The East Carolinian, April 11, 2000






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www.tec.ecu.edu
the 1 �
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 101
GOT BEER? pg.6
PETA's campaign angers many
37 days to go until Graduation
NEWS BRIEFS
Technology Showcase
The annual Technology Showcase will
be from 10 a.m. -3 p.m. today in the Multi-
purpose room of Mendenhall Student
Center. Computer makers and software
developers will show and demonstrate
their products. Microsoft, Dell, Cisco and
Apple will hold special presentations
throughout the day in Room 244. The
Technology Showcase is sponsored by
ECU Information Technology and Comput-
ing Services. Contact Terry Harrison at
328-6798 for more information.
PhysicianWriter
Nationally known physician and author
Perri Klass will give a public lecture on the
importance of readjng to children. Her pre-
sentation is scheduled for 4 p.m. today in
Room 2E-100 of the Brady Medical Sci-
ences Building. Klass directs Reach Out
and Read at Boston Medical Center
where she also teaches pediatrics. Her six
books include "Baby Doctor: A
Pediatrician's Training" in 1992 and "Other
Women's Children a novel published in
1990. She has written for "The New York
Times "Parenting "Discover" and "Es-
quire
Health Fait
A health fair that offers blood pressure
and glaucoma screenings, weight checks
and information about an assortment of
healthy lifestyle issues ranging from the
benefits of exercise, good nutrition and
spiritual pursuits, will be available from 1-4
p.m. today at the Student Health Center.
The 2000 Spices of Life spring fair will be
held from 1-4 p.m. on the brickyard and
lawn arda in front of Mendenhall Student
Center.
Beaches
The tropical coastline of Puerto Rico
with its luxury hotels and casinos will be
among the sights shown in the travel and
adventure film "Puerto Rico-Isle of En-
chantment" at 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. today
in Mendenhall Student Center. A theme
dinner is scheduled for 6 p.m. For tickets
and information call the Central Ticket Of-
fice at 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
Blood Drive
The Red Cross will collect blood from
donors from noon until 6 p.m. Wednesday,
April 12 in the Multi-Purpose Room of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Distance Learning
ECU faculty will attend and provide
presentation at the Distance Learning In-
stitute that runs from 8:30 a.m. until 4 p.m.
on Wednesday, April 12 at the Ramada
Plaza Hotel. The program is sponsored by
the Southeastern Regional Technology
and Teaching Conference and includes in-
formation and discussion about distance
learning technologies, Web-based learn-
ing and the development of courses for
the Internet. Marilyn Sheerer, dean of the
School of Education, will give the welcom-
ing address at 8:30 a.m. Contact the
School of Education at 328-6621 for more
information.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Would you agree to meet
someone in person that you
met in an online chat room?
Results of last week's question:
Do you think it makes a difference if
you vote in the SGA elections?
50 Yes 50 No
TENNIS TEAMS LOSE TO NCSU
pg.8
Wolfpack beats Pirates 6-3
TUESDAY, APRIL 11. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Showers, high of 80�
and a low of 55�
p
f kt
Suspected Internet attacker arrested
joint operation proves
fruitful for local poke
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
The search for 20-year-old
Gayle Alan Sanford III, who was
wanted by the University of Ar-
kansas Police Department
(UAPD) for assault, terroristic
threatening, false imprisonment
and failure to appear ended early
Monday morning in Greenville,
N.C.
College police stations
around the Southeast were first
alerted to Sanford's activities
when he was arrested on Jan. 25
for the rape and false imprison-
ment of a ! 9-year-old female stu-
dent at the University of Arkan-
sas. When Sanford failed to show
up for his arraignment in Febru-
ary, it was discovered that he had
left the state.
Warrants for his arrest were
issued for failure to appear on the
charges of battery In the third
degree, false imprisonment in the
second degree and terroristic
threatening. Capt. Brad Bruns of
the UAPD said there was no war-
rant issued for the rape because
the prosecutor has not filed
charges as of yet.
Police have been tracking
Sanford's movement since Febru-
ary, but had been unable to catch
up with him until now. He was
seen on the campus of Ciemson
University three weeks ago.
Police officials said that being
aware of Sanford's method of
operation helped to bring him in
to custody.
"What he commonly does is
go into Internet chat rooms, like
at collegeclub.com or something,
to meet young women and get
them to meet him in person
someplace Bruns said. "He talks
to students all over the country
this way
According to an ECU police
report, the search for Sanford
began in Greenville when a resi-
dent of Umstead Hall alerted the
ECUPD after she received an e-
mail from an unknown person
who wanted to meet her. Police
were not able to locate Sanford
at that time, but officers pro-
ceeded to post alert bulletins in
the residence halls and at Joyner
Library. Sanford was later found
and arrested at approximately 2
Steee-rike! You're out!
Pirate pitcher Foye Minton winds up for a strike during a recent game Sunday night against University of
Virginia Commonwealth at East Carolina's Harrington Field. (Photo by Garrett McMillan)
Campus planning meeting held
Parking, housing
concerns addressed
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
Last week, the Campus Plan
Core Group met to discuss the
newest version of the campus
expansion plan.
The latest rendering of the
plan to expand the campus was
derived primarily from one of
the three original drawings that
were submitted in December of
last year. The plan chosen to be
given to the BOT for approval
underwent some modifications
at the suggestion of groups like
TUNA (The University Neighbor-
hood Association) as well as by
university officials.
Krisan Osterby-Benson of
Ellerbe Beckett Planning Con-
sultants explained the four sec-
tions of the latest plan. The first
part deals with the process and
the program of campus expan-
sion.
k
"This basically deals with the
university's goals and objectives
in terms of square footage
needs Osterby-Benson said.
The other sections outline
community context issues, espe-
cially in terms of historic neigh-
borhoods, the land-use plan and
west and east campus expansion
into the downtown area.
One of the main topics of dis-
cussion was the issue of parking.
According to the new proposed
plan, four or five parking decks
may be in the future for the cam-
pus. Osterby-Benson explained
that that there would need to be
a balance between surface and
structured parking. Currently all
the parking areas at ECU are sur-
face. The plan shows that the
proposed parking decks will be
built at Minges Coliseum, behind
Aycock Hall (where Epps Middle
School now stands), on the south
side of Tenth Street, and toward
west campus.
Other proposed changes in-
cluded the idea to convert Gotten
and Fleming residence halls into
faculty and staff offices. New resi-
dence halls will be built at the
bottom of College Hill and close
to where Slay and Umstead halls
currently stand. The university is
also considering buying the
Pirate's Place Apartments (previ-
ously known as Player's Club)
and using the land for fraternity
and sorority houses.
Bruce Flye, director of Facili-
ties and Planning, emphasized
that the construction and reno-
vations on campus will be in di-
rect correlation with ECU'S en-
rollment needs.
"Timing is hard to plan in
terms of the funding we'll need
Flye said. "We have a deficit need
that needs to be taken care of
first
The campus plan is still ten-
tative, however, until the BOT
has time to review it once again
and vote on it at their meeting
on May 12.
