The East Carolinian, August 15, 2000







eastcarolinian
NEWSA2
2000-2001 academic calendar
Important events in the
upcoming year
SPORTSC1
Meet the Pirates
Announcing the annual
Meet the Pirates dinner.
SECTION 2
Spice up your dorm room
Decorating tips for stu-
dent's dorm rooms.
TODAY'S WEATI
SUNNY
High 90
Low 82
145 days to go until Graduation
WELCOME
TO THE
FALL 2000
SEMESTER
This is the Back To School
edition of The East Carolinian.
Our first regular twice weekly
issue conies out on Tuesday,
August 22.
ISSUEINDEX
ECU ticket information C2
A complete guide to purchasing
tickets to ECU sporting events.
ECU club sportsC3
A listing of the variety of club
sports for students to join.
One Card more than an I.D.
A3
Every Student needs the One
Card in order to participate in most
campus functions.
Textbook buying 101A6
Tips from an upper classman on
where to find the best deals.
The truth about urban
legendsB1
Everyone has heard of urban leg-
ends. Whether or not you choose
to believe them, they have become
ingrained in the minds of our society.
Tips about bicycling at ECUB3
ECU is moving toward becoming a
pedestrian campus, devoid of signifi-
cant auto- traffic. One key to this plan
is the use of bicycles.
0NLINESURVEY
Do you feel that expanding the
Ledonla Wright cultural center
will make It a better resource?
Vote online at www.theeastcarolinian.com
Co online each issue and vote in our
online survey. Express your opinion
online about campus issues.
BIGGEST EVENTS OF
Summer 2000
A look back at what
happened
in and around ECU
Nancy Kuck
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Expansion plan is
revised
ECU officials recently revised
a controversial expansion plan,
which will now keep all construction
within existing borders of campus
for the next 13 years. The expan-
sion plan, under development for
more than a year, has come about to
accommodate projected university
growth of up to 9,000 students in
the next eight years. The new plan
focused on acquisition of uptown
Greenville, better known as down-
town.
The vote to halt the eastward
expansion of the campus was agreed
upon by the ECU Board of Trustees
on May 12. This motion was
brought about by pressure from the
Save Our Neighborhood campaign,
according to Bruce Flye, facilities
planning director. The downtown
businesses are rallying together
to help stop the expansion into
the area which would included
the acquisition of the Attic lot,
Chico's Mexican Restaurant, BLT's,
University Book Exchange (UBE),
and Buffalo Wild Wings (BW-3).
The University of North Carolina
Board of Governors unanimously
approved funding for the expan-
sion on May 19. The N.C. General
Assembly will vote on the bond ref-
erendum in November. If approved,
the referendum would allot $3.1
billion for proposed construction
and renovation of North Carolina's
public universities and community
colleges. ECU will receive $190.6
, million which would help pay for
the $55.1 million Science and Tech-
nology Building, building a new
Nursing, Allied Health and Devel-
opmental Evaluation Complex.
Although citizen's opposition
has helped to halt expansion, the
main reason for the revision of the
plan is in fact due to a lack of fund-
ing. The expansion continues to
be a sensitive issue among students
and the community who are faced
with uncertainty as to what will take
place 13 years from now.
Surviving the storm
Dr. Robert C. Sheets, former
director of the National Hurricane
Center, gave a public presentation
and reception on the topic of
"Extreme Weather Events in Eastern
North Carolina's Future on May
25. The speech drew in about 350
people including experts from fields
such as biology, sociology, non-
profit groups, and government agen-
cies. These diverse groups shared
information they gathered after hur-
ricane Floyd to try to help control
damage from future storms.
Sheets, who has made over 200
flights through hurricane eyes, dis-
cussed the cause and effects of storm
surge, storm tracking, evacuation,
coastal development and the prob-
lems of subsidized property, positive
building strategies, and provided
before and after slides. He concluded
with an emphasis on the importance
of public education of Hurricane
Safety through the media.
Tragedy sparks fire leg-
islation
Colleges and universities across
the United States are awaiting Con-
gress' approval of two proposals
regarding campus fire safety. ECU
is attempting to stay ahead of the
game with its plan to install sprinkler
systems in every residence hall.
Currently, Jarvis Hall is the only
residence hall that has a sprinkler
system. The next hall to acquire
the system will be Jones Hall. Each
residence hall will be phased in as
renovations go under way and as
money is available.
Legislation was passed for all
University of North Carolina resi-
dence halls, fraternity, and sorority
houses to be re - outfitted with
sprinkler systems by the year 2001.
The residence halls and houses at
ECU have an annual systems check,
monthly fire extinguisher checks
and evacuation drills that are usu-
ally established within the first two
weeks of each semester. The drills
test evacuation times and fire alarm
activation. Resident Advisers also
hold monthly meetings in which
they go over fire safety with the
residents.
New bus route
unveiled
The ECU transit department
planned a new bus route, which
was unveiled during the second
summer session. The request for the
bus was brought up by the transit
management in response to a need
they perceived for a more pedestrian
- friendly campus. New busses were
also introduced. The bus, model
SLF 200 is smaller than our current
busses with a low floor design and
wider aisles.
This new route is scheduled to
make a 20-minute circuit around the
main campus. The bus will circle
between 5th and 10th streets, and
between 1st and Reade streets. The
goal of the new bus routs it to give
more options for students and staff
and to have the shuttle constantly
moving.
Computer labs to oper-
ate 24 hours
Information Technology & Com-
puter Services (ITCS) has chosen
three computer labs to take part
in a pilot project in the fall. This
project will allow the computer labs
to be open and staffed 24 hours a
day during the week. The intent of
having these labs is to gage the use
of the computers on campus
The labs affected by the pilot
programs are located in Austin Hall
and in Aycock and White residence
halls. Although two of the three labs
will be located in residence halls, all
three of the labs will be available for
both on - campus and off - campus
students on a 24-hour basis.
House speaker visits
Speaker of the House, J. Dennis
Hastert, visited Greenville to cam-
paign on behalf of U.S. Representa-
tive Walter Jones on July 6. Hastert,
who was the keynote speaker at a
luncheon of over 220 supporters
including mem
Jarvis Hall, the oldest residence hall on campus, gets a renovated, (photo by Emily Richardson)
Former NHC director warns of biggest problems during evacuation (photo by Emily Richardson).
New bus route unveiled dunng the second summer session (photo courtesy of ECU transit).
Speaker of the House, J, Dennis Hasten, answer reporter's questions during a press conference with
U.S. representative Walter B. Jones, (photo by Emily Richardson).
fcj





2 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Tuesday, August 15,2000
news@ecupiratemail.com
Downtown, off-campus parking made easy
NEWSBRIEFS
Fall semester registration
begins today until Aug. 23.
Classes begin
Wednesday, Aug. 15.
Search committee to keep
applicants confidential
The Chancellor Search Committee recently
approved a code of ethics that will require all
committee members to keep applicant infor-
mation strictly confidential. Janet Greenwood,
a representative of the A.T. Kearney Executive
Search firm, told the committee that all inter-
views must be kept private. This is to protect
applicants in high positions at their own
institutions who may be reluctant to apply
due to the potential problems for them
with their own boards of trustees. Most cam-
puses, such as N.C. State and UNC-Chapel
Hill, involve only committee members when
selecting their candidates.
Newman Center announces
new hours
The ECU Newman Catholic Center invites
all new freshmen and returning students to
attend worship services during the following
times: 6:30 p.m. Saturdays; 11:30 a.m. and
7:30 p.m. Sundays; 8 a.m. Tuesdays, Wednes-
days and Thursdays; 5:30 p.m. Wednesdays.
A Fellowship Supper will follow Wednesday's
service. Thomas P. Bonacci, C.P the Campus
Minister, has set this schedule. The center has
recently been remodeled and provides a place
for study, relaxation, prayer and communica-
tion for all who choose to visit. The center is
located at 953 E. 10th St.
Foreign language help offered
The ECU department of foreign languages
and literatures will begin offering a modified
Spanish course designed for students who
have significant difficulty in learning a foreign
language. The program will carry a student
through four semesters of Spanish study and
will meet ECU's foreign language require-
ment. The new courses use the same text-
book as the traditional ones, but employ a dif-
ferent approach. More repetition and review
is offered along with explicit explanations in
English of grammar and pronunciation. Stu-
dents interested in the program should con-
tact the department of foreign languages and
literatures at 328-6017, or the department of
disability support services at 328-6799.
Top variety entertainer in U.S.
visits Hendrix
Variety entertainer Craig Karges will bring
his "magic of the mind" to the stage of Hen-
drix Theatre at 8 p.m. Saturday, August 19.
While using illusion and psychic happenings,
Karges will demonstrate "walking" tables that
levitate, three ring fingers borrowed from
audience members linked together in a chain,
as well as read minds and make predictions.
Admission is free with a valid ECU One Card.
For more information contact the ECU Stu-
dent Union at 328-4715.
PCMH seeks volunteers
People young and old interested in help-
ing others and learning about careers in
hearth care are encouraged to become volun-
teers at Pitt County Memorial Hospital. Hospi-
tal volunteers are required to work four hours
a week or on alternate weeks, any day from
9 a.m9 p.m. Training is provided. PCMH
also has a special volunteer program for teens
ages 14-18. For more information contact
the PCMH volunteer services department at
816-4491.
Hendrix films
"Erin Brockovich" (R) will begin at 10 p.m.
Thursday, Aug. 17 and at 7:30 p.m. Friday,
Aug. 18. "American Beauty" (R) will begin at
7:30 p.m. Thursday and at 10 p.m. Friday.
Both movies will be shown in Hendrix Theatre
in Mendenhall Student Center. Admission
requires an ECU One Card for an individual
and a guest.
WHAT TO DO IF YOU'RE TOWED,
WHERE TO PARK
The campus of ECU is a surging district adjacent
to the downtown limits of the City of Greenville.
Limited on-street parking is available in close prox-
imity to the University and must be balanced with
the parking needs of residents living in the Tar River
and College view Historic District.
If you receive a ticket or find that your vehicle
has been towed, you may pay your fines and get
additional information at the following locations:
City of Greenville Finance Department
City Hall, 201 W. 5th St.
830-4451
Greenville Police Department
500 S. Greene St.
830-4317"
CRIME SCENE
July 24
Harassing Phone Calls - a student in Cotton
Hall reported receiving several phone calls over
the past two weeks in which the caller says noth-
ing.
July 26
Larceny - a staff member reported her check-
book was stolen from her office in Mendenhall
Student Center
July 27
Intoxicated Subject - an officer found a stu-
dent conscious but disoriented and intoxicated
north of McCinnis Theater. She was transported
to PCMH for possible alcohol poisoning
Vandalism - a student reported that someone
had thrown food items on his vehicle while
parked near Slay Hall. No damage occurred
July 28
Traffic Accident - a faculty member reported
that someone had struck his personal vehicle
while parked east of the Rivers Building. The
person responsible, a student, had left a note
stating she had backed into his vehicle and
included her contact information.
Larceny - a student reported her bicycle was
stolen from the rack between White and Clem-
ent Halls.
Simple Assault - a student reported being
assaulted by a staff member on two separate
occasions.
Expired Registration; Insurance violation - a
non - student was issued a state citation for the
above listed violations after being stopped north
of Fletcher Music Building.
No Operator's License - a non-student was
issued a state citation for driving without a oper-
ator's license after he was topped at 4th and
Reade Streets for driving without operating tail
lights.
July 29
Driving While License Revoked - a non-
student was arrested for DWLR after he was
stopped on Cotanche Street for an insurance
violation.
July 30
Assault on a Public Official - a white juvenile
was arrested on 5th Street after she assaulted an
ECU and Greenville PD officer. The subject was
released into the custody of parents of a friend
with whom she was staying.
Fictitious Registration - a non-student was
issued a state citation for displaying a fictitious
registration plate after being stopped on Reade
Street
July 31
Simple Assault - a staff member was served 2
arrest warrants for simple assault reported
Larceny - a staff member reported the larceny
of his parking decal from his desk in the Old
Cafeteria Building.
Larceny - a staff member reported the larceny
of a hard drive from an office in joyner East.
FINES AND PENALTIES
Parking Violations: $5-$25
Handicapped Parking Violation: $50
Towing Fees: $45 minimum (depends
upon time of day and day of week.)
If your vehicle is towed and you would like to
dispute that action, you may do so by contacting
the Pitt County Magistrate's Office at 830-6450.
If you accumulate three or more unpaid parking
tickets that are in excess of 90 days old, the City
will attach a wheel lock to your vehicle, preventing
that vehicle from being moved until all fines are
paid.
VISITOR PARKING
Visitors or individuals not enrolled or employed
by the university must display a parking permit
while using non-metered campus parking spaces.
Visitor permits are issued by the Department of
Parking and Transportation Services. The permit
temporarily registers the vehicle and allows parking
in various areas of the campus. The fee for a one-
day Visitor permit is $4. The fee for a one-week
Visitor permit is $10.
One-day parking passes are also available at the
School of Medicine in Brody Building AD49. This
office is located inside the administrative offices,
just inside the entrance to the lobby of the Brody
Building. The School of Medicine parking office is
open 7 a.m. - 3:30 p.m Monday through Friday.
A metered Visitor Parking Lot is located at the
corner of E. 5th St. and Harding Street for the
convenience of visitors to the central campus.
All information provided by ECU Parking and Tran
sit Services "A Guide to Downtown Parking in Green-
ville
Tuesday,
www.theea.
Academic Year 20
June 1, Tuesday
July 28, Friday
Aug. 2, Wednesday
Aug. 14, Monday
Aug. 15, Tuesday
Aug. 16, Wednesday
Aug. 18, Friday
Aug. 22, Tuesday
Aug. 23, Wednesday
Aug. 30, Wednesday
Sept. 1, Friday
Sept. 4, Monday
Sept. 27, Wednesday
Oct. 3, Tuesday
Oct. 20, Friday
Oct. 21-24
Oct. 25, Wednesday
Nov. 6, Monday
Nov. 15, Wednesday
Nov. 22-26
Nov. 27, Monday
Nov. 28, Tuesday
Dec. 6, Wednesday
Dec.7, Thursday
Dec. 8, Friday
Dec. 9, Saturday
Dec. 15-16
Dec. 16, Saturday
October 16, Monday
December 15, Friday
Dec. 16, Saturday
Jan. 4, Thursday
Jan.5, Friday
Jan. 8, Monday
Jan. 12, Friday
Jan. 15, Monday
Jan. 16, Tuesday
Jan. 23, Tuesday
Feb. 19, Monday
Feb. 20, Tuesday
March 11-18
March 19, Monday
March 26, Monday
April 10, Tuesday
April 13-14
April 19, Thursday
April 20, Friday
April 28, Saturday
May 1, Tuesday
May 2, Wednesday
May 3, Thursday
May 4-5
May 10, Thursday
May 12, Saturday
FALL SEMESTER 2000
Last day to apply for admission to Graduate School for the fall
Last day to submit appeals for readmission for fall semester
Last day to pay or secure fall semester fees without penalty
Schedules canceled for all who have not paid fees by 4 p.m.
Registration and schedule changes
Classes begin; late registration; schedule changes
Weekend University classes begin
Last day for late registration and schedule changes (drop and add)
Last day for schedule changes (add only); Last day for Weekend
University schedule changes (drop and add)
Last day to apply for graduation in December
6:30 p.m. Weekend University Labor Day holiday begins (no classes)
Labor Day holiday (no classes)
Last day for Undergraduate students to drop term-length
courses or withdraw from school without grades. Last day
for submission of grade replacement requests.
Last day for undergraduate students to drop a Weekend
University class or to withdraw from school without grades
6:30 p.m. Weekend University Fall Break begins (no classes)
Fall Break (Saturday-Tuesday)
8 a.m. Classes resume; State holiday makeup day
Early registration for spring semester 2001 begins
Last day to remove incompletes given during spring andor
summer session 2000
Thanksgiving break (Wednesday-Sunday)
8 a.m. classes resume; Last day for graduate students to
drop courses without grades
Last day to submit thesis to Graduate School for completion
of degree in this term
Classes end
Reading day
Regular exams begin; Weekend University classes meet
Commencement; Weekend University classes end
Weekend University exams (Friday-Saturday)
6 p.m. Exams for fall semester close; last day to submit
appeals for readmission for spring semester
SPRING SEMESTER 2001
Last day to apply for admission to Graduate School for the
spring semester
Last day to pay or secure spring semester fees without penalty
Last day to submit appeals for readmission for Spring semester
Schedules canceled for all who have not paid fees by 4 p.m.
Registration and schedule changes
Classes begin; late registration; schedule changes
Last day for late registration and schedule changes (drop and add):
6:30 p.m. Weekend University classes begin
State holiday (no classes)
Last day for schedule changes (add only); Last day for
Weekend University schedule changes (drop and add)
Last day to apply for graduation in May
Last day for undergraduate students to drop term-length
courses; withdraw from school without grades. Last day for
submission of grade replacement requests
Last day for Weekend University students to drop Weekend
University courses; last day for Weekend University
students to withdraw from school without grades
Spring Break (Sunday-Sunday)
8 a.m. Classes resume
Early registration for summer sessions and fall semester
Last day to remove incompletes given during fall semester
State holiday-no classes (Friday-Saturday)
Last day for graduate students to drop courses without grades
Last day to submit thesis to Graduate School for completion
of degree in this term
Weekend University classes end
State holiday makeup day. Classes end
Reading day
Regular exams begin
Weekend University exams (Friday-Saturday)
7 p.m. Exams for spring semester close
Commencement
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St 15,2000
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Tuesday, August 15,2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
Neumuwv Ccutkollc
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953 E. 10th St. � 757-1991
Fr. Thomas P. Bonacci, C.R
Fr. Tohv, fcuctdty,
St staff welcome, cdl
haw oauL returning
students.
� Saturday Mass: 6:30 p.m.
� Sunday Mass: 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m.
� Tuesday, Wednesday, & Thursday: 8:00 a.m.
� Wednesday: 5:30 p.m.
Followed by Fellowship Supper
TAKE A "LOVffLV CRtllSS" TO
v�
Mexican Restaurant
27
THURS. AUG 17TH ("COME MONDAY" AND YOU'LL BE EARLY!)
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The East Carolinian 8
news@ecupiratemail.com
Get caught in the tech trap
On-campus senices
help students compute
Jennifer Farris
INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY AND
COMPUTING SERVICES
Information Technology and
Computing Services (ITCS) extends
a warm "Welcome to ECU's new
and returning students. We hope
you enjoyed a well-rested summer
and are ready for the many excit-
ing experiences that lie ahead!
ITCS looks forward to providing
you with easy access to new and
improved campus-wide computing
resources and challenging employ-
ment opportunities.
We are happy to announce that,
beginning this fall, two residence
hall computer labs will remain open
24 hours a day during the week. The
College Hill computer lab, located
in the basement of Aycock Hall, and
west campus' White Hall lab will
remain open and staffed 24 hours
a day, Sunday through Thursday.
The labs will operate under regular
hours Friday and Saturday. Austin
l.ab, located in Austin Building near
Howell Science complex, will follow
a similar schedule.
As a measure to help protect
computers from the countless
viruses currently circulating, faculty,
staff and students will receive a
free copy of the Norton AntiVirus
software (PC or Mac) by bringing a
factory-sealed recordable compact
disc to the lab in Austin 208. Lab
assistants will exchange the blank
CD-R for a CD containing Norton
AntiVirus, installation instructions
and other useful software.
Undergraduates who present
a valid ECU OneCard may check
out laptop computers from campus
libraries. Three laptops are available
for check out at Joyner Library
and one is available at the Music
Library. Contact the Joyner Library
Teaching Resources Center service
desk or the Music Library service
desk for additional information.
Want to drop friends a quick
e-mail on your way to class? Check
out the five-day weather forecast
or latest news headlines? Then
pay a visit to the popular Cyber
Cafe' units located in Mendenhall
Student Center. These units seat two
comfortably, while providing users
access to e-mail, the enhanced stu-
dent desktop, newspapers and other
interesting sites. Interactive touch-
screen kiosks, located throughout
campus, also provide students
greater access to Web resources.
Undergraduate students inter-
ested in employment opportunities
within information technology
consulting can find position details
and an online application form
at this web address: www.ecu.edu
itcstudent help. Both administra-
tive and technical positions are
available. Duties range from data-
base maintenance and creation to
PCMac troubleshooting to various
clerical tasks, such as copying, filing
and faxing.
"We offer students a friendly
enriching work environment
said Joe Norris, director of informa-
tion technology consulting. "ITC
employees are exposed to progres-
sive technologies and learn to
thrive in a professional fast-paced
business setting
Freshman scholars interested in
additional information technology
learning opportunities are encour-
aged to participate in the ECU
Scholars IT Program. Scholars will
play an integral role in the testing of
new hardware and software applica-
tions, receive hands-on training
for Microsoft Office, e-mail, per-
sonal Web page development and
evaluate ECU's Student Desktop
and various wireless technologies.
Implemented this fall, the program
will provide students with a com-
petitive edge upon graduation and
an intensive technology-oriented
academic experience.
For a comprehensive listing of
campus computer labs and hours of
operation, important policies and
Web page creation guidelines, visit
the ITCS Web site at www.ecu.edu
itcs. Information about RezNet, a
cooperative program between rrCS
and University Housing Services
(UHS) to provide a high-speed
connection to the Internet for
on-campus students, is provided
at my.housing.ecu.educonnect
connection.htm.
ECU One Card more than an I.D.
Variety of uses makes
students lives easier
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
In the years you spend at ECU,
you will undoubtedly become well
acquainted with the uses of an ECU
One Card. These cards are much
more than just a student ID.
The One Card is the official
picture ID of ECU. Every student
must show his or her card in order
to participate in most campus func-
tions, such as bowling at Men-
denhall Student Center, seeing a
movie at Hendrix Theatre or bor-
rowing athletic equipment from
the Student Recreation Center.
The card can also serve a variety
of other purposes.
Those of you who will live on
campus will likely use the One Card
for dining. Your card will store your
meal plan and declining balance
information, in short, if you want
to eat anywhere on campus you'll

need to pull out your One Card.
Your card can also be used in a
Copiserv account. At various places
around campus, there are Cash-to-
Card machines. You put in a $1,
$5 or $10 bill and the money is
transferred to your card for use at
all campus vending machines and
copiers.
The One Card can also be used
for a Golden Key account. Money in
this account can be used for buying
athletic event tickets, paying library
fines and getting prescriptions filled
at Student Health Services.
Most freshmen receive One
Cards during summer orientation.
If you did not receive one, go to
the ECU One Card System Office
located in Ragsdale 101.
To acquire a card, you will need
a driver's license and social security
card or current class schedule.
You can also get one made for a
dependent. This will cost you10.
If your card is lost or stolen you
can get a temporary ID made for a
small fee. Permanent replacements
will cost $15.
For more information contact
Jennifer Sutton at (252) 328-2015 or
e-mail at suttonjen@mail.ecu.edu.
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I





