, wide-screen
TVs and lounges, concerts, art, and
more.
Allied Blacks for Leadership and Equality, Adult and
Commuter Services, Banking, Central Ticket Office,
InterFraternity Council, Operations and Reservations,
Panhellenic, RideRiders Board, School Supplies,
Student Fund Accounting Office, Student Government
Association, Student Leadership, Student Locator,
Student Union, Transit, Technical Services, WZMB
To Meet
We've got rooms for meetings, and
lounges and patios for relaxing with
friends.
On the Web: www.ecu.edumendenhall
Hours: MonThurs. 8 am-11 pmFri 8 am-midnightSat noon-midnightSun noon-11 pm
TAMPA,
Yankees star
sentenced to
Tuesday after
probation b
Influence of
leaving the si
Strawberr
the spread ol
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Judge Florem
Monday mor
He said he t
medication
meeting with
"I used th
taking media
feel well he
blacked out. I
anybody. I fi
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Strawberr
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4BER 14,2000
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
SPORTS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN 9
TAMPA, Fla. (AP)-Suspended
Yankees star Darryl Strawberry was
sentenced to two years' house arrest
Tuesday after admitting he violated
probation by driving under the
Influence of medication and by
leaving the scene of an accident.
Strawberry, who is fighting
the spread of colon cancer, apolo-
gized during a brief hearing before
Judge Florence Foster for causing a
Monday morning traffic accident.
He said he blacked out from his
medication while heading to a
meeting with his probation officer.
"I used the wrong judgment
taking medication because 1 didn't
feel well he told the court. "I just
blacked out. I didn't know if I hurt
anybody. I feel really bad about
that
Strawberry was released from
jail Tuesday, slipping out a side
door to avoid crowds.
Foster was the judge who placed
the suspended eight-time All-Star
Strawberry gets house arrest
Voters OK Lambeau Field tax plan
on probation last year in a drug
and solicitation case. Prosecutors
requested house arrest, although
Strawberry could have been sent
to prison.
Assistant State Attorney Robin
Fuson said that Strawberry will
still have to face the misdemeanor
charges from Monday's accident�
driving under the influence and
leaving the scene of the acci-
dent�as separate crimes that could
bring additional punishment.
House arrest means the 38-year-
old outfielder leave home only to
go to a doctor's office or for work.
Should he attempt to rejoin a major
league baseball team, he would
need court permission, Fuson said.
"There's a lot going on there
Yankees manager Joe Torre said
before Tuesday night's game against
Toronto. "You have to wonder how
he's going to make a living
Because of his season-long sus-
pension, Strawberry is not drawing
a salary from the Yankees.
Outside court, Strawberry's wife,
Charisse, said her husband is sorry
about what happened, and was
relieved to know the woman whose
car he hit wasn't injured.
"I just hope we'll recover from
this she said, as tears rolled from
behind her sunglasses.
She said her husband, who had
surgery last month, is in a lot of
pain because of the cancer and
having a kidney removed. He also
has some mental difficulties, she
said, but did not elaborate.
"We still have to live every
day. He still has to wake up every
morning and look in the mirror
and say, I'm going through this
she said.
Strawberry, who has battled
drug and alcohol abuse for years, is
not permitted to leave home even
for an activity as mundane as going
to the movies or to his children's
school.
Are you interested in becoming involved with
YOUNG LIFE
Want to love high
school folks for Christ?
If you are interested
and would like to find
out more
Call the Pitt
County
Young Life Office
at
757-377
GREEN BAY, Wis. (AP)-Voters approved a half-
percent sales tax on Tuesday night to help the Green
Bay Packers renovate lambeau Field, clearing the way
for the team to start construction in January.
fn a record turnout, 48,788 voters, or 53 percent,
supported the half-percent sales tax in Brown
County, according to unofficial final results. There
were 42,580 votes against it.
The county will start collecting the tax Nov. 1,
Packers President Bob Harlan said.
"We are going to have the finest stadium in the
NFL Harlan said at the Stadium View Sports Bar
and Grill in Green Bay, where 400 team supporters
gathered Tuesday night.
"America's team still resides in Green Bay,
Wisconsin
Long before the final votes were counted, a cheer
went up at the Stadium View Sports Bar when WBAY
televised its exit poll, which projected the sales
tax would pass.
"We have Vince Lombard! looking over us
said Larry Primeau, known as "Packalope" for the
antler-adorned helmet he wears.
Voters also decided whether money generated by
the tax in excess of that needed for the renovation
should go toward county services. The unofficial
final tally had 50,317, or 55 percent, votes against
that idea, and 40,714 for it.
By passing the first question and rejecting the
second, voters decided the additional tax revenue
will be used to retire the Lambeau Field debt years
earlier.
The sales-tax vote had been projected as a close
one, pitting voters' love of the Packers against their
pocketbooks.
About 57 percent of the county's more than
160,000 eligible voters went to the polls Tuesday for
the sales-tax issue. Tuesday's turnout was a far cry from
predictions of 80 percent, but good enough to beat a
previous September primary record of 23 percent.
Tom Tomashek of Ashwaubenon said he sup-
ported the tax because he wants his children and
grandchildren to watch the Packers play at lambeau
Field.
"Truthfully, without the Packers, this would be like
a ghost town he said. "You might as well board up
all the hotel rooms
The Packers announced the $295 million renova-
tion in January, saying it would expand the 43-year-old
stadium's capacity to 71,100 seats by adding 0,00O
more, modernize the stadium with more bathrooms
and concessions stands and add a mall-like atrium for
the Packers Hall of Fame, Packer Pro Shop, stadium
club and other amenities.
S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series
Ctx 33lacE VDctcl) �n6 ttje anb Ctoir
of tle Prince of VPdc fciwsion
� m
l�
Itnb you tbouttbt trxtt Iktwfe Sonric mat tbt fttet
fWV to wear a �Hrt
Contact us for special military, H�IC. an group rctee
Sunday, September 17, 2000 7:00 p.m.
Minge. Coliseum
the "t 3iitrtn� Preebvtmau Collate pipe Sanb txill
perform presbotf at vv.W p.m.
Divcounl lickcti available with a valid ECU One Card until 6 pjn.
on day of event, providing tickets remain.
llfcDcmcc 8tu6cnt� 12.�
faculty Staff 24
Public Ht the ooote 27
Central I idiel Oflice 252-328-4788. 1-800-fcCU-ARTS VTPf: 252-328-4736
or 1 -oOObCU-AKTS, Monday Friday. 8:30 ajn. - 6:00 pm.
wvrvv.ect1.edumendenl1aUecuarts5ht1rd
WIN ATRIP
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OUTDOOR
Partners In Campas Life
We Relish Students!