This writer can be contacted at
news@tec.ecu.edu.
Gayle Alan Sanford was arrested in Greenville for assault, false imprisonment
and terroristic threatening earlier this year at the University of Arkansas.
a.m. on Monday morning by investigation
ECU and Greenville police offic
ers in the apartment of a Pitt
Community College student
who agreed to play a role in the
"A lot of good police work
was done in this case said Tom
See ATTACKER, page 2
,edonia Wright
welcomes new
director
Nell Lewis was recently hired as the new director of the
Ledonia Wright African-American Cultural Center, (photo by
Emily Richardson)
Lewis plans total
campus involvement
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
Nell Lewis was recently
named as the new director of
the Ledonia Wright African-
American Cultural Center.
Lewis, who has replaced in-
terim Director Ty Frazier, is
an ECU alumna, who earned
her undergraduate degree in
1969, and continued on to
graduate work at a time
when there were signifi-
cantly fewer African-Ameri-
can students in attendance.
Lewis worked as the Pitt
Community College (PCC)
director of Community Out-
reach before coming to ECU.
While at PCC, she worked as
a school representative to all
areas of Pitt County with
schools, churches, social
agencies, businesses and or-
ganisations to help identify
individuals who would ben-
efit from the resources that
PCC had to provide.
As director of Ledonia
Wright, Lewis says she plans
to work to help total campus
involvement with the
center's activities.
"My overall goal is to en-
sure the center is more than
a museum and social gather-
ing place, but that it becomes
an experience for all who
visit Lewis said.
She also plans to expand
the center and to have it
house an educational resource
library about Africa and Afri-
can-American history and cul-
ture.
" I emphasize that I do want
to help to enhance the feeling
of community on our campus
by encouraging everyone to
stop by the center to share in
the African-American experi-
ence Lewis said.
Lewis also plans to work
with faculty members in all
academic areas to collaborate
on ways to encourage use of
the center in their classes and
lectures.
Ms. Lewis's duties include
overseeing the daily operation
of the center, working closely
with minority student organi-
zations on campus like the
gospel choir, planning all pro-
gramming for the center along
with the Office of Minority
Student Affairs, and aggres-
sively seeking financial sup-
porters to help reach the goals
and develop the vision of the
center.
"1 am excited to be here be-
cause ECU is at the forefront
in cultural relations) in imple-
menting initiatives that re-
spond to the increasing num-
bers of culturally diverse
groups Lewis said. "1 am so
impressed by the warm,
friendly reception that the ad-
ministration, faculty, staff and
students gave me even before
I arrived on campus
This writer can be contacted
at cherold@tec.ecu.edu.





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Tuesday, April 11,2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES CRIME SCENE
Duke University-ln an Infor-
mal presentation to about 100
people at Duke University Friday
night, "The View's" Lisa Ling re-
flected on the underrepresentation
of Asian Americans in the main-
stream media.
"Of the 26 primetime shows on
television, not one showcases Asian
Americans in leading roles she
said. "Even when the corporate net-
works are attacked for lack of racial
diversity on television, minorities
still only play small parts
Citing her experience on ABC
and her previous job as a television
reporter, Ling talked about the lack
of diversity in the media and ex-
plored the lingering Asian stereo-
types in the news.
"Asians are only put on spotlight
for violating human rights or steal-
ing nuclear secrets Ling said. "It
conveys the wrong associations to
the general public
Ling attributes these American
biases to remnants of a deep psy-
chological distrust generated by
American wars in the 20th century.
"Look at the wars that America
fought in-World War II, Korea, Viet-
nam-and look at who the enemies
were she said. "On top of that,
there is a sense of paranoia from
Asian successes in America, espe-
cially in the early '80s, when the
Vietnam war was just over
Ling said both factors drove her
toward her chosen profession.
"There is a lack of diversity at the
executive level, which translates
into less sensitivity to minority Is-
sues she said. "Unfortunately,
there is little incentive for more
minorities to apply in the media
industry and improve the racial situ-
ation, which is what I want to do
However, Ling is hesitant to
serve as a role model for the Asian-
American community. "Just because
I am on TV does not mean I should
be pressured to represent an entire
generation she said. "Does Bar-
bara Walters represent an entire gen-
eration of middle aged, post-meno-
pausal women?"
Ling suggested that if more
Asian Americans applied for posi-
tions in the field, the media would
lose some of their biases. "The time
is ripe for Asian Americans and mi-
norities to pursue media she said.
Ling closed her presentation by
encouraging Asian Americans to
break racial norms in the media in-
dustry.
University of Texas at Austin-
In response to racially offensive fly-
ers posted across the University of
Texas-Austin campus Friday morn-
ing, student organizations will hold
a rally Monday to speak out on ra-
cial issues affecting students.
The National Alliance, an orga-
nization that identifies itself as a
white separatist group, distributed
flyers stating "Don't have sex with
blacks Avoid AIDS citing the
names of three black men who al-
legedly "lied about being HIV posi-
tive and had sex with dozens of
white women The flyer also states
incorrect statistics about black men
and HIV.
The National Alliance distrib-
uted about 4,000 flyers among the
Houston, Dallas, Waco, College Sta-
tion and Austin areas last week. The
group advocates the establishment
of an "aryan nation" free of Jews
and racial minorities, according to
the Southern Poverty Law Center, a
non-profit organization that tracks
hate groups.
A spokesman for the National
Alliance, who asked to remain
anonymous, said his organization
has chosen the university as a tar-
get in promoting its message.
The group has also been linked
to racially motivated vandalism on
campus, including posters defaced
with neo-Nazi propaganda advertis-
ing the National Alliance Web site.
Students from the Anti-Racist
Organizing Committee, Asian
American Relations Group and In-
ternational Socialist Organization
will meet in the South Mall at noon
Monday to hold a rally and speak
out on racial issues affecting the
University.
Robyn Citizen, a government
sophomore and AROC member,
said she was disappointed, but not
surprised when she saw the flyer.
"The flyer is completely racist
Citizen said. "It's based off the mis-
conception that black people are the
only ones that can get this disease,
and the idea that black men are
sexually promiscuous
Dana Cloud, an associate profes-
sor of communication studies and
a member of the International So-
cialist Organization, said the flyers
are another example of the perpetu-
ation of hate on campus.
"I know for a fact that ignoring
the National Alliance does not
make them go away Cloud said.
"Speaking out shows that they are
not welcome here
April 6
Obscene Phone Call-A student
in Garrett Hall was issued a cam-
pus appearance ticket (CAT) af-
ter Parking and Traffic reported
that he had left an employee an
obscene voice mall message.
Damage toProperty-A student
reported that his vehicle was
damaged while parked east of
Scott Hall. The radio antenna
had been broken off and was lay-
ing on the ground.
Breaking and Entering-A stu-
dent reported that someone en-
tered her room without permis-
sion between 11:30 p.m. and
10:30 a.m. on. She said that
nothing was taken, but they had
cooked noodles in the micro-
wave and ate half a Pop Tart.