4 The East Carolinian
www. theoastcamlinian. com
Tuesday, August 15,2000
news@ecupiratemail.com
Tuition increase effects campus, students differently
Legislature approves
about 8 percent
increase in-state
Nlkia Jones
STAFF WRITER
Fall semester tuition and fees
have increased for all students in
order to obtain hands on equip-
ment students demand and to make
ECU competitive with other North
Carolina universities.
According to Michael Balko,
university cashier, tuition is
reviewed and set annually by the
North Carolina legislature who
looks at proposals set by each
university and what they antici-
pate their cost to be. They will
then adjust the tuition accord-
ingly. Once fees are reviewed and
approved by the board of trustees,
the UNC board of governors has to
give their final approval.
"Tuition is the cost of educating
your son or daughter Balko said.
"Fees are services rendered by the
university. Under fees, you have
to look at what students say they
want offered and what we think
we have to offer to be competitive
with other schools our size
Fees ECU requires from all stu-
dents are the educationtechnology
fees, health service fee and the
university fee.
"All students whether full or
part time pay these fees Balko said.
"The educationtechnology fees
fund an initiative to give students
the state of the art, hands-on equip-
ment they may need. The health
service fee supplies a medical facil-
ity and staff. The university fee is
the catch all. Under university fees,
you have services students expect.
It covers the media, transit services,
fine arts, athletic events and day to
day operations of facilities
Different departments also have
to set fee Increase and justify that
increase with the local board of
trustees. Once the increase has
been justified, the board of trustees
will approve that portions of the
increase.
That request will then go to the
boa rd of governors and they ha ve to
give final approval for any increase
in the required fees. Tuition and
fees have been going up about three
to five percent over the last six to
10 years which keeps in check the
cost of revenue and inflation.
"Tuition and fees have been
going up but in the state of North
Carolina, we still fall in the bottom
third of the nation as far as what we
charge for tuition and fees Balko
said. "A full time in state student
only pays about 19 percent of the
total cost of their education. North
Carolina taxpayers this academic
year subsidize that tuition and fee
figure by $8,322 per year per full
time in state student. We can only
have a mix of 18 percent of out of
state students
There is a noticeable difference
between what an in-state student
pays contrasted with that of an out
of state student.
"Soon no one will want
to attend college because
it costs too much. I feel I
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ST
II6E. 5THST. GREENVILLE, NC 27811 PH: 252-830-6800
as though all the money
that I spend for school will
haunt me for the rest of
my life
Crystal Newman
SOPHOMORE
"Tuition and fees this fall semes-
ter for an in state student are
$ 1128.50 and out of state students
pay $5,060. Basically, an out-of-
state student is paying 100 percent
of the total cost of their education
to come to North Carolina. Even
though that seems high, that figure
is less than some in state tuition
rates in the north. This rate is even
cheaper than they can pay in their
own state Balko said.
However, even though the
increase in tuition and fees may
seem a positive aspect for giving the
university better, more elaborate
equipment and helping keep us
up with the competition, many
students feel an increase in fees
may hinder their ability to stay in
school.
"Soon, no one will want to
attend college because it costs
too much. I feel as though all the
money that I spend for school will
haunt me for the rest of my life
said sophomore Crystal Newman.
Many other students share New-
man's perspective.
"Although the tuition is moder-
ate, the prices for parking, meal
plans and housing fees make up
for it. ECU tries to nickel and
dime students to death by requiring
payment for every insignificant ser-
vice said senior Christy Robards.
"The university keeps expand-
ing and prices keep going up,
whereas qualities of instructors
stay the same. We keep getting
extra things, but the academic areas
don't seem to be increasing any
said junior Ashley Harris.
But not every student shares
negative feelings about the fee
"ECU is definitely spending
students and parents money wisely.
We are becoming much more of
an academic and very respectable
school said senior Kevin Walsh.
While some students view the
increase as tremendous or at least
think the fee increase will affect
them or incoming students person-
ally, school officials have alternative
opinions.
"The increase in fees is a result
of doing business, inflation and
the increase in the population of
students Balko said. "Our first
function is as an educational insti-
tution. Our second function is to
bring fruition as economically as
possible. It is important to remem-
ber, they (tuition and fees) never
increase for the sake of increasing.
I would never tell parents the cost
was inexpensive, but in the state of
North Carolina, secondary educa-
tion is probably still one of the
best financial investments anyone
can make
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Tuesday, August 15, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
The East Carolinian 0
news@ecupiratemail.com
Student Health offers top quality care student �"� s" Char9
ln-house lab,
pharmacy, low costs
make difference
Jennifer Johnson
STAFF WRITER
As an ECU student, you have the
opportunity to use Student Health
Services (SHS) and the programs
it offers.
"Come over and see what ser-
vices Student Health provides
before you need them said Kay
Wilkerson, director of SHS. "We
have an extremely competent medi-
cal staff. All of the physicians are
board certified in a specialty
SHS is made up of a team of pro-
fessionals who provide health care to
the students of ECU at reduced costs
which are covered by student health
fees. There are a few additional costs
you may encounter that are not
covered by student fees. However,
these extra costs are provided to you
at reduced prices
SHS has an in-house lab that
runs most of the lab work. Occa-
sionally, SHS may need to send
your lab work to an outside lab-not
to worry though, since this is also a
reduced cost. Insurance Is accepted
by SHS to help reimburse students
for these additional costs. All you
need to do is fill out a claim form,
which the staff is more than willing
to help you with.
Tor students who are not sick
enough to need a health care pro-
vider, SHS provides a self-help
counter.
"Over-the-counter medications
like cold tablets, headache medica-
tions, condoms and other non-
prescription items are sold at the
SHS pharmacy at a reduced cost
said Beth Credle, director of health
education. "ToreceiveOTCmedica-
tions, a student only needs to fill
out a form located by the cashier's
window
If you need to see an actual
physician quickly, SHS recommends
making an appointment. An urgent
care service is also available, which
is based on a triage system. This
means the sickest are seen first,
while same day care works you in
throughout the day.
In order to take advantage of
SHS, and even before beginning
classes, all incoming students must
provide immunization records.




Veils I
SILVER
BULLET
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. 'ATouchOfChss'
756-6278




it


it
It
"State law mandates that stu-
dents have updated immuniza-
tions to keep their enrollment
Credle said. "According to the law,
anyone who does not turn in their
immunization records by a specific
time will have their enrollment
revoked and will not be able to stay
In their classes
Students need to do their paper-
work early to make sure they are
not forced to leave in the fall.
"Incoming students get their
immunization records into the
Student Health office during orien-
tation Wilkerson said.
Aside from providing health
services, SHS offers many programs
to promote well-being. Some of
these programs include yearly phys-
icals such as pap smears and testicu-
lar check-ups. Approximately five
times a month, or when requested,
SHS will provide programs in resi-
dence halls, sororities and frater-
nities. These programs educate
students on topics such as healthy
relationships, alcohol use and sex
relations and will be announced on
campus and in the residence halls
during the cqurse of the year.
For instance, October is Breast
and Testicular Cancer Awareness
Month, and December is HIV
Awareness Month. Be sure to watch
for fliers on campus and ads in TEC
in the coming months.
On a last note, a word of warn-
ing-regardless of the service you
choose, SHS does not provide a
note for students who miss class.
However, your professor may call to
check when you visited SHS.
"Let your instructor know when
you are too sick to come to class
Wilkerson said.
"Get plenty of sleep and rest,
maintain a healthy diet, drink
alcohol only in moderation if at
all, avoid cigarettes and tobacco
products, exercise regularly, manage
stress and time, develop healthy
relationships and form healthy
habits related to personal health
Credle said. "Be pro-active-don't
wait until you get sick, ill or injured
to think about health and fitness
SHS will continue its ongoing
renovations this fall, but it will be
open at its regular hours, 8 a.m5
p.m. Monday-Friday, and 9 a.m
noon Saturday-Sunday.
For additional information on
SHS call 328-6841, or contact Beth
Credle for information about health
programs at 328-6794.
(Not Covered By Student Fees
LAB CHARGES
UrirulysismicroscopkS5
Wet mount gram stainIS
Stool culture15
Throat culturess
Urine cultureJS
Complete blood countS5
Mono test110
Blood glucosess
2hr glucose tolerance testS8
5hr glucose tolerance testS10
BSC110
Ova and parasitess
KOH (lungus)S5
Syphilis testSS
Herpes$29
Gonorrhea Culture H ClamydiaS12
Pap screeningS30
Repeat pap smear$10
Pregnancy testSS
Cholesterol screening$6
VACCINES
TB skin test$s
Tetanus boosterSS
Hepatitis B$33.34
Hu vaccineSS
MMRS3S
X-RAY CHARGES
In-house$25
X-ray copies$5film
SUPPLIES
Arm slings$3-5
Cervical collar15
Splintsbraces$3-35
Crukhes (il not returned)$30
Cane (il not returned)$15
PHYSICALS
Non-complicated physicals$20
Charges added lot lab work lenl oul lo a reference laboratory depend on Ihe nalure of theieM
Over-the-counter and prescription items are available at the phaimacy at a reduced cost.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
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Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757- 0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
Truth,Equality,Justice
-Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
3493C South Ev,�s Stm. Phon.e 752-0952 752-0753
Bedford Commons, Greenville e-mail - ghb.greeiTviUenc.COITl
I
I
)
GO GREEK!
East Carolina University
2000 Recruitment Registration
Your registration must be accompanied with a check for $40, non-refundable, made
payable to ECU Panhellenic Association. Recruitment dates are September 1-4,
2000. Registration deadline is August 28, 2000. Questions? Call (252)328-4235.
Return to: East Carolina University
201 Whichard Building
Greenville, NC 27858-4353

Last Name
First
Middle
Social Security Number
High School Name:
Off-campus address (if applicable)
Phone Number:
SEPT. 1-4
Is there a sorority affiliate in your family?
(YN) please circle
If yes: Relationship:
Name:
.Sorority
Relationship:
Name:
.Sorority
High School Activities:
Other colleges attended:
GPA:
Previous college activities:
Hobbies:
COLONIZATION
SEPT. 8-10
PANHELLENIC ASSOCIATION INFORMATION RELEASE FORM
In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974,1 hereby grant
the Dean of Students at East Carolina University the right to release academic information
for sorority pledging and initiation to Panhellenic or the appropriate sorority when necessary.
My termination from Rush or membership in a sorority will void this release.
Student Signature.
Date





0 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
OPINION
Tuesday, August 15,2000
(.com
Tuesday, A
www.theeast
We'd prefer to spend
our money on the
reason we came here:
our education. So when
we agree to pay more
money for school, we'd
like the university to
put it to professors'
salaries and library
books and computers.
our view
What a surprise: tuition is going up again. In a new America where
those without college educations are the invalids in the work place, a
university diploma has become the most valuable commodity a person
can own. Naturally, it costs a pretty penny.
We've been lucky in North Carolina. We have some of the lowest
tuition costs in the country, all because the old guys who started out
state government wrote our educational guarantee into our constitution.
In-state students have no idea what it's like to be faced with an outrageous
cost for such a modern necessity.
But we're beginning to get the picture. The money our parents
started saving in our youth no longer covers the full bill, giving more
and more students a reason to go into debt every semester. Now the
fees have increased again.
It's not that we begrudge the university money to make it competitive
(Although we would like to point out that maybe ECU should concentrate
on improving the housing crunch before encouraging more students to
come here). It's more a question of where our money goes. Take Student
Health fees, for example. Many students at this university have never
set foot in the Student Health Center, and when they do, most are
handed a bottle of aspirin and sent on their way. Yet we all pay a small
fortune in fees to keep the program running, when Student Health
misdiagnoses an astounding number of illnesses on a regular basis; just
ask any upperclassman who's been sick on campus.
Think about all the new construction, too. We think the Science and
Technology Building is a great idea. But the Strength and Conditioning
Center? No offense to the football team, but shouldn't we put more money
into the library collections before we give the athletes a new sauna?
We understand the need for money around here, and we have no
problem paying for it. Most of us, however, don't have a lot of money
to spare on programs we never use. We'd prefer to spend our money on
the reason we came here: our education. So when we agree to pay more
money for school, we'd like the university to put it to professors' salaries
and library books and computers.
Here's one prime example of how foresight pays off. Once upon a
time, this school spent a nice pile of money on its new General Classroom
Building. Because this building had such poor ventilation, ECU now
spends a nice pile of money heating and cooling it. That was a building
created with the idea of making ECU more competitive. Is that what we
can expect from the new tuition increase?
So, administration, spend our money wisely. Please remember who
paid it, and why we did. Really improve things around here. Don't just
put up some beautiful architecture and think all the other problems
will go away.
Trade with China may send wrong signal
Politics affecting missile defense system
Faisal Lodhi
OPINION COLUMNIST
Recently, the United States has
initiated talks and some action into
producing the first U.S. air-missile
defense system. This would protect
the country against any missiles
being launched into U.S. airspace.
With nuclear technology and long-
distance missiles no longer being
secret, it would make sense that we
should have an anti-missile system.
However, it seems as if Russia and
the European countries don't feel
too comfortable about the plan
proposed by President Bill Clinton
(it would probably look good in
his legacy to be the president who
started the project).
As it Is now, the project is ready
to start construction and is cur-
rently scheduled to be completed
by the year 2005. However, there
are a few obstacles keeping it from
taking off, one of them being the
foreign countries opposed to this
plan. Why should they have any
say in this?
The first obstacle which the
United States faces is getting this
missile defense system to work.
Two out of the three recent tests
have failed. The first time there was
a problem with the heat seeking
equipment, which failed to see
where the radar was.
The second time, the missile
4id not deploy in time to catch the
oncoming missile. To the surprise of
many officials, some of the systems
which were labeled as complete
and ready to go also failed during
the tests. Thus, before the United
States can announce their readiness
to build this system, the tests have
to show that it will actually work.
Many senators have expressed their
concerns and even some Democrats
have said that they would expect
President Clinton to hold off on
the project for the time being.
The second obstacle is the Euro-
pean-Russian and now India's con-
cern over this project. By starting
on the project, the United States
would be violating the 1972 ABM
treaty with Russia. Russia is very
concerned about the American
plan to deploy a national missile
defense system, and it thinks that
Washington is planning to under-
mine the balance of forces which
shaped up after the end of the
Cold War, according to India's
Defense Minister, George Fer-
nandes. However, one would have
to ask why Russia and other nations
are concerned with a system that
is designed to protect all SO U.S.
states against an attack by 30 or
fewer long-range missiles. This
would be accomplished using a
combination of powerful radars,
ground-launched missile intercep-
tors based in Alaska and high-speed
computers.
With the last test conducted in
July having failed, it seems as if
there are going to be more delays.
U.S. intelligence maintains that
North Korea will have long-range
missiles capable of reaching the
United States by 2005. However, it
doesn't seem, at this point, that a
full working model, one that can
differentiate between a decoy and
the real thing, will be ready to go
before 2007. With other nations
also building up their arsenal, the
United States should move fast
to be fully prepared. It no longer
takes weeks or months to cross the
Atlantic. Unfortunately, one does
have to suspect that somewhere
along the lines, politics is playing a
major role in the decision-making
process.
This writer can be contacted at
flodhi@tec. ecu. edu.
Faisal Lodhi
OPINION COLUMNIST
The recent opening of trade
relations with China has taken
center stage in the political arena.
President Bill Clinton is encour-
aging the House and Senate to
approve a bill that would open
trade relations with the Chinese
government.
This would clearly benefit the
United States economy by opening
a market of over a billion people to
United States business-more than
triple the size of the United States
market. However, there are some
other underlying factors that must
also be given consideration in this
deal; human rights concerns being
the most important.
So, is trade with China as good
as it sounds? Or is it true that
nothing is as it seems?
First, let's start with the bill's
specifics. The bill would:
�Grant China the same low
tariff and other economic benefits
that are extended to current U.S.
trading partners
�End the annual congressional
review of China's trade and human
rights policies.
�Create a commission to moni-
tor the status of human rights in
China
�Enact a provision to ensure
that Chinese goods aren't dumped
into the United States.
The first item would let China
export its products into the U.S.
market without the penalty of high
tariffs. Without relatively low tariffs,
it is difficult for foreign manufac-
turers to maintain competitive
prices in the domestic market. The
second item would end the current
congressional review of China's
trade policy and human rights
activity. This would be a big blow
for human rights activists, who
generally favor economic sanctions
against China, because the Chinese
government would not have to
answer for its traditionally dismal
human rights record. However, the
third item would create a commis-
sion to monitor the continuing
status of human rights in China.
The question remains as to how
successful this commission would
be compared to the congressional
reviews of today. The last item
on the list would make sure that
an inordinate amount of Chinese
goods aren't introduced to United
States markets, hurting American
manufacturers.
So, it seems as if everything
is good. We still watch the Chi-
nese activities and we open trade
relations, which could have a big
impact on the United States econ-
omy.
Human rights advocates don't
like the idea of opening trade with
China because this would signal
to the Chinese that we are willing
to tolerate human cruelty if there
is an economic benefit involved.
However, China is an independent
country, and quite a large one too.
We cannot force them to do things
our way, although we like to push
it around everywhere else. Now
there doesn't seem like there is
much we can do except continue
the international dialogue.
We can discontinue trade with
China, which hurts us quite a bit
as well, and stop other kinds of
aid. But, that only closes the doors
of communication and nothing
is accomplished. By opening com-
munication, trade, and other rela-
tions, we can hope to exert a long-
term influence over the Chinese
government. This is the main argu-
ment that the White house is pre-
senting, and it seems much more
reasonable than the other alterna-
tive in which everybody loses.
Abortion a matter of choice
Leslie Griffin
OPINION COLUMNI
No matter when you turn on
the TV you hear something about
an abortion clinic being blown
up or a Congressman stating his
opinion on what the abortion laws
should be. I don't know about you,
but 1 am tired of hearing about
it. The simple truth is, if abortion
is illegal then some women are
going to find other ways to kill
their unborn babies.
I think people should just stay
out of other people's business, plain
and simple. If this truly is the land
of the tree then every single person
has the right to decide what they
want to do with their bodies and
unborn babies. People should not
be bombing abortion clinics when
people are inside. They have that
right to be there if that is what
they choose to do. Who are they
to say that abortion is right or
wrong? They are not God. They are
ordinary people just like us. The
people that are so anti-abortion
don't need to stereotype women
who choose to have an abortion
as promiscuous or even say that
this is their form of birth control.
Those who point the finger need
to look at each person individually
before they tell them they are doing
something wrong.
Granted, I know that some
women use abortion as a form of
birth control. To me this is wrong,
and these women should have to
live by some type of laws.
I know that abortion is a hot
topic. I also know that some of you
out there are very much against
it. I just feel that if a person is
going to have an abortion that it
should always be their decision.
We have no right to tell another
person what is right or wrong. This
is a free country, let people live the
way they want to live. If abortion
is the answer for them, let them
dolt.
This writer can be contacted at
lgritfin@tec.ecu.edu.
Listen up, Freshmen
Steve Losey
GUEST WHITER
Face it: most college kids drink
Chris Sachs
OPINION COLUMNIST
At every college in America you
will find kids drinking alcohol. I
don't care if it is an all-girls school,
ill male school, military school,
Bible school or cooking school. I
Jon't care if it is a college where
students live away from home-there
is always going to be drinking going
mi. College and drinking go hand in
:iand. This has been true for as long
is there have been colleges, booze
ind sex. The combination of the
:hree makes for a cohesive web that
is very important to growing up.
When a kid is shipped of to
:ollege he or she is taking the first
real step in becoming an adult. For
the first time the kid is out from
jnder the thumbs of their parents
and are free to do whatever they
want, whenever they want, and
with whomever they want. Such
Freedom placed upon a kid at about
the time they are really getting into
rebellion and curiosity is like trying
to stop your house from burning by
tossing a bucket of flaming gasoline
mi it.
Parents need to see that kids are
gonna drink, some are gonna drink
a lot, and some are going to drink
until they die. There is nothing
they can do about it and they
never will. There just isn't. You can
ban drinking on campus, you can
ban drinking at college fraternity
houses, hell, you can ban alcohol all
together, and it will not make even
the smallest difference. College
kids are smart (no duh, they're in
college) and they will get a hold of
booze in a million different ways.
They will change where they drink,
what they drink, and with whom
they drink, but believe me, they
will drink. It will never stop.
Drinking is like a game-you can
change the rules, but the game will
always continue.
I think that parents should relax
a bit about college drinking and let
the natural process of growing up
take their course. I am not saying
you should tell your kid to drink
it up and hand him a Budweiser,
but I think the mass hysteria needs
to dry up. The best thing to do for
college kids is to leave them alone
and let them discover life and all
of the dangers it has to offer. Some
handle it well, some don't. That's
life, and that is what letting your
kids alone might bring.
And for all the parents whose
children have died from drinking
too much, it is due more to the
addictive nature of the kid's per-
sonality or hisher lack of self-
esteem that made him or her drink
themselves to death. Alcohol was
not to blame, nature was. And no
one can argue with nature. But if
you look at the numbers of kids that
drink in college and the number of
kids that died from drinking, the
risk is almost non-existent. It is a
minor concern in reality.
So don't get me wrong am not
pushing booze, I am not condoning
binge drinking and alcohol-related
deaths, but I am saying those situ-
ations are here, will always be here,
and that they are a part of life.
Kids are going to discover these
things no matter what, so since it
is going to happen, and you will
never know when, then accept that
it might and move on. Life will
progress no matter how many laws
you pass or how many complaints
you make.
This writer can be contacted at
csachs@mail. fee. ecu. edu.
Steve Losey is an ECU graduate
and former news editor of "TEC Hi-
ts now the crime reporter for "The Free
Press" in Kinston.
The best piece of advice I can
give to the incoming class of 2004
would be to get involved in campus
activities, the sooner the better. I
know it sounds corny, but it's true
for many reasons.
When I came to ECU, I was 17
years old and painfully shy. I was
thrown into this school almost 300
miles away from home with no car,
not knowing a soul.
Like so many freshmen, I found
it hard to meet people. I dabbled in
fraternity rush and quickly realized
it wasn't for me. I hung out with
the people on my floor in Clement
Hall, but I didn't fit in with many of
them. The hardest part about meet-
ing people was finding a common
subject to talk about.
When spring semester started,
I was approached by my friend
Tracy about working on "The East
Carolinian Tracy had just begun
working as a sports writer there and
she knew I was an English major
who could write a little bit.
I was hired that January and
started covering sports right away. It
was the perfect job to bring me out
of my shell. The gawky kid with the
big glasses who could not possibly
talk to people was suddenly forced
to approach complete strangers and
ask them questions. Soon, it didn't
seem quite so bad.
Working for "TEC" also helped
broaden my social life. I started to
recognize more and more people
every time I went downtown and
heard about more parties. The
theme of the parties I had been to
before was drink! drink! drink! like
most freshman parties. The parties
I started going to were smaller and
most of the people knew each other,
less like the Elbo transplanted into
an apartment, and more like close-
knit friends hanging out.
I also worked my way up at the
paper. After a year, Tracy became
sports editor and I became her
assistant. I later became the news
editor of "TEC" and was able to
turn that into a good job with "The
Free Press" in Kinston.
It's very easy to sit back and let
your college years slip by. I almost
did. But I'm glad I didn't, because
if I had wasted my hours away
watching "South Park" reruns I
wouldn't have many of the friends
and experiences I do now.
eastcarolinian
, Editor
Photo Editor
MfrUltb, features editor
Sport! Editor
Head Copy Editor
Serving ECU since 1925, The East Carolinian
print! 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday
during the regular academic year and 5.000 on
Wednesdays during the summer. "Our View" is the
opinion of the Editorial Board and is written by
Editiorlal Board members. The East Carolinian
welcomes letters to the editor which are limited
to 250 words (which may be edited lor decency or
brevity). We reserve the right to edit or reject
letters and all letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent
via e-mail to edlton9tH.ecu.edu or to The East
Carolinian, Student Publications Building
Greenville, NC 27851-4353. Call 252-328-6366
for more information.
M
Al
�NC Bar (
Now
'Where you
Cal
8
10
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V