10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WWW.THEEASTCAROLINIAN.COM
SPORTS
THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 14, 2000
SPORTS@TEC.ECU.EDU
Locals have love, hate for Spurrier
JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. (AP)-
Steve Spurrier is popular in his
hometown. Some people really like
him.
Others really like to hate him-
especially when he brings his Flor-
ida Gators to Tennessee on Satur-
day.
"A lot of Tennessee people don't
like him a lot because he's won
seven out of 10, and you just don't
like people who beat you all the
time said Spurrier's older brother,
Graham, who still lives in Johnson
City. f Then a lot of people up here
pull for him, except for that one
game
Graham has gotten used to the
stares he gets driving around town
with his "Gator Man" license plate.
He just smiles.
And why not? Florida has only
lost three times to Tennessee since
his little brother became coach 10
years ago, "so there's not a whole
lot they can say
Steve Spurrier's visits to Neyland
Stadium are nothing new. In fact,
one game he remembers most was
when he was the coach at Duke
before he took the helm at Florida.
"I think the big special feeling I
had was 1982 to tell you the truth,
first time I ever had a chance to
go in there and coach he said.
"That was a memorable game for
me and all the Itookies when we
had a monumental upset I guess
you'd say, the 25-24 game. But its
always a little bit special going back
to your home state
The Spurrier family moved to
the mountains of upper East Ten-
nessee from Florida when Steve
was 12. Not long after, he starting
making a name tor himself on the
football and baseball fields and the
basketball court. He is by far the
best-known athlete to hail from
Johnson City.
"I could tell when he was young
that he was going to be something
special Graham said. "He wasn't
always the quickest or strongest
but he just usually finds a way to
win
The field in the town's stadium
where his alma mater, Science Hill
High School, plays football was
officially named Steve Spurrier Field
several years ago.
A nearly life-size photo of a
young Spurrier posing with his arm
ready to throw the football dwarfs
other pictures, retired jerseys and
plaques lining the wall outside the
Science Hill gym.
Next to the picture is a list of
his athletic accomplishments from
1962-76 including: All-State in
football, basketball and baseball;
1966 Heisman Trophy winner at
Florida and quarterback for the
San Francisco 49ers and Tampa Bay
Buccaneers.
It does not include his current
coaching status.
"He is probably the most hated
coach that came from Johnson
City said retired postmaster Fred
l.ockett, cracking a smile. "Steve
has a lot of friends, (but) when it
comes to football everybody boos
him
It seems many people are proud
of Spurrier's success-except when it
comes at the Volunteers' expense.
"They're not proud of him the
day he does that says Washington
County Sheriff Fred Phillips. "He
keeps Tennessee on its toes
Others don't have a soft spot
for him at all.
"I don't like him. I kind of look
at him as a traitor. If he was coach-
ing Tennessee I might feel a little
different says Phil Vittetoe, owner
of a local trophy shop.
The coach's brother says most
people who think they don't like
him change their minds after meet-
ing him.
One particular group of friends
finally met Spurrier when he visited
Johnson City.
"He sat with them a couple of
hours and shot the bull and talked
and he answered everything. They
couldn't believe what a nice guy he
was. Once you really meet him, he's
just like everyone else Graham
said.
Any animosity might have been
avoided had Spurrier become a
Volunteer.
When Spurrier was a high school
senior in 1962, Tennessee employed
the single wing offense that relied



