The East Carolinian, May 2, 2000







www.tec.ecu.edu
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 107
BAREFOOT STOMPS ON pg. 8
Revelers carry on, despite wet
weather.
11 days to go until Graduation
NEWS
Semester windup
Wednesday, May 3 is the last day of
classes for the spring semester. Spring se-
mester exams begin Thursday, May 4 and
continue through May 11.
T.G.i.f. senior celebration
ECU's senior celebration "Thank Good-
ness I'm Finished will be held today under
the north side of Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
and includes food and entertainment. Con-
tact the ECU Alumni Association at 328-
0605.
Beethoven extravaganza
The North Carolina Symphony will per-
form its "Beethoven Extravaganza" at 8
p.m. tonight in Wright Auditorium. Call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788 to re-
serve tickets.
Positive thinking
W. Mitchell, author and television show
host, will bring his positive message "It's
Not What Happens to You It's What You
Do About It" to ECU in two presentations at
3 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Wednesday, May 3 in
Wright Auditorium. The 3 p.m. program is
for faculty, staff and students and the later
address is for the public. After co-founding
a metal casting company, Mitchell suffered
a fiery motorcycle accident that left him
burned over 65 of his body. An airplane
crash took away his ability to walk. Contact
Regina Wilder in the ECU department of
Human Resources at 328-0117.
Travel film
"Treasures of Mexico" is the travel-ad-
venture film at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, May 3 in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. A theme dinner is scheduled
for 6 p.m. For ticket information call the
Central Ticket Office at 328-4788.
Book sale
The Friends of Joyner Library will hold
a book sale from 9 am.m until 5 p.m. Satur-
day, May 6 in the Multi-Purpose Room of
Mendenhall Student Center from. The sale
continues from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday,
May 7 and from 9 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. on
Monday, May 8.
Blood drive
The ECU School of Medicine blood
drive will take place from 10 a.m4 p.m.
Tuesday, May 30 2W40 in the Brady build-
ing. Door prizes will be awarded to those
who donate and refreshments will be
served.
Floyd recovery Internships
The N.C. Department of Health and Hu-
man Services is offering student intern-
ships to 175 students this summer to fur-
ther the recovery and rebuilding of eastern
North Carolina. Students of all disciplines
are encouraged to apply. For more infor-
mation and applications go to
www.dhhs.state.nc.usfloydcorps.htm.The
deadline for applications is May 12.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you feel that TEC did a
good job covering the
events of the school year?
Results of last week's question:
Do you feel the SGA should have
responded to the alleged racism
downtown before now?
55 Yes 15 No
PIRATES COMPETE IN PENN
RELAYS pg. 12
Frye, McGinn notch third place
finishes.
TUESDAY. MAY 2, 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Showers, high of 80'
and a low of 56�

Eakin steps down as university chancellor
Chancellor to remain
at ECU until successor named
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
Last Thursday, Chancellor Richard Eakin an-
nounced that he will retire from his position as
ECU's chief executive officer as soon as a successor
is named.
Eakin, who has served as ECU's chancellor for
13 years, will be taking a research leave but will
return later to serve as University Professor of Edu-
cational Leadership.
"While it is never easy to decide when to de-
clare one's departure from university leadership,
this feels like the right time for me Eakin said.
Eakin cited ECU's future needs, which will re-
quire long-term commitment, as one of the rea-
sons behind his decision to resign.
"The university is expected to grow at an un-
precedented pace Eakin said. "Accompanying
that growth will be the parallel challenge of pro-
viding classrooms, laboratories, offices and resi-
dence halls for those new students and teachers.
These ventures will be of significant duration and
will benefit from uninterrupted leadership
University of North Carolina President Molly
Broad praised Eakin's achievements and contribu-
tions to the university and community during his
tenure.
"Over the past 13 years, ECU and eastern North
Carolina have been the beneficiaries of his leader-
ship and vision, for even as he has worked to
strengthen ties with the local community, Chan-
cellor Eakin has helped push the reach of ECU far-
ther out into the region and the state Broad said.
"Under his watch, the ECU campus has achieved
Doctoral II status and has made great strides in
sponsored research, fund-raising and technology
iniatives
Phil Dixon, Chair of the Board of Trustees
(BOT), expressed his admiration and respect for
Eakin.
"The university has grown and prospered in
nearly every way during (Eakin's tenure Dixon
said. "What we have accomplished in recent years,
from academics to funding athletics, has been truly
remarkable, and the chancellor played a major role
in all of our achievements
The search for a new chancellor will begin as
soon as the BOT forms a search committee. The
committee will be made up of faculty members,
students and trustees. The committee will submit
to Broad the names of at least two finalists from
the nation-wide search for consideration. The presi-
dent will then nominate a finalist to be the new
chancellor. The final decision is made by the UNC
Board of Governors, the governing body of all 16
universities in the UNC system. At the request of
the ECU BOT, Eakin will remain in office until a
successor is chosen.
This writer can be contacted at news@tec.ecu.edu.
Chancellor Richard Eakin announced last Thursday that he will be retiring
from his position at ECU. (photo by Garrett McMillan)
1999-2000 IN REVIEW
� � ' � M �gi - -
Looking
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
AUGUST
�ECU starts off the year with a
record enrollment of 18,223 students.
In addition, the freshman class boasts
3,258 eager new Pirates, the largest
ever at ECU.
�Hurricane Dennis threatens the
East Coast and soaks Greenville with
rain. Damage is minimal, but the
worst is yet to come.
�Hurricane Floyd thrashes eastern
North Carolina. Despite unprec-
edented flooding in Greenville as a
result of the hurricane, the university
returns to normal fairly quickly. The
academic calendar is modified to
make up for the nearly two weeks of
lost class time and more than $6 mil-
lion is raised and distributed by the
ECU Family Relief Fund. ECU's big-
gest tragedy of the disaster is the death
of freshman Aaron Child, who
drowned in the flood waters.
� Despite the
chaos and dam-
age to Greenville,
the ECU foot-
ball team
travels to
North Caro-
lina State
University's
Carter-Finley
Stadium in Ra-
leigh to play
the, nation-
ally ranked
Miami Hur-
ricanes. The
Pirates
overcome
a 20-point
second-
half deficit to upset the Hurricanes with a
score of 27-23. A wave of Pirate fans rush
the held to celebrate one of the most in-
credible games in Pirate football history.
OCTOBER
�ECU is invited to join Conference-
USA as a full member. Beginning in 2001,
all 15 varsity teams at ECU will compete
in C-USA.
�FEMA continues to aid
Greenville and the rest of east-
ern North Carolina with
hurricane recovery. By Oct.
15, federal and state assis-
tance approaches $50 mil-
lion, with $15 million being
disbursed directly to indi-
viduals and families.
�The NCSU Football team
ventured into Pirate Country for
their first game ever at Dowdy-
Ficklin Stadium. The Wolfpack
leaves with their tails in between
their legs after the Pirates domi-
nate the game and win with a final
score of 23-6 in front of a record home
crowd of 50,092 fans. As a result of the
victory and their outstanding season, the
ECU football team is invited to participate
in the first inaugural Mobile Alabama
Bowl.
DECEMBER
�Chancellor Eakin overrides
the Student Government
Association's recommenda-
tions concerning student
fees for the first time
ever. In addition, the
ECU Board of Tnistees
(BOT) follows the lead of
officials at UNC-Chapel
Hill, NCSU, UNC-
Wilmington and UNC-
Charlotte and requests a
tuition increase at ECU
J
for the 2000-2001 school year.
�The Pirate Football team heads south
for the Mobile Alabama Bowl. The Pirates
lose to the Texas Christian University
Horned Toads with a score of 28-14. No
ECU football team has ever won a game
played in the state of Alabama.
�The Brody family makes a donation
of $8 million to the School of Medi-
cine, bringing the family's contri-
butions to a total of more than
$22 million. The school is re-
named the Brody School of
Medicine.
JANUARY
�University and city offi-
cials meet for the first time
to discuss the accusations
made by students of
discrimination
against minorities at
downtown clubs. Les
Robinson, an attor-
ney for the Bar Asso-
ciation, says actions
will be taken to end
the alleged discrimina-
tion.
�The BOT discusses ways to further di-
versify the board. The discussions
stemmed from the dismissal of a Board
member last year who made a racist re-
mark at a Pirate Club meeting.
�Students enjoy a day off to play in
the snow. While the damage is minimal
in Greenville, the storm is declared the
worst snowstorm to hit the Piedmont re-
gion in more than 100 years, and Presi-
dent Clinton declares 31 counties in
North Carolina federal disaster areas.
FEBRUARY
�In accordance with the UNC plan to
increase overall system enrollment, ECU
unveils the preliminary drawings of the
proposed campus expansion plan.
�The UNC Board of Governors vote
to raise tuition by 2.1 percent at all 16
universities in the system. In addition,
ECU'S tuition is raised by $203.
MARCH
�Student Elizabeth Ann I-abus is killed
in a car accident by an allegedly drunk
driver.
�The Dean of Students position, cur-
rently held by Dr. Ronald Speier, is dis-
solved in an effort to reorganize the Divi-
sion of Student Life.
APRIL
�A locker room brawl leaves one bas-
ketball player injured, two suspended and
many questioning the conduct of Head
Coach Bill Herrion, who's words are said
to have incited the fight. Players say that
I lerrion encouraged the team to be more
aggressive and violent. Following the in-
cident, trainer Jim Bazluki speaks with
Herrion about the role his comments may
have played in the fight and is fired
shortly thereafter.
Playboy magazine
pays a visit to ECU to
take photos for the
"Girls of C-USA" edition
due out in October. The
visit stirs up both excite-
ment and controversy.
�ECU suffers the loss
of two students. Reggie Neil Harris is shot
during an attempted robbery on North
Jarvis Street. A few weeks later, senior Sh-
annon Meek is killed in a car accident just
outside of Farmville.
� 'Chancellor Eakin announces that he
will be stepping down as chancellor after
13 years as ECU'S chief executive officer.
This writer can be contacted
at news@tec.ecu.edu.
H-