April 7
Driving While Impaired-A
non-student was arrested for
DWI after he was stopped for
turning left on a red light.
April 8
Driving While License Revoked,
Probation Violation-A non-stu-
dent was arrested for the above
referenced charges after being
stopped for driving the wrong
way on Reade Street. Further in-
vestigation revealed that he was
wanted by the Beaufort County
Sheriff's Department and he was
turned over to them.
Provisional Driving While Im-
paired-A non-student was issued
a state citation for provisional
DWI after being stopped for a
traffic violation at the intersec-
tion of Fifth Street and Founders
Drive.
Brush Fire-A non-student re-
ported a small brush fire north
of Parking and Traffic Services
extinguished by McDonald's em-
ployees.
April 9
Underage Possession of Alco-
hol-A student was issued a state '
citation and CAT for underage
possession pursuant to a traffic
stop. He was a passenger in the
stopped vehicle.
ATTACKER
from page 1
Younce of the ECUPD. "It was a good example of joint
work between police departments
When Sanford was taken into custody, he was in
possession of some items belonging to a woman he is
thought to have assaulted in a city near Greenville. The
woman has not reported the incident.
"We're going to be contacting other campus agen-
cies to see if there's anything else he's done that may
not have been reported as well Younce said.
It was also discovered that Sanford is wanted in
Kansas for aggravated indecent liberties with a child.
Younce said that Sanford is currently being held in
the Pitt County Detention Center awaiting extradition.
Extradition occurs when a state surrenders an alleged
fugitive of the law to the state in which the crime(s)
occurred.
This writer can be contacted at news@tec.ecu.edu.
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Technology Showcase 2000
April 11,2000 10:00am - 3:00pm
Mendenhall Multi-purpose Room
www.ecu.edultctechfair
Alltel - Clurhllf Matthem and Gloria nywr
Presentnwn of products structured k simplify your lift: combination paging and phone, alto �t browsing lano.W Mmmmi on l-C'l I employee
Alphanumeric - Wmdy Burgess
Alphanumeric often sortitions through consulting, network implementation, outsourced technical personnel, training, service and support
Apple Compiler - Ckarlr, Cm. Brian Harrison and Phillip Mien
Extend your Network with Wireless Technology, Send Live Video Across the Interact with QuickT�ne
ASAP Software - ftirrrn tfii'ts
Government Sales Executive
CHOICE! Corter CerterrlBM - ay Lanier, Pat Imtge, Brain Canlen and Chris Mirmis
liducalton Solutions for the New Millennium
CISCO � Belinda Cremhaw, Stvll Wertt, Bob Levy mi Brent Carter
AVVII) (Architecture for WVideo and Integrated ta) applications. Voice over ID telephony along with Streaming Video and Video Conferencing
applications enhance the educational learning environment hy expanding communications media
Oell - Saw Uuchnt. Buck Merchant and Mitt Campbell
Demonstration of Dell's products and services
Dowdy Book Stores - Timm llackett �.
Digital video and computer editing
ePhn (formerly IM,C l�kr.l,�). Too Broum and Ian Bryant
Provide information about cPlus and Avanlrs CDScrvc product
Gateway. Kir hard Johnson
Dcmoojlralion oftiatcuuy s products and services
James River Technical-fVIer Chiang
Silicon Graphics products
Microsoft. John Kristoffuut Ivor llyngttmm
Dcmonstfation ofWrndows 2000 Professional, Windows 2000 Server and Offlcc 2000
romeroy Computer Resources - Margie Scoml, Randyfjyng, Jeff Wehner and Bob Degler
Hard copy solutions for the educator. Demonstration of various printing solutions from IIP as well as Pomcroy-s on-line training courseware for individuals
Premier Systems lac - Bill Roberlt, Mike Mod, Orris Inrgem andor llenitt
Voice and Video over IP
Productivity Point - Annette Blum
MCSE for 2000, Cisco Certification and Demonstration of Windows 2000
Red Hal, IrK-AMU Bats
Demonstration of the Lanix operating system and services
SAS lastHalc lac Calhf Vemlk, Robert Latham and Georgia Udnier
IWucts and .Solutions far Data Warehousing. Data Mining and Wch l-nehlcmcnl
Whlllock Group - Herbert McCrail II
Demonstration of I CD projectors and Snurtltoard (Interactive whiteboard)
Ziff Davis -Tom Palmer
Technology and I.dum� - Moving anlo the Future
Special Presentations In Mendenhall 244
9:00:�m- 10:00am Mjrrowft- Demonstrate Windows 2000 Professional featuring laptop stifa. amfigunui� surmirt f� comnuler lah USH
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2:00pm - 3:00pm Apple - Wireless Ethernet demonstration using Apple's new "Airl'orf'(8()2.1 l-oasal) wireless pokIikIs This scvsi.m will
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Apple s entire product line. Discuvston of the interoperability between different "flavors' 0f 802.11 products from I cent. Cisco. Aiiwnel. Apple.
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Tuesday, April 11, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
;3493C South Evans Street
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SGA NOTES
SGA Vice President John
Merlac congratulated the new
executive board. SGA Treasurer
Overton Harper said only 97 of
the'220 flood loans donated have
been paid back in full. $22,350 is
still currently due. Harper said
students that do not pay back the
loans will be tagged andor will
not be able to register. He added
that those students' records will
never be released in the future if
needed at other universities.
Christy Lynch, junior class
president, said the semi-formal
SGA banquet will be from 7 p.m
midnight April 17 at the Hilton.
Lynch said the evening will be
filled with speakers, awards, food
and dancing.
Sadie Cox, representative and
elected treasurer, introduced
seven new constitutions: Alpha
Kappa Psi Professional Business Fra-
ternity, The Ject Kune Do Associa-
tion, New Life Christian Fellowship,
The Student Affiliate of the Ameri-
can Chemistry Society, Golden Key
National Honor Society, Pre-pro
Health Alliance and Epsilon Chi Nu
Fraternity. " :
Lynch introduced a legislative
bill for the funding for the 1999 se-
nior class gift to remodel the front
of Mendenhall Student Center and
add an outside seating area.
Harper said the remodeling re-
quires $3,000 from the SGA which
has been saved since the 1998-99
school year when the plan was first
introduced. According to Pam
Godfrey, SGA president of 1999,
Chancellor Eakin will fund the rest
of the project if more money is
needed.
Representative Laura Stein
said the Campus Safety Walk will
begin at 7 p.m. Wednesday night
in front of Mendenhall.
Na'im Akbar, co-chair of the
minority coalition asked for SGA's
support dealing with downtown
discrimination through a written
statement.
The welfare committee re-
quested that Akbar and another
member of the coalition join
them next at 4:30 p.m. Monday
to discuss the issue.
Steven Carmichael, represen-
tative and vice president of the
Black Student Union, said he
would be at the meeting with
Akbar to answer any future ques-
tions and help write up a resolu-
tion.
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4 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Tuesday, April 11, 200?)