jst15.2000
vratemail.com
Tuesday,August15,2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
The East Carolinian 7
news@9cupiratemaH.com
signal
i if everything
watch the Chi-
we open trade
iiikl have a big
ted States econ-
idvocates don't
ning trade with
s would signal
I we are willing
cruelty if there
nefit involved,
in independent
a large one too.
�m to do things
we like to push
lere else. Now
n like there is
xcept continue
alogue.
nue trade with
. us quite a bit
sther kinds of
loses the doors
i and nothing
opening com-
and other rela-
to exert a long-
:r the Chinese
the main argu-
te house is pre-
ns much more
? other alterna-
Dody loses.
e this is wrong,
should have to
E laws.
artion is a hot
lat some of you
much against
if a person is
bortion that it
heir decision.
:o tell another
or wrong. This
people live the
ve. If abortion
lem, let them
e contacted at
zu.edu.
own town and
parties. The
I had been to
nk! drink! like
es. The parties
re smaller and
ew each other,
isplanted into
lore like close-
out.
way up at the
Tracy became
became her
ime the news
1 was able to
job with "The
i.
t back and let
p by. I almost
Idn't, because
hours away
irk" reruns I
of the friends
now.
Mark A. Ward
Attorney At Law
�DWI, Traffic, Felony Defense
�NC Bar Certified Specialist in State Criminal Law
�24 Hour Message Service
752-7529
www.mark-ward.com
MasterCard
Guide to ECU's Colleges and Departments
Now Open! Come visit us
ooks.com
'Where you don't stand in line for BIG DISCOUNTS
�COLLEGE OF ARTS AND SCIENCESPsychologyDEPARTMENTSApplied Alts
1002 General Classroom BuildingSociologyRlostatHtlcs
328-6249Theatre and DanceClinical Laboratory Science Communication Science) and Disorders�SCHOOL OF BUSINESS 3119General flinwia Bnllnlag
The College of Arts and Sciences encompassesPROGRAMSCommunity Health328-6966
a maor portion of general classroom requiri -Classical StudiesHealth Information Management
ments for undergraduate students. It Is theCoastal StudiesOccupational TherapyThe five departments of the School of Busi-
largest college on campus, with 17 depart-Ethnic StudiesPhysical Therapyness prepare students for successful careen
ments and 10 interdisciplinary programs.(ireat HooksPhysician Assistant Studieswithin the operation of profit and non-profit
including classes In a variety of subects, allInternational StudiesRehabilitation Studiesorganizations. Departments within the school
the way from biology to women's studies.Medieval and Itenalssance Studies Multidfsciplinary Studies�SCHOOL OF ARTare some of the most popular on campus.
DEPARTMENTSNorth Carolina Studies2000 JenkinsDEPARTMENTS
AnthropologyReligious Studies328-666SAccounting
RiologyWomen's StudiesDecision Sciences
ChemistryECU'S School of Art Is the largest In the state,Finance
Communication�SCHOOL OF ALLIEDand one of the largest in the southeast. ItManagement
EconomicsHEALTH SCIENCESIs known for Its rigorous curriculum andMarketing
Belkcompetitive acceptance policy. Students must
foreign languages and literatures328-4400submit a portfolio before proceeding from�SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
general art courses Into their specialties.IS4 Speight
Oeology1 he School of Allied Health Sciences offers328-4260
Historybachelors, masters and doctoral degrees.TheDEPARTMENTS
Mathematicsmany disciplines the School offers all workFoundationsECU began as a normal school, otherwise
Philosophytoward Improving the quality of healthcareArt Educationknown as a teachers college, so the School
Political Sciencethrough education.Art History Fine Artsof Education Is actually older than the
see COLLEGES, page 9
Tired of sharing a bathroom?
Everyone who lives with us has a
private hath. In addition to:
� Free extended cable in each room
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Call in music requestsWin great prizesSupport your college radio!
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Featuring campus organizations
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WOMEN'S
Musk from women artists
LIFELINE
Topics of personal & physical
wdlbeing
During the hours when we're not
featuring � specialty show, you can
tun in to a mix of alternative rock
V





8 The East Carolinian
www. theeastcarolinian. com
NEWS
Tuesday, August 15,2000
news@ecupiratemail.com
Tuesday
www.thee.
Textbook
Buying 101
Tips from an upper-
classman on where to
find the best deals
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
Going to buy books is the
quintessential college experi-
ence. It is always a major hassle,
but everyone has to do it. Look
forward to long lines and waiting
a week or so to get that one special
book that you need because a
professor forgot to order it on
time. University Book Exchange
(UBE) has the best customer ser-
vice. There is usually an attendant
by where the books are kept, and
they will generally help you out.
According to Kevin at Dowdy
Student Store (located next to
the Wright Place), the best time
to buy books is one week before
classes begin. That is when one
can find the best selection of used
books, which are cheaper than
ones with the cellophane wrap-
ping still on them. Barring that,
you can order your books online
at vvww.studentstores.ecu.edu.
At UBE, the best time to buy
books online is at the beginning
of August. Their Web site is
www.ubeinc.com.
Where to get the best textbook deals
1. "Art Fundamentals" (Ocvirk)
Dowdy new: $48 used: $36
U.B.E new: $45 used: $34.40
Bigwords.com new: $45.15 used: $39.15
Varsitybooks.com new: $48.92 NA
2. "Stylebook and Lible Manual" (A.P.)
Dowdy new: $42.65 used: $32
U.B.E: new: not in stock
Bigwords.com: new: $13.95 used:$11.2S
Varsitybooks.com: new: $12.80 NA
3. "Understanding Mass Communications" (Defleur)
Dowdy new: $55.95 used: $41.95
U.B.E new: $52.45 used: $39.30
Bigwords.com: new: not in stock
Varsitybooks.com: new: not in stock
4. "Writing in General and the Short Story in Particular" (Hills)
Dowdy new: $14 used: $10.50
U.B.E new: $18.60 used: $13.95
bigwords.com new: $10.71 used: $9.80
varsitybooks.com new: $8.40 NA
5. "Fiction 100" (Pickering)
Dowdy new: $51 used: $38.25
U.B.E new: $53.85 used: $40.35
Bigwords.com new: 47.43 used: $38.25
Varsitybooks.com new: $48.45 NA
6. "Second Shift" (Hochschild)
Dowdy new: $13 used: $9.75
U.B.E new: $17.95 used: $13.45
Bigwords.com new: $10.33 used: $9.45
Varsitybooks.conT new: $8.10 NA
7. "Marriages and Families" (Shehan)
Dowdy new: $52 used: $39
U.B.E new: $56.85 used: $42.60"
Bigwords.com new: $47.92 used: $41.55
Varsitybooks.com new: $52.25 NA
Honorable Mentions: ecampus.com, textbooksource.com,
collegedepot.com
Note: Bigwords.com offers free shipping with a $35 or more order;
varsitybooks.com lists $4.95 for shipping. Both sites deliver within
3-5 business days.
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a good leader. Talk to your Army ROTC advisor to find out
more. And get ready to sweat a little.
ARMY ROTC Unlike any other coHege coarse you can take
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Remember to visit The Sprint Store throughout the year at
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Dl
Iroadcastlng, 1.1
L'hnology
Business, Vocat
tton
Counselor and i
Educational tea
ElementaryMid
foundations, Re
Science Educatu
Special Educatlo
�SCHOOL Of
PE
6(1 Minges
328-4630
The School of I
mance deals wi
and recreation ar
of the school is i
knowledge com
enhancement of I
and quality ot III
DEI
Exercise and Spoi
Health Education
Recreation and l.i
�SCHO
ENVIRON1
I
Established in 19
Environmental :
Improve the qual
munit. I he dep
themselves to con
Apparel Merchanci
Child Developmci
Nutrition and ilos
�SCHOOL O
TEC
(Lo
INF
API





igust 15,2000
iupiratemail.com
irks!
us.
n take.
SM
ir
Tuesday, August 15, 2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
The East Carolinian 0
news@ecupiratemaH.com
Colleges
from page 7
university. Since Its Inception, the education
department has taught a massive number
of teachers, who have spread out all over
the country to Impart the knowledge they
learned here.
DEPARTMENTS
Itoadcastlng, llbrarlanshlp, and Educational
Lhnology
'Business, Vocational, and Technical Educa-
tion
Counselor and Adult Education
Educational Leadership
KlementaryMiddle tirades Education
Foundations, Research and Reading
Science Education
Special Education
�SCHOOL OF HEALTH AND HUMAN
PERFORMANCE
6(1 Minges
328-4630
The School of Health and Human Perfor-
mance deals with health, exercise science
and recreation and leisure. The primary focus
of the school is to discover and disseminate
knowledge concerning maintenance and
enhancement of health, physical performance
and quality of life.
DEPARTMENTS
Exercise and Sport Science
Health Education and lromotion
Recreation and leisure Studies
�SCHOOL OF HUMAN
ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES
I US Riven
328-6891
Established in 1968, the School of Human
Environmental Sciences studies ways to
Improve the quality of life within the com-
munily. I he departments regularly adapt
themselves to conform to current trends.
Apparel Merchandising and Interior Design
Child Development and Family Relations
Nutrition and Hospitality Management
�SCHOOL OF INDUSTRY AND
TECHNOLOGY
120 Raw!
328-6705
The programs within the School of Industry
and technology are application based, and
stress the use of technical and management
principles In solving real-world problems.
The school prepares Its students for careers
in the 21st century.
DEPARTMENTS
Construction Management
Environmental Health Silences, Safety, and
technology
Industrial Technology
Planning
Aerospace Studies
Military Science
�SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
816-2322
The School of Medicine Is based at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital, the base health center
for Greenville and all Its surrounding areas.
Students receive hands-on experience as they
train at ECU'S highly accredited medical
school to practice whatever specialty they
prefer. Selection Is competitive, but students
wlthalltypcsof undergraduate degrees can be
accepted as long as they pass the tests.
DEPARTMENTS
Admissions
Anatomy and Cell Biology
Biochemistry
Emergency Medicine
Eamlly Medicine
Generalist Physician Program
Information technology and Computing
Services
Medical Humanities
Medical Smdent Associations
Medicine
Microbiology and Immunology
ObstetricsGynecology
Pathology and laboratory Medicine
Pediatrics
Pharmacology
Physical Medicine 6t Rehabilitation
Physiology
Prospective Health
Psychiatric Residency Program
Surgery
Telemedicinc
�SCHOOL OF MUSIC
AJ. Fletcher
328-4270
ECU'S School of Music, one of the leading
music education centers In the Southeast,
trains about 350 music majors and minors
every year. The college offers Its students
many opportunities to perform in musical
groups or In solo projects
DEPARTMENTS
Music Education
Performance
Church Music
Theory-Composition
Music Therapy
Music Theatre
Piano Pedagogy
�SCHOOL OF NURSING
Rivers
328-6099
The School of Nursing, ECU'S first academic
school, was established In 1959. The school
offers bachelors and masters degree programs
to those who aspire to become professional
nurses. The School also offers an RNMSN
option.
DEPARTMENTS
Clinical Concentrations
Adult I lealth Nursing
Nurse Midwifery
Primary Care Family Nurse Practitioner
Neonatal Nurse Practitioner
Community Nurse Practitioner
Community Health Nursing
Clinical Serves Administration
Adult Health Nursing
Community Nursing Systems
Parent Child Nursing
�SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORK AND
CRIMINAL JUSTICE STUDIES
134 Ragsdale
328-4383
Studies in criminal justice and social work
lead to careers in helping the public. One of
the smaller colleges on campus, the School
of Social Work and Criminal Justice still
graduates a number of successful students
every year
Student organizations offer
extracurricular opportunities
All groups encouraged
to participate in profile
Laura Benedict
STAFF WRITER
We're
g Under
� Construction,
f Still Serving You!
ECU STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE
There are approximately 250
registered student organizations
at ECU. This year, "TEC" will be
running a profile on one organiza-
tion per week, beginning Aug. 21.
If your organization is interested
in increasing its visibility to both
the on- and off-campus communi-
ties, please send an e-mail to
editoK�tec.ecu.edu.
The following is a list of all
registered ECU organizations along
with the most current contact
information available.
DEPARTMENTAL CLUBS
American Chemical
Society-Student Affiliates � 561-7287
American Marketing Association
439-1878
American Society of Interior Designers
413-0352
AMT0 � 752-4509
Anthropology Graduate
Student Organization � 321-42929
Art Education Guild � 757-1346
Biology Graduate Student Association
353-8869
CDFRMFT Graduate Association
752-3080
Child Life Student Association
353-6266
Criminal JusticeSocial Wort Alliance
353-7236
Design Associates � 754-2421
Doctoral Student Association
353-0117
ECU Communication Organization
931-9599
ECU Dance Association � 931-9334
ECU Counselor Education Association
3284661
ECU Philosophy Club � 757-0994
ECU Chapter of the Society
for Technical Communication
931-0506
ECU Chemistry Graduate Association
328-1667
ECU Computer Science
Graduate Student Organization
264-3294
ECU Society for Clinical
Laboratory Science � 328-3304
ECU Student Athletic Trainers' Club
321-7214
Elementary Education Club
328-7965
Environmental Health Science Club
758-9984
Exercise and Sports
Science Majors Club
353-3114
Financial Management Association
328-3124
Geo Club-329-1353
Geography Graduate Student Alliance
931-1143
Graduate Association of Social Workers
931-9924
Graduate Business Association
752-4448
Graduate Student Advisory Council
321-4929
Hearth Education Alumni Society
328-1554
Hospitality Management Association
353-9064
Management Information
Systems Association
328-3944
Maritime Studies Association
752-8037
Medical School Council � 830-5157
Middle Grades Education Club
328-1136
Music Therapy Club � 412-6107
National Association of
Industrial Technology � 355-8225
National Student
Speech-Language Hearing Association
752-5842
Painting Guild � 752-7544
Physical Therapy Organization
3554709
Physician Assistant Studies,
The Keller Society
321-6353
Physics Graduate Student Association
329-1193
Professional Association of
Industrial Distribution � 757-3134
Recreational and Leisure
Graduate Society � 353-8701
Sculpture Guild � 931 -0280
Society for Advancement of
Management' 758-9672
Society of Manufacturing Engineers
830-2254
Society of Physical Students
758-3506
Society of Student Software Engineers
3284611
Spanish Club '329-1149
IMPORTANT NOTE TO NEW ECU STUDENTS:
If you have not gotten your immunization records in, please get them to
SHS as soon as possible so you will not be withdrawn from the unlversltyl
The construction at ECU Student
Health Service is progressing! The
new structure being built will add
approximately 12,500 additional
square feet of clinic area and office
space to the existing building, so
that we may better serve you! We
are scheduled this fall to move into
the new addition so the existing
building can be renovated. (Look
for the entrance of the building to
change.) Our construction is
expected to be complete by Spring
2001. We'll keep you posted about
changes at the SHS!
ECU students pay a fee with their
tuition that covers or greatly
reduces the cost of services
received at the Student Health
Service Take advantage of the
quality primary health care
services offered to you:
Professional Staff
Appointments
Urgent Care
LaboratoryX-Ray
Pharmacy
Health Education
Allergy Clinic
Mental Health
Physical Therapy
Sports Medicine
and much more
Brasstvood
Apartments
� Quiet Neighborhood
� 1 Bedroom $320
� 2 Bedroom $380
� WasherDryer Hookups
� Ceiling Fan
� Free WaterSewer
� Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & Restaurants
� Office On Site
www.brasswood.com
VU6 Bmnrood Court �!
Phone: 25WH�9 � hi: 2SHS5-K5J
brasrwoodtfgimivulcnr.cooi
(Located Beside Joyner Library)
INFORMATION: 3x8-6841
APPOINTMENTS: ?28-6?I7
Ire you tired of not getting a
seat on the ECU transit bos?
We are the only complex in town to
offer express bus service to FXU. In
addition to:
� Free extended cable in each room
� Two phone jacks in each bedroom
� Full size washerdryer
� Monitored alarm system
� individual leases
3305 E. 10th St. 752-9995
Welcome New & Returning Students!
HeelSew
Quik
FOOTWEAR CLINIC
201 Carolina East Mall
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-756-0044
Fax 1-252-758-0139
Quality Shoe Repair While You Wait!
Half Soles, Full Soles, Heel Replacement,
Shoe Shine. Factory Shines, Dye Work,
Complete Line of Shoe Care Products,
Clothing Alteration & Much More!
(Hours: MonSat. 10 am-8 pm)
Ask about our 1 Year Shoe Shine Card
Marvin Staten
Shelley Staten
Owners
Student Accounting Society
758-9522
Student Government Association
551-3769
Student National Medical Association
3534534
Student Occupational Therapy
Association 758-5245
Visual Arts Forum
752-7544
GENERAL CLUBS
Allied Blacks for Leadership
and Equality � 328-8812
Alternative Spring Break
328-3934
American Medical Women's
Association -561-7379
Association for the Education
of Young Children �752-6666
B-GLAD � 413-0580
Black Graduate Student Association
328-8853
Campus Scouts of ECU � 746-4138
Circle K International � 328-7250
Coastal Resources Management
Association � 752-3769
East Carolina Friends � 353-0073
ECU Ambassadors � 439-2368
ECU College Republicans � 353-2834
ECU Marching Pirates � 413-0527
ECU Pirate Cotorguard � 3284982
ECU Students Against
Destructive Decisions � 328-3174
Environmental Conservation
Organization of ECU �328-3495
Health Promotion Council � 355-1885
International Student Association
7584880
Leadership Corp � 830-3691
National Residence Hall Honorary
3284683
North Carolina Student
Rural Health Coalition '328-3180
Pirate Outreach � 3214843
PreProfessional Health Alliance
3284236
RCLS Student Society � 561-7465
Student Athlete Advisory Council
695-0229
Student Council far Exceptional
Children � 328-3553
Student OtotBfc AsMcMbn
329-H56
Student Health Information
Management Association -758-4653
The Residence Hall Association
328-1679
United to Create Inclusion
3284530
College
credits
for
taxpayers.
uPto$I�00
Bow up on tax break that can
help vou foot the hills for
higher (duration.
The HOPfc Credit can cut
your federal tax up to S I iOO
per undergraduate student per
veor Applies itn t" the fW
two cars n (.ollege or other
post �econoan courses.
1 he Lifetime I earning
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i pi
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ruesday, August 15, 2000
theeastcarollnian.com
The East Carolinian 11
news@ecupiratemail.com
Important criteria for N.C. residency status
allowing these instruc-
tions will make moving
easier
Try to do these things immedi-
ately upon arriving in North Caro-
na, since al2-month advance resi-
liency is necessary to establish resi-
dency for tuition purposes.
1. Obtain a North Carolina driver's license.
2. Register to vote in North Carolina.
3. If you drive a car, license it in North
Carolina.
4. Obtain a North Carolina bank account
and use it for all your funds.
5. Accept no financial aid from parents or
other relatives on a regular basis (occasional
cash gifts are OK).
6. Prepare to file a North Carolina Tax Return
at the appropriate time, save records, pay stubs
7. Withholding is deducted from your pay-
checks if you are a graduate assistant File a tax
return even if just to get that money back.
8. Be prepared to prove that you are totally
financially independent Can you answer these
questions satisfactorily:
�How do you pay your tuition and other
educational expenses?
�How do you live?
�Do you have sufficient income from all
sources to support yourself? (Include your
assistantship, waiver, scholarship assistance,
loans, part-time employment outside the university,
savings, etc.).
9. If you have a student loan in your own
name, that is an indication that you are financially
independent
RESIDENCE STATUS FOR
TUITION PURPOSES
The basis for determining the
appropriate tuition charge rests upon
whether a student is a resident or
a nonresident for tuition purposes.
Each student must make a statement
as to the length of his or her residency
in North Carolina, with assessment
by the institution of that statement
to be conditioned by the following:
Residence
To qualify as a resident for tuition
purposes, a person must become a
legal resident and remain a legal
resident for at least 12 months imme-
diately prior to classification. Thus,
there is a distinction between a legal
residence and residence for tuition
purposes. Furthermore, a 12 month
legal residence means more than
simple abode in North Carolina.
In particular, it means maintaining
a domicile (permanent home of
indefinite duration) as opposed to
maintaining a mere temporary resi-
dence or abode incident to enroll-
ment in an institution of higher
education. The burden of establishing
facts which justify classification of
a student as a resident entitled to in-
state tuition rates is on the applicant
for such classification, who must
show his or her entitlement by the
preponderance (the greater part) of
the residentiary information.
Initiative
Being classified a resident for
tuition purposes is contingent on
the student's seeking such status and
providing all information that the
institution may require in making
the determination.
Parents' Domicile
If an individual, irrespective of
age, has living parent(s) or court-
appointed guardian of the person,
the domicile of such parent(s) or
guardian is, prima facie, the domicile
of the individual; but this prima facie
evidence of the individual's domicile
may or may not be sustained by
other information. Further, non-
domiciliary status of parents is not
deemed prima facie evidence of
the applicant child's status If the
applicant has lived (though not
necessarily legally resided) in North
Carolina for the five years preceding
enrollment or re-registration.
Effect of Marriage
Marriage alone does not prevent
a person from becoming or continu-
ing to be a resident for tuition pur-
poses, nor does marriage in any
circumstance insure that a person will
become or continue to be a resident
for tuition purposes. Marriage and
the legal residence of one's spouse
are, however, relevant information
in determining residentiary intent.
Furthermore, if both the husband
and his wife are legal residents of
North Carolina and if one of them
has been a legal resident longer than
the other, then the longer duration
may be claimed by either spouse in
meeting the 12 month requirement
See RESIDENCY page 12
? KESWICK
APARTMENTS
Amenities
� Stepsaving kitchens with frost ftee refrigerator,
contlnous clean range, Wish washer, disposal
� Washerdryer hookups
� Private balcony or patio with outdoor storage
� Carpeting, mlnlbllnds and vertical blinds
� Wood-burning fireplace with mantel
� Energy saving heat pump
� Ceiling fans
� Walk-in closets
� On site laundry facilities
� 24 hour emergency maintenance
� On site management
� ADA Compliant Apartments available
� Pets welcome
Facilities
� Clubhouse with swimming pool
� Lighted tennis court
� Sand Volleyball court
� Children's playground
� Fully-equipped Fitness Center
&
1510 Bridle Circle
Greenville, NC 27831
Telephone: 252-355-2198
Fax:252-355-4973
www.rent.netairectkeswick
Campus Christian Fellowship
2000 Fall Kick-Off
Cook-Out
Wednesday, August 16 @ 6 p.m
200 E. 8th Street
Rae. Ctr. and Ham's)
Into call 762-7198
CCFs Weekly Events
QU6ST - Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
Weekly Praise A Worship Service
uNpLUGGED � Sundays at 7 p.m.
Student Led Devotions
6TOW Groups - TBA
Small Group Bible Studies
Student Union welcomes you to campus
Check out these free events
&�r0
Student Union Hotline: 252.328.6004
www.ecu.eduStudent Union
FILMS: Hendrix Theatre
"Great script. Great directing.
Great acting. Great movie
rWrl
�.I0UMC STONE
AMERICAN
BEAUTY
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wmmim muHtumutm
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Thu. Aug. 17 @ 7:30 PM
Fri. Aug. 18 @ 10 PM
Julia Roberts
Erin Bwckovlch
I WMffl (3E0 EL sasHS"
Wed. Aug. 16� 7:30 PM
Thu. Aug. 17 � 10 PM
Fri. Aug. 18 @ 7:30 PM
Special Event
Sat. Aug. 19
Mentalist
Craig Karga
8:00 PM Hendrix Theatre
Pirate Underground
FEATURING:
JeoTeK
10 PM groundfloor MSC
FREE admission to this
smoke-free alcohol-free
coffeehouse featuring,
free billiards, and free
refreshments.
)�





18 The East Carolinian
www.the0astcamiinian.com
Tuesday, August 15,2000
news@ecupiratemail.com
Residency from page 11
I
for in-state tuition status.
Military Personnel
A North Carolinian who serves
outside the state in the armed forces
does not lose North Carolina domicile
simply by reason of such service.
Students from the military may prove
retention or establishment of resi-
dence by reference, as in other cases,
to residentiary acts accompanied by
residentiary intent
In addition, a separate North
Carolina statute affords tuition rate
benefits to certain military personnel
and their dependents even though
not qualifying for the in-state tuition
rate by reason of al2 month legal
residence in North CaroUna. Members
of the armed services, while stationed
in and concurrently living in North
Carolina, may be charged a tuition
rate lower than the out-of-state tuition
rate to the extent that the total of
entitlements for applicable tuition
costs available from the federal gov-
ernment, plus certain amounts based
under a statutory formula upon the
in-state tuition rate, is a sum less than
the out-of-state tuition rate for the
pertinent enrollment. A dependent
relative of a service member stationed
in North Carolina is eligible to be
charged the in-state tuition rate
while the dependent relative is living
in North Carolina with the service
member and if the dependent rela-
tive has met any requirement of the
Selective Service System applicable to
the dependent relative. These tuition
benefits may be enjoyed only if the
applicable requirements for admission
have been met. These benefits alone
do not provide the basis for receiving
those derivative benefits under the
provisions of the residence classifica-
tion statute reviewed elsewhere in
this summary.
Grace Period
If a person (1) has been a bona fide
legal resident, (2) has consequently
been classified a resident for tuition
purposes, and (3) has subsequently
lost North Carolina legal residence
while enrolled at a public institution
of higher education, that person may
continue to enjoy the in-state tuition
rate for a grace period of 12 months
measured from the date on which
North Carolina legal residence was
lost. If the 12 month period ends
during an academic term for which
the person is enrolled at a state institu-
tion of higher education, the grace
period extends, in addition, to the end
of that term. The fact of marriage to
one who is domiciled outside North
Carolina does not by itself cause
loss of legal residence, marking the
beginning of the grace period.
Minors
Minors (persons under 18 years
of age) usually have the domicile
of their parents, but certain special
cases are recognized by the residence
classification statute in determining
residence for tuition purposes.
(a) If a minor's parents live apart,
the minor's domicile is deemed to be
North Carolina for the time period(s)
that either parent, as a North Carolina
legal resident, may claim and does
claim the minor as a tax dependent,
even if other law or judicial act assigns
the minor's domicile outside North
Carolina. A minor thus deemed to
be a legal resident will not, upon
achieving majority before enrolling
at an institution of higher education,
lose North Carolina legal residence
if that person:
�upon becoming an adult acts, to
the extent that the person's degree
of actual emancipation permits, in
a manner consistent with bona fide
legal residence in North Carolina and
begins enrollment at an institution
of higher education not later than
the fall academic term next following
completion of education prerequisite
to admission at such institution.
(b) If a minor has lived for five
or more consecutive years with rela-
tives (other than parents) who are
domiciled in North Carolina and if
the relatives have functioned during
this time as if they were personal
guardians, the minor will be deemed
a resident for tuition purposes for an
enrolled term commencing immedi-
ately after at least five years in which
these circumstances have existed. If
under this consideration a minor is
deemed to be a resident for tuition
purposes immediately prior to his
or her 18th birthday, that person on
achieving majority will be deemed
a legal resident of North Carolina
of at least 12 months' duration.
This provision acts to confer in-state
tuition status even in the face of other
provisions of law to the contrary;
however, a person deemed a resident
of 12 months' duration pursuant to
this provision continues to be a legal
resident of the state only so long as
he or she does not abandon North
Carolina domicile.
Lost but Regained Domicile
If a student ceases enrollment
at or graduates from an institution
of higher education while classified
a resident for tuition purposes and
then both abandons and reacqulres
North Carolina domicile within a
12 month period and, if he or she
continues to maintain the reacquired
domicile at the time of re-enrollment
at an institution of higher educa-
tion, that person may re-enroll at
the in-state tuition rate without
having to meet the usual 12 month
durational requirement. However, any
one person may receive the benefit of
this provision only once.
Change of Status
A student admitted to initial
enrollment In an institution (or
permitted to re-enroll following an
absence from the institutional pro-
gram which involved a formal with-
drawal from enrollment) must be
classified by the admitting institution
either as a resident or as a nonresident
for tuition purposes prior to actual
enrollment. A residence status clas-
sification once assigned (and final-
ized pursuant to any appeal properly
taken) may be changed thereafter
(with corresponding change in billing
rates) only at Intervals corresponding
with the established primary divisions
of the academic year.
Transfer Students
When a student transfers from
one North Carolina public Institution
of higher education to another, he
or she is treated as a new student by
the institution to which he or she is
transferring and must be assigned an
initial residence status classification for
tuition purposes.
Copies of the most current North
Carolina Residency Manual are avail-
able for inspection in the University
Residency Classification Office, Joyner
Library and Health Sciences Library.
Students are responsible for being
familiar with the contents of this source
of regulation.
RESIDENCE STATUS APPLICA-
TIONS AND DEADLINES
Students applying for the in-state
rate of tuition should complete a
current Residence Status Applica-
tion and return it to the University
Residency Classification Office, Divi-
sion of Business Affairs, at least three
weeks prior to registration day for
the semester they are seeking in-state
tuition.
(All information taken from the
ECU School of Music's home page at
www.music.ecu.eduResidency.html)
.
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ugust 15,2000
vupimtemail.com
plying for the in-state
should complete a
nee Status Applka-
i it to the University
ification Office, Divi-
l Affairs, at least three
registration day for
:y are seeking in-state
ttion taken from the
Music's home page at
�diiResidency.hnnl)
QUOTE OF THE DAY
"Colleges are places where pebbles are
polished and diamonds are dimmed
Robert C. Ingersoll
the east Carolinian
INSIDE
Getting Wired at ECU
How to handle computer setup on
campus and offompus
TOP 50
Things to
Do at ECU
1. Co downtown
2. Get pierced
3. Survive a hurricane
4. Tear down a goalpost
5. Co to class with pantyhose
on your head
6. Waste some time at the
Sonic Plaza
7. Appeal an ECU parking ticket
8. Co to Barefoot on the Mall
9. Pull an all-nighter
10. Force yourself to socialize
with your hall mates
11. Sled down College Hill if snowy
12. Eat a pizza at Alfredo's at 2 a.m.
13. Run out of declining balance
14. See a play at McGinnis
15. Swim in the fountain in
front of Wright
16. Join a fraternity or sorority
17. Listen to the mall preacher
in the spring
18. Watch less TV
19. Tailgate before a football game
20. Read "The East Carolinian"
21. Watch cars drive by on the
patio of La vista
22. Take random pics with an
Izone and decorate your life
23. Study abroad
24. Study a broad
25. Ride the Drunk Bus to
downtown
26. Play pool at Mendenhall
27. Make Wal-Mart your only
place to shop
28. Pick a fight with a Sports
Pad bouncer
29. Join the Student Union
30. See a drag show at the
Paddock
31. Eat only Kraft macaroni
and cheese for a week
32. Get sick of mac and cheese
and switch to Ramen noodles
33. Have a cup of coffee at the
Percolator
34. Freshmen: Wear your
downtown uniform to class
35. Count how many cats there
are on campus
36. Show up at Whichard at
4:30 a.m. to register
37. Show up at 8 a.m laugh at
the people who showed up
at 4:30 a.m.
38. Take their spot in line
39. Go to the Iron Pour at
the School of Art
40. Listen to WZMB
48. Go to Mike's Deli every
Saturday. EVERY Saturday.
41. Get lei'd
42. visit The Corner for Blues Night
43. CALL HOME FOR MONEY
44. Go to a Travel Lecture Series
45. Go ahead, make my day
46. Get written up by your R.A.
47. Collect as many bottles of
amoxicillan from SHS as possible
49. Attend an anime (SAGA)
club meeting
50. One word: HALLOWEEN
9 Classes You Should Take at ECU
1. Bask Scuba Diving (EXSS 2278) 4. Intro to Theater (THEA 1000) 7. Color and Design (ART 1001)
Student Oft tn learn lh. Ki .� . W? ,VV
Students get to learn the basics
of scuba diving without the risks of
the open sea. This class is a bit more
demanding than most electives, and
when students complete the course,
they receive NAU1 certification that
allows them to scuba dive on their
own.
2. Introduction to the OldNew
Testament (PHIL 16951696)
These two courses are not just for
Christians. They offer an objective
and extensive look at the history
and interpretation of The Bible in an
environment comfortable to anyone
with an open mind. Students are
encouraged to express their opinions
and make their own judgments based
on the facts provided. You may even
learn something about yourself.
3. American Folklore (ENCL 3570)
Ever hear you get an auto-
matic 4.0 if your roommate a-n
dies? Not true. You can learn IIA
what else is or is not true in 4
American Folklore, a course
that focuses on urban legends I
you grew up with. The class
also sheds light on suspected ' I
campus "hauntings" and other ' - -
strange phenomena.
� J
-
J
This class not only appeals to those
students interested in attending theater,
but also to those who are curious about
the behind-the-scenes and historical
aspects of theater. Instructors work
to create a fun environment where
students interact with the professor and are expected
to attend three plays during the course of the semester.
It's a great way to learn about carrying a play's
production from start to finish.
5. Astronomy (PHYS 4080, 4081)
Astronomy is not just about
constellations. This class teaches
about possible ways the Earth was
created, what distant stars are made
of, and how long it will take us
to get to the Milky Way. Students
should have a healthy background in math. In this
course, you may gain a broader understanding of
where our planet has come from and where it is
headed by studying the life-cycle of other celestial
bodies.
6. Political Issues (POLS 3011)
Now is your chance to put in your
two cents. Political Issues examines
selected foreign and domestic issues
facing American national govern-
ment. You can learn about the facts,
the problems and the benefits sur-
rounding some of the challenges
that face the U.S. government today.
Then you can decide how you would
handle hem.
Along with Art Appreciation,
this course is one of the most
popular fine arts courses that fresh- Y
men sign up for. Though not open jr. "?
to art majors, most students look- f y
ing to fulfill general education
requirements can take part in such
activities as sketching, drawing,
painting and design. Those with
little or no artistic talent shouldn't
worry-talent is not necessary to
succeed in this course.
$
W
V
8. Intro to Psychology
(PSYC 1000)
This course provides a first look
at the way the human mind works.
Students study memory, development,
social and abnormal behavior, and other
subjects that are a mystery to most of us. Find out why
you do what you do, and how to handle it.
9. Introduction to Medieval and
Renaissance Studies (MRST 2000)
This course takes society all the way back to the
conception of modern civilization.
Students look at art, literature,
language and history of the period
and how it has influenced the
development of world cultures.
The class is known for spawning
in-depth discussions and present-
ing new ideas.
Spicing up your dorm room
One reality that sets
in quickly for on-campus
students is having to cram
two roommates' personal
stuff into a 10'x 10'dorm
room. With the following
suggestions from Debra
Fritz, Target Home Decor
Consultant and Allied
Member of ASH) (Ameri-
can Society of Interior
Designers), we've come up
with surefire ways to add
pizzazz to your room (at a
reasonable cost):
Bedtime Stories
Before moving in you
may want to get in touch
with your new roommate
and come up with a simi-
lar color scheme, to keep
your stuff from clashing.
Since the bed is the focal
point of your room, make
it really stand out. Start
with an eye-catching com-
forter-animal prints, tie-
dye and bold patterns
are all attention grabbers.
Accessorize the comforter
with bright, solid color
sheets and pillowcases,
and finish it off by incor-
porating funky patterns
and textures with throw
blankets and pillows.
Shed Some Light on
the Subject
Nothing makes your
room look better than
great lighting. You may
be stuck with fluorescent
light overhead, but
explore some fun light-
ing options- to create- the-
look you want. A feather
lamp, beaded lamp, or
lava lamp can set just the
right study mood. Or, jazz
up windows, doorways,
closets, and bed frames
with string lights. Experi-
menting with different
shapes and textures will
help to make your room
shine.
Have a Seat
Instead of dragging the
old living room couch up
five floors, try an inflat-
able chair or sofa. But-
terfly chairs with bright
or embroidered slings are
also great seating options.
They're all lightweight
and compact which will
make moving in much
easier. Add an animal
print throw rug to your
seating area and your
friends won't ever leave.
Bookworm
To make studying
more appealing (after all,
this IS college) make your
desk more functional and
comfortable. Choose file
organizers, shelves, pen
cups and stackable draw-
ers in bright colors. Add an
unusual clock or embel-
lished picture frames for
interest. Hang a mirror or
a great picture above your
desk to create a more cozy
study spot.
(From Target's "Dorm
Decor 101: Merchandise
Overview fbrBack-to-Coliege
2000-)
Some ECU students'
suggestions:
"Place a carpet or
throw rug in your room
to give it some color
said Karen Barber, sei
English major. "And I
don't like the plastic
crates, so I store my
items in baskets
"I decorated my
room with things from
a dollar store where
you can get a lot
for little money said
(Catherine Shelton, a
senior accounting
major.
Although you do
have a lot of freedom
when it comes to deco-
rating your room, there
are a few things which
are strictly prohibited
such as:
Candles
Incense sticks
Propane stoves
Grills
Electric frying pans
Hot plates
Deep fat cookers
Electric and
kerosene heaters
Ceiling fans
Personal air
conditioners
The bottom line
your imagination
have fun-just remember
to abide by university
housing rules.
photos courtesy of Target
The truth about urban legends
photos courtesy of Target
Common rumors dis-
pelled
Brian Frizzelle
FEATURES WRITER
Everyone has heard of
urban legends. Whether
or not you choose to
believe them, they have
become ingrained in the
minds of our society.
Although many of these
stories are universal, ECU
is home to more than its
fair share.
Whether it's the
15-minute rule for stu-
dents waiting on profes-
sors to arrive or the prom-
ised 4.0 GPA upon the
suicide of your roommate,
nearly all students are
familiar with some type
of urban legend.
"The term urban leg-
ends refers to a certain
category of folk tales
said Dr. Karen Baldwin,
director of the ECU folk-
lore archive in the English
department. "They are all
part of the huge body of
student knowledge main-
tained by students. They
border on being true but
pertain to concerns and
values of students
Three of the legends
that circulate around ECU
are common across Amer-
ican college campuses.
According to the urban
legends reference pages
at www.snopes.com, the
theory of being authorized
to leave a class after wait-
ing for a professor for IS
minutes and the theory
of students being granted
a 4.0 after the suicide of
a roommate are generally
false. Even though most
students believe that there
are actual regulations that
mandate how long they
are required to wait for a
late professor, few univer-
sities, in fact, have policies
concerning this. The best
advice would probably be
to continue waiting in
class until you hear for
certain that the professor
is not coming.
Regarding the suicidal
roommate, no college or
university in the United
States has a policy of
awarding a 4.0 average,
or anything else, to a
student whose roommate
commits suicide. In other
words, the only thing
that can be gained by
pushing your roommate
into offing his or her self
is a great deal of legal
trouble.
One of the most
famous local legends is
that ECU once made
"Playboy" magazine's top
"party school" list for
several years running.
This legend is also with-
out merit. "Playboy" only
printed the list once and
ECU was nowhere on it.
The basis for the "Play-
boy" legend stems from
the lecture given by a
school official to the stu-
dent body in the 1960's
about French kissing.
Apparently, the local press
caught wind of the story,
which supposedly found
its way to "Playboy
There are some urban
legends at ECU that have
some basis in truth, how-
ever. Cindy Kitrell, direc-
tor of Principal Gifts for
Institutional Advance-
ment and a former ECU
student, remembers the
See Legends on page 7