The East Carolinian
Bww.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
Mark Eagle to return to ECU for fall semester
. Student continues
to recover from accident
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
� � -Sophomore Mark Eagle is on the
rdad to recovery and plans to return
to ECU for classes in the fall.
' On Feb. 19, Eagle was hit by a
car when attempting to cross 10th
Street near Miami Subs. He was
transported to Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital (PCMH) with serious
head and internal injuries.
According to Eagle's mother,
Nancy LeQuire, her son spent 25
days in the intensive care unit of
PCMH.
Eagle was released from PCMH
on March 17, and was then trans-
ported to the J. Paul Sticht Rehabili-
tation Center In Winston-Salem for
six days of in-patient physical
therapy.
LeQuire said her son continued
out-patient therapy until April 20.
She said Eagle continues to work on
his recovery at his home in
Salisbury, NC with the hope that he
will, in time, return as close as pos-
sible to his former physical and
mental capacity.
According to Laura Sweet, assis-
tant dean of student lifedean of stu-
dents, Eagle came to campus several
weeks ago to register for fall semes-
ter. Sweet said Eagle is doing very
well.
"Mark is doing beautifully
Sweet said.
LeQuire said Eagle's head inju-
ries are unpredictable. She added
that her son is hopeful that he will
be able to maintain his former sta-
tus in the top ten percent of his
class.
According to LeQuire, Eagle is
continuing to improve and regain
the 30 pounds his lost during his
recovery. She said Eagle retains a
large scar on his left side of his body
and has lost sight in his right eye.
"He maintains a positive atti-
tude and shows determination to
reach his greatest potential
LeQuire said.
LeQuire said her son and family
are grateful to all of Eagle's friends
and the administration for the sup-
port given to him throughout his
recovery and hopeful return.
"I am very excited about my re-
turn Eagle said. "I truly appreciate
all the support I have recieved over
the months
This writer can be contacted
at aharne@tec.ecu.edu.
Possible rape at fraternity reported
Case under
further investigation
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Last Sunday, a female student reported that she
, was allegedly raped at the Delta Sigma Phi Frater-
nity House at 510 E. 10th St. while attending a party.
The victim was taken to Pitt County Memorial
Hospital (PCMH) by her friends where personnel
contacted the ECU Police Department (ECUPD).
According to Det. Thomas Neville of the
.Greenville Police Department (GPD), a rape kit was
� administered on the victim. Neville said the kit was
sent to SBI Headquarters in Raleigh on Monday
morning.
Neville said the victim resides on campus.
Laura Sweet, assistant dean of Student Life and
advocate for female victims of assault, said she has
begun the process of assisting the student with the
matter and is also making counseling sessions avail-
able to her.
According to Melissa Bartlett of the GPD, a sus-
pect has been identified and is currently under ques-
tioning. She added that no charges have been filed
at the present time.
Neville said he will be reinterviewing the suspect
this afternoon for further questioning. He added that
the ECUPD is helping with the investigation.
This writer can be contacted
at ahame@tec.ecu.edu.
Gunfire erupts at Texas Two Step
ECUPD aids in
arrests, holds suspects
REAP dedicates new playground
$10,000
gift funds structure
Caroline Jordan
STAFF WRITER
JC; Last Saturday, members of
Jvjhe Remedial Education Activi-
?ties Program (REAP) celebrated
�"he completion of their new
�playground.
REAP, which is run under the
School of Education's depart-
ment of special education, re-
ceived $10,000 from Irene
Howell of the Howell Center in
Greenville to construct the play-
ground. The Howell Center is a
residential facility for children
with significant medical needs
and who are unable to be cared
for at home, including children
who are wards of the state.
Howell, along with her .hus-
band and other family members,
were some of the approximately
90 people in attendance, includ-
ing faculty from the School of
Education.
"It was obvious the kind of com-
mitment she and her family have
to children with disabilities said
Dr. Marilyn Sheerer, dean of the
School of Education.
According to Lead Teacher Kim
Koen, staff from Harrelson and
Smith Contractors saved REAP over
$2,000 in time and equipment.
"They had a very big role Koen
said.
On Saturday, an engraved
plaque was adhered to the purple
and gold playground dedicating it
to Howell. Harrelson and Smith
Contractors were also thanked for
their time and effort. Some previ-
ous REAP participants were in atten-
dance along with the 16 children
that are enrolled in this year's pro-
gram. Of the 16 children in the pro-
gram, 14 have special needs and two
are developing typically-without
any handicap.
"It was a great day Koen said.
"The kids really had a wonderful
time
REAP provides direct educa-
tional and related services to pre-
school children with develop-
mental delays such as Autism
and Downs Syndrome.
"It really represents our com-
mitment to providing early in-
tervention to children with
problems Sheerer said. "A lot
of these preschool children
wouldn't have any place to go.
We are pleased to offer these pro-
grams
The REAP staff also provides
supervision for students com-
pleting course requirements for
observation, practicum, student
teaching, internship, and certi-
fication In birth to kindergarten.
The program's previous
wooden playground was torn
down in 1997 after failing to
comply with new state regula-
tions for day care arid preschool
facilities. The playground is es-
sential for observation of REAP
children's gross motor learning
development, sensory needs,
and social development.
This writer can be contacted
at cjordan@tec.ecu.edu.
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Last Friday, gunfire was ex-
changed in the Texas Two Step club
parking lot, leaving two wounded
and one arrested.
The Greenville Police Depart-
ment (GPD) classified the incident
as an 'assault with a deadly weapon
with intent to kill inflicting serious
injury
According to Melissa Bartlett of
the GPD, gunshots were fired once
the club was closed after a confron-
tation between several individuals
' escalated in the parking lot.
Both Santez Keys, a non-student
from Washington, N.C and Collin
Johnson, a non-student from Or-
lando, Fla were transported to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital (PCMH)
for treatment of gunshot wounds.
PCMH personnel were unable to
comment of the victims' current
conditions due to confidentiality is-
sues.
ECU officers apprehended two
suspects involved in the shooting
on the sidewalk north of the Human
Resources and Institutional Ad-
vancement Building and held them
until the GPD arrived on the scene.
According to Bartlett, three sus-
pects have been detained by the
GPD for questioning.
Bartlett said non-student,
Carlester Taylor was arrested and
charged with carrying a concealed
weapon, along with possession of a
stolen firearm. She said Taylor was
found in the area after the shoot-
ing.
As the investigation continued,
Taylor received additional charges.
According to Captain K.M.
Smeltzer of the GPD, Taylor was
charged with discharging a firearm
in city limits and possession of con-
trol substances.
Bartlett said the substances
found could not be released at the
present time.
Smeltzer added that Charles Bell,
a Greenville resident, was also
charged with discharging a firearm
within city limits. Neither Bell or
Taylor were injured.
Bartlett said J.P. Madigan, an of-
ficer of the GPD, fired his weapon
during the Incident. She said it is
"policy" that anytime an officer fires
his weapon, the Greenville Police
Firearms Discharge Team must in-
vestigate to make sure it can be jus-
tified with due cause.
Detective Steve Pass of the GPD's
major crime unit is currently con-
tinuing investigations dealing with
all parties involved.
Smeltzer said that anyone with
information pertaining to the shoot-
ing is asked to call the GPD, 329-
4317 or Crime Stoppers, 758-7777.
This writer can be contacted
at aharne@tec.ecu.edu.
EAST CAROLINA AWARDS FOR EXCEUENCE
Congratulations to the following students, student organizations and organiza-
tion advisers who were honored on Sunday night for their outstanding achieve-
ments during the 1999-2000 academic year.
First-Year Student Leadership Award: Patrick Suarez
Purple Pride Humanitarian Award: Yolanda Thigpen
Outstanding Adult Student Award: Na'im K. Akbar
Outstanding Senior Leadership Award: Sherry Ingram
Outstanding Student Organization Leader: Rinardo Reddick
Outstanding Student Worker: Staci Lynne Hines
Student Organization Award for Outstanding Philanthropy: New Generation Campus Ministry
Unsung Leader Award: Yolanda Thomas
Outstanding Student Organization Adviser: Dr. Linda Mooney
'Outstanding Student Organization: ECU Panhellenic Association
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lay 2, 2000
9tiec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian
news@tec.ecu.edu 1
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CRIME SCENE
April 28
Simple Affray-A staff member reported that two
students were involved In a flstfight over dasswork
In a room In the Sports Medicine Building. They
were each issued a CAT.
Auto Accident-A staff member was involved In
an accident when she struck a fence while traveling
east In the parking lot at Bunting Field. No damage
occurred to the fence.
Harassing E-mails and Voice Malls-A student re-
ported receiving three phone calls replying to a per-
sonal ad placed on Yahoo Internet service and one
sexually explicit email. A possible suspect has been
named for placing the personal ad.
April 29
Underage Intoxication-A student in Jones Hall was
issued a CAT for being intoxicated while underage
after another student reported a fight about to oc-
cur on College Hill Drive. This subject was not in-
volved and no fight occurred.
April 30
Miscellaneous Ca-Officers responded to a call
of water flooding the south side entrance of the
Cashier's Office. It was found that Greenville Utili-
ties had turned on the hydrant to drain it. They
were contacted and responded to turn it off. They
also contacted Home Care Cleaners to remove the
water.
Assault on a female, Larceny-A student reported
that she has been assaulted by her non-student boy-
friend outside of Clement Hall and its lobby area.
She stated that he grabbed her throat and threw
her. He then grabbed her set of keys and left the
area. She was transported to the Pitt County Deten-
tion Center to obtain three warrants.
Damage to Property-A student reported that three
numbers had been scratched into her vehicle while
parked in a metered space east of Clement Hall.
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
N. C. State University-Iii the wake of
the Littleton school massacre, authori-
ties, parents and the nation scurry to find
someone, something to blame for the
horrible tragedy!
Some look to the parents of the at-
tackers, to the police, who were pre-
sented with threats from the killers' Web
site a year or more before the shooting,
and to the NRA for lack of gun control.
Robert Schrag, professor of commu-
nication at North Carolina State Univer-
sity and nationally recognized expert on
the effects of media on children, looks
to the media, as do many others, as a
source of the violence.
"The more violent and aggressive the
television that a child watches, the more
we see fairly consistent trends through-
out the child's life Schrag said. "They
tend to themselves and behave in more
aggressive ways; they tend to choose
aggressive solutions even on a pen-and-
pencil test more quickly than a child that
has not watched a lot of violent televi-
sion '
The image of men in black shooting
up things, of dissatisfied people taking
out there rage in a violent blaze of glory,
is one that has been burned onto
society's retinas in the past few years by
the entertainment and news industry.
"The problem, I think, and the thing
that concerns me with the Colorado
shootings is that it would be far more
unnerving if it was more surprising
Schrag said. "The problem is it wasn't
very surprising
From recently fired, disgruntled
postal workers taking out their superi-
ors and co-workers, coining the phrase
going "postal to the alienated student
dressed in a trench coat, shooting up his
school during a dream sequence in a
movie, society has come to expect such
tragedies.
"As we listen to the children who
escaped talking about it, how they were
sitting in their classroom and suddenly
they heard gunshots and bombs going
off, what in a child's life would make it
so immediately apparent to them that
those are gunshots and those are bombs
going off?" Schrag said. "How many gun-
shots and bombs have you hear in real
life? Violence is something that has
been normalized in our world by its over-
whelming presence in our media, both
entertainment and information media
Schrag's work on media violence
manifesting itself in a child's behavior
is based on concept of narratives, a child
internalizing behavior viewed in media
as a script for hisher own behavior.
"The seemujg relationship is that
children from a variety of areas, media
being only one, create perceptions about
what is true in the world and how they
are supposed to behave in the world on
the basis of what is true Schrag said.
The normalization of violence and
the building of these violent narrative
scripts in children's psyches has resulted
in an increase in massacres like those in
Littleton, Color and these tragedies will
continue, according to Schrag.
"If everywhere I look in my entertain-
ment media and the news I'm seeing
automatic weapons and people using
them as a normal way of resolving con-
flicts, that normalizes the narrative for
me Schrag said. "Then I, the disen-
chanted, the suicidal, the alienated, frus-
trated person, say 'What's the appropri-
ate way for me to act this out?' And sud-
denly we see another round of videotape
of children fleeing automatic weapon
fire
According.ro Schrag1, when a child
sees violence in the media and knows
nothing else to understand that it is not
the true way to handle things, then the
only way heshe knows to deal with a
conflict is through violence.
University of Houston-University
of Houston Students can expect some
changes to the propaganda and mass
communication curriculum the next
time the course is taught on campus
thanks to the Elian Gonzalez case.
It may be a political, legal and immi-
gration issue, but communication pro-
fessor Garth Jowett said the five-month
custody dispute over Gonzalez will pro-
vide fodder for propaganda researchers
for years to come.
"It's clearly a very interesting case
study about how poor old Elian ended
up in the middle of what was a very con-
tentious, hut also very interesting, pro-
paganda battle he said.
Jowett and Montana State University
Professor Victoria O'Dorinell are already
discussing how the case will be worked
into the next edition of their book, "Pro-
paganda and Persuasion
Jowett currently teaches a graduate
seminar on propaganda in the School of
Communication. After weeks of research
and lively class discussions, he said he
finds it interesting how people interpret
a single event.
"It's just a matter 1 guess of how you
phrase it, how the way people look at
the same event and phrase it two differ-
ent ways he said.
As an example, he cited interpreta-
tions of Saturday's Associated Press
photo that depicted an armed federal
agent confronting Gonzalez and his res-
cuer, Donato Dalrymple.
While the government may have
downplayed the potential for violence,
Jowett cited columnist William Satire's
use of language to emphasize how close
the operation came to bloodshed.
The way the media portrayed the
photo also disappointed Jowett.
"I was concerned on Saturday morn-
ing at the repetition, the number of
times the picture was presented without
countermeasure he said. "There was no
attempt to interpret the picture beyond
what it visually apparently showed
As pundits and Monday morning
quarterbacks chimed in with their inter-
pretation of last weekend's events, Jowett
said he was surprised to discover how
he and conservative talk show host Rush
Limbaugh had reached two different
conclusions over whether Gonzalez's
media exposure was a good thing.
"I just found that amazing, from my
own psychology, that here are two
people, Rush and myself, looking at the;
same event and coming up to a 180-de
gree different opinion about it-his no-
tion that Klian should be made available!
to the press at any and all times as being!
a good thing Jowett said.
In the future, Jowett said he doesn't;
expect propagandists to learn from the!
events of the past five months.
"People don't learn he said. "They
never learn from these events
But he said you can't fool everyone
all of the time: "The audience learns,
though. The audience has some residual
memories that indicate they need to be
more cautious about these things and
pay more attention to them
Despite the belief that it is possible
for the public to wise up to these tactics,
Jowett cautioned that as long as propa-
gandists appeal to people's emotions,
they will never learn from their mistakes.
"One would like to believe that, but
it doesn't happen he said. "There's no!
clear indication, looking at the history'
of propaganda, that that's ever hap-
pened. People get a little more leery, but
when emotions are involved, then all the
rules fly out of the window and past his-
tory means nothing
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e
The East Carolinian
?wjjv.tec.ecu.edu
I
NEWS
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
news@tec.ecu.edu
Wake researchers to
jclone monkeys for study
i
4yinston-Salem(AP)-Wake For-
estfljiiversity researchers won't dls-
cuj�their reported attempts to clone
a cwpny of monkeys predisposed to
al5jholism, partially because they
hanm't yet succeeded.
Jl have to delay my comments
uritil we are where we consider we
h&e reached some of the goals of
en6 study said Dr. Kathleen Grant,
a fjsearcher who studies alcoholism
arid the study's lead investigator.
V monkey would be the most
hijjfily evolved mammal cloned
frJjn a cell taken from an adult ani-
mal Scientists have cloned mice,
shfep, cattle, goats and pigs, but
nver a monkey.
; Medical school sources, who
declined to be identified, told the
Winston-Salem Journal that the re-
searchers hope to develop a mon-
k�y colony predisposed to alcohol-
ism, all cloned from a single alco-
holic monkey.
; Mark Wright, the school's direc-
tor of public information, said the
project is related to a study of alco-
holism that has been submitted for
publication in a peer-reviewed
medical journal. In such situations,
researchers are often reluctant to
discuss their work. Other sources
siid the researchers are also worried
that publicity could jeopardize grant
applications.
Researchers at other medical
schools have stumbled and failed at
this stage.
Don P. Wolf, a reproductive bi-
ologist at the Oregon Regional Pri-
mate Center, knows the pitfalls of
this kind of research. He published
preliminary studies in 1997 report-
ing success in techniques needed to
clone a monkey, but he has not suc-
ceeded in cloning an adult monkey.
"If they succeed cloning from an
adult cell, that would be a big break-
through, especially if they do it
quickly Wolf said. "My bias is, you
may be able to succeed at a very low
frequency. The success rates are
pretty low. We have argued we can't
afford to make and transfer embryos
that we have little confidence are
capable of leading to a pregnancy
Dr. Dee Schramm, a reproduc-
tive biologist at the Wisconsin Re-
gional Primate Research Center at
the I Iniversity of Wisconsin, said he
is trying to make genetically identi-
cal monkeys using a method differ-
ent from the one being used at Wake
Forest. Instead of transferring ge-
netic information from an adult
monkey, he is working at splitting
embryos produced through the nor-
mal union between a sperm and an
egg into identical twins and triplets.
The monkeys he breeds are used in
AIDS research.
Wolf came to Winston-Salem
about six months ago to talk with
Grant and her colleagues, who in-
clude Dr. Kent E. Vrana, a researcher
who specializes in alcoholism and
drug abuse, and Dr. Michael R.
Adams, a primate specialist. '
The team is also working with a
biotechnology company in Massa-
chusetts called Advanced Cell Tech-
nology. The company holds a
patent for a cloning technique. Its
scientists work with cloned cows to
perfect techniques for cloning hu-
man cells for potential use in organ
replacement and other medical
therapies.
Company researchers report in
Friday's issue of the journal Science
that six cows they have cloned show
none of the premature aging that
scientists previously found in Dolly
the cloned sheep. The finding could
ease fears that cloned cells age too
fast to be useful against diseases.
Advanced Cell Technology presi-
dent Dr. Michael D. West said he
could'no't comment on his work
with the Wake Forest team because
the university had asked him not to
�. zz-
Clinton says he supports
D.Cs gun buyback program
WASHINGTON (AP)-Presi-
I dent Clinton threw his support
J Friday behind a gun buyback
program in the District of Co-
i lumbia, pushing aside criticisms
I that the programs are ineffective
! because they draw only old,
cheap guns from people desper-
' ate for money.
The president went to the
Metropolitan Police
Department's training facility on
the south side of town to promote
another city gun buyback scheduled
for June 23. Mayor Anthony Will-
iams said the city would devote
1250,000 to the gun purchases, and
Clinton added another $100,000
from the federal Department of
Housing and Urban Development.
Clinton called the District's
buybacks one of the most success-
ful in the country a bittersweet
victory for a police department
that has seen several officers
slain in recent years and just wit-
nessed an Easter Monday shoot-
ing that wounded seven children
outside the National Zoo, includ-
ing one police sergeant's little
brother.
CLINTON
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NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR FALL SEMESTER
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DorM Muss Mon May 8th It s a
Fr&e Show with Fat Mama
Just far yo'li Our way of saying thanks and
Congrats to all of our graduating seniors
We'll miss you and your parents money
little joke come on you know we II
miss you
MA'YSAT PEASANTS
?"ir?n levs uil "NOm SUMMIT
Big Tuesdays!
V?CW & WWF Pay v per Views
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Vfatch your favorite team on our
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Tuesday, f
www.tec.e
CUNT
"You are i
prise, and yoi
body that C
all the traged
you should tal
Critics que
eral funds she
program sine
crime rate is n
"As well ii
programs are, i
illusioned to tl
an impact on c
Association sp
said.
The Repub
mitteesaidClii
prosecuting c
guns, rather th
abiding citize
weapons.
"Ninety-n
ES
AFFO
Inclui
316-
(Acroi
9
BAND
entertainrr
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day 2, 2000
i@tec.ecu.edu
fumes
n,
org.
�ply-
EOE
fcs
shelf
Mpprt
days
n
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
CLINTON
The East Carolinian m
news@tec.ecu.edui I
w
from page 4
"You are in a successful enter-
prise, and you ought to tell every-
body that Clinton said. "Amidst
all the tragedy and heartbreak,
you should take enormous pride
Critics questioned whether fed-
eral funds should be used for the
program since its impact on the
crime rate is not calculable.
"As well intentioned as these
programs are, no one should be dis-
illusioned to think that it really has
an impact on crime National Rifle
Association spokesman Bill Powers
said.
The Republican National Com-
mittee said Clinton should focus on
prosecuting criminals who carry
guns, rather than encouraging law-
abiding citizens to give up their
weapons.
"Ninety-nine percent of the
time, honest Americans who are
hurfing for money bring in guns
that have been sitting in their
houses without being used spokes-
man Chris Paulitz said. "The ones
who are not bringing in the guns
are the criminals. It doesn't make
any sense
Williams said the age and type
of the guns are not an-issue.
"I'm not trying to run an an-
tique gun dealership he said. "If
we avoid just one death, even an
accidental death, then I think it is
worth it
Last summer, District police col-
lected 3,000 weapons at roughly
$ 100 each. They kept a few "for dis-
play purposes" while the rest were
test-fired, given ballistics tests and
destroyed, Police Chief Charles
Ramsey said.
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EXAM STUDY HALLS
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Thursday, May 4
Sunday, May 7
Monday, May 8
Tuesday, May 9
. Wednesday, May 10
from 6:00 p.m. until 10:30 p.m. each night
For further information contact
Ellen Crawford True
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dOWN
Tuesday, r
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We just got s
campus
woman hasn't
campus t
backhoes and
anywhere? V
can at least pre
0PINIC
E
If I have le
humility. This
through my co
the highlight
job of being ar
is not easy. By
printed on a re
ous hate mail, i
threats, all of v
ing levels.
People seen
and that if I w
they have the i
home, call my
thing they wan
said. I will be tl
will be the first
offensive, but ti
ten.
Well everyti
wrote. That wa:
ecution. 1 thouf
don't think the
I also would
took time out t
uirin. Without
clear idea as to
age all of you tc
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provides, for so
thoughts in prii
This job has co
0PINI0
AS
I can't say th
anything right n
heading up back
than ranting anc
rather just send y
the semester as
will bring. '
Let's see, I sur
loving every sec
roommate horro:
picked up on thi
the most of it. Al
days of our lives.