MUM
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday,
www.tec.e
Most outstanding regional chapter
Zeta Phi Beta sorority was chosen as the Most Outstanding Collegiate Undergraduate Chapter of the Eastern Region
at their annual conference held earlier this semester in Crystal, Va. The sisters of Zeta Phi Beta also contibuted the
most hours of service and held the highest GPA of any sorority on campus, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
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Terra Steintx
Susan Wrigh
Emily Richar
Daniel E. Co:
We as memb
feel that demi
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of land for u;
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��OTMIMMOTM
April 11, 2001 'uesday, ApriM 1, 2000
itmedia.ecu.edtP wW-tec.ecu.edu
� " I
OPINION
The East Carolinian
edtor@studentmedkacuu�W
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eastcarolinian
Holly G.Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Feetures Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, Mfeft Mwfe 0wfty Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-3284366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-3284558
E-MAILtec@8tudentmedla.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing the regular academic year. The lead editorial In each
edition is the opinion of the mafcxtty of the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited for decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to salt or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian
Student Publications Building, Greenville, NC 27858-4353
For additional information, call 252-3284366.
AMDIl4"mfc� MctW5.
ECO Has cHfiMteo
THeiR mascot To
Biu-V Trie boll vozee!
mZEKT II!
0URVIEW
We as members of the student body
feel that demolishing thes homes is
unnecessary and wrong. There is plenty
of land for use around campus that
-doesn't involve demolition of people's
homes and lives.
"Webster's Dictionary" defines the notion of eminent domain as
the power of the state to take private property for public use with
payment of compensation to the owner While this process is mainly
used for building housing in low income neighborhoods and urban
renewal, it is now being used by ECU to take possession of and
destroy the homes bordering campus toward Elm Street between
5th and 10th streets.
The land is slated to be used for new facilities with the majority
being devoted to a parking deck. While a parking deck is drastically
needed by the university, we believe that the reward is not worth
the risk. These homes have housed numerous families that have
supported the school for decades. They are having their loyalty
thrown back in their faces by the practice of "eminent domain
We as members of the student body feel that demolishing these
homes is unnecessary and wrong. There is plenty of land for use
around campus that doesn't involve demolition of people's homes
and lives. Even though a parking deck is crucial to the university's
survival, how are we to sleep knowing the price was so high that we
had to take someone's home away so that we would not have to
walk as far to get to class? '
We are ready and willing to pay for further expansion of our
beautiful campus, but not at the expense of the alumni, faculty,
students and -Greenville residents who call this land home, if the
plan goes through as designed, where are these people to go? ECU
is making bold strides into the future but are also burning bridges to
the past.
OPINION COLUMN
Sydney offers track, diving, ballroom dancing?!
del
Mark Larado
OPINION COLUMNIST
LETTER TO EDITOR
Dear Editor,
j This letter is in response to the article writ-
ten by Ms. Long and Ms. Rodriques, "Who knows
what the future holds?" printed in the Thurs-
day edition of TEC. I would like to ask these la-
dies if they have ever even looked atread an
issue of Playboy?
. PlayboyIs more than just pictures. The maga-
zine contains interviews, articles, advice, fash-
ion, jokes and news among other worthwhile
items. 1 know of many women who enjoy view-
ing the monthly publication. 1 have used articles
found in Playboy as sources for several college
papers. Since your concerns are so academically,
based, I thought you would like to know the in-
tellectual value of Playboy. On the level of Play-
boy visiting ECU, college is about more than aca-
demics. It is a place for learning about life, try-
ing new experiences and making decisions for
your future. If the gorgeous women of this
fine institution choose to have the experience
Of a photo shoot (which was not nude), you
should applaud their courage to try new opportu-
nities. You should not put them down because you
do not agree. As for your attack on males attend-
ing ECU, assuming we are all "falling out of our
chairs" over Playbos visit is sexist and uncalled
for. Do not assume having a penis makes you an
uncontrollable, hormone-driven sex freak. All of
ECU should be proud that the No. 1 men's maga-
zine in America chose to feature some of the most
beautiful women on the East Coast by visiting our
campus.
�The human body is a beautiful art form and
sexuality is a healthy part of human existence. I
do not understand why you find expression of the
body vulgar and demeaning, nor an individual's
right to make her own decisions wrong. If you wish
to repress expression, exploration and the human
body, please do it to yourself and do not denounce
Playboy's visit or the people who participated.
Matt Waymack
Junior
LETTER TO EDITOR
- Dear Editor,
: As president of RHA, it is my responsibility
CO represent the more than 5,000 students that
ttVe in residence halls. In this role, I think that
tts important that I express my views concern-
ing the SGA elections that took place last week.
: First, I feel that the candidates in the SGA
ejection process had a total lack of respect for
die system. These students had little or no re-
gard for the judgments rendered by the Dean
of Students Office or the University Honor Board.
There are hiany rumors being spread about the
candidates in this election and the Student At-
torney General that have no firm foundation
and are hearsay.
! As a former Honor Board member, I value
these two entities and their opinions very much,
especially since I have had very positive experi-
ences with them in the past. However, there has
Ken a conflict in what candidates were told in
advance of the election, and what they were told
after the election. The Orr ticket was disquali-
fied the night before the elections, but received
Written documentation from the Elections Chair-
Jferson that they could run on as a write-on
Qjcket.
After the ballots were cast, the Orr ticket was
then told that their ballots would not count be-
cause the stickers were used as a form of write-
in for their ticket. This was not clarified to the
grr ticket prior to the elections. I would like to
stress that the Honor Board and the Elections
Chairperson need to explain any future deci-
sions that are rendered concerning SGA elec-
tions, and that all the students involved are
aware of why decisions are made and how they
pin correct any mistakes that occur.
2 Second, our voUng system should be fair for
the students that choose to vote and the candi-
dates. It is common knowledge that poll work-
ers are biased by making suggestions to students
about who they should or should not vote for. I
witnessed biased attitudes of poll workers at Todd
Dining Hall, and i was very concerned when I saw
this actually happen. In this particular instance, I
felt that the student was being misguided because
she was told that she could not vote for the Orr
ticket because they were not on the ballot, a tre-
mendous disservice to this student. As a member
of the student body, I deemed it necessary to ex-
press my opinion to the persons at the ballot sta-
tion about their practices, but felt that my opin-
ion was ignored. I have also noticed that students
have no privacy while they are casting their bal-
lots, which is also an injustice for the student body
and the candidates because some students may
feel intimidated.
Since this has occurred on numerous occasions
during the election, I formally request the
scrutinization of this election to see if another elec-
tion is warranted to benefit the students of ECU.
For the future, we need to learn from and de-
velop a process that will deter any unfair prac-
tices during our elections. Possible solutions are
as follows:
1. Create a system that fosters privacy at bal-
lot stations for the students by having private
booths, where students can cast their ballot with-
out indmidation.
2. Hire non-student workers to man the ballot
stations, thereby eliminating any possibilities of
students being biased while out the election box.
In closing, I am confident that any of the can-
didates from this election will do an outstanding
job. The student body needs to understand that
they have so much to lose, and so much more to
gain, and that they are a crucial piece to this com-
plicated puzzle in which they have the power to
stop all the bickering and unfair practices that
occur each year during our SGA elections.