8 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Tuesday, August 15,2000
sports@ecupiratemall.com
Tuesday
www. thee
AUVICh r-OR FRESHMEN
We asked 10 upperclassmen the ques-
tion, "If you could pass along one piece of
advice along to incoming freshmen, what
would it be?" Here's what they said.
1. "Do not be afraid to explore
different areas of study. They
will make you a more well-
rounded person. Study hard,
but find time for enjoyment
because college is a once in a
lifetime experience
ABRAHAM WILLOUGHBY
SENIOR, BUSINESS MAJOR
2. "Live your life for yourself
because you only live once
KENDRICK REVIS
SENIOR, COMPUTER SCIENCE MAJOR
3. "Choose your friends wisely.
Take your classes seriously and
make sure you do good your
first semester, especially
SHONDA DRAKE
SOPHOMORE, DESIGN AND DRAFTING MAJOR
4. "Be prepared to change
because college is a place
where we all mature
SHERLENE MASON,
SENIOR, COMMUNfTY HEALTH MAJOR
5. "Only go downtown two
nights a week
THOMAS BELL;
SOPHOMORE, PSYCHOLOGY MAJOR
6. "Don't get stressed
TRAVIS CUTLER
SENIOR, CDFR MAJOR
7. "Remember why you're
here. There is a happy
medium between partying
and studying
REBECCA FAULK
JUNIOR, NURSING MAJOR
8. "Find a good church and
stay involved and get to know
someone you can be account-
able to (a mentor)
SHONDELL JONES
GRADUATE, MASTERS IN PHYSICAL THERAPY
9. "Find a major you like and
would love doing the rest of
your life
ALAYNA BINGHAM
JUNIOR, CLINICAL LABORATORY SCIENCE MAJOR
10. "RememberA'is for
academics. 'B' is for being.
That is one reason for being
here. Make an emphasis on
time management and study
habits
IAN SWANK
SENIOR, PUBUC RELATIONS MAJOR
m m �
How to Connect with the new
RezNet Auto-Registration System
When you set up your computer in your dorm,
you're getting hooked to a system called RezNet,
which functions as a permanent connection to the
Internet without the hassle of dialing in and tying
up the phone line. There are three main things you
need to be able to get connected with the new RezNet
Auto-Registration System:
1. A properly configured computer that meets
connection standards (some Windows '95 and most
Windows '98)
2. An Ethernet card properly installed
3. An Ethernet cable (make sure you don't try to
use a phone cable).
Registering your computer with the Auto Registra-
tion System only takes five to 10 minutes. All you have
to do is follow these Instructions:
1. RezNet uses the Dynamic Host Configuration
Protocol (DHCP) to assign IP addresses. You will need
to configure your computer to use DHCP. If needed,
complete instructions can be received from RezNet al
their web site http:my.housing.ecu.educonnect on
any computer currently connected to the Internet.
2. Plug your Ethernet Cable into either data port. If
one is being used, use the unused data port.
3. A temporary IP address will be assigned to your
computer and that only connects to the new auto-
registration web site.
4. Open your web browser (Netscape or Internet
Explorer) and it should go to the RezNet Web site
automatically. If it doesn't, try connecting to http.
provision.ecu.edu.
5. After reading the statement on the Web page,
select "I Agree, begin IP Registration The page will
request a User ID and Password. Type in your Exchange
(ECU e-mail) User ID and Password for authentication.
Call 328-6866 if you have problems with your user
ID and password.
6. Select Student, Faculty or Staff (defaults to
Student)
If you're a student who works on campus (which
also makes you staff) registering a personal computer,
select Student. If you're a Graduate Student teaching a
class registering a personal computer, select Student.
7. Select Stationary or Mobile (defaults to Station-
ary). Stationary meaning the computer will be used
in one location on a regular basis (desktop computer
or laptop computer that only stays in one student's
room). Mobile means the computer will be used in
various places around campus.
8. Type your ECU ID number (your social security
number
9. Click Submit to complete registration process:
a. the system searches Database for Name, Building,
Room, and Phone
b. retrieves MAC address from DCHP server
c. stores Information In Database
d. adds information to DHCP server client list,
which allows your computer to access the Internet
10. Providing the above steps complete success-
fully:
a. Completely shut down your computer and
restart
b. For students needing to know the Internet "name"
and address of their computer: the computer's Internet
address or name will be studentuserid.students.ecu.edu.
Students' IP addresses will change often, but the
students' domain name will stay the same.
II you don't decide to bring your own personal
computer along with you to college, you still have
access to using the campus labs. For your convenience,
they will be open 24 hours starting this fall semester
of 2000.
Do I need to get
hooked up?
Advice on whether you'll
need a computer this year
Leslie Long
STAFF WRIER
Leslie Long
STAFF WRITER
�� t ECU, every student is given an
,k e-mail address that goes through
Pthe school and its home page.
It consists of the student's initials (first, last
and middle) and his or her birthday (for exam-
ple, 0131 for an. 31), followed by the tail
"@mail.ecu.edu which is the same for every-
one. When you arrive at the typed address
www.ecu.edu, you are given the home page of
ECU. Here's how to check your e-mail account:
1. Go to the highlighted area that says
"E-mailPhone" and click on "E-mail
2. Scroll down until you see the bulleted
selection saying "Access your e-mail via the
Web" and click.
3. Enter your User ID (initials and birth date)
in the space for "Log On Hit enter.
4. In the box that pops up on your screen,
enter your User ID again. In the password space,
enter the last six digits of your Social Security
Number (SSN). Then click "OK
5. Later, you may be notified to change your
password, but until then, your SSN will suffice.
Along with all those other major decisions you
will face this year comes the question of whether
or not you'll need a computer. The answer is yes,
whether you use the provided facilities on campus
or the nice new laptop your parents bought you,
computers have become essential for all college
students.
If you're having trouble deciding whether to
bring one or not, listen to what those who have
experienced it have to say. A few recent interviews
with professors, parents, students and last year's
freshmen included one main question: Do freshmen
really need a computer when they first arrive here,
and do you think it's a benefit?
"Yesldosaid Kay O'Neill, the mother of Laura,
a junior speech therapy major. "As a parent, I would
worry about my child going to the library late at
night. I'd be worried it wasn't safe. With a computer
in their room, they can study right there. I think
it's a great convenience
"Why wouldn't they bring their own computer?"
said associate library studies and education professor
Lawrence Auld. "One primary use for computers is
word processing. Freshmen will take English 1100
and 12(H), which are both writing intensive courses.
They need a word processor for that
"You could also access resources through the
Web and use e-mail, too he also said. "In those
ways, I think it's a great benefit to have a personal
computer
When current students were asked if they felt
freshmen especially needed to bring a computer,
a few disagreed.
"Yes said junior business major Tim Johnson.
"It saves the trouble of going down to the computer
lab. But if they don't have their own computer,
there are labs available for them. Either way, they
have sources there for their use
"I don't think that freshmen need personal
computers because our school has a lot of computers
that are accessible to them around campus said
occupational therapy major Angie Lynch. "But I do
think it's essential to use a computer on campus for
papers and schoolwork. You don't necessarily need
to have your own personal one
If you do choose to bring your own computer,
you are not alone. According to ECU's Dowdy
Student Stores, they sold 175 computers to incoming
and returning students for fall 2000. That's more
than double their sales lasl year.
The Student Desktop
Leslie Long
STAFF WRITER
The ECU Student Desktop is an informative feature
that all students use at some point in their education. To
enter the Desktop, you go through the ECU homepage
and follow the links. Enter your student identification
number (your full Social Security number), and then
your ECU Personal Identification Number (PIN).
The desktop is a web-based collection of applications
that will allow you, as a student, to view your student
information; your history and current standing at ECU.
The Desktop includes the following:
�Student Application Toolbox-gives information
ranging from checking your course grades to checking
course seat availability. You can also register for
classes. It has a student locator to help you find out
information about a current student. You can view a
list of ECU majors and degrees. Vehicle registration
is also an option.
�What's New on My Desktop?-shows you the
new features to the desktop or shows any current
updates.
�Local Weather Forecast-current weather conditions
for the GreenvilleWashington, N.C. area.
�Frequently Asked Questions-questions in regard
to the function of Student Desktop, or your most
commonly asked questions, too.
�Comments or Suggestions-comments about the
site, ideas for improvement.
�Useful Web Links-view many useful sites such as
the ECU computer use policy, ECU's bus schedules,
ECU's Career Services home page, ECU's Cooperative
Education Office home page, the registrar's office,
a link to the Student Stores and the Department of
Human Resources.
Bl
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Tuesday, August 15, 2000
www.theeastcamlinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 9
features@ecupiratemail.com
BEST TASTING
SUBS IN TOWN!
Tips for bicycling at ECU
DELI CSl PIZZA
East 10th St. (Next to Post Office)
830-9098
Call us for all your catering needs!
Open 9am-12pm
Buy 1 Get 2nd
$2 OFF
US 2 Topping Pizza
$7.99
Pick-Up Only
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU is moving toward becom-
ing a pedestrian campus, devoid of
significant auto- traffic. One key to
this plan is the use of bicycles.
While the campus is small
enough to be easily crossed by
foot, non-resident students and
those living in residence halls at
the extreme ends of campus often
use bikes to get to class. (However
those that live in Belk, Scott and
Tyler Residence Hails soon become
adept at climbing hills.)
The best place to park your bike
is at any one of the racks outside
every campus building. Please note
that bikes parked inside a classroom
building; in stairwells or residence
halls; on sidewalks; or attached
to trees, bushes or public seating
fixtures may be impounded at an
owner's expense.
All bikes must be registered and
display a permit. Registering your
bike is free and permanent. Contact
Parking and Transportation Services
at 328-6294 for more information.
SAFETY TIPS
� Wear a helmet
Helmets have been shown to
decrease head injury by up to 85
percent.
� Wear proper clothing
It is important to be seen by
motorists so wearing bright easily
visible clothing is important.
Iie aware of your surroundings
Stay alert while on your bike.
Most accidents occur when the rider
is unaware of traffic entering the
road from driveways and intersec-
tions.
'Keep an eye on the road
Watch out for obstacles like
potholes, loose gravel or anything
that can cause an accident.
�Be cautious at night
Make sure your bike has proper
reflective surfaces and keep to
familiar streets and sidewalks.
�Pay attention to your bike
Keeping your bike in working
order is an easy way to be safe.
Check your brakes and make sure
your wheels are properly fastened.
BIKE SECURITY TIPS
Bicycle theft is a problem every-
where, especially on college cam-
puses where bike use is prevalent.
'Get a good lock
Chains can be cut and if you
have a nice bike, and they offer very
little resistance to a thief. U-locks
provide complete security but can
be bulky and expensive. Other
locks such as those that feature
heavy chains wrapped in rubber
can also provide plenty of security
at a lower cost.
�Lock your bike properly
Be sure to lock both the bike
frame and front wheel to the rack.
Wheels and frames can be stolen
by themselves.
�Register your bike
Having your bike registered by
the ECU Police Department is a free
and permanent way to prevent bike
theft. Similar services are offered by
the Greenville Police Department.
WHERE TO GET
YOUR BIKE FIXED
Bicycle Post
530 Cotanche St.
757-3616
AVERAGE COSTS
Tune-up
$39.99
Broken part labor
$6 price of part
Mendenhall Student Center
DE
IB!
QQ
.
QDOQQQ
AUG. 15 FROM W P.M.
AT THE MSC BRICKYARD
Stop by the Merchants
Expo to meet local
merchants and pick up lots
of free goodies.
AUG. 16-18 AT 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Erin Brockovich (R) Julia Roberts stars as a file clerk at a
small law firm who discovers a cover-up Involving a major
public utility company, contaminated water, and a
small desert community suffering the effects of the pollu-
tion. In spite of their Initial reluctance, Roberts works to win
their trust and convinces them to file a lawsuit Will the
lawsuit pay off? Don't miss the action! You and a guest get
in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
HR9S. GBDDDQQ
?QqdQ
AUGUST 19 FROM 10
P.M. TILL MIDNIGHT AT
MSC (GROUND FLOOR)
ECU Battle of the Bands
participant
Jester, rocks' while
you roll 'em and rack 'em.
AUGUST 16-18 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
American Beauty (R) Winner of the 1999 Oscar tor Best
Picture, Kevin Spacey stars in the story of Lester Bemham's
mid-life crisis. With a wife thathates him, a daughter who
regards him with contempt and a boss who's gunning to
fire him, Bemham has nothing to lose. While changes in
Bemham's life leave his wife and daughter angry and
betrayed, he enjoys a freedom he's never experienced
before. But what's the price of this newfound freedom?
You and a guest get in free when you present your valid
ECU One Card.
AUQU8T19 PROM 8-10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Watch Crag Karges as he brings a fantastic display
of illusion and psychic phenomenon to the stage,
He makes tables walk and levitate into the air, links
together audience members' rings, reads minds, and
more. He even risks his performance fee in a special
demonstration of his abilities. He's thrilled audiences
in appearances on The Tonight Show and Larry King
Live, and now he's coming to Mendenhall Student
Center. Admission to the show is free with the
presentation of a valid ECU One Card. Students
may bring one guest
?DO DDQ
AUGU8T15 FROM 8-11
P.M. AT MSC (GROUND
FLOOR LEVEL)
Drop by the Bingo,
Bowling,
Billiards Bonanza to
play Bingo for cash
prizes, stop by the Outer
Limitz Bowling Alley for a
game or two on Brunswick
lanes equipped with auto-
matic scoring, and shoot
some pool.
Alied Blacks for Leadership and Equality, Adult and Commuter Services, Banking, Central Ticket Office
Inter-Fraternity Council, Operations and Reservations, Panhetenic, RIdeRlders Board, School Supplies
Student Fund Accounting Office, Student Government Association, Student Leadership, Student Locator
Student Union, Transit Technical Services, WZMB Radio
0� � Web: www. MseduTmiiHtMhall Row Mon-Tkur 8 a m -11 p.m.rtI 8 � m
M�tni(ht53t. NcMm-Midninlit Sun. Notin
We're glad you are back,
We wish you the best as you unpack.
Settle in with us at Tar River Estates,
Hurry by to see us, and please don't be
late.
Our cozy townhomes offer comfort
and style,
Our Tar River team will go
the extra mile.
So move in to join a community of
friends,
Where friendships and memories will
never end.
AIMCO
1801E. ist St - Mobile Unit
Greenville, NC 27858
(252)752-4225






4 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Tuesday, August 15,2000
features@ecupiratemail.com
Tuesday
www.theea.
Birth Control Information
"Protect yourself
1) Barrier Methods
Includes: condoms, sponges, spermicides, dia-
phragms, cervical caps-methods that stop sperm
from reaching the womb
Duration: single use, insert before intercourse
and remove after.
Effectiveness: The male condom is especially
effective in preventing pregnancy and sexually
transmitted diseases. Other barrier methods vary,
but most unexpected pregnancies are caused by
human error-improper insertion or breaking or
tearing of the device. There is a low occurrence
of side effects.
Availability: over-the-counter (except the dia-
phragm and cervical cap only available from
doctor)
2) Intrauterine Devices (IUD)
Includes: a small, T-shaped piece of plastic that
contains either copper or a hormone to be
inserted in the womb
Duration: lasts several years, but string should be
checked once a month
Effectiveness: effective in preventing pregnancy
and lasts longer than all other methods, but can
be painful to insert or remove and can get infected
in women who have more than one partner
Availability: must be inserted and removed by a
doctor or nurse
3) Birth Control Pills
Includes: an oral contraceptive that contains hor-
mones to prevent pregnancy
Duration: Pill must be taken once a day. One set
lasts a month. One prescription generally lasts a
year.
Effectiveness: Pills are medically safe but have
many side effects, both negative and positive.
They have a good record for preventing preg-
nancy, but do not protect against sexually trans-
mitted diseases and can be ineffective if the
woman forgets to take a pill.
Availability: prescription only
4) Five-Year Contraceptive
Implants (Norplant)
Includes: match-sized sticks placed under the
woman's skin on the inside of her upper arm that
regularly release hormones to prevent pregnancy
Duration: prevents pregnancy for up to five years
Effectiveness: safe, highly-effective protection
from unwanted pregnancy, but does not protect
against sexually transmitted diseases; has a ten-
dency to generate unattractive side effects, such as
hair loss and acne; helps prevent cancer.
Availability: Implant must be inserted and
removed by a doctor.
5) Three Month Contraceptive
Injections (Depo-Provera)
Includes: a simple injection which contains hor-
mones to prevent pregnancy
Duration: injection in the buttocks or arm lasts
three months, needed four times a year
Effectiveness: safe, highly-effective, long-lasting
protection against pregnancy, but does not pro-
tect against sexually transmitted diseases; includes
same side effects and cancer prevention as five
year implants, but also can cause women to stop
having periods altogether. Other side effects are
depression and loss of interest in sex.
Availability: Injection must be given by a doctor.
www.attic-nightclub.com
ATiTIC
209 & 207 E. 5th St
Greenville NC, 27858
TONIGHT
I
x
www.attic-nightclub.com
752-7303
special guest:
Revelation Darling
WeeKeNd EXcuTSkN!
Wed. Aug 16
$2 Heineken's
ftifciY Buzz Nutley
� PR0P C0MIC
$2 Adm 9-9:30 w college ID
Thu. Aug 17
Dexter Freebish
new rock
WELCOME BACK t
ECU PARTY?
Fri. Aug 18
special guest: Bare Bottom
mike corrado band
rLx WELCOME BACK
ECU PARTY I
Sat. Aug 19
Chairmen of the Board
Beach Music's 1 Show
? special guest: one step beyond
www.livewireonline.com
BACK TO SCHOOL WITH MCDONALDS
FREE APPLE PIE OR SUNDAE
when you buy any Extra Value Meal
When you buy any Extra Value Meal, we'll treat
you to a FREE Apple Pie or Sundae. You chbosel!
Offer is good only at McDonald's on 10th Street in
Greenville. Limit one coupon per customer per visit.
One free item per coupon. Please present the coupon
when ordering. Not valid with any other offer.
Expires: September 1, 2000
J

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On Mosely Drive, off of Greenville Blvd.
Two Bedroom Units.Reserve One Today!
561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL SEMESTER
Picl
Er
FEAT
What do
can't decide
Space Cowbo;
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Sutherland, a
The film,
by Clint Eas
an amalgam
he's done in
character, n
Clint himsell
so determine
right that hi�
one flaw. Toi
pilot with a
J





Tuesday, August 15,2000
www.theeastcamlinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 0
features@ecupiratemail.oom
Pick of the week: Space Cowboys
Emily Little
FEATURES EDITOR
What do you call a movie that
can't decide where it belongs?
Space Cowboys, starring Clint East-
wood, Tommy Lee Jones, Donald
Sutherland, and James Garner.
The film, written and directed
by Clint Eastwood, seems to be
an amalgamation of everything
he's done in the past. The main
character, naturally played by
Clint himself, is typically heroic,
so determined to do only what's
right that his stubbornness is his
one flaw. Tommy Lee Jones is a
pilot with a penchant for living
dangerously, Donald Sutherland is
a slutty engineer, and James Garner
is a Baptist preacher who navigates.
The team comes together to repair
a satellite so old no one else knows
how to fix it. Naturally, things go
wrong.
What starts as a series of jokes
about old people suddenly turns
into a drama, then becomes an
action flick when the guys finally
get on the ship an hour and a
half into the film. As a result, you
find it difficult to get wrapped up
emotionally because they all cancel
each other out. This is particularly
evident since these parts are split
up. In other words, you don't get
a little comedy mixed in with the
drama and the action. It mostly
stays in one genre at a time, so
it seems like three different short
stories.
Another major problem with
this film is its lack of musical score.
Throughout the first half, there
is no background music to the
dialogue, so that when a hip-hop
tune suddenly blares out at the
boys' arrival at NASA, it seems
terribly out of place. It's not until
they start toying with the satellite
in space that their actions are
enhanced by some orchestration.
Despite these problems and
some predictability on the part of
young, cocky astronauts and the
evil boss with a hidden agenda
Moonlight Madness Sale
Thursday; Aug. 17th
7PM-IIPM i
Habitat for Humanity
Resale Store
402 W 10th St.
Bring your student ID for 10-50 discounts
GREAT STUFFGREAT PRICESFOR A GREAT CAUSE!
i i i i i i 4
yuk yo tuJt mU wkt m U
V�JU p APE fa m AfhtUti�
�kWI j4U, fat ulL, ECU Ui tAla,
�-& 4�wi�et4 4lUal
tye't U Ufjt Unfihf!
Hliu WILD 44 y,
CM fa JtUlU e kpX qtoM.
204 Edlv�lL l)w
7S2-SW
(James Cromwell), the four old
friends save the movie with acting.
Well, three of them anyway. The
other characters are so dynamic,
James Garner has almost nothing
to work with. His character falls
flat throughout the film. Donald
Sutherland, on the other hand,
makes the comedy work better
than anyone else in the cast.
Space Cowboys is generally
entertaining, but probably has
more to offer the older crowd
in the way of humor. It's a nice
picture to see if you've got nothing
else to do for three hours, but
don't move your schedule around
to accommodate it.
Swashbuckler Carwash
Brand new car washing equipment
AII types of detailing and hand washing
available Mon-Sat 8-5
24 hour self service wash and vacuum
0n-site manager
(On 14th St. bet ween
Belk dorm
and Harris Teeter)
Single-load, double-load and triple-load
washers and HOT dryers
20 minutes per quarter
Open everyday 6 a.m. until 10 p.m.
Convenient parking
Soap � Soda
Games � TV
Jarvis St Laundromat
203 Jarvis Street Greenville
Fourth St. o��&
1 s Fifth St.
ECU ArtBldg