it

���������
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
SILVER
BULLET
'JUTmuA OfClass'
756-6278
Dolls:
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRI&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
UatfSIOiiWMifCnntHJULMMAWfebnlMaUM)


it
it


'����.�
Looking For a Church Home?
Clog Comfort
5SO COtANCHC St.
GMZMILU, VC
www.ourposrriiAiL.coM
(ZSZ) 757-0713
Boston
Activities offered at Unity:
Sunday Morning &
Evening Services
8:30 AM. 11:00 AM & 6:00 PM
Bible Study (10:00 AM)
Cross Bearers (A College & Career
Ministry)
Couples Classes (All Ages)
Wednesday Night Supper
& Service
GROW series & Bible study
(6:30 PM)
Praise & Worship
A wonderful blend of traditional
hymns & praise & worship choruses!
Leagues
Basketball (Men & Women) - Fall
Softball (Men & Women) - Spring
Tons of other planned
activities including:
ECU Campus Outreach
ECU Van Ministry
Kings Dominion
Skiing (Water & Snow)
Volleyball
Shopping outings for the ladies
Golf for the men
Cookouts (railgating at ECU games)
and lots, lots more
Attention College
Students!
Can't find the right church or
Bible study group? Need to get
things right with God? Look no
further. Unity's College & Career
Ministry (Cross Bearers) may be
just what you are looking for. We
discuss issues you are dealing
with including relationships, drugs
& alcohol, God's will for your life,
evangelism, and holiness.You will
find solid preaching and teaching
of God's word here at Unity.
Please come and join usl We look
forward to meeting you.
ECU VAN SCHEDULE
9:20 AM Mendenhall bus stop
9:25 AM Cotton Dorm
9:30 AM Slay Dorm
9:35 AM College Hill bus stop
9:40 AM Unity Church
BIRKENSTOCK
UNITY FREEWILL BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th St Greenville, NC � 756-6485
(Take a left on 14th ST. at the top of College Hill and travel
straight past Elm ST. Greenville Blvd. & Red Banks Road.
Unity is located on the left a short way past Red Banks Road.)
Give blood
rugby!
The ECU Rugby team is
looking for new players.
NO experience is necessary
and NO cuts are made!
If you miss football or just
want to try something new,
then come out and join us!
For more information contact
Student Recreational Services
at 328-6387, or visit
us on the web:
www.recserv.edu.edu
m� ndthw m a mw at tsnss
$1.00 OFF
any whole sub
50 off half sub
Expires 102500
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aotmI328 � 6387
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SPORTS
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High Fidelity
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 14, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 14, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1433
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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