Thank you,
Rlnardo Reddick
President, Residence Hall Association
Surprisingly, it is yet another Olympic year. It
is easy to know this because NBC is running com-
mercials like, "NBC, proud owners of the Olym-
pics of 2000, 2002, 2004, and 2006, if we live
that long This year the Olympics will be in
Sydney, Australia-home of Foster's, kangaroos,
and Yahoo Serious.
And like every Olympics before Sydney, each
venue introduces a new sport to the Olympic rep-
ertoire. For instance, in 1988 when the Olympics
were in Seoul, we were introduced to tae kwon
do. In 1992, we adopted men's handball. And in
Atlanta, the U.S. gave the Olympics beach volley-
ball. This dates back to 1938 Berlin, when Hider
introduced us all to the "Jew, run for your life
2Q0-meter which was fortunately replaced by
the triple jump in 1968.
So with all those historical events introduced
into the Olympics, what event does the country
that boasts that they are the most macho, manly,
and burly in world want us to watch? Blind croco-
dile wrestling? No, ballroom dancing!
Yes, that's right, ballroom dancing is now an
Olympic event. Now, I have to put my foot down
on this one. I didn't mind synchronized swim-
ming, I got used to table tennis. Hell, I looked
away when it came to the walking 15-k. But I don't
think ballroom dancing should be an Olympic
event.
What scares me most about ballroom danc-
ing? It's not the fact that it really isn't a sport. I'm
scared that it will become popular. This happened
to figure skating. Every time I turn on the TV I
always see glimpses of "Legends on Ice "Ice and
the Legends "Ice on Ice XXX and I don't want
ballroom dancing to end up with its own one-
hour special always opposite a football game. The
only thing that should be on opposite a football
game, should be another football game (or nu-
dity).
In addition, at the heart of every Olympic
event is some survivalist nature. If the modern
world was to come to an end, we can rely on the
javelin throwers to spear us some food, weight
lifters to help make houses, and maybe the syn-
chronized swimmers could use their spectacular
water show to put their prey into a hypnotic
trance while some athlete like the hammer
thrower sneaks up and knocks it out. You see, all
of these are valuable skills if Olympic athletes
were called upon to help us survive. The only
time ballroom dancing will be needed as a valu-
able skill is if someone were trapped aboard a
Navy frigate headed toward San Francisco.
If Sydney wants us to perceive them as being
a land of "Mad Max" and Aussie Rules Footbaf
instead of the country were they filmed "Priscffla,
Queen of the Desert I suggest they combine
events. I'm not talking about the decathlon-lQ
events over two days. I'm talking about combin-
ing events like the javelin throwers get extra
points for hitting long-distance runners ok thai
track. Just like NASCAR minus the flaming wreck
long distance events are only fun to watch on tiff
last lap. Now if we combine the javelin and men
five million-k that would be a fun event to watch.
Also, what the Olympics should do is to allow
drug use by athletes in events that wouldn't nec-
essarily enhance their performance, like give
speed to badminton players. Hell, if they did that,
we would create a whole new event; single-per-
son badminton. Basically it would be one guy
running around the net hitting the birdie either
until his drugs wear off or he collapses of a heart
attack.
So if we don't do something now, on Sept. 15
(which I don't even consider part of the summer)
we'll be stuck watching ballroom dancing and lis-
tening to John Tesh commentating about it. I can
handle John Tesh when he doesn't play his mu-
sic, but I can't handle ballroom dancing.
This writer can be contacted at
mlarado@tec.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Money corrupts Internet
Demosthenes
OPINION COLUMNIST
The Internet is supposed to be an electronic
world in which free exchange of ideas and infor-
mation can happen. I don't know what planet you
are living on, but here on Earth, free can be a
scarce commodity. The last time I went online to
look for something, my e-worid was bombarded
by advertisements, bulletins and messages (not
to mention the e-mails from Felisha at
Clublove.com) all geared at extracting my money
from my bank account.
You see, an electronic world is not only the
perfect place to exchange all sorts of informa-
tion, but it is also the perfect place to conduct
business. So what is a money grubbing tycoon
going to do when he sees the power of e-busi-
ness? He is going to start up an Internet com-
pany and advertise his product all over the Web
and anywhere else he can post his dot-com gar-
bage.
Now who's site do you think will pop up first
when you search for information on an item of
interest�the independent organization who posts
free info, or a site which is trying to sell you that
item? Obviously, the businessman will ensure that
his site comes first, thus hindering your ability
to find what you need. Once again the introduc-
tion of money has corrupted a uniquely func-
tioning system.
Born of the need to exchange research and
ideas among university environments, thai
Internet has lived its innocent and free years ana
is now coming to realize the harsh reality of thtf
world as it is bombarded, by global economics.
Where does it all stop, because whether you like
it or not this is just the beginning.
You now have the option of free Internet con-
nection if you so desire�but wait! What did I sty
about free? Free if you want to watch ads scroi
across your screen while you try to download
"South Park" sound bytes.
The power of communication is, in general,
scary. Imagine walking around campus instantly
connected by voice to anyone you wish to talk to
through the microphonereceiver In your ear.
Now imagine that you have to listen to running
ads whenever you are not using your connection.
Seems silly? It will happen if you let it�so where
does it all stop?
Just like in sports and friendship, money cor-
rupts, and will continue to corrupt the Internet
with increased involvement. The Web is still a
great way to find information, especially if you
already know where to look, but you first have to
get through the thin layer of dirt that now covers
what you really want: free exchange.Where does
it all stop? Until we meet again.
77js writer can be contacted at
demosthenes@tec.ecu.edu.
�ele





I The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, April 11,2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Time management key to happy endings
1
Darwin Awards II
NOMINEE m-The News of the Weird;
' NOMINEE: Michael Anderson
Iwin'made News of the Weird posthu-
mously in 1989. He had spent
several years awaiting South
Carolina's electric chair on a
murder conviction before
having his sentence re-
duced to life in prison. In
March 1989, sitting on a
metal toilet in his cell and
attempting to fix his small
TV set, he bit Into a wire
and was electrocuted. On
Jan. 1,1997, Laurence Baker, also a con-
victed murderer once on death row, but later
serving a life sentence at the state prison in
Pittsburgh, Pa was electrocuted by his
homemade earphones as he watched his
small TV while sitting on his metal toilet.

NOMINEE 10-The Indianapolis Star.