Tuesday, May 2, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian 7
editor@tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community sines 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing Die regular academic year. The lead editorial in each
edition Is the opinion of the majority ol the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited tor decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to editor@sludentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian,
Student Publications Building, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
For additional information, call 252-328-6366.
We just got started on the pedestrian
campus. What if the new man or
woman hasn't got the stuff? What if the
campus deteriorates to a mass of
backhoes and dirt piles with no parking
anywhere' What do we do then? We
can a! least pressure him to give us our
sign before he goes.
OURVIEW
OPINION COLUMN
Everyone rejoice-my last column this year
Patrick McMahon
OPINION COLUMNIST
If I have learned one thing this school year it is
humility. This year has provided me with a voice
through my columns that, for the most part, has been
the highlight of my experience at this school. The
job of being an opinion columnist with a conscious
is not easy. By having my opinions on various issues
printed on a regular basis, I open myself up to vari-
ous hate mail, attempted physical assaults and death
threats, all of which 1 have received in record-break-
ing levels.
People seem to think that I am the voice of Satan
and that if I write something they don't like, then
they have the right to call me at home, come to my
home, call my parents and cuss at them and do any-
thing they want to me because they don't like what I
said. I will be the first to admit when I'm wrong and
will be the first to apologize for something blatantly
offensive, but to date I stand by everything I've writ-
ten.
Well everything except that "Yankee" column I
wrote. That was a bad idea that with even worse ex-
ecution. I thought I could joke about it but dammit, I
don't think the joke was told all that well.
I also would like to give thanks to everyone who
took time out to e-mail me with a reply to my col-
umn. Without your feedback, I would never have a
clear idea as to how I am doing as a writer. I encour-
age all of you to reply to columns.
To be paid, even the meager sum the newspaper
provides, for something as simple as conveying my
thoughts in print is crazy to me but also appreciated.
This job has convinced me to declare myself a cre-
ative writing major with a minor in journalism. So if
you hate me now, you gonna hate me in five years when
I'm writing for Rolling Stone or working at MTV.
I really love this job and the people it has allowed
me to meet. From eating dinner with Eve backstage at
the Ruff Ryders concert to meeting various bands at The
Attic, it has given me more than I ever could repay. And
despite what many of you probably think, I love each
and every one of you. Without you I probably would
have quit a long time ago. You have made this job fun.
Probably because you give me the most material to write
about.
From all of these past trials and tribulations, I am
proud of what I have done with both of my columns in
TEC and being entertainment editor for The Fountain-
head. Emily Little, the head editor for TheFountainhead,
has taken that publication to another level. Working
here also gave me the opportunity to meet Shannon
Meek. She was a true 'personality' in every sense of the
word; the world has lost a beacon of light with her death.
Shannon was a beautiful soul. She will be missed.
I have made a conscious effort to make a name for
myself through my columns and hopefully I have done
that. Maybe if the new editor doesn't mind a few law-
suits and death threats, she will let me come back and
write in the summer and fall.
You people have been my inspiration and motiva-
tion and I offer my sincerest thanks and gratitude. Thank
you all for a wonderful year and good luck on your fi-
nals.
This writer can be contacted
at pmcmahon@tec.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
No goodbyes, only until next time
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
I can't say that I really have a huge opinion about
anything right now, except getting through finals and
heading up back to Maryland for the summer. So rather
than ranting and raving about some random topic I'd
rather just send you the best wishes for the last days of
the semester as we look forward to what the future
will bring. '
Let's see, I survived my freshman year at ECU while
loving every second of it. Luckily, I don't have any
roommate horror stories or homesick sob sagas. I have
picked up on the 'college life' scene and have made
the most of it. After all, they do say these are the best
days of our lives.
I've met some great friends and those that help make
life lessons clearer. Unfortunately, many of my new buds
are seniors and will be leaving this quaint little town.
Best of luck to all of you. I would especially like to wish
Holly the best of luck in Florida. Thanks for being 'cut-
throat'�you've taught me more than you'll ever know.
And to Terra�enjoy Australia! It's been an honor being
your assistant. I'll miss you in the fall. Guess it will be
time for a "fresh start
To the rest of you, thanks'for the good times. I'll
never forget them. And those returning in the fall, have
a fun and safe summer. Can't wait until we live it up
again. Best of luck on finals!
This writer can be contacted at aharne@tec.ecu.edu.
Chancellor Richard Eakin has decided to leave us. Before he arrived,
there was no Ledonia Wright Cultural Center, no Sonic Plaza, no Stu-
dent Recreation Center. You could get Coke on campus, but we weren't
in Conference USA. Playboy never came here, but the SWAT team did
on Halloween, and we were not a Doctoral II university.
Over the past 13 years, Richard Eakin has been an ally for the stu-
dents and teachers at this school. He has overseen our development
from a hospital-based education-heavy university to a beautiful campus
offering a plethora of excellent departments with impressive degrees.
And now he's leaving. TEC would like to know, does this mean we
won't get our sign? Eakin promised us a sign, and we haven't gotten it
yet. And that makes us wonder what other wonderful ideas are leaving
us with his departure. We just got started on the pedestrian campus.
What if the new man or woman hasn't got the stuff? What if the cam-
pus deteriorates to a mass of backhoes and dirt piles with no parking
anywhere? What do we do then? We can at least pressure him to give
us our sign before he goes. It would be one more wondrous accom-
plishment for the record books.
In the meantime, we can only hope our next chancellor will collect
a record as impressive as Eakin's. So, Chancellor Eakin, thanks for being
such a good leader. We'll miss you.
And put in a good word for us with the new guygal. Tell him or her
to give us a sign.
And As CMfiiticmcfo.
ujfLl�.Ve0eon
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Editor-in-chief says farewell
Holly Harris
EDITOR-IN-CHIEF
Three years ago when I first crossed the threshold
of the TEC office I never imagined that I would be
sitting here in this chair, in this office, saying goodbye
to my university as the Editor-in-Chief of our stu-
dent newspaper. In this capacity I rarely have time to
write anything for the publication that I have lived
for during the past year. So now, as I look back over
the course of my time here I want to take a moment
to thank those who have made our journey this year
meaningful, and offer a bit of advice to those who
have presented themselves as roadblocks at every
turn.
This year I have been the captain of a ship that
sailed stormy seas. It has been a time of heartbreak
and loss for our entire campus community, and it
seemed that at every turn we at The East Carolinian
were the messenger of bad news. We faced the loss of
our homes and tangible memories; not only here in
Greenville, but also in our hometowns as well. We
were forced to bury our own, counsel our friends and
try to forge ahead through classes that were losing
meaning in the face of adversities that seemed im-
possible to bear.
In the face of all of this, a select group of people
worked to keep information in our grasp�to keep
our campus bound and united through information.
It is these people that I want to thank as I walk out of
this door for good. It is these people who taught me
the definition of journalism and passion, and painted
these virtues into their writing every day.
I have had the honor to work with some of the
finest collegiate writers, artists and photographers in
the country. They have taken on topics that are diffi-
cult to write and design about, and have done it all
in a tasteful, professional manner. For every story that
I have marked up with my dreaded red pen, there
were three that I sat in my office and wished I had
written. My reporters have dealt with terrifying is-
sues this year and have learned by trial and error as
well as sheer determination to listen critically, write
effectively and represent their fellow students' inter-
ests totally. I am utterly, unshakably and unreserv-
edly proud. However, there is still something else that
needs to be said.
For those eternally complaining naysayers who
deride the efforts of our campus journalists and al-
ways find something to complain about in every is-
sue of the paper, let me describe a day in the life of an
East Carolinian staff member. In fact, the abridged ver-
sion will suffice to draw an appropriate image: 8 a.m
wake up, go to work; 9 a.m6 p.m call contacts, go
to class, run to courthouse to pick up document, go
to class, go back to courthouse, call more contacts,
go to class; 7 p.m2 a.m eat breakfast, edit section,
think about maybe doing homework.
We work demanding full-time jobs while doing
calculus homework and attending geology lectures.
So, if you have a problem with us, either join our
ranks and help us to improve or shut your trap. We
always appreciate advice, mentoring and new employ-
ees�all of which have been in short supply over the
course of this tragic year. So please, if you think you
might want to write, edit, take pictures, design pages
or even sell advertising, we want you. If you are a
faculty member and have experience you think might
help us hone our skills, we want you. Your campus
wants you too�you can make a difference.
We would like to thank some of the people on
campus who have made our lives and our publica-
tion more rich and complete. Dean of Students,
Ronald Speier has been our advocate in every way.
From offering his support and advice to coming to
every event we hold, Dean Speier has been fantastic.
His loss will be keenly felt. Chancellor Richard Eakin
has always responded to our phone calls, made ev-
eryone else respond to our phone calls and eternally
laughed at our (ahem) pointed editorial cartoons.
Marie Britt, Janet Respass and Yvonne Moye have been
our mothers and our friends�we love you. And last,
but not least I, and everyone at TEC would like to
thank our adviser, Paul Wright. There are no words
to say how phenomenally patient, kind and intelli-
gent he is. There is absolutely no way we would have
made it through the year without him.
Finally, I want to thank my staff for a great ride.
From Man Beast Alpha to the PL and the Wall of
Shame, you've been inspiring. Oh, that FS. You made
me laugh at myself and I love you all for it. I have
looked hot death in the face and let me tell you, it's a
rotten opinion column that nobody is going to find
funny. I'm off to 'make a fresh start if you want me
you can just get me on the horn. Pugstein will miss
you, adieu.
This writer can be contacted at editor@tec.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Thank goodness it's summer
Dorcas Brule
OPINION COLUMNIST
Why do things never seem to go the way they
should? Is it their logical progression for my benefit?
Although this isn't in the correct order, my first
gripe is about the weather. Eastern North Carolina has
got to have the most messed up weather patterns in
the world. I know it's illogical, but I feel as though this
location really does have its own special weather pat-
terns that have been carefully created and calculated
to disrupt my life, and the lives of my fellow ECU stu-
dents.
Last semester we had to deal with Floyd and flood-
ing at the most inconvenient time. I mean, hello,
couldn't the weather have waited to give us that two
week break when we really needed it instead of a short
month after classes had started? And because ECU was
the most affected university, I tend to think we have a
weather curse. For instance, here we are in the midst
of beginning our exam week and the weather is BEAU-
TIFUL. We don't even have reading day to enjoy it
because Mother Nature cursed us with snow earlier in
the semester and now we have make up snow days.
And that snow subject is another thing. I don't
know about you, but upon moving to eastern North
Carolina, snow was the last thing I expected. Next week
and the week after, when exams are over I swear we
are going to have crappy weather. I've learned that
that's just the way it goes in this state at this school -
perhaps just in my life. Something good happens, It
rains snows hurricanes or floods.
My next, rather unrelated gripe is about financial
aid. Although, as an English major-and we all know
what that means-I can skillfully tie in everything fcfy
saying that it was raining when I realized I had no fi-
nancial aid to finish off my last semester at ECU. t
figures, mood weather. Yes I've only got one morf
summer session to go and they're telling me that they
can't give me the financial aid to cover it. I went to
summer school last year, spent the same amount of
financial aid during the normal school year and still
had enough to cover both summer sessions. What
gives? I think they just don't like me. But, really, I won-
der if they're just trying to make me stay and spend
more money. I won't do it, I won't. If I have to sell my
body on 5th Street to make the money, I will. I swear
I'm leaving this place! 1
Although, because I'm basically a happy person 1
can't end this tirade of mine on a bad note, so I musi
admit that despite horrid weather, exams and lack ol
financial aid I'm happy to say that it is the end of the
semester, and THANK GOD.
Be safe this summer, everyone, don't try to bring
your crazy ECU antics to your hometowns you might
really get arrested.
This writer can be contacted at dbrule@tec.ecu.edu.





The East Carolinian
.www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
features@tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday,
www.tec.e
li
II
g
FEATURES BRIEFS
Vegetarians can barbecue too