Multiple choice made easy.
(2 What is the best tool to get you through college and your career?
ft
a. iMac

s

fipN
c$&
$P b. Power Mac G4 Cube
The iMac features an award-winning
design and simple internet connectiv-
ity. The iMac DV brings students a
complete desktop video solution at
an affordable price.
An entirely new class of computer. It combines
the performance of the PowerMac G4 with the
miniaturization, silent operations and elegant
desktop design of the iMac.
A� c. iBook
TS"
d. PowerBook
The iBook incorporates the best-sell-
ing features of the iMac into a sleek,
portable design. iBook is ideal for the
student on the go.
The PowerBook offers the mobile student a
powerful option. The Powerbook's lightweight
design and maximum performance make it an
elite among laptops.
A: e. Any Mac Above.
iW
ECU Dowdy Student Stores
Wright Building
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
(252) 328-6731
www.studentstores.ecu.edu

to
Authorized Reseller
CECU Dowdy Student Stores. All right, reserved. Apple and .he Apple lop, are revered trademarks and iMac. iBook. town Macintosh G4 Cube and ftTwerBnok arc trademarks of Apple Ganputer. Inc revered in the 05, and other countries
Hden must termarnarked by Ooolw 13,OT(i. Offer is valid white .supplies last. "Offers are valid while supplies last
Tuesday,
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Tuesday, August 15, 2000
wwwtheeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 7
features@ecupin3temail.com
Registration: Not as painful as you expect legends
from page 1
Internet, telephonic
methods offer alterna-
tives to long lines
Brian Frizzcllc
FEATURES WRITER
Registration, although it can be a
romplicated matter, isn't something
hat you should lose sleep over. By
�ollowing a few simple instructions
md heeding the advice of wizened
jpperclassmen, students today
:an navigate through registration
without any headaches.
The horror stories concerning
registration are familiar to all col-
ege students: the unavailability
)f needed classes, the problem of
eing stuck in classes that you don't
need, and of course the dreaded
never-ending lines. Fortunately, for
tew students, the advancements
made in the last few years with the
registration process have almost
een able to put all of their fears
it ease.
"You don't need to wait in line
niymore said Amy llissette, assis-
:ant registrar. "There are different
iptions. It's decentralized now. The
rimes have changed
Indeed, there are different ways
that students can register. There
is still the old standby, which is
registering in person at one of the
many terminals across campus.
But you can also take advantage of
the ability to register from home
by using the telephone or online
registration.
According to Dr. Dorothy
Muller, dean of undergraduate stud-
ies, we are one of a few schools to
offer all three methods.Whichever
method a student chooses is
entirely up to them. Kach method
has its own advantages and disad-
vantages.
"If you are off campus, then
the Web and telephone are the
best options Bissette said. "If
you are on campus, then using
the terminals may be better. It's a
combination of things. There are
good things about all of them
Some students still find it sim-
pler to go to the terminals in person
to register.
"Registering at the terminals is
probably the quickest Muller said.
"You have someone there who can
flip screens. It is very interactive
because you are right there. The
downside is waiting in lines. But
we really haven't had a problem
with lines
The tough part is tracking down
student advisers. No matter which
method you use, you are required
to get either a signature or a code
from your adviser. But once you
have the code, you can register
online or by telephone without
their input. However, terminal
registration requires your adviser's
approval before you can make any
changes to your schedule.
"With telephonic registration,
you can do the manipulation your-
self Muller said. "But it could
conceivably take you more than
one phone call
For those students with access to
a computer, Web registration may
be the best choice. The Web lets you
see more information than just the
course sheet that you hand the ter-
minal operator and is displayed on
the screen in front of you instead of
dictated to you over the telephone.
But one requirement for using
Web registration is the access to
a computer and the ability to use
it.
"For the average person, it's
not very easy to understand the
requirements and instructions
saidjantes Walker, a senior. "It's not
really user-friendly to the average
person
"The Web is becoming increas-
ingly capable Muller said. "It
saves those students wtio live at a
distance long trips. The Web over
time will probably open earlier and
earlier. There are definite advan-
tages to having the capabilities of
web and telephonic registration
There are several things that
students must know regardless of
which method they use.
"Make sure you keep up with
the date that registration starts
because sometimes it pops up and
it's easy to forget said Kristina
Cahoon, a senior.
Freshmen can do themselves a
favor by asking upperclassmen for
advice about registering. Although
freshmen registration during ori-
entation is restricted to using only
the terminal, they too will have the
chance to decide between the three
options when they begin registra-
tion for their second semester.
I'he current registration sched-
ule can be found at the student
bookstore and in all of the offices of
the different disciplines. These arc-
essential for every student because
they offer important information
that students need to know about
registration. They are updated every
semester and tell students where
to register, along with detailed
descriptions of each option that
they have. They also have a listing
of all the classes
rumors concerning closed study
when she was a freshman in the
I97(y.
"Women had to stay in their
rooms and study from 7 p.m.
until 10 p.m. every night Monday
through Thursday said Kitrell.
"The rumor was that if you went
downtown somebody would ask
to see your ID and would be able
to tell that you were a freshman
and you would get kicked out of
school
Another well-founded rumor is
that ECU was built on quicksand.
Virgil Clark, an alumnus of Fast
Carolina Teachers College, said
"ECU was built on top of quicksand.
In fact, there used to be a lake
where Christenbury gym is right
now
Another legend based in fact
concerns Reid circle.
"Reid circle, where people lay
out now, used to be the commu-
nity swimming pool said Karen
Clough, campaign administrator for
Institutional Advancement. "It was
filled in because of quicksand
"Urban legends express fears
and hopes, and they work very
well because in the context that
you heard them things reinforced
the idea and there is nothing to
counteract it Baldwin said.
Another area which always
seems to be covered by urban leg-
ends is supernatural activity.
"The supernatural element is
very much part of college students
lives because of their transplanted
lives Baldwin said.
Cotton Hall, White Hall, McGln-
nis Theater, and the Alpha Omega
Pi sorority house are all rumored
to be haunted. Cotton Hall's ghost
is said to be a man looking for
his fiance. McGinnis Theater is
said to be the home of the ghost
of Lucille Charles and the Alpha
Omega Pi house visitor is referred
to as Victoria.
"White Hall was built over
a graveyard said Scott Wells,
director of development in the
college of arts and sciences. "The
second or third floor study room
is haunted
Essentially, urban legends are
just that. No matter if they are true
or false, they still will continue find
believers in our society.
"They are not trivial Baldwin
said. "They will function as long as
people believe them
This writer can be contacted at
bfrizzetleStec.ecu.edu.
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S The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Tuesday,August15,2000
features@ecupiratemail.com
Planning to live off campus? If so, you can eliminate at least one
long line by arranging your utility service in advance. By
planning ahead, you can save valuable time and possibly
money. These options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service may be put in their
name. Just pick up a "Request for Utility Service" application
from the University Housing Office in Jones Hall; at Greenville
Utilities' Main Office, 200 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive; or at
GUC Express, our satellite office located at 509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the application (which must be
notarized) and mail it to GUC, P.O. Box 1847 Greenville, N.C.
27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your parents'
power company.
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name, a deposit
will be required. Residential deposits are as follows:
Water only $25
Electric only $100
Electric & water $125
Electric, water & gas 175
Electric & gas $150
You can save time by mailing the deposit in advance. Be sure to
include your name, where service will be required, when service
is to be cut on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the service address.
The service charge or $20.00 for electric and water, andor $30.00 for gas will be on your
firsr bill. GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on. While we do not require
you to be home when electric or water service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure
that all electrical appliances and water faucets are OFF during the cut on procedure
11 Greenville
Jk Utilities
752.7166 � 200 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive � www.guc.com
Tuesday,
www.theea,
iff
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Eli Lilly
Services
Student C
John Har
Career St
Gilbert S
Career Se
Grainger
Room 10:
Ferguson
Career Se
NVR, Inc
Room 10:
AU dates,





mBBmaBBi
ust 15, 2000
piratemail.com
Tuesday, August 15,2000
www.the9astcarollnian.com
FEATURES
The East Carolinian 9
com
DO
Career Services �
701 East Fifth Street
Greenville, NC 278581352
I (252)328-6050
(252) 328-6425 fax
EAST
UNIVERSITY
Get Connected
www.ecu.educareer
Career Services Workshops
All Workshops are held in room 103,
Career Services at 4:00 p.m.
ConNections to Career Services, Mondays
Resume Writing, Tuesdays
Exploring Careers, Wednesdays
Interviewing Tips, Thursdays
Career Day Schedules
GeneralBusiness Career Day
September 20, 2000
Industry & Technology Day
October 5, 2000
Graduate School & Professional Fair
November 2, 2000
Health Career Day
November 16, 2000
Education Career Day
March 2, 2001
On Campus Recruiters
(As of August 1, 2000; More to Be Announced)
If your qualifications match a specific job description
and you have submitted a resume, you will he able to
electronically schedule an on campus interview.
Please note some of the companies that have already
confirmed on campus interviews for the Fall Semester.
The following dates represent the closing date or last
day in which students can request an interview:
Dixon Odom PLLC September 20
McGladrey & Pullen September 20
John Hancock Financial Services September 21
Arthur Anderson September 26
Consolidated Electrical Distributors September 27
Greater Carolina Group September 27
Jefferson-Pilot Financial September 27
Abbott Laboratories October 3
Grainger October 3
Olde Discount Brokers October 3
BB&T October 4
Gilbert Southern Corporation October 5
Wachovia October 5
Ferguson Enterprises October 6
NVR, Inc. October 6
DU October 12
Apex Systems October 13
Eli Lilly Pharmaceutical October 17
Sherwin Williams Company October 20
TruGreen ChemLawn October 21
State Farm Insurance October 24
Modern Woodman of America October 31
Maxim Healthcare Services November I
West Point Stevens November 14
Check the Career Services web site for a Ust of
additional companies and interview dates
Networking 101;
Information Sessions
Throughout the semester, recruiters will conduct
informal presentations about their organizations.
Check upcoming events for future listings.
(Already scheduled as of August 8th)
Clubs & Bars in Greenville
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Eli Lilly Pharmaceuticals - October 4, 3:00 p.m Career
Services Room 103 and at 7:00 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center, Room TBA
John Hancock Financial Services - October 4,6:00 p.m I
Career Services, Room 103
Gilbert Southern Corporation - October 5, 5:00 p.m
Career Services. Room 103
Grainger - October 16, 6:00 p.m Career Services,
Room 103
Ferguson Enterprises - October 19, 8-9:30 p.m
Career Services, Room 103
NVR, Inc. - October 19, 6:00 p.m Career Services,
Room 103
AU dates, times, and locations are subject to change.
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DOWNTOWN:
1) The Attic
209 E. 5th St. 752-7303
One of the South's best small venues, The Attic, hosts some of the
best up-and-coming-bands in the country. The club also includes a
second room that plays house music most nights and a bar. Attire is
casual and cost of entry depends on the show.
2) BW-3's
114 E. 5th St. 758-9191
This restaurant and bar is always packed. BW-3 specializes in hot
wings and offers free trivia and a juke box as entertainment
3) The Cellar
209 E. 5th St. 752-4668
The Cellar is the quintessential dance clubmeat market. They play
hip hop and dance music all night and offer karaoke on certain
nights. The club maintains an extensive bar. Attire is mate-seeking
and night club dressy. Watch out for occasional fights. There is a $3
cover charge most nights.
4) The Corner
218 E. 5th St. 329-8050
The Corner regularly hosts local music acts, particularly jazz bands.
The environment is a smoky, laid-back bar with pool tables. There is
generally a cover charge on nights when bands play.
5) Ham's
701 Evans St. 830-2739
This restaurant is also a brewery. Students regularly meet outside
on the patio to socialize and drink from one of the full bars on
the premises.
6) Happy's
517 Cotanche St. 752-6728
Happy's is a typical bar. Many of the patrons are regulars.
7) Pantana Bob's
513 Cotanche St. 757-3778
This club is a meat market for those who don't think the Cellar is
meat-markety enough. PB's plays the nastiest of hip-hop and caters
to a somewhat frisky clientele. Attire is as ghetto as possible.
8) Peasant's
110 E. 4th St. 752-5855
Peasant's is a smaller version of The Attic. They regularly host local
and regional rock bands with promise. They also have a full bar, a
pool table, a foosball table and a patio. The stage is on the smaller
side, and you can almost always count on leather-jacket clad slam
dancers at every show. Attire is totally up to you. The cover charge
depends on the band, but is more expensive for those under 21.
9) The Sports Pad
109 E. 5th St. 757-3881
This very large club is a combination of things. It includes a usually-
overcrowded hip-hop room, a standard dance club music room,
a room full of pool tables, a room for karaoke and several fully-
stocked bars. Attire is club gear, and there is a cover charge most
nights.
10) Underwater Pirates Cove
511 Cotanche St. 754-2207
This restaurant specializes in Jamaican food. Underwater hosts an
open mic night and tends to be less crowded than the dance
clubs.
11) Wrong Way Corrigan s
122 E. 5th St. 758-3114
Although Corrigan's is on 5th Street, it usually goes unnoticed by
underclassmen. The club has one long bar and a floor right in front
of a stage where they usually host really interesting bands. Attire
is a little more preppy and the environment is a little more casual.
The cover charge depends on the band.
12) Cabanna's
714 Cotanche St. 758-4591
Cabanna's is a struggling club with a freshman-friendly atmo-
sphere, hip hop music and pool tables. The women's bathroom
offers two kinds of condoms but no soap. This is your standard
meat-market, assuming enough people show up to fill the place.
13) La Vista
213 E. 5th St. 758-9550
This bar is more of a hang-out than anything else. Students usually
grab pitchers of beer and hang out on the patio where they can
watch other students going downtown. The clientele is completely
varied and the music relies on a juke box.
OUTSIDE DOWNTOWN:
-
1) The Paddock
1008 Dickinson Ave. 758-0990
2) Jewish Mother The Plank
Colonial Mall
3) Texas Two-Step Pepper's
507 N. Greenville Blvd. 757-0265
Wilson Acres
Now pre-leasing
for Spring 2001
'eaturing 2 & 3 bedroom townhouses w1 2 baths
Water, sewer & cable included
lach unit contains a self-cleaning oven, a large frost-free
rigerator, dishwasher, washerdryer connections, utility
m, large patio with private fence, extra outdoor lighting
1 deadbolt locks on all doors for added security, wallpa-
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1806 E. 1st Street
752-0277
Cat lege
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I
10 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
FEATURES
Tuesday, August 15,2000
features@ecupiratemail.com
Photographer position
The East Carolinian is now hiring responsible students for
part-time work as photographers. Apply for positions at the
Student Publications Building (across from Joyner Library).
�Must have own camera
�Knowledge of Photoshop
�Trained eye for composition
CELLULAR & PAGING
WO WIRES CONSULTANTS
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Account Spending Limits No Credit, Cellular & Paging
Come By and See Us at Mendentiall
August 15th 6-8PIUI
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?Certain Restrictions Apply. Call for Details
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(252) 756-3301
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Raise your gee.p.a.
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If you can maintain a 3.3 grade average through the first
semester, you will be eligible for $14.95 a month internet
access through geeksnet gee.p.a. program. It's easy, just
sign up at either the Computer Geekdguarters on
Firetower Rd. in Greenville, or at the UBE in downtown
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Then bring proof of your g.p.a. to either location, and
will be inrolled in the program, all mW
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252-355-3339
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QUOTE OF THE DAY
"Never argue with anyone who buys
ink by the pound
Tommy LaSorda
the east Carolinian
INSIDE
ECU ticket information
Complete guide to purchasing tickets
to sporting events
C2 X T
Adams twins-Anthony and Antwan
Adams, twin football players, enter their
second season confusing both C-USA
offense and ECU fans in the Pirates' defen-
sive backfield
Bill Herrion ECU's second year bas-
ketball coach.
Conference USA-ECU will begin
play in the conference next season.
David Carrard-ECU's junior QB will
go head to head with the Hokie's Heisman
hopeful Michael Vick on Sept. 7 in a
matchup of two of college football's most
exciting players.
ECU fight song-Nobody can sing
the whole thing, but the lines we do know
we sing loud.
Ficklen-Dowdy Ficklen Stadium,
Home of the ECU football team. It held
over 50,000 fans for last season's N.C. State
game.
Criffin-Pernell Griffin, ECU LB and
team's leading tackier in 1999, returns to
wreak havoc on opposing offenses.
Harrington field-Home of the ecu
baseball squad
lerland-Alphons Van lerland, the
7-foot, fan favorite ECU basketball player.
Jungle-The tree-covered area beyond
Harrington field's left field wall.
Keith Stokes-ECU's dangerous punt
returner.
Logan-Steve Logan enters his eighth
season as ECU's head coach. Last year he
passed Clarence Stasivich to become the
Pirates coach with the most wins.
Minges Coliseum-Home of the
ECU basketball and volleyball teams.
Nix-Derrick Nix, Southern Miss running
back who has tormented the ECU defense
for two years.
Orangemen-Syracuse comes to
town on Sept. 23.
Peach Bowl-In 1991, ECU defeated
N.C. State 37-34 in one of ECU's greatest
football moments.
Quash Earl Quash played for the ECU
basketball team in 1972. Hey, his surname
starts with Q.
Rose-Tim Rose, in one year, the ECU
defensive coordinator has built a defensive
tradition in a school and conference not
known strong defensive play.
Southern Miss The Golden Eagles
have beaten the Pirates every year since
joining the conference. This season ECU
plays them in Hattiesburg, Miss, on Thanks-
giving weekend in what should be the
C-USA title game.
Tulane-ECU's opponent on Parent's
day, Sept. 16.
UAB-ECU can avenge last season's
most surprising loss on Oct. 28.
Virginia Tech-Thursday night,
ESPN, need I say more.
West Virginia The Pirates travel to
Morgantown on Nov. 28.
X Cames-X Games Champion Dave
Mirra used to call Greenville home.
Yelverton-Snow Hill's Antwane Yel-
verton, who returns for his second season
on the Pirate defense.
Zombie As in WZMB, Zombie Radio,
the only place to catch ECU Lady Pirate
Basketball on the radio.
MEET THE PIRATES
Date announced for annual
Meet The Pirates" dinner
GREENVILLE, N.CThe sixth annual "Meet The
Pirates" night will begin at 5:30 p.m. Saturday, August
19th, 2000 in Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium. Bring the whole
family for a great Vermillions meal and get to know your
2000 Pirate football team as you sit with your favorite
players and coaches in a relaxed dinner setting.
"Meet The Pirates" will be held under the north
side of the stadium (upper-deck side). Admission will
begin at 5:30 p.m. through Gate 7 with dinner starling
at 6 p.m. Advanced reservations are required. Tickets
are S4 per person, meal ticket included. Call (252)
328-4530 to reserve your seats, as seating is limited.
Reservations will be accepted until August 18th on a
first-come, first-serve basis.
Following the dinner, there will be a photo & auto-
graph session on Bagwell Field starting at approximately
7 p.m. This session will provide the opportunity to get
autographs and photos with the ECU football team.
Football posters and schedule cards will be given away
as well as officially licensed F.CU souvenirs at special
promotional pricing. There is no admission charge for
the photo & autograph session and it is open to the
public. Fans coming only to the photo & autograph
session must enter the stadium through Gate 8.
Jamie Wilson scores during ECU's comeback win over Miami last season, (photo by Emily Richardson)
ECU FOOTBALL
IMPACT PLAYERS
QB-David Carrard (Jr)
Garrard enters his third season under center for the
Pirates. A strong contender for C-USA offensive player-
of-the-year, Garrard will look to torture defenses again
in 2000.
Last season, the sophomore came into his own as a
Pirate QB, throwing for 2595 yards and 15 touchdowns.
The Durham native also rushed for 493 yards and
eight touchdowns.
LB-Pernell Griffin (Jr.)
As a sophomore, Griffin played alongside Pirate
legend Jeff Kerr. Still Griffin ted the team in tackles
and combined with Kerr to provide a potent linebacker
tandem.
Griffin's 121 tackles in 1999 ranked third in the con-
ference and put him on most All-Conference teams.
Griffin begins his junior year looking to provide lead-
ership to a young defense.
RB-Jamie Wilson (Sr.)
Greenville's own Jamie Wilson has been a mainstay
in the Pirate backfield for three seasons. Last season's
leading rusher returns to provide a key component of the
dangerous Pirate offense.
Wilson racked up 865 yards last season, including
a career-high 183 yards in the season opener against
West Virginia.
RBKR-Keith Stokes (Sr.)
Stokes was one of the most exciting players on
last season's Pirate squad. The 5'10" transfer electrified
Pirate fans with daring kick returns and shifty runs.
Stokes comes back for his senior season and will be
an exciting option for Head Coach Steve Logan
at Tennessee
at Alabama
at Oklahoma State
MEMPHIS
SOUTH FLORIDA
at Tulane
at Houston
LOUISVILLE
atUAB
at Cincinnati
11 2425 EAST CAROLINA
A- Army
MR diets
TLb. Nickname: Cadets
Black Knights
Location: West Point, NY
Head Coach: Todd Berry
Record: 3-8
wwllvHIIIv
� 92at Cincinnati
� 99BOSTON COLLEGE
� 916at Houston
� 923MEMPHIS
� l07at New Mexico State
� 1014at East Carolina
� 1021TULANE
� l14AIR FORCE
� : 11at Louisville
� 1118UAB
l22vs. Navy (in Baltimore)