Cigarette lighter may have triggered fatal ex-
plosion Dunkirk, Ind. A Jay County man us-
ing a cigarette lighter to check the barrel of a
muzzle toader was killed Monday night when
the weapon dfschaFged in his face, sheriffs '
investigators said. Gregory David Pryor, 19,
died in his parents' rural Dunkirk home'at
about 11:30 p.m. Investigators said Pryor
was cleaning a .54-caliber muzzlejoader that
had not been firing properly. He was using
. the lighter to look into the barrel when the
gunpowder ignited
NOMINEE M-APMammoth Lakes: A
SanAnselmo man died yesterday when he
' hit a lift tower at the Mammoth Mountain ski
' area while riding down the slope on a foam
pad, authorities said. Matthew David Hubal,
i 22, was pronounced dead at Centinela
Mammoth Hospital. The accident occurred at
"about 3 a.m the Mono County Sheriffs De-
.partment said. Hubal and his friends appar-
ently had hiked a ski run called Stump Alley
and undid some yellow foam'protectors from
the lift towers, said Lieutenant Mike Donnelly
of the Mammoth Lakes Police Department.
The pads are used to pro-
tect skiers who might hit
the towers. The group
apparently used
the pads to slide
down the ski
slope and Hubal .
crashed into a tower.
It was not clear if the
tower he hit was one with its pad removed.
"With the cold temperatures, the snow was
probably pretty fast said Donnelly.
NOMINEE 12-Reuters, Warsaw, Po-
land: A poacher electrocuting fish in a lake in
central Poland fell into the water and suf-
- fered the same fate as his quarry, police said
Thursday. The 24-year-old man was one of
four who went fishing with a cable, one end
of which they attached to a net. A news,
agency quoted a police official in Wloclawek
as saying. "For a while everything went ac-
cording to the poachers'plan and they had
fish in their bags the agency said. "But at a
certain moment the man holding the net
tripped and fell into the water The other
poachers tried irrvain to revive him, it said.
NOMINEE 13-AP-St. Louis: Robert
Puelo, 32, was apparently being disorderly
in a St. Louis market. When the clerk threat-
ened to call police, Puelo grabbed a hot dog,
shoved it in his mouth, and walked out with-
out paying for it. Police found hirrj uncon-
scious in front of the store. Paramedics re-
moved the six-inch wiener
from his throat, where it
had choked him to
death.
. NOMINEE 14-Un-
known: A poacher, Marino
Malerba, shot a stag stand-
ing above him on an over-
hanging rock-and was killed in-
stantly when it fell on him.
NOMINEE 1S-AP-
Kincaid, W. Va A blasting cap ex-
ploded in a man's mouth at a party. A man at
a party popped a blasting cap into his mouth
and bit down, triggering an explosion that
blew off his ifps, teeth and tongue, state po-
lice said Wednesday. Jerry Stromyer, 24, of
Kincaid, bit the blasting cap as a prank dur-
ing a party late Tuesday night said Cpl
-iM.D. Payne. "Another man had it in an
iarinm, hooked to a battery, and was t,
o explode it Payne said. "It wouldn't go
nd this guy said, Til show you how to
'set it off I just can't imagine anyone doing
thing like that Payne said
l
Exam time means
added stress for students
Joe Schlatter
STAFF WRITER
With the end of the semester looming on the hori-
zon, students are beginning their frantic preparation
for finals. Many are also discovering they may not be
as prepared as they would like.
Jennifer Rutherford, an ECU senior, is a criminal
justice major planning on law school. She knows first-
hand how important grades can be and how much fi-
nal exams impact those grades.
"I have known I wanted to be a lawyer since my
first year of high school but had second thoughts when
everyone at ECU told me how hard it is to get into law
school Rutherford said. "I eventually just faced up to
it and decided to do what I had to since that was what
I always wanted
Jennifer's single-minded focus is important when
it comes to performing in school, according to Dr. Alfred
Smith, assistant director of the Center for Counseling
Freshman Ryan Barnhart studies at a furious pace as finals
rapidly approach, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
and Student Development.
"Having a clear goal is a good first start Smith
said. "If you know what you want you can work harder
at getting there
Smith and the other counselors advise students on
a variety of issues, but finals time alwayrbrings about
increased stress and fear in many students.
"Stress is a common problem all year but does in-
crease at the end of the semester Smith said. "The
pressure of doing well coupled with outside stressors
can overwhelm a student, especially freshmen
Freshmen and women are Smith's most frequent
clients. Women account for over 60 percent of those
he sees and freshmen are represented slightly more
often than other classes.
"The biggest problem students have is time man-
agement Smith said. "If students would conceptual-
ize more than one day at a time and work on a week or
two weeks they would see less stress in everything
According to Smith, time management- and good
study habits are crucial to arriving at finals time with
the least amount of problems.
. Other ECU students new to the college experience
find it can be intimidating, but some of their own study
skills have paid off so far.
Freshman Melissa Bradley knows that college is a
new world with a lot of distractions, yet she feels she is
doing well with the new pressures.
"I didn't ask for help studying during my first se-
mester and ended up doing pretty well Bradley said.
"I was surprised that all my exams were cumulative,
which I wasn't used to, but the study guides and cram-
See FINALS page 7
STAY AWAY FROM MILK?!
PETA urges college students to
drink beer while angering many
Maura Buck
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Milk. It does a body good. Or so they say. According to People for the
Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), milk may not be as good for the
body as people think. In fact, beer may actually be healthier than a glass
of the white stuff.
Recently, due to pressure from Mothers Against
Drunk Driving (MADD), PETA has modified its one-
time harsh 'got beer?' campaign and turned it into
Marcus
Locjkhart
chugs a can
of brew,
(photo by
Garrett
McMillan)
a beer-is-a-healthier-beverage-than-milk argument. Al-
though college students have been extremely recep-
tive to the beer ads, PETA has decided to focus more
on fighting the dairy industry through exposing the
hardships of cattle instead of sensationalizing beer con-
sumption.
"Personally, I don't find the 'got beer?' campaign
all that offensive said freshman Mike Slatken. "I
know that I really wouldn't drink beer as opposed to
milk just because they say it's healthier
According to their Web site, PETA claims that dairy
cows produce more than 100 pounds of milk a day�
that's 10 times more than they would normally pro-
duce. Furthermore, PETA claims dairy cows are a threat
to the environment. They expend more than 120
pounds of waste products daily, a number equivalent
to that of two dozen humans. As a result, milk may
actually do more harm than good to our bodies.
PETA contends that milk contains contaminants
such as blood, pus, hormones and pesticides, and is
linked to numerous dangerous health conditions
such as obesity, heart disease and even cancer.
A study completed at Harvard suggests
that milk could actually cause osteoporo-
sis. Ironically, milk has long been be-
lieved to prevent this bone affliction.
Still, the question remains: Is
drinking beer the real solution to
these claims? Many students
feel that this may be taking
things a step too far.
"I think that the PETA
people used manipula-
tion to try to get to col-
lege students when they
chose beer as an ad de-
vice said junior Tabitha
Boulding.
Dr. Betty Straub, director of health
promotions for Student Health Services, feels
that PETA's campaign strategy is out of line.
"Truthfully, I think that they could have
used a 'got milk?' ad with a red circle and a slash
more effectively than the 'got beer?' campaign Straub
said. "I think that it's a shame when an organization
appeals specifically to college students in such a way
We've all seen the ads hailing the utility of milk
for our bodies. Who hasn't seen Kristi Yamaguchi with
a milk mustache telling us that without milk she
wouldn't be as strong as she is?