When people think of
a barbecue, they often
think of slapping a steak
on the grille. However
many people, namely
Vegetarians, can be quite
creative in utilizing the
grille for a meal more in
tune with their eating
habits. Here are some
creative recipes adapted from the vegetarian so-
ciety Web page, www.vegsoc.org. Perhaps even
those carnivores out
there would enjoy a non-
-f fe traditional meal them-
M mMp selves. Bonne Appetite!
BARBECUED VEGETABLES
Most vegetables are delicious when barbe-
cued, either cooked straight on the grill or
wrapped in foil and thrown into the hot coals.
INGREDIENTS:
VEGETABLES
� redyellow peppers, whole
� courgettes, sliced in half lengthwise
� aubergine, thickly
sliced
� sweet potatoes,
thickly sliced
� onions, cut in half
MARINADE
� 75 ml5 tbsp olive oil
� 1 large clove garlic,
crushed
� 30 ml2 tbsp mixed
summer herbs, finely chopped
� salt and freshly ground black pepper
1. In a screw top jar combine the marinade
ingredients together, shaking well.
2. Brush the vegetables with the marinade
and set aside for at least half an hour to
enable the flavors to develop.
3. Before barbecuing brush the vegetable
pieces once again with the marinade and
sprinkle some extra seasoning over them.
4. Barbecue over a grill, turning frequently.
5. Alternatively, pierce each whole vegetable
with a fork, place on a square of foil, add 2
tbsp of marinade, wrap the square of foil
around the vegetable and cook in the coals
until soft.
SPICED ALMOND DIP
Serve with bread sticks or sliced pita bread.
INGREDIENTS:
� 40 g1.2 oz flaked almonds
� 1 clove garlic, crushed
� pinch cayenne pepper
� 2.5 ml12 tsp salt
� 2 small tomatoes,
skinned & finely choppet
� 30 ml2 tbsp red wine
vinegar
� 150 ml14 pint olive oil
s
1. Lightly roast the almonds under a grill and
leave to cool.
2. Grind finely in a nut grinder.
3. Put the almonds, garlic, cayenne pepper,
salt, tomatoes & vinegar into a liquidizer
and blend.
4. Add the oil very slowly while blending, until
the whole mixture is amalgamated.
5. Chill well.
BARBECUED FRUIT
The best way to barbecue fruit is by making
fruit kebabs All firm fruits give delicious results,
especially when slightly marinated in an alcoholic
sugar syrup, so that the outside of the fruit
pieces caramelize.
INGREDIENTS:
FRUIT
� pineapple, cubed
� apple, cubed
� pear, cubed
� melon, cubed
� strawberries, whole
MARINADE
� 75 g3 oz sugar
� 60 ml4 tbsp water
� liqueur (any)
1. Thread alternative fruit pieces onto
skewers.
2. In a medium pan gently heat the sugar and
water until all the sugar has dissolved, and
the syrup has thickened slightly.
3. Allow to cool before adding the liqueur of
your choice.
4. Brush the fruit with the marinade and leave
to one side to enable the flavors to de
velop.
5. Before barbecuing, brush the kebabs once
again with the marinade.
6. Barbecue over the grill, turning frequently,
until the outside of the fruit begins to cara
melize.
RELAY FOR L
continues despite
Participants join
fight against cancer
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
"I am a survivor of seven years said Kathleen Cox, Relay for Life vol-
unteer. "The Relay for life is really important and I'm very committed to
it
Although the fight against AIDS is popular among celebrities and highly
publicized fund raiser, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the
United States. Second-only to heart disease, cancer is a far more deadly
killer than AIDS. In the United States, one out of every four deaths is
caused by cancer. Nearly five million lives have been lost to cancer since
1990. The American Cancer Society tracks cancer occurrence, including
the number of deaths, the number of cases and how long people survive
after diagnosis. This year about 552,200 Americans are expected to die of
cancer, more than 1,500 people a day. In 2000, about 1,220,100 new
cancer cases are expected to be diagnosed.
On April 28 and 29, approximately 1,500 Greenville residents and stu-
dents ran, walked or skipped around the track during
the 24-hour Relay for Life. Survivors, people who have
lost family members to cancer and those who simply
believe in supporting a good cause were out braving the
rain Friday night.
"I lost my mother to cancer in 1989, and that's why 1
try to come out here and support this every year said
Bill Dawson, a member of State Employees Association
of North Carolina (SEANC). "This is my fifth or sixth
year.
"We have 31 people on our team walking to support
the cause Dawson said.
Not only was SEANC walking the track, but they were
also cooking up food for any hungry passers-by. Although
it was raining, the attitudes of the participants were
buoyed by the loud music blaring from the speakers
mostly oldies, and good food everywhere.
"We have cake that is scrumptious to your tummy
and makes your toes wiggle said Tomi Britt, volunteer.
"I think this is a great cause because if you don't have cancer yourself, you
probably know someone who has it. It's very worthwhile to try and find a
cure. Another reason why I'm here is because when I went to ECU, the
American Cancer Society gave me a scholarship to go to nursing school,
so I support what they do
Memorial Baptist's Youth Group was there as well, and they were em-
bracing the cause to learn about the importance of fellowship and com-
munity.
"We always get them together, and ft's always a great time of fellow-
ship and fun said Judith McCoy, Memorial Baptist Youth Leader. "And it
helps to know that we're doing it for a good cause
According to Jenn Prichard, the co-chair for the event, the American
Cancer Society of Greenville was hoping to raise120,000 from this event.
Ninety teams signed up to participate in the relay, and that meant
approximantly 1,500 people participated in the actual relay. The runners
Bev Holland and Pat Tutino walked for several hours in the Relay for Life, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates.
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Age-Adjusted Cancer Death Rates
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and walkers on the track were only a part of the total number of participants; the many
people who sponsored them were also vital to the success of the event.
For the past six years, the Relay for Life has been an annual event in Greenville. Volun-
teers and participants said they are optimistic about the future of this event.
Though the reasons varied for supporting the cause, Prichard's sentiments were share, i
many of the people on the track.
"I'm here because I never want anyone to have to go through chemotherapy Prichard
said. "I don't want anybody to have cancer; we just want it gone
Volunteers, such as Prichard and McCoy, work year-round to make sure the event goes off
smoothly. At some points in the year, they might work, unpaid, as many as 30 hours a week,
but they believe that it is worth fighting against one of the deadliest diseases to strike Ameri-
cans.
This writer can be contacted at features@tec.ecu.edu.
u
Dance 2000" performances successful
Ballet and contemporary
performers take center stage
Essi Akakpo
STAFF WRITER
The East Carolina Dance Theater gave its
first presentation of "Dance 2000" at McGinnis
Theater performed by the ECU dance depart-
ment received standing ovations and thunder-
ous applause from audiences.
Seven dance pieces were featured during
the performance. The choreography and ex-
ecution of complicated moves in "Barbie
2000 "Tip History-The 20th Century Taps"
and "Transitional Illuminations"(by Leo's Gold
award recipient Mia Michaels as choreogrd-
pher) were climactic moments in the perfor-
mance.
Several dance styles were featured. For in-
stance, the dances were classical in "Rustic
Wedding Variations" and more contemporary
in "Barbie 2000" and "The 20th century taps
The musical selection was very diverse in
"Barbie 2000" and it ranged from performers
like The Mills Brothers to Elvis Presley via Little
Richard.
There was a variety of musical genres
throughout the performance. Classical music
composers and performers such as Vivaldi and
Vanessa Mae were featured along with con-
temporary performers like Velva Blu, Tom
Wasinger and Jim Harvey. Unique Percussive
rhythms added zest to "Tap History
The overture was a choreography titled
"Rustic Wedding Variations" performed to
music composed by Karl Goldmark. The piece
was well orchestrated with a choreography
directed by Joseph Carow and the dancers
demonstrated very good abilities in working
as group.
"Barbie 2000" was choreographed by
Patricia Pertallion, and it was performed with
a humorous and ironic edge featuring a drag
queen as Barbie. It also featured a funny Go-
rilla and some sexy dominatrices that re-
ceived a big ovation from the public. The
dancers of this piece added good facial and
body expressions to their performances
which was a bonus to the quality of this
piece.
"The Tap History-The 20th Century
Taps" piece was the first part of the spec-
tacle. It was divided in five parts and the
last part was the greatest one. The decors
were completely changed. The theater was
dark and the public could only see the fluo-
rescent shoes of the tappers. Added to that,
instead of music, students Collin Batten and
Jeremy Woodard played percussion on
empty paint buckets.
The ensembles of performers were suc-
cessful; in conveying their artistic message
because of the apparent teamwork in every
move. Each performer gave a part of him-
self in the dance and they were able to come
up together with a very expressive choreog-
raphy.
The dancers had meaningful body ex-
pressions and a good sense of acting. Also,
the costumes and sets were appropriate to
each piece. At each curtain close, applause
filled the theater.
Lighting and sound designer Ken White
and his assistants also contributed a lot to
the success of this representation with im-
pressive lighting and sound designs.
The most interesting part of "Dance
2000" was the creativity that appeared in
the various choreographer's works. It added
to the excellent and unique quality of the
performance. Dancers showed a lot of self-
discipline and endless practice sessions
through their well-coordinated perfor-
mances.
"Dance 2000" was a successful perfor-
mance, showcasing the talent and hard work
of the dancers, production staff and chore-
ographers.
This writer can be contacted
at eakakpo@tec.ecu.edu.
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iy, May 2, 2000
es@tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian
features@tec.ecu.edu
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j.edu.
(7-571 sails into theaters
WWII submarine flick offers
great intensity, entertainment
Maura Buck
FEATURES ASSISTANT EDITOR
There is a new fish in the sea and it's creating
some major waves at the box office despite the fact
that the film was released April 21.
U-571 contains stars such as Matthew
McConaughey, Jon Bon Jovi, Harvey Keitel and Bill
Paxton while telling the story of a team of U.S. Sol-
diers during World War II. The soldiers are sent on
a mission to sneak aboard a disabled German U-
boat (or as we know it, a submarine) to steal an en-
cryption device. This device would help America
and its allies win the war and take down Hitler's
regime.
Lt. Andrew Tyler, played by McConaughey, has yet
to attain command of his own boat because Commander
Mike Dahlgren claims that he is not ready. When their
plan fails, McConaughey finds himself in command of
eight other men desperately trying to keep things in
order in a half-dying ship.
In fact, not only is the en-
gine dying, but also every-
thing is in German. Oh, and
let us not forget that there
are only a few torpedoes left.
Throughout the dura-
tion of the picture, there is
an overwhelming eerie ner-
vousness of not knowing
what lurks out there in the
water. Between depth
charge explosions and mis-
siles, the crew is continually
fighting an uphill battle
(Photos courtesy of the
World Wide Web)
against an enemy with the upper hand.
The overall war themes leave many viewers com-
paring this film to Sav-
ing Private Ryan, a mo-
tion picture that
thrived on character
development. This
film, on the contrary,
Is more dependent on
the plot instead of fo-
cusing on the charac-
ters. Truly, the film
provides viewers edge-of-your-seat suspense, not to
mention intensity from start to finish.
Though surely not every aspect of U-S71 is ac-
curate in accordance to actual battles during WWII,
it does give an accurate account of the historical
significance of war-times as well as a peek into the
navy as opposed to the typical ground-soldier story.
John Mastow, director and co-writer, incorporates
historical submarine films such as Crimson Tide and
Hunt for Red October into this film and then reinvents
those scenes to suit his personal style. However the
film works because it is both exciting and interest-
ing.
What sets this film apart from others is its use of
cinematography as well as the talented cast. Perhaps
one of the greatest attributes to the actors is the emo-
tion that seems to come so natural to their situation.
They yell, scream, sweat and breathe appropriately
and believably in each terrifying scene.
Although movie prices are utterly ridiculous, this
is one film that is worth seeing for its entertainment
value. Despite the running time of 118 minutes, each
minute is full of a passion inspired by an evident
commitment by the cast and crew as well as a patri-
otic tribute to soldiers everywhere.
This writer can be contacted at mbuck@tec.ecu.edu. '
Residents wonder why their walls keep rumbling
RANDOLPH, Mass. (AP)�Every so often, at no par-
ticular hour and with no apparent warning, the houses
on Marie Way start to rumble.
Windows shake. Dishes and glasses vibrate so
loudly it sounds like a cross between a helicopter and
a jackhammer. Pictures sometimes fall from the walls,
and residents on this suburban street about IS miles
south of Boston tumble from their beds.
The episodes began two years ago-and have re-
peated every month or two, but sometimes more of-
ten.
And nobody knows why.
Residents have no shortage of theories about what
causes the episodes, which last anywhere from a few
seconds to five minutes or more. Some blame earth-
quakes, traffic or the methane-burning trash facility
across the road.
Andrew Curtis, 10, who lives on the street, joked
that aliens might be responsible.
So far, it's as good a guess as any.
Most residents agree that none of the explanations
fit, considering the timing and nature of the episodes
and the small area where they take place.
"I haven't the foggiest idea said resident Tony
Panarelli, who slept for months with a video recorder
at his side to capture the vibrations on tape.
James Curtis, Andrew's father, said he and his fam-
ily moved into the neighborhood just a couple months
before the trembling started.
"It was kind of a surprise one night to get woken
up-the car alarms were going off Curtis recalled. "To
me, it's sounds like a helicopter about to land on the
roof. Everything really shakes, and you look up in the
sky, and there's nothing there.
"It's been a nuisance, and I'd like the nuisance to
stop
John Ebel, a Boston College seismologist, was
brought in by the town to solve the problem after a
town meeting in January. Sd'far, he's got a few leads,
but no solid answers.
Ebel distributed surveys around the neighborhood
and set up instruments to measure the vibrations and
waited until the phenomenon came back. When it fi-
nally returned in March, Ebel had the data he needed
to get started.
First, the numbers showed the vibrations were
monochromatic, or of a single frequency, suggesting a
machine could be responsible.
"There's no natural source that I know of, either
earthquakes or rock movements of any sort that would
be so monochromatic Ebel said. "Earthquakes are rich
in many frequencies. When we rule out natural sources
Double Coupons
B Up to and including
food k Drug mtkuti See store for details.
like that, then a machine would be the next guess
Ebel confirmed the nature of the vibrations when
he saw Panarelli's tape.
Looking closely, Ebel saw that while glasses were
shaking in Panarelli's house, a chandelier was not sway-
ing in relation to its base. Because different objects vi-
brate at different frequencies, that again suggested there
was only one frequency of vibration.
The initial data also helped Ebel pin down the
source as somewhere near Marie Way and its surround-
ing streets. He can't confirm it any closer until he sets
up multiple seismographs, and that process has been
held up due to equipment problems.
Ebel also wants to digitize Ihe sound on Panarelli's
tape to get further information.
"Right now, I just don't have a good guess he said.
"The level of the vibrations seems pretty strong, so
we're talking about something that could put a fair
amount of energy into the ground itself
Once, working in Germany's Black Forest, Ebel said
he had encountered a similar problem and discovered
the vibrations were caused by sawmills.
But he conceded the brevity and unusual timing of
the vibrations in Randolph-they often strike very early
in the morning�clouds the picture. Companies that
operate in the surrounding area have all said they don't
operate machines capable of producing such an effect.
The best guess-and it's still just that�is that it's some
kind of powerful machine very close to the ground and
in a house on Marie Way or a nearby street. But Ebel
says his job is to provide whatever help science cah
and not to knock on doors.
"At that point, you're kind of in to the realm of
human behavior he said. "Any of the residents is as
much an expert as I am at speculating on those mat-
ters ;
Ebel said the research offers a welcome challenge
and a change of pace from teaching.
"Here's a case where seismology is trying to help
out the average citizen he said. "They have something
they don't understand. And the science can help ad-
dress the question
Of course, science hasn't found the answer. But that,
Ebel says, makes the problem a good example of the
scientific process.
"It's a microcosm he said. "It really represents the
way science works. We don't know what the answer s
and we don't know when we'll get the answer, but we're
pretty sure if we keep studying it we should be able to
figure this out
D0KING FOR A
MMER JOB?
FEATURES WRITERS
NEEDED
Apply at the 7EC office on the second floor of the Student Publications
Congratulations
Graduates!
from
Dowdy Student Stores
SELECT
Alumni
MERCHANDISE
including
select in-stock frames
apparel
ther alumni items
��

Sale runs
Tuesday, May 2
to Friday, May 12
Student Stores
Ronald E. Dowdy
Where your dollars support scholars!
Wrisht Buildins � 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu





jP- ' The East Carolinian
.lHWw.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, May 2, 200p
features@tec.ecu.edtj
Barefoot on the Mall 2000:
No shoes
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Above: Senior Kathy Black is instructing senior
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ALKATZ
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$2 ADMISSION WITH ECU ID FROM 9-9:30
On Thursday, April 27,
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fuesday, May 2, 2000
tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian If
features@tec.ecu.edu
ns:
JSIC
ILLY"
FALKVILLE, Ala. (AP)-Getting a haircut in Falkville
bould be a mouth-watering reminder for customers
Jtyled In a former barbecue restaurant.
Although sandwiches aren't sold there anymore, the
arbecue aroma hasn't totally evaporated from the new
business, "Backstreet Barber Shop offering a rustic
front porch with century-old boards and cedar posts
from a bam at Lacon.
Tina Rogers, an owner of the building, kept a rusty
pair of scissors hanging from a nail inside to remind
Former barbecue joint home for haircuts
her of the former tenant, Chub's Backstreet Barbecue.
"The workers were going to toss them, but 1 like
antiques and old things Rogers said.
She and husband Charlie have been business part-
ners In Charlie's Food Mart on Morgan County 55 East
since 1986. Four years ago, they opened the barbecue
joint around the corner.
Kim Miller began to work at Charlie's as a clerk in
the evenings and on weekends, while attending day
barbering classes at Calhoun Community College.
Billy Evans, Rogers' brother-in-law, was in the store
one day and oked, "If the barbecue place doesn't work
out, you could open a barbershop
Miller didn't think much about that Idea then. But
she still dreamed of having a business.
She and a friend, Tanya Henderson, had taken
barbering classes at Calhoun from the same instruc-
tor and talked about a partnership.
"One day, Charlie walked In and said, 'I know of a
perfect little building for a barbershop "
Rogers said he wasn't aware of Evans' off-handed - 1
remark about three years earlier to Miller, but, "I knew
she was determined on a career in barbering and !�
thought she might be interested in her own shop
He said the barbecue store was taking so much time
that the anchor business suffered. So they moved I
barbecue service into the Food Mart.
The barber partners came in and started serviil
haircuts next door.
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The East Carolinian
wtyw.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
sports@tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Martinez angers
players, fans
Pedro Martinez remained un-
beaten by the Indians on Sunday,
despite being ejected from the
game in eighth inning for hitting
Roberto Alomar.
Many Indians players also
thought Martinez was deliberately
throwing way inside at Einar
Oiaz, who doubled twice off him
in the seventh inning. They were
even more upset by his refusal to
join the bench-clearing fight when
Cleveland pitcher Charles Nagy
hit Jose Offerman in the eighth
inning.
Moments after being taunted
by Indians reliever Scott
Kamieniecki for not coming out to
fight, Martinez hit Alomar in the
right buttock with a pitch. The two
teams again met in the infield to
brawl, but Martinez was the only
one ejected. He was booed by
fans as he walked to the Boston
dugout.
Grant knocked out
in second round
Lennox Lewis pummeled
Michael Grant in a short heavy-
weight title match on Saturday
night.
"Every time I hit him he went
down, so I just kept hitting him
Lewis said.
jt. Grant came out with a fury
on the opening bell, but was
�quickly stopped by Lewis' hard
hits.
It was stupidity on my part
Grant said about his first-round
strategy.
Grant's 32-fight winning
-streak was crushed by a strong
right uppercut by Lewis at 2:53
�In the second round. He
'Struggled to get to his feet be-
fore the 10 count, but couldn't
;makeit.
Lewis' next fight is expected
;to be against Francois Botha on
iikily 15 in London.
Clemson football
player dies at 20
Rranrion Rouse. 20-vear-old
piemson defensive end, died cf
�a heart attack in a movie theater
'Saturday night. He was taken to
�Oconee Memorial Hospital but
�culd not be revived.
I Rouse, who was redshirted
s a freshman, took part in
spring drills, but has never
iplayed for the Tigers.
"Our thoughts and prayers
l)o out to the family said Coach
Temmy Bowden. The players
and the coaching staff were all
extremely touched by Brandon.
I spoke to his family this after-
noon and expressed our condo-
lences. He will be missed by
all
Wood to return for
Astros game Tuesday
�- Pitcher Kerry Wood will re-
tun to the majors after missing
all of last season to play for the
Chicago Cubs. The 1998 Na-
tional League Rookie of the
Vear hasn't pitched a game
since Game 3 of the first-round
playoffs against the Braves in
4998. He blew out his elbow last
ir during spring training and
reconstructive surgery in
Track teams head to prestigious meet
Men need lower times
to qualify for NCAAs
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Coming off of a successful CAA
Championships, the ECU men's and
women's track and field teams headed
to Philadelphia for the 106th annual
Penn Relays. The prestigious meet is
referred to as the "Super Bowl of track
and field
The women's track team arrived in
Philadelphia fresh off of their first con-
ference title.
"We did pretty well coming off of
(the CAA Championships) said Head
track Coach Matt Munson. "It was
tough to get motivated, but Penn is a
very good motivator
The Pirates got good performances
out of thrower Crystal Frye and fresh-
man high jumper Colleen McGinn.
Frye overcame the cold weather on
Thursday to place third in the shot put.
"It was one of those days when you
compete hard but your performance
doesn't match the effort Munson
said.
McGinn's third-place finish in the
high jump came on her highest jump
of the season. McGinn cleared 5'7 a
personal best by half an inch.
"She's been jumping 5'6 12" all
year long Munson said. "So her com-
ing out and jumping 57" was good for
her confidence. So we're glad she did
that
The Lady Pirates also got strong
performances from hurdler Ayana
Coleman, who placed 13th overall in
the 400-meter hurdles. Teammate
Kiona Kirkpatrick placed 24th overall.
In the 4xl00-meter relay, the team of
Nicky Goins, Demicko Picott, Carmen
Weldon and Rasheca Barrow placed
24th out of 81 teams. In the ECAC sec-
tion of the meet, the 4x400-meter re-
lay squad placed fourth overall.
The 4x800-meter relay squad placed
18th in a field of 33. Meanwhile, the
distance medley squad placed 13th.
Toni Kilgore placed 12th in the triple
jump in Saturday's competition.
On the men's side, the 4x40O-meter
relay squad entered the meet looking
to qualify for the prestigious Champi-
onship of America race. The Pirates'
qualifying time of 3:09.27 was the 12th
fastest of the day. However, the team
did not qualify for the championship
final. Instead they would race in the
IC4A section. They placed fifth overall
with a time of 3:07.02.
Currently the team is ranked eighth
in the country and needs to get some
low time to qualify for the NCAA
Championships later this month.
"We didn't get the time said Head
men's track Coach Bill Carson. "We're
not very good at running in front of
everybody. We're not good
frontrunners. We tend not to push it
The Pirates did get strong showings
from the 4x 100-meter relay squad of
Darren Tuitt, James Alexander, Frankie
Green and Anthony Sherrard placing
fifth in the IC4A section with a time of
41.45. In the 400-meter hurdles, Lynn
Stewart placed sixth with a time of
51.61. Stewart's time was a career best
as well as a school record.
In the 4x800-meter relay, the team
of Ricky Bell, Brian Beil, Stu Will and
Antonio Gray placed 25th overall.
"It was a good meet for our young-
sters said Head Cross Country Coach
Len Klepack. "I think they saw why it's
considered the Super Bowl of track and
field
In the 5,000 meters, Justin England
placed 30th with a time of 14:51.24.
This writer can be contacted at
spons@tec.ecu.edu.
1
ftST


�liT
ECU'S Justin England (foreground) placed 30th in the 5,000 meters, (tile photo)
Baseball gains two wins, one loss against GMU
Pirates just miss sweep
with loss on Sunday
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU'S baseball squad headed to
George Mason this weekend. The
Pirates won the first two and lost
Sunday's finale.
The Pirates improved their
record to 37-15 (11-7 in the CAA).
On Friday, the Pirates beat the Pa-
triots 8-3. The team was led by
sophomore Chad Tracy who
launched a three-run homer in the
top of the first. The Pirates jumped
to a 4-0 lead in the first inning. The
Pirates added a run in the fourth
and four and more runs in the
sixth en route to a 9-6 victory.
"Everyone has really started
feeling like the team is playing bet-
ter and we are excited about
that said outfielder, James
Molinari. "Last week we were able
to come away with four wins in
five games after struggling for a
couple of weeks and that is a posi-
tive. We have been playing bet-
ter as a team and been playing
much better offensively, which
we need to do to continue to
win
, On Saturday, the Pirates won
their fourth straight game by de-
feating the Patriots 8-3. Once
again, Tracy provided the Pirates
with some scoring punch by hit-
ting the first of two two-run hom-
ers in the top of the sixth. Tracy
hit another in the ninth to com-
plete the Pirates' rout of the GMU.
One aspect of the game that
the Pirates focused on was steal-
ing bases.
"We talked about it earlier in
the year, that we were not a great
base-stealing team said Assistant
Coach Kevin McMullan. "We de-
cided that we needed to put guys in
motion to help advance runners. We
have done that more lately and it has
shown in our putting more runs on
the board. But you have to give the
credit to the players, as they are the
ones out there doing the things that
need to be done to win
On Sunday, the Pirates fell to
GMU 11-7. GMU put up six runs in
the fourth inning to bolt to an early
lead and put the game away.
Molinari hit a solo home run in the
fifth to help bring the Pirates to six
runs. However, the Patriots would
prove too much as they would hold
on to secure the win.
"Anytime you can go on the road
and get two wins, it is a pretty good
weekend said second baseman
Nick Schnabel. "Of course we have
liked to get the sweep, but that is in
the past and we have to keep it there.
Now we have to look forward to
Tuesday at Elon and keep on work-
ing toward our goals
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
ECU'S Eric Bakich steps in against VCU earlier this season, (file photo)
OPINION COLUMN
What it
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Coming into this year, Pirate fans had good reason to
be excited including a football schedule full of tough op-
ponents and a slew of intriguing home games, a new men's
basketball coach and men's and women's teams that were
picked to place near the top of the conference.
They had good reason to be excited, but they did not
know how right they would be.
Most of what made this past year special came from a
football team that united a community and provided hap-
piness in a time where there was little.
The season that began in Charlotte with a promising
win over West Virginia at first looked like it may turn out
to be a pleasant story. Soon it would take on a larger role.
When the floods brought by Hurricane Floyd decimated
much of Greenville, the team became a source of pride for
the school and the community when they notched wins
over South Carolina and Miami.
It is the Miami game that may be the greatest moment
of the year. Playing in Raleigh's Carter-Finley Stadium, the
Pirates came back from a 20-point second half deficit to
upset the ninth-ranked Hurricanes.
Following the game, hordes of ECU student piled onto
the turf celebrating the win. This put the Pirate football
program into the national spotlight and made the poll-
sters take notice. More importantly, if only for a short
time, it took the minds of the ECU community off of the
devastation in Greenville and gave them something to
be happy about.
The team spent most of the rest of the season in the
Top 25 as a showdown with arch-rival N.C. State loomed.
On November 20, the Wolfpack played ECU in
Greenville for the first time. The Pirates beat State 23-6 in
front of a Dowdy-Ficklen record crowd of over 50,000.
The win gave the Pirates a berth to the inaugural Mobile
Alabama Bowl.
In the bowl game, ECU fell to Texas Christian. The
team finished with a record of 9-3. However, their season
would be measured by something more important than
wins and losses.
In October, ECU announced that they would join
Conference USA in two years. The move would improve
the Pirates' standing in many sports, most notably bas-
ketball. In December it was announced that the CAA
would not welcome ECU back for the 2000-2001 season.
When basketball season rolled around, ECU's men's
team began play with a new coach, Bill Herrion They
were also picked-by many to place first or second in what
would prove to be their final season in the CAA
The team suffered through injuries and blown leads
to make it a tough experience for many Pirate fans The
team finished near the bottom of the conference The situ-
ation got worse in April when many players came for-
ward stating that some of Herrion's comments in prac-
tices incited a brawl between two players before the CAA
Tournament.
Despite the basketball program's setbacks the 1999
2000 season reminded us why we love college sports.
The success experienced a football team helped a com-
munity heal following a disaster. It showed that to be a
Pirate fan in 2000 was something to be treasured.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
jesday, N
v.tec.ec
(above) EC!
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over 50.00C
victory over
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tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports@tec.ecu.edu
Images of a Pirate season
I
(above) ECU'S Travis Holcomb-Faye looks to pass at one of ECU'S home basketball games; (above
right) ECU'S Jamie Wilson rushes against N.C. State. The Pirates would win the game 23-6 in front of
over 50,000 (file photo); (right) ECU fans storm the turf at Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium following ECU'S
victory over N.C. State (file photo); (far right) Jeff Kerr made an impact in ECU'S appearance in the
Inaugural Mobile Alabama Bowl (file photo).
With Exams, looming
stress levels can be
high. Students and staff
of ECU are invited to
visit the Newman
Center for counseling
and relaxation. There is
a daily mass at 8am
Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday
with a 5:30pm mass on
kVi�il ImKli KVm It1 �lvl�il � IJ
dinner. The Newman
Center is located at 953
East 10th St.
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Phone 752-0952 752-0753
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The East Carolinian
vvww.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
Lukas protege set for first derby
LOUISVILLE, Ky. (AP)-lf there's one thing Todd Fletcher learned in
his years working for trainer D. Wayne Lukas, it is that there's strength
in numbers.
This may be Pletcher's first trip to the Kentucky Derby since he set
out on his own five years ago, but the Lukas protege boasts a Lukas-like
contingent for Saturday's race at Churchill Downs.
In fact, Pletcher has four entries to Lukas' three in what is expected
to be a full 20-horse field for the 1 1-4-mile Derby.
"Some people might say, Oh, you know this guy's here with four
horses. He's trying to make a big splash or whatever the 32-year-old
Pletcher said Sunday in front of Barn 42. "We're here because all four
horses deserve a chance to be here
Not only will this be the first Derby for the New York-based trainer,
but with four 3-year-olds, Pletcher also makes history: No other rookie
Derby trainer has saddled as many starters.
Pletcher's foursome is no pushover, either. He trains Blue Grass run-
ner-up More Than Ready for James Scatuorchio; Arkansas Derby win-
ner Graeme Hall for Eugene and Laura Melnyk; and undefeated Trippi
and Impeachment, third in the Arkansas Derby, for Cot Campbell's
Dogwood Stable.
"I'm pleased and excited about it Pletcher said. "But it's really hard
to get too caught up in it because we're here with a job to do and we
have four horses to do it with
Spoken like a true Lukas disciple-business, after all, is business.
Lukas, meanwhile, will send out Blue Grass winner High Yield, Ex-
change Rate and Commendable as he tries for his 13th win in a Triple
Crown race.
Due to common ownership, two of Pletcher's horses-Trippi and Im-
peachment-will be coupled in the betting with two of Lukas' horses-
High Yield and Commendable. The formidable quartet could end as
the betting favorite over Fusaichi Pegasus.
Lukas, looking for his fifth Derby win, has a 20-year streak of sad-
dling at least one Derby starter. The Hall of Earner has started a record
35 horses in the Derby, and on five occasions, he sent out three or
more starters, including five in '96.
Pletcher started working for Lukas in 1989 after learning the "train-
ing fundamentals" from his father, Jake, who worked primarily on the
Midwest racing circuit. In 1996, he came away from his Lukas experi-
ence with a much better understanding of what it takes to run a highly
successful stable.
Under Pletcher's watch, Thunder Gulch won the '95 Florida Derby
and then won the Derby and Belmont Stakes forLukas.
On his own, Pletcher's best campaigner until this year was Jersey
Girl, who won seven in a row including the Acorn, Mother Goose and
The Test in 1998.
"What Wayne's organization does is it operates on a couple of fronts
so everything has to be methodical and organized said Pletcher, who
has a degree in animal science from Arizona. "And there's a lot of at-
tention to details. If you were working for someone with 20 horses,
maybe you wouldn't get all that
Pletcher seems to have the hang of it now. He has 80 horses in
training in Kentucky and New York.
"He's turned into a terrific horseman with a great mind and a great
flair for detail Campbell said.
Other Lukas graduates include trainers Mark Hennig and Dallas
Stewart. Asked about Pletcher preparing for his first Derby, Lukas said:
"1 wish all of them had horses (here), and someday they will. And he
(Pletcher) has four
More Than Ready, to be ridden by John Velasquez, looks to be
Pletcher's best bet.
In the 1 1-8-mile Blue Grass, he battled High Yield in the stretch
before losing by a head. He has six wins, two seconds and a third in 10
career starts, but has yet to win going around two turns.
"He established himself early on as a very good horse Pletcher
said of his colt who won his first five starts. "We knew we had a classics
type horse then. He was second in (he Louisiana Derby his first time
around two turns, and ran better in the Blue Grass. He's moving in the
right direction
Lewis' assault charges are inadmissible
Atlanta(AP)-Three previous assault charges against Baltimore Ravens
star Ray Lewis cannot be admitted as evidence in his murder trial, a
judge ruled Monday.
The assault charges, all of them dropped, were filed by three women.
Judge Alice Bonner said the charges were not similar enough to those
Lewis now faces.
Prosecutors argued the assault charges showed Lewis had a history of
violence and rebutted the defense's claim that Lewis acted as peacemaker
during the street fight after the Super Bowl in Atlanta.
Ed Garland, Lewis' defense lawyer, noted the dropped charges carry
"a danger of unfair prejudice and confusion
The defense on Monday also asked the judge to suppress evidence
collected at Lewis' home in Baltimore.
Defense lawyer Don Samuel said police did not have sufficient rea-
son to look for evidence of a crime there and said the search warrant was
too broad.
Prosecutors said police searched Lewis' home because most of his
things had been removed from his Atlanta hotel room. They also sus-
pected co-defendant Reginald Oakley might have returned to Lewis'
home.
The judge did not immediately rul� on that matter. The court planned
to hear further motions Monday.
Lewis and two co-defendants are expected to stand trial May IS on
charges they murdered Jacinth Baker, 21, and Richard Lollar, 24, after a
party following the Super Bowl.
Lewis' lawyers might find it difficult to continue their strategy por-
traying the linebacker as a devoted family man who hardly knew two
others charged in the deaths.
A newspaper reported Sunday that Lewis appeared with a co-defen-
dant in a sexually explicit mail-order video. The video shows Lewis and
Joseph Sweeting watching party guests perform sex acts for-money.
Defense attorneys have said Lewis hardly knew Sweeting and the other
co-defendant, Reginald Oakley.
The videotape, "Luke's Freak Show: Cancun 1999 was produced at a
party thrown in the Mexican resort town by rap musician Luther Campbell.
In it, Lewis enters with Sweeting and dances shirtless between two
scantily dressed and gyrating women.
Campbell, leader of the rap group 2 Live Crew, told "The Atlanta Jour-
nal-Constitution" he is friends with Lewis and Sweeting, a fledgling mu-
sic producer and strip club promoter from Miami. The three met when
Lewis was playing with the University of Miami.
Campbell, who wears Lewis' No. 52 Ravens jersey while promoting
videos and CDs on his Web site, called Sweeting a "good friend" of Lewis.
Oakley, the other co-defendant, does not appear in the video, which
has not been mentioned in the case.
Sweeting has a long criminal history, including convictions for grand
theft and possession of a firearm by a convicted felon. The charges stem
from the mid-1980s.
"Joe had some problems but that's all long ago his brother Anthony
said. "Some of that is IS years ago, half his life
Oakley also has a significant criminal past, with about 25 criminal
counts against him between 1985 and 1992. Charges include assault, em-
bezzlement, possession of a stolen vehicle, and assault on a police officer.
Lennox Lewis displays heart in KO victory
NEW YORK (AP)-Lennox Lewis gave an impressive answer to a ques-
tion he thought should never have been asked.
The 34-year-old British champion retained the WBC and 1BF heavy-
weight titles with a second-round knockout of Michael Grant, displaying
his punching power and looking nothing like the fighter who had split
two bouts with Evander Holyfield.
"This was an opportunity for me to show my aggressive side Lewis
said Saturday night. "There's always been a question about my heart. 1
don't know where they got that one. Lennox Lewis has a great heart
Exposing Grant as a fighter who wasn't ready for the big time may
have also done wonders for Lewis' image.
"I don't think I should be judged by the two fights with Evander
Holyfield Lewis (36-1-1) said. "I think this proves I've got awesome power
and 1 can take you out with one punch
Grant (30-1-1) felt a lot more than one punch. The challenger was
knocked down three times in the first round and then knocked out in the
second as Lewis showed Grant attacking was not a solid strategy.
"I was surprised his corner sent him out for the second round Lewis
said. "1 thought Michael Grant's style was the perfect style for me to show-
case my talent
The 6-foot-7, 250-pound Grant admitted to "stupidity on my part" for
trying to take the fight to Lewis, but it was clear that a fighter who only
began boxing six years ago was no match for the heavyweight champion.
"Lennox is a champion for a rea-
son Grant said.
Lewis still holds the WBC and
IBF version of the titles-a federal
judge ordered the WBA to strip him
for not fighting the top contender-
but it may be more significant that
he showed he could fight like a big
heavyweight champion.
That didn't happen in two cau-
tious fights with Holyfield.
"I'm glad he didn't go another
12-rounder said Emanuel Steward,
Lewis' trainer. "Lennox actually enjoys exciting fights
A little more than halfway through the first round at Madison Square
Garden, Lewis threw a punch to the body followed by a right to the head
that put Grant down for the first time. By the time the bell sounded to
end the first round, Grant had been down two more times and the only
question was whether he would come out for the second round.
He did, and managed to last until late in the round, when a Lewis
uppercut floored Grant, and he was finally counted out at 2:53 of the
second round.
Lewis, who earned some10 million, emerged from the fight atop the
heavyweight ranks, no matter what happens with the WBA title.
Holyfield is expected to fight John Ruiz for the WBA title in June.
"Whoever picks it up is just a paper champion Lewis said. "I'm still
the undisputed champion
Lewis is scheduled to fight Francois Botha, last seen getting cold-cocked
by Mike Tyson, on July 15 in London. Then there's a possible date with
contender David Tua in September.
But the heavyweight division doesn't have a lot of fighters who have
both the name recognition and the skills to challenge Lewis. That could
pose problems for future earnings potential, as Saturday's fight with Grant
was hardly a blockbuster on pay-per-view.
?KESWICK
1510 Bridle Circle
Greenville, nc 27834
APARTMENTS
FREEDOM
Are you a student who would like the Freedom of renting an apartment
without the worry of your roommate paying their portion of the rent ????:
if the aimer is yes then
KESWICK APARTMENTS IS THE PLACE FOR YOU
We offer,
liiilvniHiI leases JJ
9 month lease terns
Fully cauiffed Fitness center
lighted tennis courts
Swimming pool
Saml Volleyball court
WasherDryer hookups
For more information call 355-2198 to experience
Trie Keswick style - Make it yours
150 Bridle Circle
Greenville, .NC 27834
??
On site laundry facilities
Walk-in closets
24 hour emergency maintenance
Wood burning fireplaces
Mini blinds and vertical blinds
Ceiling fans
Pets welcome
�t
' tented!J
Past participants from
Legislators' School for Youth
Leadership Development.
If ! nded Legislators' School at
lina University or We
Carolina University, please contact the
School office at ECU al
islati
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ail.e
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Every Night- 22 oz Kirin Ichiban bottle wlime- $2 75