8 The East Carolinian
www.the9astcar0iinian.com
SPORTS
Tuesday, August 15,2000
sports@0cupiratemaii.com
SPORTSBRIEFS
While you were out
Some ECU sports news
from this summer
ECU Baseball wins CAA
The ECU baseball team won its second
straight CAA crown in dramatic fashion
on May 21. The Pirates trailed by one
run in the bottom of the ninth to VCU
in the Championship game when ECU's
John Williamson capped a rally with a
game-winning single.
Following the 7-6 victory in Manteo,
the Pirates were selected as a namber-one
seed in the NCAA tournament and for
the second straight year they headed to
Louisiana to take on a number-two seed
on their home field.
The Pirates overcame the Louisiana
heat but were unable to overcome the
Rajun' Cajuns of Louisiana-Lafayette. The
Cajuns ended the Pirates hopes of getting
past the regional with an 8-5 victory on
May 28.
For ECU'S Nick Schnabel, the loss
ended his college career. The beginning
of its next phase began in June, when
he was selected in the 31st round by the
Montreal Expos.
Schnabel was one of four players with
Pitt County ties selected.
Sprinters compete at NCAA's
Darrick Ingram, Damon Davis, Law-
rence Ward, and James Alexander repre-
sented ECU at the 2000 NCAA Outdoor
Championships in Durham. The team
competed in the 4x400 meter relay
where they turned in their best time of
the year, a school record, in the prelimi-
naries.
Dealt a tough lane assignment, the
team finished second in their heat with a
time of 3:03.23.
In the finals, the team was not as
sharp. Earning All-American status with
a seventh place finish in the race, the
Pirates capped a season in which they
continued to put ECU among the nation's
best.
MJCGC comes to Greenville
The 2000 Michael Jordan Celebrity
Golf Classic took over Greenville for a
weekend in July.
A long list of stars from TV and sports
raised money and played the course at
Brook Valley CC in front of throngs of
spectators.
Among those playing a round were,
Michael Jordan, vlnce Gill, Amy Grant,
Mario Lemieux, Marshall Faulk, Ray Allen,
Brett Hull and Rocket Ismail.
The tournament raised money for the
Ronald McDonald House of North Caro-
lina and turned Greenville into a celebrity
stomping ground for two days.
s For tickets to an ECU sporting event
C USA Schedule
In July, Conference USA announced
its plans to divide the conference in
2001-2002. ECU will fall into the power-
packed American Division for Men's bas-
ketball. The Pirates will face teams such as
Cincinnati, Louisville, UNCC and DePaul
twice a year starting next season.
Pirate football prepares
for season
In early August, the Pirate football
squad began the grueling practices in
the 90-degree heat. The team was picked
to finish second in the conference by
the media. In many preseason polls, the
Pirates sit just outside the Top 25.
Practice began with much optimism as
the Pirates return many key components
from a team that finished 9-3 in 1999.
The began three-a-day practices on
August 8, days after the freshman
reported. The team will continue to train
with an eye toward the season opener on
September 2 at Duke.
Do you want to see a
Pirate athletics game in
person? Of course you do!
Here's where you find out
about seating, prices and
any other information
you might need to get you
into the action!
The ECU Athletic
Ticket Office is located
adjacent to the Pirate Club
Building. Ticket office
hours are MonFri. 9 a.m.
-5 p.m. You can reach the
ticket office by calling
1-800-D1AL ECU (inside
N.C.) or (252) 328-4500
or you can write the office
at ECU Athletic Ticket
Office, ECU, Greenville,
NC 27858-4353. You can
also use the links below to
order your tickets online,
through the mail or by a
fax machine.
2000 FOOTBALL
TICKET INFORMATION
Reserved Seats: S138
Seating is in the lower
and upper levels. Season
tickets include six home
games at Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. Pirate Club pri-
ority seating is assigned
on the Pirate Club Pri-
ority Points System. All
season tickets will be filled
prior to single game ticket
orders. May 1, 2000 is
the priority deadline for
renewal and new season
seating assignments.
FacultyStaff: SI 10
The ECU facultystaff
tickets are specially dis-
counted for all ECU
employees. Sections 2,3
and 215 are the desig-
nated facultystaff sec-
tions. Those (acuity and
staff fans who would like
to sit in the upper deck in
Section 215 should indi-
cate that preference on the
ticket application. Ticket
location requests do not
guarantee seat location. All
faculty and staff members
who are Pirate Club mem-
bers will be assigned seats
based on the Pirate Club
Priority Points System in
the Pirate Club sections of
the stadium.
Economy Plans
For the 2000 football
season, two Economy
Plans will be available to
serve all family sizes. The
traditional Economy Plan
includes five season tick-
ets for the price of $500,
just $100 a ticket! The
Three Seat Economy Plan
includes three season tick-
ets for just $300. All season
tickets include six home
games played at Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium. Each
plan is over 25 percent off
the regular season ticket
and is located in Sections
19, 20, 21, 219, 220 and
221. Seating is based on
the Pirate Club Priority
Point System.
Group Tickets
Gather a crowd from the
office, friends or clients
to attend a Pirate football
game together. Group tick-
ets are available for $13
per person for groups of
25 or more people. Group
ticket discounts will not
be available for the Vir-
ginia Tech game during
the 2XX) season. To order
group tickets, please con-
tact the ECU Ticket Office
at 1-800 DIAL ECU.
Alltel Pirates Cove
Entertain clients, employ-
ees and friends at the
Alltel Pirates Cove! Spe-
MY OPINION
2000 season offers
hope; challenges
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Well, its finally here. The 2000-2001 edition of
Pirate athletics is upon us. We've still got the best
football team in the state, and no conference ties
in anything else. This should be interesting.
This is the season where we're left out in the
cold. Conference USA won't let us in until next
year, and the CAA kicked us out a year early.
This leaves every sport except football in
temporary limbo, playing a CAA schedule with
no hope of a title.
For those teams it is indeed a shame. This fall,
our women's soccer team will try to build on the
promise from 1999. The men's and women's cross
country teams will be unable to translate their
experienced lineups into conference gold. The
women's basketball squad will look for their third
straight winning season, but will be without a
shot at a conference title.
ECU's Baseball, Women's Track and Women's
Swimming and Diving will be unable to defend
their conference titles from 1999.
Other sports face different obstacles. Colleen
Farrell will be in her first season as head coach of
ECU's volleyball team. Meanwhile the Men's soccer
team will have to respond from a 1999 season that
saw them register only three wins.
Second-year head men's basketball coach Bill
Herrion will look to improve on last year's 10-18
record. With a young team and more of his players,
the coach will continue to ready his team for the
competition that awaits in C-USA.
Getting ready for C-USA will be the main
concern for most teams this season. The lone
exception is football, where for two seasons the
Pirates have shown that they can play with, and
usually beat, most every team in the conference.
This season should be no different. Much of the
nucleus from last season's 9-3 squad return. With
teams like West Virginia, Syracuse and of course,
Virginia Tech on the schedule in addition to
conference foes such as Houston, UAB, Louisville,
and the vexing Southern Miss, the 2000 season
should provide some thrills.
When the Pirates join C-USA next year, the
level of competition in most sports will improve
drastically. However in the interim, many of ECU's
teams, though playing in the shadows between
the conference, will work very hard and try to
shine.
cial tailgate section for
your group provides an
atmosphere filled with
music, a visit from Pee Dee
and ECU Cheerleaders
and Pirate Spirit. Groups
of 25 or more can pur-
chase single game tickets
for only $13 per person.
Group ticket prices are
not available for the Vir-
ginia Tech game. Start
planning for your group
outing with the Pirates
NOW! Reserve a space
through the Sports Mar-
keting Office
(252-328-4530).
ORDERING TICKETS
RenewalPriority
Deadlines
All season ticket holders
will be guaranteed seat-
ing assignment priority
each year provided season
tickets are renewed by
the priority deadline
and meet stated
requirements for priority
seating assignments.
Single Home Games
Single game tickets will be
issued after June 15, 2(XX)
(all season ticket orders are
completed before single
game ticket orders are
filled). Single game orders
are filled on a first-come,
first served basis. Orders
received the week of the
game are to be picked
up at the designated call
window on game day. No
refund will be made if
tickets are not picked up.
Away Game Tickets
July 1 is the priority order-
ing deadline for away
games. Away game ticket
allotments will be based
on ticket availability to
as broad a distribution as
possible. Orders received
by Pirate Club Members
who meet the July 1
deadline will receive first
priority based on the
Pirate Club priority points
system. Ticket orders
above priority quota will
not be assigned with pri-
ority tickets and will be
honored only after other
priority orders are filled.
Bowl Tickets
Ticket policies will be
based on the priority
system and availability to
as broad a distribution as
possible to all supporters.
Payment
Payment for tickets can
be made by check to the
ECU Athletic Fund or
charged to VISA or Mas-
terCard. Payment must
accompany your order
and must be made by the
person (or spouse) whose
name appears on the appli-
cation.
No Refund Policy
There is a no refund policy
for ticket orders to ECU
Athletic events. When
you place your order, you
accept all policies and seat-
ing assignments related to
your ticket order.
Replacement Tickets
There is a $5 replacement
fee for lost or stolen tickets.
No exceptions.
Americans with Disabil-
ities Act Information
Requests for accommoda-
tions related to disabilities
should be made to the Ath-
letics Ticket Office at (252)
328-4500. Requests must
be made at least 48 hours
prior to the events. If
handicapped seating is
needed, please notify the
ticket office of this special
request when the order is
being placed. The ticket
office cannot guarantee
game day changes for
handicap seating.
Address Changes
Address changes should
be made in writing to the
Athletics Ticket Office.
Please notify the post
office of a new address
so that tickets may be for-
warded to you.
For additional informa-
tion or to order football
tickets, contact the ECU
Athletics Ticket Office at
1-800 DIAL ECU inNCor
(252) 328-4500 or write:
Athletics Ticket Office
East Carolina
University
Greenville, NC 27858
All information taken from
"Football Ticket Info" at
www.ecupirates.com.)
One team at a time
FOOTBAL
The 1999 ECU football season was an incred-
ible ride from Charlotte to Mobile. The emotional
high point of the season came on Sept. 25 when
ECU upset 9th-ranked Miami in Raleigh while
Greenville was still in the midst of a devastating
flood.
Later in the season, ECU beat archrival N.C.
State in front of over 50,000 fans in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium. Following the win, the team accepted an
Invitation to the Mobile Alabama Bowl.
The Pirates fell to TCU in the bowl, but at 9-3
the season was an unabashed success.
The ECU men's soccer team fell on hard times
last season. Their 3-1.3-1 record put them near the
bottom of the conference in 1999. This season,
second year head coach Devin O'Neill looks to
improve on last season.
O'Neill will have an experienced team to work
with this season as five seniors will contend for
the starting positions.
Goalkeeper Dino Stambolitis returns, as do
defenders Greg Hoffman and Nick Errato. Up
front the Pirates will feature seniors Chris Powell
and Andy Jennings at midfield and senior Scott
I.efevers at forward.
GOLF
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WOMEN'S
SOCCER
The 2000 golf season will feature many changes
for the Pirates. The most important is that, for the
first time, ECU will field a women's golf team. The
team will be coached by men's golf coach Kevin
Williams. No roster has been set for the team.
The men's team will return the nucleus from
the team that finished fifth in the conference in
1999. Senior Marc Miller returns, as do juniors
Frank Adams and Chad Webb.
The team's highest finish last season came
at the Pirate Spring Intercollegiate, where they
placed second.
m
The ECU women's soccer team made sure that
the CAA would remember them following their
1999 season. The team compiled an 11-6 record
and took third in the conference following the
regular season.
However, this season the team will be without
many of the seniors that led to the success in 1999.
Still, second year head coach Rob Donnenwirth
can look forward to a talented squad.
Leading the way is senior forward Kim Sandhoff.
The Hawaii native was named to the All-CAA team
for the third time in 1999 and picked up All-Region
honors as well last season.
CROSS
COUNTRY
VOLLEYBALL
Head Coach Leonard Klepack will have many
familiar faces on his 2000 men's and women's
cross country teams. For the men, the Pirates
bring back senior Steve Arnold, senior Stewart
Will, junior Charles Nickum and sophomore
Ricardo Bell.
For the women, a trio of seniors will return
from a team that placed fifth in last years CAA
Championships.
Seniors Lauren Chadwick, Ayana Coleman
and Fran Lattie will join junior Abby Hayes
and sophomore Kay Livlck on the potent Pirate
squad.
First-year Head Hoach Colleen Farrell inherits
a senior laden squad for the 2000 season. Five
senior starters return from a team that went 9-16
in 1999.
Perennial All-Conference selection Cinta Claro
returns at outside hitter. She will be joined at
the position by fellow senior Liz Hall. Two more
seniors will supply some power and experience at
middle hitter as Sarah Kary and Luncinda Mason
return for another season.
Meanwhile, at setter, sophomore Lisa Donovan
returns to round out the team.
Re
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������-��I � Wmm
JSt 15,2000
iiratemail.com
Lt
Tuesday, August 15,2000
wwwtheeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 8
sports@ecupiratemail.com
Looking for employment while at ECU?
We can Help! Clerical Industrial openings for full& part time
OF GREENVILLE
216 Arlington Boulevard � 252.321.1601
We know the people that you need to know!
ease notify the
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len the order is
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Changes
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icket Office at
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icket Info" at
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(located behind Harris Teeter)
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Open Mon-Fri. 8:30 am-5 pm � Sat. 8:30 am- 2 pm
ECU Club Sports offer variety
WHAT IS
CLUBSPORTS?
The Club Sports Program
is designed to promote and
develop the interests and skills
of individuals in different sports
or recreational activities. The
program provides competitive,
instructional and recreational
activities for students, faculty
and staff. The program empha-
sizes student leadership in the
development of a sense of com-
munity and provides fun and
enjoyment.
HOW CAN I GET
INVOLVED?
The following are the steps
all students must take in order
to become involved in Club
Sports, affiliated with Student
Recreation Services:
1. Consult with the Club
Sports staff in regard to the pro-
posed club to ensure that certain
criteria are being met:
a. expression of student
interest and student leadership
b. availability of facilities
for practice and competition
c. availability of adequate
competition within a reasonable
geographical range
d. availability of funds to
meet the financial needs of the
club
e. availability of a coach
instructoradvisor
f. potential of the club to
earn supplemental funds
g. capacity of club to
meet needs not currently met
elsewhere on campus
2. Complete a Club Sport
Request for Affiliation Form and
submit to Coordinator of Club
Sports.
3. Prepare a Constitution
and By-laws and submit a copy
for approval to the Coordinator
of Club Sports.
4. Upon completion of the
above procedures the Coordina-
tor for Club Sports will review
the request with the Club Sports
Staff and either approve or reject
the request.
5. Publicize and announce
the club formation throughout
the ECU campus and conduct an
organizational meeting.
6. Provide a roster of club
members
7. Register as an ECU
student organization with the
SCA and the Student Leadership
Development Office. Following
approval and affiliation the club
becomes bound by the rules and
regulations of the Department of
Recreational Services, the Club
Sports staff and ECU. The
club becomes eligible for Club
Sports services and benefits and
full rights and privileges. The
club may submit a budget for
monies; request facilities, vehi-
cles, travel, etc. Annual registra-
tion shall be required. Once cer-
tification is granted in an aca-
demic year, it will continue for
the duration of that academic
year including the summer ses-
sion unless withdrawn by the
university andor the Depart-
ment of Recreational Services.
WHICH CLUBSPORTS
ARE OFFERED?
�Sports
Rugby
Men's and Women's
LacrosseDisc Golf
Men's and Women's Ultimate
Frisbee
Men's and Women's Volley-
ball
Underwater hockey
Water Skiing
Kayaking
Roller Hockey
Badminton
Bowling
Women's Field Hockey
Fencing
Racquetball
Men's Soccer
Water Polo
Water Ski
�Martial Arts
Coju Shorin Karate
Tae Kwon Do
Isshinryu Karate
Tai Chi Chaun
(Information taken from ECU
Club Sports Manual at
www.recserv.ecu.edurecserv
ClubsClubmanuall .htm)
For more information contact
Gray Hodges at Student Recre-
ation Services at 328-6387 or at
hodgesg@mail.ecu.edu.
listen up!
We need help!
Foumainhead wants writers.
Were Hie ones that write about
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Apply at The East Carolinian
office, second floor, student
Publications Building
Must have a 2.0 GPR
Intramural sports
Student Recreation Services conducts a variety of intramu-
ral sports over the course of the year. These sports include:
Flag Football Volleyball Ultimate FrisbeeBilliards Table Tennis Bowling
Tennis Golf Wiffleball Football Punt, Pass & KickWalleybaW Racquetball Foosball Softball
Air Hockey SoccerIndoor soccer Tennis
Basketball (3-on-3 & 5-on-5)Disc Golf
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MASS SCHEDULE:
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� SLinclay Mass: 11:30 a.m. & 7:30 p.m
� Tues Wed & Thurs 8:00 a.m.
� Wednesday: 5.30 p.m.
Followed by Fellowship Supper





4 The East Carolinian
www. theeastcarolinian. com
SPORTS
Tuesday, August 15,2000
sports@ecupiratemail.com
Tuesday
www.theea.
lamRECREATlON
vvwvv.
I
I
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
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INTRAMUHALSPORTS
Aug. 22 Kickball Tournament Reg.
Flag Football Officials Meeting
King and Queen of the Halls
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ECUNFL Pick ' em entries begin
Volleyball officials Meeting
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Intercoastal Waterway in Wilmington Aug. 18 Reg. Aug. 17 at 6:00 pm
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�������
lust 15, 2000
ipiratemail.com
Tuesday, August 15,2000
www.theeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 0
sports@ecupiratemaU.com
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Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
When ECU announced they
would join Conference-USA,
visions of the ECU basketball team
playing against Ixwisville, Cincin-
nati and DePaul each year danced
in the heads of Pirate fans.
"For men's basketball we are
going to be going into a confer-
ence that has tremendous history
and it's going to be a great chal-
lenge said Head Men's Basketball
Coach Bill Herrion, upon joining
the conference. "When you talk
about Louisville, UNC Charlotte,
DePaul, Houston, they have been
to the Final Four and won national
championships. There are some
great teams on the men's side
With C-USA's announcement
of how they would diwy up the
14 men's basketball teams in the
conference, ECU will now get a
little more cozy with the confer-
ence's basketball powerhouses.
C-USA will be split up into
two seven-team divisions for
the 2001-2002 season. ECU will
belong to the American Division.
Also in the American Division
are UNC-Charlotte, Cincinnati,
DePaul, Louisville, Marquette and
Saint Louis.
The marquis name in the
group is Cincinnati. The Bearcats
have been one of college basket-
ball's most consistent programs
recently. The team has also been
the class of the conference for
much of the last decade.
With the Bearcats in ECU's
division, it means Cincinnati
will play the Pirates twice a year,
guaranteeing a yearly visit to
Greenville.
Also coming to Williams Arena
each year will be the Louisville
Cardinals, one of the most storied
programs in college basketball his-
tory. Under long-time head coach
Denny Crum, the Cardinals have
maintained a winning tradition
and won two national champion-
ships.
see HOOPS page 7
Expos draft Schnabel
Four Pitt County
players accepted
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
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ECU senior second baseman
Nick Schnabel was made the 31st
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"I'm pretty excited about it
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Schnabel said.
Schnabel came to ECU from
Ohlone Junior College in Califor-
nia before the 1999 season. In
his first season with the Pirates
Schnabel was third on the team
with a .357 batting average and
tied the ECU single season record
for doubles with 20. Schnabel
also owns two other ECU school
records: 14 sacrifice bunts and 176
assists in the 1999 season. Schna-
bel was voted the CAA Defensive
Player of the Year in 1999 as well.
This season Schnabel was
named to the All-CAA First-Team.
He hit .308 with 23 RBIs and 12
stolen bases. Schnabel also com-
mitted only nine errors out of 324
chances for an impressive .972
fielding percentage.
More impressive than his indi-
vidual achievements was the
unprecedented success the Pirates
experienced during Schnabel's
career.
"I was looking in the paper and
I saw that we were the first team
to win more than 90 games over
two seasons and the first to win
over 40 games two years in a row
Schnabel said. "It's nice to know
we did something
see Schnabel page 6
NCAA Track and Field Championship held
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Men's team not
dealt good hand
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
For the ECU men's 4x400 meter
relay squad, being dealt a bad hand
is nothing new. The team has dealt
with injuries and a season spent
under stormy skies.
At the 2000 NCAA Track and
Field Championships it was no
different. The team of sophomore
Lawrence Ward, senior Darrick
Ingram, junior James Alexander
and senior Damon Davis, would
again face poor lane assignments
and rain delays yet they managed
to put it all behind them and run
the best time in school history
on the biggest stage of collegiate
track and field.
The Pirates entered the semifi-
nal as the lowest ranked team.
This meant that they would be
running from lane eight on the
outside.
"It's a tough seed said Head
Men's Track Coach Bill Carson
"It's hard because you're running
and setting the pace for the other
people
The team did not let a tough
lane assignment slow them. The
team finished second in the heat
behind Arkansas and ran the fastest
time in school history, 3:03.23.
Ward ran the opening leg in
45.7 seconds.
Ingram, who ran in the semifi-
nals of the open 400 earlier in the
night, ran the second leg in 45.6
seconds.
"He did great running back to
back in less than an hour and 30
minutes Davis said. "The only
thing about Darrick is that he's
very confident in his ability and
confident in us, I'm glad to have
him on the team
In the third leg Alexander kept
the pressure on Arkansas and
gained separation from third place
Southern Cat.
"The key to the relay was James
Alexander Carson said. "He ran
45.7. James hasn't run 45 since
his freshman year. He did that in
Texas. We've been working hard
on James improving his methods
of running the quarter. He's had
talent all along, he just didn't
run it right. He came out and
relaxed this 100 here, got into the
curve, turned it on and was strong
coming down there. He brought
that into Damon very strong
Davis ran the anchor leg in
45.8 seconds and cemented ECU's
spot in the finals and made sure
that he and Ingram had one more
race as Pirates.
The Pirates faced their first
obstacle in the finals before the
see Track page 7
Christian E
Come join us each week
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For meeting place,
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Healthcare is a growing and exciting career field. As a volunteer, you can get a head start by
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UnwiMy HMllh Sysemi o( Unm Cin� inclucte Pm Ccxjn MOTonal HtwW. coc