"The entire campaign is ridiculous said freshman
Stacy Tyner. "I would never choose to drink beer over
milk
Milk has long been believed to be a source of nu-
trition, providing muscles with protein and provid-
ing essential nutrients to the body, making it strong
Freshman Lynda Victor drinks a cool
glass of milk, getting her daily calcium
(photo by Garrett McMillan)
and healthy.
"For women, by the time they
are 18, they seem to get diet-con-
scious Straub said. "As a result,
they tend to cut out milk and dairy
products from their diet, a condi-
tion that will affect their bones
more and more as they age
Recently, PETA agreed to pull
the 'got beer?' campaign from col-
lege campuses nationwide. How-
ever, MADD is still pushing for a
complete ban of the promotion of
beer. In addition, PETA included a
donation of $500 to the MADD or-
ganization, which was subse-
quently refuted by MADD because
of their continued support of beer
consumption. You can check out
more information on the PETA Web
site at www.milksucks.com.
This writer can be contacted
at mbuck@tec.ecu.edu.
Good health dependent on balanced diet
Supplements, alimentation
should provide necessary vitamins

Essi Akakpo
STAFF WRITER
You are what you eat, according to the addage ev-
ery mother passes on to her children. The fact is, ex-
perts say the surest way an individual can prevent poor
health is by obtaining his or her recommended daily
alllowance of essential vitamins and minerals.
. "Vitamins help the body to function normally; they
act like regulators and they help in the creation of new
proteins said Catherine Sullivan, nutrition intern at
the department of family medicine.
"Vitamins also help protect us against heart disease
and from developing various cancers said Laura
Hartung, campus dining nutrition director.
Fruits and vegetables are excellent sources of a wide
variety of vitamins. Beta carotene and vitamin A are
found in vegetables like tomatoes, collard greens, green
leafy vegetables and sweet potatoes, and in fruits like
i
papayas, peaches and watermelons. Broccolistrawber-
ries and red bell peppers are very high in vitamin C.
Valuable sources of vitamin B12, Bl and 2 are
present in milk, yogurt, beans, chicken, while vitamin
E can be found in nuts, wheat germ and vegetable oil.
"Pay close attention to your antioxidant food
sources�beta carotene, vitamin A, vitamin C and E
Hartung said. "Antioxidants are shown to interfere with
the disease process by neutralizing harmful molecules
in our bodies called free radicals and to slow down the
aging process people who eat five to seven servings
of fruits and vegetables per day are 50 percent less likely
to develop cancer
If certain fruits and vegetables are out of season or
just too expensive, another way to get the vitamins
you need is by taking a vitamin supplement.
"The supplements are a valuable source of vitamins
also Sullivan said. "But your alimentation (diet) al-
ready provides a certain amount of vitamins, so you
have to be cautious about the supplements; 50 to 100
percent of the daily value is reasonable
Replacing poor eating habits by pill-popping with-
out caution may cause some harm to the body.
"Pills can be harmful in excessive doses Hartung
said. "It's a lot easier to overdose using a pill, while it's
i
very hard to overdose by eating the food source of vi-
tamins
For instance, too much vitamin D can cause irre-
versible kidney, heart and blood vessel damage and
bone malformation. Also, too much vitamin C can
cause diarrhea and urinary tract abnormalities.
"Do not over supplement Hartung said. "A multi-
vitamin is OK as a protective factor, but too much can
be harmful. Never take a supplement that exceeds the
RDA by 150 percent
In a casual survey, students were asked if they add
fruits and vegetables to their alimentation. About 50
percent said they usually have fruits and vegetables but
don't really care about getting vitamins.
"I don't think students get their vitamins naturally
from foods Hartung said. "According to a survey I
took two years ago, of the 1,446 people who ate in our
restaurants, only 53 percent of them felt their current
eating habits were healthy. Students think healthy eat-
ing takes too much time or money. Anything worth-
while in life takes some effort. There is some truth to
'you are what you eat
This writer can be contacted at
eakakpo@tec. ecu.edu.
!





April 11, 2000
media.ecu.edu
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Tuesday, April 11, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian I
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
FINALS
from page 6
Give Blood,
Please.
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 12,2000
12:00 NOON-6:00 PM
Mendenhall Student Cento-
Sponsored by Army R0TC
ming with my notes pulled me
through
As a nursing major, Bradley says
she knows her grades are important
but feels she has a handle on her
classes. Her roommate, freshman
Jessica Lassiter, has found things a
bit easier.
"I had a few cumulative exams
in high school so that didn't really
shock me, but the difficulty of some
of my exams last semester still sur-
prised me Lassiter said.
Time management might not
have caught up with them yet, but
both agree that they have particu-
lar study styles.
"1 don't study in groups. 1 tend
to do better by myself Lassiter said.
Bradley also finds relying on her-
self is the way to go. These room-
mates feel they will be ready for fi-
nals-when they get to them-and
will finish their first year with good
grades.
Jennifer Rutherford has found as
she finishes her senior year that the
skills she learned at school are the
way to go. She stays with her read-
ing, she sets goals for each day and
finds herself ready for finals.
With exams less than a month
away it's time to begin preparing by
creating study schedules and plan-
ning time to study with a group or
in a quiet place. And if all of this is
still overwhelming, give the coun-
selors at the Center for Student De-
velopment a call. After all, it is all
about the grades.
This writer can be contacted
at jschlatter&tec. ecu. edu.
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g The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, April 11, 2000:
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edg
Tuesday,
www.tec.i
lentless cha
Duval. In th
calmly held
complete an
nev that brc
om David
ijay Singh
lie Els to
�able
: jour-
his soc-
nrce-unuer o? 10 wir
ole 1
n the Mas-
ters with a three-stroke win
over 0s for his eighth career
victory.
"This is something I think
you can't beat Singh said
while slipping a size 46 green
jacket over his broad shoul-
avid Duval and Loren RoM
erts tied for third place with 70,
and Woods, trying to pull off
the greatest 36-hole comeback
in Masters history, got within
three of the lead but played
even-par on the bad
3S Di.icno;fHi
nultipli
disea
eilsorT
and under
n cell transplant last montJ
flemyre made
merit at a
before the Yankees play
Seattle Mariners In the I
nal game of a season-open!
road trip.
The treatment will includ
four months of chemotherapy,
meaning Stottlemyre will miss
the Yankees home'ppener
against Texas on Tuesday. He
does not expect to miss many
"games this season.
:4 Chmura arrested
for sexual assault
Green Bay Packer tight end
Mark Chmura was arrested
Monday on. accusationsof
sexual ayaialt. Two femafes,
ages 17 'ahdTgTfalleged
Chmura and another 'man had
inappropriate sexual contact
with them at a Hartland area
residence over the weekend,
said Waukesha County District
Attorney Paul Bucher.
anura, 31, has not been
formally charged, Bucher said.
Chmura is entering his ninth
season in the NFL after sitting
out most of the Jast following a
neck injury he received during
the second game pf the season.