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The East Carolinian
IEJ0EYSH0W
COMICS
Tuesday Mav 2. 2000
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, v4,m - - � � A. 4 . 4 �
m The East Carolinian
wWw.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, I
www.tec.t
FOR RENT
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
300month. available now. 125
ery Street Call 758-6596. ask for
omas
9R RENT three 5 bedroom houses
ose to campus. Call 704-236-1577.
�CU AREA one. two. and three bed-
room houses and duplexes. All with
rfeatair. off street parking pets ok.
spme fenced yards. Call 830-9502.
WESLEY COMMONS North. 1 bed-
ripm $340. 2 bedrooms $410. Wa-
tr and sewer included. Available now
d pre leasing for fall semester. Wain-
ht Property Management 756-6209.
M FOR rent in house five min-
es from campus. Subrenter needed
f Jr the summer. Mid-May through Mid-
4ugust. Very affordable Call Gerald
fgtmore information 329-1483.
-jp�
IfKF TO lease a 4-bedroom apartment
sflthe Player's Club. Rentdeposit
3260. WD included; on ECU bus ro-
ue; available after this Spring session.
Qall Carla at 353-5056.
TWO BEDROOM 1 12 bath town-
House. ECU bus route, water, laun-
dry, pool, small pets, ample parking
$350 no deposit. ASAP call 756-7755
dr 355-6851 or 4125807.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS 8 Jasmine
Gardens accepting deposits for fall se-
mester. 1 bedroom $350 per month.
2 bedroom starting at $410. Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FUN, FRIENDLY & RESPONSIBLE
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED TO
SHARE 4 BR APT. BEGINNING IN
AUGUST. $275MO 14 UTILI-
TIES & CABLE. CALL KRISTEN 9
353-2665.
1997 MITSUBISHI Galant ES All pow-
er, auto. 37,000 miles. $12,000obo
excellent condition 752-5375 leave
message.
BRAND NEW! Box spring and mat-
tress $70. dresser $40. night table
$35. Call Tara at 329-8318.
FOR SALE: cream colored leather
couch. In OK condition. $75obo Call
757-2064. ask for Devon or Jon.
FOR SALE! New floral couch w pas-
tel colors and queen-size pull out bed.
$350obo. Green recliner chair $30
obo. Moving sale. Hurry! Call Amy
329-0040.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER JOBSI The Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Department is con-
tinuing to hire for their upcoming sum-
mer programs. A variety of positions
are available with the Athletics' Divi-
sion to include: Camp Supervisor and
Camp Counselors for the Sports Mini-
Camps. Baseball coaches. Skate park
staff and Softball league scorekeepers.
For more information, please contact
the Athletic Office at 329-4550 Mon-
day-Friday after 2 pm.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER RECEPTIONIST. Looking
for an outgoing person to help in a
fast paced office. 8am to 5pm Mon-
day-Friday. Send resume to 3481-A
South Evans Street Greenville. NC
27834.
2 CLEAN responsible females need-
ed ASAP. $250month plus 13 ca-
ble, electric, phone. $200 deposit.
Some pets OK w deposit. 3 blocks
from campus. Big house, garage, yard.
Call 758-7249.
SERVICES
LIFEGUARD WANTED call 752-6794
6-9pm.
FULL-TIME CHILDCARE needed this
summer (mid-June-Mid August) for
two children (ages 5 & 9). Own trans-
portation required. Call 758-5806.
ECU AREA Big five bedroom two bath
House. Off street parking. Gas heat
window air. Refrigerator with icemak-
er. pets OK. WD hookup. Call 830-
SS02.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
snare a beautiful houseexpenses,
fjjlose to campus. Available August or
December until June 2001. Call 754-
SUBLEASE 2 bedroom 2 full bath
apartment in Arlington Square In-
cludes water, sewer, cable, WD hook-
uQJdishwasher. and fireplace. Access
tcJJJool and weight room $500 month
Available mid-May. 754-2526
CANNON COURT 2 bedroom 1 12
b&th townhouse. Basic cable includ-
efj. $475 per month. Available now
and accepting deposits for fall semes-
ter. Wainright Property Management
766-6209.
1IBDR- 2 bdr. water and cable includ-
ed. ECU bus line. pool, on-site mngt.
S maintenance. Pets allowed. 758-
4D15.
SPACIOUS 2 & 3 bedroom townhous-
ek. 2 BR 1 12 BA. 2 BR 2 12 BA. 3
BR 1 12 BA WD hook-ups. new ap-
pliances, newly renovated near ECU
752-1899 day 561-2203 pgr night.
CtNE BEDROOM, two person apart-
rrient for sublease for the summer. Call
762-2529. Ask for Candace or Cherry.
CYPRESS GARDENS 1 bedroom
$395-$420, 2 bedrooms $475-$500.
Basic cable & water and sewer includ-
ed Available now and accepting ap-
plications for fall semester Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
SUB-LEASE Apartment. 2 BR locat-
ed 1 mile from campus. Starting mid-
day: May is paid for. Call 757-0795
immediately.
mi TANNING beds! Two bed two
bth, washer dryer connect. Private
patio with storage closet, sliding glass
dpor, swimming pool. Summer sublet
$�65 call 355-3404.
ECU AREA unique one bedroom
house Central heatair six foot priva-
cy fence around backyard. WD hook-
up off street parking, pets OK. Only
$425. Call 830-9502.
SUBLEASE 4-LESS Large 2-bedroom
available in May. Eastbrook Apts. ECU-
bus route. Cable, water, trash includ-
ed Only $425month. $25 off rent,
$160 off deposit ($325) Call Nick 754-
2982.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
WANT A BREAK?
Get 12 off security deposit
through March 31, 2000
1 or 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, range
refrigerator, free
watersewer,
washerdryer
i hookups, laundry
; facilities, 5 blocks
from campus,
ECU bus services.
Wesley
Commons
South:
-All properties have 24 hr.
emergency maintenance
Call 758- 1921
r�op�u I t
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR apt. on ECU busline be-
ginning Aug. 1st. Must be neat and
responsible. Smokers welcome $225
month plus 12 utilities. Call Julie @
353-6707.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to move into
Dockside ASAP, or by July 5. $275
rent 13 utility. Great place to live.
Need to know by May 5. Call Dave
752-0009.
FEMALE NONSMOKING studious
roommate needed to share 3 bedroom
3 bath new apartment. $250 plus 1
3 utilities for June-May 2001 No pets,
private phone line Call 931-9467.
STUDIOUS NONSMOKING male
roommate needed ASAP Three bed-
room, private bath, washer, dryer, etc.
$300.00 month plus 13 utilities. Call
752-7136 or email
gcm0729@mail.ecu.edu
COME LIVE with the two most com-
patible roommates in Greenville. You
can live in a nice duplex with cathe-
dral ceilings, gas logs, personal drive,
and all appliances including washer
and dryer. 551-6939.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
for the 2000-2001 academic yr. Roo-
my 5 bed house 4th and Jarvis. Great
location. Lease starts in June Call 757-
1565.
TWO ROOMMATES needed to share
house one block from campus, start-
ing May 15th, nonsmoking serious
students wanted, rent 150 13 util-
ities. Call Bill at 931-9436
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students. Cam-
pus three blocks. Prefer graduate stud-
ent. Central air. ceiling fans, washer,
dryer. $250.00 plus utilities. (703) 680-
1676.
DONT LOSE your deposit for leaving
your carpet a mess. Have your carpet
professionally steamed cleaned. We'll
clean it so you don't have to. Call Ad-
vance Carpet Cleaning 493-0211.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED: Carpet cleanerFloor
technicians. No experience necessary.
Flexible schedule. Starting at $6.50
per hour. Must have a valid driver's
license. Call 756-9857 Monday-Friday.
NOW HIRING: Student patrol unit
May 8th- August 15th. possibly into
Fall. 7p.m. until 12 a.m MonSat. also
11p.m. until 7a.m. on 6-18-00 to 7-1-
00, 7-9-00 to 7-22-00. Willing to work
special events or part of summer? Call
ECU Police at 328-6787.
SUMMER BABYSITTER needed for
4 and 6 year olds. 20 hours week. Ref-
erences req'd. Call 353-5338.
ADULT ENTERTAINERS and dancers
needed. Must be 18 own phone and
transportation. No drugs. Make1500
weekly. 758-2737.
WANTED: RESPONSIBLE nonsmok-
er nonpartier as nanny for infant be-
ginning in August. Room and board
possible for right person. Must pro-
vide references. Call for interview.
355-5217.
FOR SALE
FOR SALE: Bed & nightstand, 2 large
area rugs, and computer desk. If inter-
ested, call Tneresa at 413-0346.
MCAT KAPLAN Course Study Guides
and Betz Guide for sale. Call 757-2982.
NO CREDIT check Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
East 10th St. (next to Papa Oliver's Piz-
za).
IBM PC, MSWord and Excel, Ether-
net ready. Great for a first time user or
a temporary replacement Asking 100
dollars. Call Ryan at 328-8185.
SOFA BED and Loveseat. In Good con-
dition, tan in color.100obo call 355-
5085.
1993 FORD Mustang Hatchback LX
extra clean, ac cold, 120k miles, air-
bag at PB PS. cass sunroof,
alun wheels, great gas mileage $3200
obo. 252-931-9105.
Perhaps the single
biggest deterrent to
drug abuse is communi-
cation - simply talking
with your kids about
drugs. That's almost
impossible unless
you've built a founda-
tion. By doing things
with them. By getting
involved with their
school and their sports.
By knowing their
friends. To leam more
about how to reach
your kids, call for a free
parent's handbook.
1-800-624-0100
Partnership For A
Drug-Free North Carolina
Partnership For A Drug-Free America'
1-888-732-DFNC:
WORK
S11BASE-APPT.
CallStart After Finals
FTPT, Flex. Sched's
ScholarshipsInternships Avail.
Customer SalesService
Conditions Apply
www.workforstudents.com
Greenville, NC
Asheville (828)281-2500
Charlotte (704)569-1120
DurhamCH (919)401-0002
Fayetteville (910)429-9051
Greensboro (336)856-7110
(252)215-1011
Greenville, SC (864)284-9675
N. CharlotteConcord (704)262-7420
Raleigh (919)788-9020
Tri-Cities (423)232-7880
Winston-Salem (336)766-3225
SWIM INSTRUCTORS needed June
5-Aug. 17. Call 355-5009.
BILL CLARK Homes needs a single
lamily superintendent for our expand-
ing Greenville. NC division. Position
offers competitive salary, production
bonuses, company vehicle, health
package. 401-K, paid holidays and va-
cations. Tremendous career opportun-
ity for an ambitious professional to ad-
vance within our fast growing compa-
ny. Interested parties should mail re-
sumes to: Heath Clark. Bill Clark Home.
200 E. Arlington Blvd Greenville. NC
27858. All inquiries to be reviewed and
responded to with total confidentiali-
ty-
CASHIER WANTED. Weekends only
Fun job. Must be dependable. Apply
in person at Big Splatt Paintball Park.
Sat. or Sun. only. Located on Old Pac-
tolus Hwy off US264.
THE LE Bleu Corporation, the official
bottled water of the Carolina Panthers,
is seeking a highly motivated sales rep-
resentative to expand direct sales in
the Outer Banks rentalreal estate mar-
ket. May-September 2000. Previous
beverage sales a plus. Excellent sum-
mer income potential for the right in-
dividual. Fax resume and references
to 252-491-8344 Attn:SB.
DELIVERYSALES HELP needed. Ap-
ply in person at Mattress Plus. 606 E.
Arlington Blvd. No phone calls please.
WANTED: PART-time warehouse and
delivery positions available for morn-
ing and afternoon hours. License re-
quired. Please apply in person at Lar-
ry's Carpet One. 3010 East 10th Street.
Greenville. NC. 27858. Hours of op-
eration are 8:30-5:30 Monday-Friday.
This position requires the individual
hired to operate a fork lift in order to
load and unload carpet. Contact per-
son: Carolyn Haddock 252-758-2300.
RESTAURANT RUNNERS hiring
part-time drivers. 2-way radios allow
for unparalleld freedom to study, watch
tv. or visit friends while waiting for an
order. Perfect hours for students 756-
5527. -
GREEK PERSONALS
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our newest officers: Pres.
Meade Holland. V.P. Olivia Anderson,
Sec. Becky Blancher, Treas. Lindsay
Rice, Educ. Jenny Turnball, Rush Amy
Weaver. You guys will do great!
SIGMA PI Epsilon. thank you for the
social and having us early to the band
party. Love, Alpha Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS TINA Overbee
on your new internship! We're very
proud of you! Love, your KD sisters.
ALPHA XI Delta would like to con-
gratulate all their graduates: Emily
Ische. Lauren Carrier. Denise Papa.
Mary Beth Petteway. Michelle Kimsey,
Kathy Ringold, Tiffany Hoffman, and
Lindsay Wilder! We love you and will
miss you. The sisters of Alpha Xi Del-
ta.
ALPHA XI Delta would like to wish
Carrie Brewer of Sigma Sigma Sigma
good luck on her trip to Africa! Love
your sister sorority.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA Sig-
ma Sigma on your win over Alpha Xi
Delta.
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Jamie McKean on her internship
with Glaxo Welcome this summer!
We're so proud of you! Love, your sis-
ters.
THETA CHI thanks for the social. We
had a blast! Love Gamma Sigma Sig-
ma.
CLUB SPORTS Program Assistant for
the Department of Recreational Serv-
ices needed. This position will run
from August 15. 2000 through May
15th 2001. The person will assist with
club sport gametournament admin-
istration, club rosters, payment of offi-
cials, etc Requirements: 8-12 hours
per week. CPRFirst Aid certification,
driver license and willing to work wee-
kend hours. If interested contact Gray
Hodges at 328-6387.
AFTERNOON TEACHING positions:
possible part-time hours. Monday-
Thursday 3:30-8:30 in the area of Eng-
lish, Math, Science. To learn about
teaching opportunities with Sylvan
Learning Center call 756-9383 or ap-
ply at 2428 S. Charles Blvd. Green-
ville.
LOSE WEIGHT and make $money$
Lose 7-29 lbs per month. Earn up to
$ 1200 month. 19 years of guaranteed
results! Call 757-2292 for Free Consul-
tation!
CONGRATULATIONS ANNA Cop-
perthwaite on being initiated into Al-
pha Kappa Psi. We're so proud of you!
Love your family tree.
KAPPA DELTA wishes everyone good
luck on finals!
WANTED: 2-SALESstock persons.
Capel Rug Outlet. 605- B East Green-
ville Blvd. Green.N.C. 27858. Hours:
10-2 M-F. 2-6 MF. Sat. 10-6, Sun. 1-5.
SUMMER INTERNSHIP: Learn mas-
sage techniques: gain communication
skills and earn money all at once. Only
available to the 1st 20 applicants. Fol-
lowing classes salary plus bonus in-
centives. Call 756-8160 for details.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000$ 1500
weekly. Legal lap dancing. No experi-
ence needed Age 18 up, all national-
ities 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
DOES A summer job with no time
clock appeal to you? Work from your
home, set your own hours, and have
a blast doing it! Pay yourself what
you're really worth. Visit liveitup.evi-
sionbiz.com and join the Work-at-
Home Revolution.
AUTISM SOCIETY of NC needs
Camp Counselors for summer residen-
tial camp serving children and adults
with autism. Located 30 minutes south
of Chapel Hill. Internship credit possi-
ble. Needed May 21-August 5. Con-
tact David Yell @ (919) 542-1033 or
dyell@autismsociety-nc.org.
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5.50 hour plus bonuses.
Make your own schedule. If interested
call 328-212. M-Th between the hours
of 3-6pm.
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to wish
everyone a safe and fun summer! Con-
gratulations to all graduates!
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our newly initiated sis-
ters: Melissa Franchi, Jenn Fry, Aman-
da Littleton, Aynsley Pagan. Kristen Po-
well. Holly Scott, and Amy Thomas.
We love you guys.
TO THE brothers, alumni, and friends
of Phi Sigma Pi: Hope everyone will
have an awesome summer break and
will enjoy beach week. Also, best re-
gards to our graduating seniors. Broth-
ers forever for Tau is the best.
COURTYARD TAVERN is now ac-
cepting applications for cooks, wait-
staff, and dish washers. Apply bet-
ween 2pm & 5pm. No phone calls
please.
PERSONALS
DISCREET GWM seeking same.
Please call J-Rock. 931-0289.
GWEN PHILLIS Valarie thanks for be-
ing so thoughtful in organizing a bri-
dal shower for me also a thank you
goes to the faculty and students for
all the great gifts. We will truly enjoy
them all. Speight building you are the
Greatest. Mary D. Brown.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
thank all the guys that attended our
Semi-formal Saturday. We had a blast!
DELTA ZETA would like to thank eve-
ryone for their love and support in our
time of need. We couldn't have made
it through without your help. Thanks
again.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
thank everyone who attended our Bar-
becue dinner!
NOW HIRING
ARTIST ILLUSTRATOR II
Department: MEDIA BOARD
Pay Grade: 64
Salary Range:25.797 to $
36,621
Closing Date: May 5, 2000
GRADUATION FROM HIGH
SCHOOL AND FOUR YEARS EX-
PERIENCE IN COMMERCIAL ART
OR ILLUSTRATING WORK: OR
GRADUATION FROM A TECHNI-
CAL SCHOOL PROGRAM IN COM-
MERCIAL ART AND TWO YEARS
OF EXPERIENCE: OR AN EQUIVA-
LENT COMBINA- TION OF EDU-
CATION AND EXPERIENCE Pri-
mary purpose of this position is
to provide marketing, layout and
graphic design and computer sup-
port and training to students
within the Student Media opera-
tion. Major responsibilities include
the layout, design and graphics for
various printed and electronic
marketing and training materials,
providing computer training and
support, and the supervision of
and assistance in the production
of the department's newspaper
and magazine products. Desire
comprehensive experience in the
use of Macintosh computers, with
a working knowledge of
PageMaker. Quark, Photoshop.
Word and Illustrator. Knowledge
of equivalent Windows systems
and programs is a plus, as is work
with scanners, digital cameras,
and OCR software. The qualified
applicant must work well with stu-
dents in a learning laboratory en-
vironment. Extensive work expe-
rience in desktop publishing
graphic design highly preferred.
Work schedule requires combina-
tion of weekday and evening work.
(Position 21428) Apply at http:
www.hr.ecu.eduhr
CONGRATS TO Maynard on gradua-
tion! We wish you the best! Thank you
for all the memories, the late night
sandwiches, and your fave juvey ban-
dana. Love Missie. Jules. Jason. Chris-
tian. Wendy. Jamie, and Charlie.
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Laurin Leonard on her engage-
ment to Barrett! We are so happy for
you! We wish you the best of luck!
Love, your sisters.
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma would like to
congratulate our seniors graduating:
Lacy, Sage. Lauren. Ann, Melissa. Ann.
Missy. Toni. Katie. Hilary, Kristy, Mere-
dith, Beth, Alison, Emily, Whitlow, Sar-
ah. Deanna. Lynsey. Jennifer & Taryn!
We will miss you guys!
CONGRATS TO B on graduation! Best
of wishes in the real world. I'll always
hold you up like you tried to on my
wildest nights. Thanx for all the bub-
bles. Remember B. boots don't go
with shorts, JK sweets. Love Missie.
GREEK PERSONALS
OTHER
SIGMA SIGMA Sigma wishes every-
one good luck on exams and a won-
derful summer!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Amy Fla-
nagan and Katrina Munday on their
new offices for Order of Omega! Love
your Alpha Xi Delta sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS ON being
elected as Sigma President Meade Hol-
land. We know you'll do a great job!
Love your family tree.
STUDIO APARTMENT tor sublease
Ringgold Towers, fully furnished, nice
view, available May 13-July 31. rent is
$275 per month, call 758-0038.
SOCCER COACH needed. Greenville
Stars Girls U-14 Challenge team. Paid
position mid-August - early November.
Previous coaching experience helpful
For more information, call Jan 756-
8571.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.carolinaskysports .com
NEED A DATE?
Try our campus calendar
atecaedu
��





y, May 2, 2000
ntmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, May 2, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian "fl�
adstt8tuderrtmedia.ecu.edu
NADIRAH PIPPEN
MEUNDA MINNET MANN
Sigma would tike to
lowest officers: Pres.
IP. Olivia Anderson,
:her, Treas. Lindsay
Turnball. Rush Amy
; will do great!
n. thank you for the
us early to the band
i Delta Pi.
ONSTINAOverbee
irnship! We're very
9. your KD sisters.
would like to con-
r graduates: Emily
rrier. Oenise Papa,
ay, Michelle Kimsey,
fany Hoffman, and
le love you and will
ers of Alpha Xi Del-
would like to wish
igma Sigma Sigma
trip to Africa! Love
ON8 SIGMA Sig-
win over Alpha Xi
d like to congratu-
i on her internship
ime this summer!
you! Love, your sis-
�for the social. We
iamma Sigma Sig-
3NS ANNA Cop-
g initiated into Al-
re so proud of you!
ee.
ihes everyone good
would like to wish
I fun summer! Con-
iraduates!
gma would like to
ewly initiated sis-
li, Jenn Fry, Aman-
' Pagan, Kristen Po
ind Amy Thomas.
lumni, and friends
?pe everyone will
ummer break and
aek. Also, best re-
ing seniors. Broth-
s the best.
jma would like to
hat attended our
ly. We had a blast!
like to thank eve-
ind support in our
uldn't have made
�our help. Thanks
ima would like to
attended our Bar-
like to congratu-
on her engage-
are so happy for
he best of luck!
ma would like to
liors graduating:
nn, Melissa, Ann,
ary. Kristy. Mere-
ily. Whitlow. Sar-
lennifer & Taryn!
s!
MT tor sublease
furnished, nice
3-July 31, rent is
758-0038.
eded. Greenville
enge team. Paid
early November,
serience helpful.
i. call Jan 756-
J TO
HVE
1 SPORTS
YDIVE
sports.com
7
Jar
Congratulations
Nad i rah!
You've come a
long way baby!
We are all so
proud of you!
Love, Mom,
Grandma,
Granddad, Abdul!
and the gang
JOHN MICHAE1 FLANAGAN
Congratulations
on your
accomplishment!
John, we are
extremely proud
of you.
Love,
Mom & Dad
AMANDA GALE HESTER
Congratulation on your hard work and
achieving your goal.
We're proud of you and we love you!
Mom & Bobby
Angie, E.A. & Raygan
Joe, Jamie, Reid & Satchel
STEPHANIE SHEA MARSHALL
WOW!
You did it just like
we knew you
would. Everyone is
very proud of your
accomplishments.
We love you.
Mama, daddy, sissy
& maw-maw
We have watched yo
Take your first steps
March to the top,
and
Strut you way to
a new career.
We are so proud of
what you have ac-
complished.
May you continue
to confront
every challenge
with courage
and
confidence.
With our love,
Mom, Dad, Grandma, Becky & Erik
TRISHAL HIGH
Trish
We are so proud
of you & love you
so much.
Congratulations
Mom, Dad,
Mama, Thomas
&Clen
NINA MELISSA DRY
Dear Nina Melissa,
You are special, unique. You have
worked hard. Keep being yourself and
striving for the best you can be.
Congratulations on a job well done;
We're very proud of you and all your
accomplishments. Wherever you go,
whatever you do we want you to
know we're beside you. The world is
yours to conquer. 6od guide you and
be with you.
Love always,
Mamy and Tara
to all of the Student Media
staff members who are taking
that big step into the real world
today.
(NO) LUCK
and keep in touch.
DEVINE.WERER (ELAINE)
Congratulations
on a spectacular
performance!
you set a goal,
kept it high and �
attained it!
We love you,
Mom & Dad
i
KELLIE SHANTA MORRIS
Congratulations, Kellie!
Wherever you go, whatever you do,
You'll take our love along with you.
Mom, Dad &Micah
JEREMY DEAN HOEGEMANN
GO GERM!
As you move forward;
and life unfolds,
we can now become!
a burden
when we get old! -
Love,
Mom & Dad
Stacey, Mike, Matt
� It
i.
king for a
in, mHte?
� !�
There's no better place to
look than in our classifieds.
Our next edition is Wednesday, May 24.
-J �





enR
v T.Mr�i�t't.i
I
is not rocket s
ii
LJ f r W
uive lli
term:
ese p
ws, features, an
hotographers
designers
�. :or
Ad sa"
e for the summer
s writers
and these for the Fall term:
� News, features, and sports writers
� Assistant sports, features, and news editors
� Features editor
�Ad designers the
Ad sales reps e&Sf �31X1
WE OFFER THE EXPERIENCE OF A LIFE-
�� �-� ��� � � � �. � . . �

Kill TWO BIRDS WITH
ONE STONE AT
Sell your books and get your
official ECU alumni ring.
Come to the place mat gives
you more bank for your
book:
Cotanche St.
Downtown Greenville
free gifts for
everyone and door
Tues May 2nd
9am-5pm
Wed May 3rd
9am 4pm
Thurs May 4th
9am-4pm
Jostens will have your official
ECU ring on display too! Come
see what everyone is talking
about.
SPONSORED BY:
ECU Alumni
Association