0 The East Carolinian
www. theeastcarolinian. com
SPORTS
Tuesday, August 15, 2000
sports@ecupiratemail.com
SCHNABEL from page 5
In addition to the winning
record's Schnabel's team racked
up, there were also a pair of CAA
Championships and two trips to
the NCAA Regionals.
Schnabel was part of a senior
class that featured All-American
closer Cory Scott as well as Pirate
mainstays Kric Bakich, Jeremy
Schumacher and James Molinari.
Schnabel, who will be leaving
Greenville this week to join the
Montreal affiliate in the Gulf
Coast Rookie League, will join an
organization known for a strong
farm system.
"The Montreal organization
doesn't do a lot through free
agency said ECU Head Coach
Keith LeClair. "This gives their
players a better chance to make
it
Schnabel is one of four players
with Pitt County ties to be drafted.
Pitt Community College's Freddie
Bynum was selected in the second
round by the Oakland Athletics.
Fellow Bulldog Lou Wieben was
selected in the 28th round by the
Kansas City Royals while former
North Pitt Standout Demetrius
"Meatball" Heath was taken in the
31st round by the Detroit Tigers.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@tec.ecu.edu.
m�'itet
waW0
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Daily Specials
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Leadership Excellence Starts Here
h





jst 15, 2000
vratemail.com
Tuesday,August15,2000
wwtheeastcarolinian.com
SPORTS
rks!
The East Carolinian 7
sports@ecupiratemaU.com
Ryan Downey
SENIOR WRITER
Pirates make mark outside of ECU
8S
se,
While most students spent the
summer working at home or taking
classes in the Greenville heat, a
handful of Pirates made their mark
away from ECU.
Amy Hendrick from the CAA
champion Lady Pirate swim team
Garnered an invitation to the
Olympic Trials in the 100 meter
backstroke. Hendrick will compete
against 93 other girls for a chance
to be in the top two finishers and
go to Sydney.
Hendrick got the invitation thanks
to a school record time of S6.22 at
the 2000 CAA Championships.
In addition to Hendrick, a group
of Pirate baseball players were
able compete in various summer
leagues.
Joseph Hastings, a key member
of the ECU baseball team which
earned a number No. 1 seed in 2000
NCAA Championships, batted his
way to the top of the Valley Baseball
League in Virginia. Hastings named
MVP of the league after helping
Staunton to the regular-season title.
Will Brinson who also played in
the VBL led his team with a 1.12
ERA (the lowest on the team) and
a 4-2 record.
In the Cape Cod League Chad
Tracy played his way onto the 2000
League All Star team. Tracy who
played with the Orleans Cardinals
along with fellow Pirate Lee Delfino
led his team in doubles with 9 and
was second on the team with a .269
batting average. Delfino hit .178
with four doubles and one triple
while collecting 16 runs and 11 RBI
for the season.
Both Tracy and Delfino will be
juniors in the 2001 season. In the
coastal plains league ECU pitcher
Scott Narron had a productive stint.
Narron was 6-2 which was tied
for first in league wins. He was
second on the squad with a 2.10
ERA. Narron was joined by fellow
Pirate Jason Mandryk who also had
a productive season.
Two rising sophomores Davey
Penny and Neal Sears have each
had outstanding summers for the
Arlington Senators. We have had
a lot of guys have outstanding
summer seasons this year said
Pirate head coach Keith LeClair.
"I think that says a lot about
the type of players we recruit into
the program. Hopefully the work
they put in during the summer will
pay off for us on the field in the
future
While the players were earning
their stripes in the summer leagues,
the ECU Athletic department made
sure that LeClair would be earning
much more.
ECU signed LeClair to a contract
extension worth $71,500 over three
years.
"Coach LeClair has made a tre-
mendous impact on our baseball
program and has established a great
foundation for continued success
said Hamrick. "We are very excited
this will provide continuity in the
baseball coaching staff, and this
will only help us as we progress
toward a new, top-notch baseball
stadium
LeClair has led the Pirates to
an 122-39 record over his three
seasons in Greenville. Under his
watch the Pirates captured two
CAA Championships, back-to-back
40-win seasons and two trips to the
NCAA Tournament as a number
one seed.
We've Got ALL You Need to
Head Back to Class at our
BACK
TO SCHOOL
Now there's a
TOLL-FREE
phone number
to serve you better!
1-877-499-TEXT
STORE HOURS and
PROMOTIONS
49
EER
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and
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Tuesday, Aus. 15
7:30 am - 5 pm
Drawing for
FREE TEXTBOOKS
Wednesday7AugM6
7:30 am - 8 pm
Drawing for
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Thursday, Aug. 17
7:30 am - 8 pm
Drawing for
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Faa Semester 2000 at ECU. One entry
form per student per day please. Entries
accepted beginning Friday, August 11.
No purchase necessary. Drawings held
Saturday, August 18 through Friday, Aug.
18. Student need not be present to win.
winners must be currently enrolled at
ECU and display valid ECU One Card.
Textbook prize includes only required
textbooks (not Coursepacks, software,
kits, or optional books) based upon
schedule at time of verification. IT books
have already been purchased at Dowdy
Student Store, a credrt will be awarded
In the amount of the books. If books
were purchased at another retailer, stu-
dent may opt to return books to that
retailer and receive free books from
Dowdy Student Store. Prizes may not be
substituted and all management deci-
sions are final.
POSTER
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thru Aug. 18
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lwl Ronald E. Dowdy
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wwwjtuclcnUtorcs.ecu.edu
ENTRY FORM
Complete this entry form and
bring It to Dowdy Student Store
In the Wright Building for your
chance to WIN some great prizes!
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Date
No purchase necessary. One entry per cur-
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rlUUPS from page 5
The decision also ensures
an in-state rivalry with UNC-
Charlotte. Long overshadowed
by their ACC cousins, the 49ers
have built a strong program that
made the NCAA tournament
twice in the '90s.
DePaul, a college basketball
power in the '50s and '60s, fell
on hard times during the last
decade. Now under former Flor-
ida State head coach Pat Ken-
nedy, the Blue Demons are well
on their way to recapturing past
glory.
Marquette and Saint Louis,
two teams who have also made
recent NCAA appearances, round
out the division.
The remaining seven teams
will make up the National Divi-
sion. The division includes TCU,
Houston, Memphis, South Flor-
ida, Southern Miss, Tulane and
UAB.
"Scheduling is challenging
with 14 teams. After reviewing
different scenarios, the confer-
ence decided that this format
meets the future needs of the
league in terms of television
exposure, continuing old rival-
ries, building new ones, and
strengthening the league over-
all said Commissioner Mike
Slive.
There will be four crossover
games between teams in the
two divisions on each team's
schedule. In two of these games,
opponents will be determined
by a rotation. The other two will
be chosen by the league.
TRACK from
page 5
race even begun.
Less than half an hour before
the race was scheduled to begin
the meet was halted for nearly
ninety minutes due to threaten-
ing weather. The delay pushed
the starting time of the finals
back from 9:15 p.m. to 10:50
p.m.
"When it started raining and
they postponed the meet, my
head got all messed up Ward
said. "I couldn't get loose again
for the race, I just tied up bad and
didn't run that well
Ward's lead off leg of 46.4
seconds left the Pirates near the
back of the eight-team field, and
caused Ingram and the rest of
the Pirates to try and make up
ground.
"When you don't get your
lead off leg into position then
you're not running your race
Carson said. "(Ingram) had to
go because after that hand off
we're in sixth or seventh position
and we're chasing. (Ingram) ran
much too hard
Ingrain's attempt to put the
Pirates back in front nearly paid
off. Coming down the back
stretch, Ingram had moved up
as high as third. However, in the
final 100 meters Ingram fell back
into sixth.
"1 got out too hard in the
first 200 (meters), I died coming
home Ingram said.
Alexander's leg was similar
to that of Ingram. The junior
came out fast and got the Pirates
as high as fourth before again
falling back into sixth.
"They got us up in there
except when you make the hand
off. Your last 20 meters are
slow Carson said. "By the time
we came out of there, we kept
coming out fifth, sixth or sev-
enth
On the anchor leg, Davis was
unable to gain ground on the
leaders and spent much of his lap
in sixth. Davis was only caught at
the line by Georgia Tech and the
Pirates finished seventh.
"We weren't running our best
times Davis said. "The thing
is that we can still be thankful
that we made it here, and that
we made it to the finals. We're
still AH-Americans. Of course we
would have liked to win it but
sometimes that's just the way
things go. I'm just thankful, even
to be here, running at nationals,
my senior year
This writer can be contacted at
sports�tec.ecu.edu.
V





0 The East Carolinian
www.theeastcarolinian.com
CLASSIFIEDS
Tuesday,August15,2000
sports@ecupiratemail.com
FOR RENT
PRIVATE ROOM available: walking
listance from ECU. Large room
15x16) with private phone line.
:able TV. Washerdryer on prem-
ses. Newly renovated older home
vith character and modem con-
venience (central heat and air),
rail Mike at 830-3735.
1 BR-2BR. water ft cable included.
3W 6 disposal. ECU bus line,
jool & pvt. laundry. On-site mgmt.
i maintenance. 9 or 12 mo.
eases. Pets allowed. 758-4015.
30WNTOWN APARTMENT.
Roommate wanted for spacious,
studio apartment. Two bedroom.
(250 a month. Please call
J29-0833.
Village of Yesteryear
(.Farm Museum located al Pin County
Fairgroundh) has openings for students to
clean artifacts and conduct tours, $8 per hour.
Friday and Saturdays I Oam - 5pm und
Sundays 1pm - 5pm. Call 321 2422
RINGG01D TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for 1 bedroom,
2 bedroom & Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
VlEDICAL OR grad student - quiet
i considerate non-smoker, town-
louse $365. Large BR. WD. DW.
jatio. Must like pets. Incl. utilities.
Mear Lowes. 756-7364.
-EMALE ROOMMATE wanted 3
jedroom duplex $233m plus
ieposit 13 util 13 phone 13
;able no pets allowed call Amy or
Tiffany 830-2872 ASAP!
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355-9275. jkenney@ncwc.edu
SOFA $150. loveseat $100. chair
$50. coffeetable $35. endtable
$25, king waterbed $300, night-
stands $50 each, dresser $250,
lamp $10 Weber Grill $35
355-9275. jkenney@ncwc.edu
HELP WANTED
OUTDOOR YOUTH Soccer
Coaches. The Greenville Recrea-
tion & Parks Department is recruit-
ing for 12 to 16 parttime youth
soccer coaches for the outdoor
youth soccer program. Applicants
must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the
ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able
to coach young people ages 5-15
in soccer fundamentals. Flexible
hours according to class schedule.
Hours are from 3p.m. until 7p.m.
with some night and weekend
coaching. This program will run
from September to Mid Novem-
ber. Salary rates start at $5.25
per hour. Starting date August 2;
closing date is after positions are
HELP WANTED
filled. Applications should be for-
warded to Ben James. Dean Foy.
Judd Crumpler. Athletic Dept .
Greenville Recreation ft Parks
Department. PO Box 7207. Green-
ville, NC 27835.
EDUCATION MAJOR preferred to
child sit in our home. 3 year old
boy. Needed part-time Tuesdays as
needed. Call for info. 321-1246.
DO YOU Need a good job? -The
ECU Telefund is hiring students
to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund. $5.50
hour plus bonuses. Make your
own schedule. If interested, call
328-4212, M-TH between the
hours of 3-6 p.m.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
immediately, 11 a.m2 p.m eve-
ryday. Flexible schedule and close
to campus. Must like working with
senior citizens. Anyone interested
should come to Cypress Glen
and apply in person, 100 Hickory
Street Greenville.
PASSION ESCORTS now hiring
escorts and dancers. Earn as
much as $500 to $1000 a week.
Call 747-7686.
APPOINTMENT SETTING tel-
emarketers. Full-time or part-
time. Flexible hours. Great for stud-
ents or career marketers. Health
insurance, paid vacation. Great
pay plus benefits and bonuses.
Call Thermal-Gard 355-0210.
PART-TIME Childcare M-F. 2-5p m,
$5 per hour. Must have reliable
transportation. Call Janet Porter
for details. 756-8523.
SKATEBIKE PARK and In-Line
Hockey Rink Attendant. The
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting individ-
uals willing to work 15-30hrs.
a week with some background
knowledge in one or more of the
following areas: in-line skating,
HELP WANTED
skateboarding or in-line hockey.
Applicants will be responsible for
overseeing both the skate park
and in-line hockey rink at the
Jaycee Park. The SkateBike park
is open Tuesday-Friday from 2p.m.
until dark, and Saturdays 10 a.m.
until dark and Sunday from 12
noon until dark. Salary rates range
from $5.50 to $6.50 per hour.
For more information, please call
Dean Foy, Judd Crumpler or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2p.m.
Monday-Friday.
SITTERTUTOR NEEDED for 6th
grader after school. Pick up from
school at 3:20p.m. and assist with
school work until 5:30p.m. every
other week. Prefer educ. major.
$75wk. 758-8400.
NEED STUDENT to help sixth and
ninth grader with homework Mon-
Thurs. Need own transportation.
Must have good math skills. Edu-
cation major preferred but not
required. Call 355-4860
WORK STUDY Help Wanted.
Joyner Library has work study
jobs available to fit your schedule.
Bring your work study hiring
authorization form, class schedule,
and social security card and driv-
ing license to Joyner Library, room
2400.
LOCAL ONLINE entertainment
E-line now hiring writers for fea-
tures, reviews, sports and movie
columns. Also hiring models for
t-shirts and other merchandise.
Call 551-1020.
EARN EXTRA $$$$ while at ECU.
Consistently recruiting for clerical
and industrial openings in Green-
ville. Call Mega Force Staffing
today! (252)321-1601.
DRIVERCHILDCARE PERSON
needed Monday through Friday,
2:45 p.m. to 4:30 p.m. to manage
afterschool activity driving and
HELP WANTED
supervising three children. Need
own car, good references. Call
355-3875 evenings.
NON-SMOKER female is needed
for after school care for a 2nd
grader girl from 2:30 to 5p.m.
. $7hr. 355-7715.
BABYSITTER NEEDED occasion-
ally between 6-10 p.m. M-F some-
times weekends anytime between
8a.m5p.m. pay negotiable non-
smoker female child is 5 year old
female well mannered 329-0431.
GREEK PERSONALS
WELCOME BACK Pirates! Thanks
for making last year so great. If
you need a great D.J call me
first! Cakalaky Entertainment,
531-5552.
GOTTA D.J.? Cakalaky Entertain-
ment has just upgraded its sys-
tem! Better lights, better sound,
same great price! Call Jeff today
at 531-5552 and book your event!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FAMILY MUSIC Festival 2000 "A
Blessing in the Storm" begins Fri-
day, August 18. 2000 with "Praize
Party 2000" at the Boys & Girls
Club (Firetower Rd.Greenville.
NC) 8p.m. -12 midnight ft Sat-
urday. August 19. 2000. Green-
ville Town Common, 10a.m. until.
Featuring many national and
local artists & Diamond "Kiddie"
Amusements. Proceeds from this
year's event to benefit The Dream
Factory, Inc. For vendor & Sponsor
information, call: (252) 215-5867.
PITT COUNTY Young Democrats
are meeting Thursday, August 24,
2000, at 6:30p.m. at Szechuan
Garden Chinese Restaurant. The
guest speaker is the campaign
ANNOUNCEMENTS
manager for U.S. congressional
candidate. Leigh McNairy.
HEY STUDENTS. THE Greenville-
Pitt County Special Olympics is
currently recruiting volunteers for
the following sports: bowling, soc-
cer, basketball skills, swimming,
roller skating, volleyball, power
lifting, after school recreation
camp and bocce. For more infor-
mation, contact Kelvin Yarrell at
(252) 329-4844.
I found
burial
treasure in
my attic
Mon- thiln -10 w.irs .tj;u
,i,nlm.i yc you spmu Sortcs I
SdWttgS Itoihts t�u (Ili'V tOllM lfc
worth marc Hum S times
tluii Iikv value. mv Mwtt
i ImMsnic worth Jigging for
"c"X�V.O.B0NDS
Do you have oUI Savings Bonds?
Check out the Swings Bond Calculator
at www.vavinesbonds.gov to discover
their value. I-800-4US BOND ,
A puWk sfevtai " itw newqppa C�
I

m East Carolina
University
Official Alumni Association Ring Collection by Jostens
lostens
ATTENTION
JRS SRS. AND ALUMNI:
Come see the uniqueness
of the recently introduced
two-tone ECU Alumni
Association Ring.
ORDER NOW AND
RECEIVE AN ECU
DIE-STUCK MEDALLION
WATCH BY CITIZENS!
DATE:
August 16th - 18th
(Wednesday - Friday)
10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m.
PLACE:
UBE-516S.CotancheSt.





just 15, 2000
ipiratemail.com
Tuesday,August15,2000
www.thaaastcarolinian.com
5. congressional
McNairy.
, THE Greenville-
icial Olympics is
ng volunteers for
irts: bowling, soc-
kills, swimming,
olleyball. power
hool recreation
s. For more infor-
Kelvin Yarrell at
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 9
sports@ecupiratemail.com
We're moving!
i years ago
4i sptno Series1
i ttlt'V ttttllll lie
.in 5 times
lue. Now Hull-
:h itoinK for
JOSAVISGS
II.0.B0NDS
zings Bonds?
s Bond Calculator
ls.gov to dtsc over
MNI:
less
iced

i
ON
St.
East Carolinian's website
is moving to a new address.
As classes start, you can find us at
www.theeastcarolinian.com






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Poor girl. All her "friends" shopped
U.B.E. Didn't tell her about the stacks
and stacks of used books that saved them money. Didn't
mention the fast-moving lines or the fact that there are
real people to talk to at U.B.E. So now her "friends" are
out celebrating with the book money they saved. She's
alone. Frustrated. Poor girl.
U.B.E. MORE USED BOOKS FOR LESS.
Uptown Greenville 516 SouthCotanche Street www.ubeinc.com I 758-2616
NEWS
Assault
Female si
at night I
145 d
The cui
dents. The
enrollment
over the n�
This fall
education I
would prov
North Care
years, 50,0i
expected st
would be J
constructioi
and add ca
dum will be
New
Dr. Dana
summer ses:
has joined E
Academic Al
managemen
Espinosa
recruitment,
She will sup�
aid operatiot
Dr. Richai
Academic Afl
new at ECU,
versity expar
and increase:
ECU'S Inte
body of 15 f r
cil, governing
information t
Creek. Repre:
sity's fraternit
to meet with
in preparatioi
take place fro
24 in Sweethi
students are
The East C
auditions for I
in "Gypsy tf
season, set foi
starting at 6:3
Studio Theatn
Arts Center. C
and dance at
Boar
Henry Willi
operating offi
from the ECU
Williamson
since 1997. H
reasons.
ON
Doyon
should i
presider
North G
Stud
Vote online
Go online
online sun
online


Title
The East Carolinian, August 15, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 15, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1420
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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