DANIEL ERIK COX
Smile Steinum
You finally made it!
Now let's get out of here
and go to Florida.
5jjv
Love, Holly
CRAIG STEVENS MORRISETTE
Not Somehow -
But Triumphantly!
We are proud of not
only what you have
done, but how you
have done it.
We love you!
Mom & Dad
JAMES M. WILLIAMSON, JR
Congratulations.
God Bless
In gifted-talent class you were
teased, picked on for being smart;
you failed. Today graduating with
honors Dean's List Psi-Chi award.
You go James
Mom Pauline
KRISTY JANET ESCORAR
Kristy, you stuck to it
and you made it.
Congratulation!
We all love you.
Mom, Dad, Ed & Diana
Piver Estate
would like to extend a heart-felt
congratulations to our graduating seniors!
Best wishes and good luck
in the future.
S
1801 E. 1st St.
Greenville, NC 278S8
t (252)752-4225






������
ANTHONY LEE STEWART
ire
nart;
with
ard.
"Like"
Tony's graduating!
You've earned it and we
are extremely proud of
you!
We love you!
Mom &Dad
LAURA RENEE'HOLMES
Laura's Graduating!
The year 2000 will
always be special.
We're proud of you,
and we love you!
Eugene & Faye
fl
JOSEPH DANIEL SAYRLACK
Joe-
You have been quite a
success and we are so
proud of you.
Set the educational world
on fire.
OERIC R. RRAOY
All our love,
Mom and Dad
Deric's Graduating.
We're proud of you
and wish you success.
Love,
jj Mom, Dad & Mark
Get a deeper, darker tan
Lie time!
tpf U GRABS! T m GRflD$!
Spend Graduation at JtJ
Jeff's Hair Design
100 - E. Victoria Court Suite C
12 minute max visit.
4 facial, tanners.
Shoulder & side
tanners for a more
natural look.
Also offering nails
& pedicures
April special
pedicures - $28
en
r
pa

(3Tic hottest, cAWest
Contempotattj Resfouicmf,
2 in Qteeniie!
r-

o
Greenville, NC 27858
321-1103

cs
UJ
)
serving pizza, pasta, 5
steak, fresh seafood & �
sandwiches jJ
� Opening 12 p.m. lunch Vd
Saturday
� patio dining also available
101 1-A Red Banks Road
321-MESH (6374)
ECU GRflDS! EECU GRHD$! iD
O
S





KAREN a REBEKAH JOHNSON
We love you
very much, and
are so very
proud of both
of you.
Mom, Dad, Lee
and Anna
LYNSEY ALISON DURISHIN
Congratulations!
We're so proud of
you, Happiness and
success in-all you
do. We'll always be
here for you.
All our love,
Mom, Dad & Ryan
CONGRATULATES
all of our staff
members among
the Spring 1999
graduates.
(
�IATIII
CeHebnate
@
Sr$
aT
open jot i�u�eli �
Dinnet & SBate oWite.
Dat& S�uncd &
�pinnet Speciafe.
Signitute Sauces:
12 degiees jtom
miM to bta .18 Ws w 100" Big
Scteen. cP6eiyoWcJIAf "cfttuOfc
cpatio
'tTonigdt
Itoily Prink & Shot Specials.
40 Afferent Ported Peers,
le's only (roiniess Plack V Tan IStatioU
vi P
Open 11am - 3am M-Sat
12pm-2am Sunday
V





inn nmmmmmmm
JENNIFER KAYE JOHNSON
You're all grown up and
graduating from college,
but you'll always be our
Baby! We're proud of you
& love you very much!
Mama & Daddy
Watch out world -
Here comes Crystal!
You did it!
Set your goals and go for
it! We're proud .of you!
Mama & Daddy
OPHELIA FULFORD
Hallelujah!
Holly's graduating!
You finally made it.
We're proud of you and
we love you!
Mom & Dad
TELLY KNIGHT
"You Did It
He would be proud
of you.
Deceased Dad Percy,
Mom, Cassandra, Valerie,
Jackson & Brian
The votes are in! We've made our choice!
EASTBROOK & VILLAGE GREEN
APARTMENTS AGREE�-
ECU students make great residents
Visit us today!
We re still easirq for Fall
v'
Eastbrook A Village Green
204 Eastbrook Drive
252-752-51






ASHTON MICHELLE ANDERSON
MARY RETH PETTEWAY
1 1 1Ashton, We all think that you are terrific! We love you the mostest! Mom, Dad, John, Cacky, Bailey and Buffy ����
Mary Beth -
We are so proud
of you!
Congratulations!
We love you!
Mom &Dad
BRIAN TUCK
We're proud of you
wKand wish you the best
rf lBBflv ifflin the future!
rmkWe love you.
r 5 Mom, Dad & Brittany
ih5;
DALTON LEIGH MOORE
Dalton-Leigh Hoo-ray!
A day long awaited for
you to walk to the
majestic music of pomp
and circumstance.
We love you,
Mom & Dad
SARAH ELIZABETH BOYER
Congratulations,
Sara! Just one more
accomplishment to
add to your ever-
growing list, I know
you must be proud
I ami
Love, Mom
&
J.ru66uyoo
-part"mentl6
' Quiet Neighborhood
� 1 Bedroom $300
� 2 Bedroom $380
� WasherDryer Hookups
� Ceiling Fan
� Free WaterSewer
� Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & Restaurants
� Office On Site
3216 Bnaswood Court
Rait 252-355-M99 � F�x 252-
IrafcwodStercwivilkncaom
lap on over to Wesley Commons South and jump on our
pre-leasing special for Summer and Fall
just minutes from
downtown and campus
1 Bath
Free water & sewer
refrigerator stove
washer dryer hookups
1 � floor patio with fence
2� floor front or back patio

� on site laundry and
management
� on ECU bus route
� 24 hour emergencg
maintenance
� pets allowed with fee
� economical utility bills






SHANNON LOUISE McDANIEL
KIRSTEN MARIE WURZINGER
You are our one
and only! Our love we
cannot hide.
And now you are
graduating - so to love
we add much pride
Mom & Dad
Every ending leads
to a new beginning.
May yours be as
bright and beautiful
as you are.
We love you!
Mom, Dad & Brian
AMANDA RERNIERLAENG
Go Girl!
We are very proud
of all you have
accomplished.
We love you!
Dad, Mom and Megan
ANTHONY MACKENZIE STEWART
Always our party child.
How proud we are of you.
Dreams do come true as a
new world awaits you.
We love you!
Yourfamily
Spring and Summer 2000
History Major Graduates
BA Degree
BS Degree
Christopher Bays
Candice Bbyd
Evelyn Dorenkamp
Whitney Farmer
Armstead Galiber
Thomas Harris
James Hufford
Rosalind Price
Boman Richardson
Bryan Savage
Christopher Short
Jasmine Stallings
Angie Tew
Derk Walker
Glen Wilson
Joseph Worley
James
Paul Gard
Ryan Gas
Julie Gorm
Jennite
is Keith
Sayblack
tew Sherrill
mith
:e
MA Degree
Jonathan Gentry
Joseph Greeley
"A
COIMGR ATULATIHIViSI 11





KHYSTALA.LYNCH
Congratulations!
Xou did good!
w
I
Love,
r Mow & M
Ss:
JENNIFER NELL BLALOCK
Jennifer -
You're our angel,
our princess, our
diva, and our best
friend. We're proud
of you.
Love,
Momma & Diddy
BETHANY LYNN GARLAND
I
We love you
and we're so
proud of you!
You've gone a
long way, baby!
Mom, Bob, Becky,
Jeff&Aimee
PAULETTE L. LOFTON

You made the
journey!
We are glad
and happy
for you.
We love you.
Mom &Dad
1510 Bridle Circle TTTJ QXYTJ fTf 4 l5w Bri cirdt
Greenville, nc 27834 J I iO W 1 VsISl. Greenville, NC 27834
APARTMENTS
FREEDOM
Are you a student who would like the Freedom of renting an apartment
without the worry of your roommate paying their portion of the rent ??????
f the answer is yes then
KESWICK APARTMENTS IS THE PLACE FOR YOU
we offer
individual leases
9 month lease terms
Fully cauipyed Fitness center
Lighted tennis courts
Swimming yool
Sand voEeyball court
WasherDryer hookups
on site laundry facilities
waSt-in closets
24 hour emergency maintenance
wood burning fireplaces
Mini blinds and vertical blinds
Ceilingfans
Pets welcome
&
For more information call 355-2198 to experience.
The Keswick Style - Make it yours
A Salute to Seniors from
the Division of Student Life
Jennifer Arp
Cathy Black
Tyler Blackwelder
Victor Correro
Vanessa Cullers
Natalie Davis .
Path Fishel
Shondell Jones
Rashad Brown
Kelly Daniels
Adrian Floyd
Kathy Hopson
Sondra Gray
Jamie Wilkins
Mary Schubert
Paul Kaplan
Kim Overton
Robert Gray
Lee Howard
Lea Jones
Brooke Kenley
Krystal Lynch
Amy Miller
Heather Natalie
Dennis Norton
Cindy Riedel
Mike Silverman
Jennifer Sanger
� Erika Swarts
Doug Smith
Sherry Ingram
Yolanda Thigpen
Tanisha Williams
Amanda Wizniak
CONGRATULATIONS
CLASS OF 2000






r Circle
2 27834
IACLYN SUZANNE HOCUTT
Jaclyn,
We've watched you
grow from our little girl
into a beautiful young
woman. Congratulations
and good luck in grad
school.
Mama, Daddy & Lloyd
JOANNA LOUISE REED
Guess what
Joanna's graduating
You didn't give up. We
are proud of you and we
love you!
Mom, Dad& Kathy
LISA MARIE ANDERSON
re
J
Praise God
Lisa's graduating!
Dad would be proud if he
were here. We're proud of the
hard work.
We love you,
Mama, Mel & Kim
4fi� open jfih yWh S Dinnei &
Sfoite uWife.
Datfij S&inck & Dinnei Specials.
Signrtute Sauces: 12 cfegtees
tom mid to bhm.
I 18 9su'100" igficteeiL
9fou jgj giftto. "
Parly Prcwk & Shot Specials.
40 Afferent Pottied Peers.
(kkmih's only fruihiess Hack V Tan S






DOUGIAS STEVEN SMITH
CLAUDIA DEAN WINSTEAD
We're happy and all
smiles too! We are so
proud of you!
"We'll love you forever-
We'll love you always"
Congratulations-
Love, Mom & Dad
Hallelujah
Dean's graduating!
We knew you could do it.
Now on to bigger and better
things. We're proud of you
and we love you.
Ashley, Jennifer & Neil
NANCY JOY SWEEMER
Nancy,
Your future is just begin-
ning. Your caring heart
will take you farther than
you'd ever imagine!
You've brought us so much
joy. We love you. I Pet. 1:8
Dad, Mom &Jeff
AUDREY LYNNETTE MURPHY
Our adorable little baby girl
has grown into a very beautiful
refined young woman. The last
of five.
We are very proud of you
and we love you!
Mom, Dad & siblings
TIMOTHY DALE CUT1ER
We are so very excited
and proud that you are
graduating from ECU
(2000).
Congratulations!
Love,
Dad, Mom Et Anthony
RYAN A. GASKILL
CRYSTAL A. KNOXCMANDII
Mandi's graduating.
You have worked so
hard for this. One
more goal completed.
We are so very proud
of you. Lots of love,
Mom & Roy
Congratulations Ryan
You're a great kid!
We'll like you forever
We'll love you
for always.
Mom & Dad
The Biology
Department
wants to
congratulate
our graduates!
Eileen Louise Appolone
Stephanie Faye Baine
Marica Caroline Berstein
Tracy Lynne Buck
Jennifer Buker
Eden Rene Garcia
Stephen Eppes Johnson
Marilyn J. Kehoskie
Michelle Marie LaHair
Steven Andrew Lynch
David Gregg McHenry
Phillip WalKer Moye
Robert Christopher Pullinger
Edward William Ray
Richard Allen Adams
Beth Anne Aldrich
Atraz Ali
Sophia Charville Allen
Timothy Allen Baize
Jeanna Michelle Barnes
Edgar Bryan Hill
Phong Thanh Ho
Joshua Ray Howard
Natasha Yvonne Howard
Chhstianne Grey Hulchins
Jennifer Michelle Indicott
Michael Jesse LaVar Barnes Heather Wade Jackson
Shawna Gray Baits
Courtney Leigh Bennett
Jennifer Millicent Bennett
DekJra Aretene Blanks
Kathleen Bottle
Sara Elizabeth Boyer
Jonrthsn Robert Brantiey
GwandotoMrtWieonRutedge Karin Marie Brown
Ripple Shahbeg Sandhu
Taran Kaur Singh
Dennis D Swan
wBTffinl.m82nS�'p
Jacob Andrew Zalewski
Patrick Christopher Burr
Brandon Jusi Cuthbertson
KeHyEkzabeth Purvis Edwards
Mary Elizabeth Kuxhman
Yasmtn A. Mohamoud
Karen MIcheKe Winningham
Alison Laura Boone
p�WJun Hyuno Byon
SS&
Jerry Morrison Troutmen
Mark Vincent Cavaliers
Chnstine Clouse
Susan Michelle Collier
Jonathan Michael Cyrus
Meredith Leigh Davis
Karen Tiffany Evans
Lauren Renae Gast
Amber Christine Gaudreau
Airsry Gene Gibson
Sandra Louise Godbolt
Sandra Lucero Gonsalez
Scott Robert Griffin
Richard Dean Harwen
Frances T. Harris
Monica Monkjue Harris
Nicolas Amond Henderson
Jentca Jo Herriman
Blake Eason Hedreth III
Andrew Mark Jacobson
Brandon Christopher Jansei
Shondell La monl Jones
Bahrum Rahmean Kamatoaki
Meredith Brooke Kentey
Joshua w.Kjue
Nathaniel Edward Kreel
Shannon Louise Lassiter
Kenneth James Lenau
Eifeh Ann Lewis
PauletteLaFayee Lofton
Marcus Gregory McLean
David BrcwnMcMtoi
Ftoger Jacob McMurray
3S
Mchaux
Amy Bena Mora.
Tabert Maurice Myers
Tracey Burrows Newhouse
TeretSpsncer Newton
TruTfijyNguyen
MsufceasaiHltxrnN
AshttyMcnslsPowal
asaay
I HHifsy i� i . .





' I
SONYA MICHELLE SIMMONS
Congratulations Sonya!
Climb until your dream
comes true! You are such an
outstanding young woman!
We are so very proud to call
you our daughter!
Love, Mom & Dad
KEVIN MOBLEY
Kevin,
Congratulations on your
graduation! Finally
We wish you the very best as
you set sail and chart some
new waters. You'll always
have our love and support
Mom & Pad
ANDREAEUBANKS
Andrea,
It seems like only yesterday
you started preschool. Now
you're graduating from
college! Congratulations!
We're, very proud of you!
love,
Mom, Dad, Renee & Kristen
Congratulations Tyler!
You are still "our promise
We are proud of you and
we love you.
Mama & Daddy
MICHAELA BINGHAM DURKIN
� MM
Hi honey!
You made it. You're a
bicentennial baby, and
a milennium marvel.
Nothing can stop you
now!
We love you -
Your family
UNIVERSITY
HAJRCUTTERS
w
l
-I
w
o
I
UNIVERSITY
HAIRCUTTERS
(in McEnally
Complex
suite 103)
EVANS ST.
HHKtOfHMCM
I-
X
(Dpemng Uay 1st
I SeAftng the Campus nnd
Witt Comtfg Since 1982!
$8.00
with Student I.D -
Mcw's Cut S tgfe gfcbf
I WALK-INS
WELCOME
ANYTIME
752-0559
Peanut!
You've always done well!
You're graduating on time!
Mom, Dad and your
brother are really proud
of you!
Congratulations!
CHRISY BERNARE
� Congratulations,
Chrisy!
Great job!
Luv,
Mom & Bert





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Title
The East Carolinian, May 2, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 02, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1409
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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