Afackers spokesman said the
team will comment once the
capitalize on the strepgt
popularit summer's
World Cup victory by Introduc-
ing teams in eight dties nation-
wide. The Women's United Soc-
ssociatiqn (WUSA) said
that the league wants to be
sanctioned byJJ.S. Soccer, but
Major League Soccer has also
ssed an interest in help-
o launch the women'
VUSA organizers s;
team.
Herrion, Hamrick respond to charges
Coach says he.
did not incite fight
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Mike Hamrick, ECU director
of athletics, and Bill Herrion,
head men's basketball coach,
responded to recent allegations
that Herrion's rhetoric may
have played a role in a late-sea-
son brawl.
"I have also discussed this
matter at length with Coach
Herrion, and I have been im-
pressed with his honesty and
candor Hamrick said in a state-
ment released Friday. "While
never inciting players to physi-
cal violence toward one another
or anyone else, he recognizes
that phrases used commonly by
coaches to athletes can be sub-
ject to misrepresentation.
"While it was reported that
this was a program in which
fights were encouraged in prac-
tice, based on what I have
learned from speaking with the
players, this was not the case.
Fighting was not promoted,
competition was. In fact, prior
to the one reported incident,
there had been no fights in-
volving basketball team mem-
bers. Agressive-sounding lan-
guage, common to athletic
coaching, however, can easily
be taken out of context and
portrayed in a way never in-
tended
In the release, Herrion also
responded.
"This past season, I have
coached the way I've always
coached Herrion said. "I be-
lieve that there are certain fun-
damental principles necessary
to build an outstanding bas-
ketball program. Included in
these are maximum effort;
commitment, loyalty, and
trust between coaches, play-
ers and support staff. In ret-
rospect, if I have made state-
ments which could have been
misinterpreted, I truly regret
doing so. I would never en-
courage fighting among my
players
"I believe that my reputa-
tion and track record speak
for themselves. In no way do
we promote fighting in our
basketball program. Rather,
we promote the achievement
of excellence through maximum
' effort and dedication
Herrion came under fire fol-
lowing allegations that his coach-
ing style caused a locker room
fight between players Quincy
Hall and David Taylor. Following
the fight, trainer Jim Bazluki, who
voiced his concerns over
Herrion's conduct, did not have
his contract renewed.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
Pirates drop two to Rams
ECU splits Sunday
doubleheader
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
.With an unblemished CAA
record and the top spot in the
conference on the line, the Pi-
rates lost two aut of three
games to VCU this weekend
at Harrington Field.
"We didn't play well this
weekend said ECU shortstop
Lee Delfino. "We can't look
upon this negatively. There's
56 games in a season. We've
got to come out and play
hard. We've got to come to-
gether as a team and start
playing like we are capable of
doing
The Pirates lost the first
game of the series Friday
night, 3-2. Saturday's game
was suspended due to heavy
rains. That set up a double
header on Sunday. The Pi-
rates won the first game 2-1
but fell in the second, 5-4.
In Friday's game, the Pi-
rates took a 1-0 lead on an
RBI double from Nick
Schnabel. Schnabel would
then score on a ground ball
from Bryant Ward. In the top
of the fourth the Rams would
answer with a two-run homer
from Davy Martin off Foye
Minton.
In the seventn, the Rams'
Robbie Gragnani led off the
inning with a single. Out-
fielder Matt Davis sent a base
hit into left field that moved
Gragnani to third. Gragnani
would then score on a base
hit from Chris Gerrity.
Minton was pulled in the
top of the eighth. He allowed
three runs on eight hits over
seven innings. He collected
nine strikeouts without issuing
a single walk.
Despite Minton's strong out-
ing, the Pirates were unable to
mount much offense and the
lefthander picked up the loss.
"Obviously we didn't swing
the bats well said Head Coach
Keith LeClair. "They didn't swing
the bats well either, but they did
a better job with situational hit-
ting than we did
Following rains on Saturday
evening, the Pirates took the
field Sunday looking to avenge
their first conference loss of the
season. However, this time it
was VCU righthander Bo Acors
who almost washed out the Pi-
rates.
Acors did not allow a hit un-
til Schnabel sent a line drive
into left field. Following a walk
to ECU James Molinari, Bryant
Ward laid down a bunt that
moved the two baserunners
into scoring position. With run-
ners on second and third, ECU'S
Joseph Hastings sent a base hit
past first. Both runs scored and
ECU took a 2-0 lead.
While Acors was keeping
the Pirates off the basepaths
for much of the day, ECU
righthander Jason Mandryk
was also having a fine after-
noon. His only run came in the
top of the seventh off a sacri-
fice fly from pinch hitter Tim
Allen that scored Jose Pabon.
After eight strong innings,
Mandryk was pulled in favor
of righthander Cory Scott. Scott
walked Martin and gave up in-
field hits to VCU's Cory
Bauswell and Jose Pabon to load
the bases. Scott then struck out
Gragnani and Allen and got
Davis to ground out the short-
stop to end the game in dra-
matic fashion.
"They got a couple of good
bunts down Scott said. "I had
a lot of confidence in the team
behind me, so it was pretty easy
to throw strikes in the ninth in-
ning. As long as I threw strikes,
it would be pretty easy to get
them out
In the second game of the
doubleheader, the Pirates went
ahead once again. In the sec-
ond inning a single from
catcher Cliff Godwin scored
Hastings to put the Pirates up
1-0. Jhe Pirates added two
more runs when Delfino
cracked a two-run homer in the
third inning.
- "I felt like I was getting good
looks for most of the day
Delfino said. "I just wasn't put-
ting the bat on the ball. I was
just fortunate to get one
In the top of the fourth, the
Rams answered, scoring two
runs of their own on two sacri-
fice flies by Martin and
Bauswell.
In the fifth, VCU knotted the
game at three when Kevin Elrod
scored on a Gragnani ground
ball.
Gragnani put the Rams up
5-3 in the seventh when his
base hit scored VCU's Brian
Mohr and Elrod.
The Pirates would cut the
lead to one when Molinari
doubled, scoring Ward. That
would be as close as the Pirates
would come as the Rams went
on to win 5-4.
This writer can be contacted
at sports@tec.ecu.edu.
ECU outfielder Eric Bakich makes contact with a VCU pitch in Friday's 3-2 loss to VCU. (photo by Garrett McMillan)
team falls to N.C. State
Lady Pirates
lose to Wolf pack 6-3
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
The Lady Pirates lost a hard-
fought match against N. C. State
last Thursday.
The match was originally
scheduled as the final match of
the season but because of a
postponement earlier in the
season there will be a match
Tuesday at home against Rich-
mond.
The Lady Pirates started with
leads in four out of the six
singles matches which opened
the contest, but were unable to
hold on to early momentum,
succumbing 6-3 to the'
Wolfpack.
The team had many close
matches that they nearly pulled
out. Senior Asa Ellbring started
off strong against Marissa
Gildemeister but lost in three
sets, 2-6, 6-4, 6-2. Her doubles
partner Hrushida Kamthe got
the only win at the No. 2 spot
against Brie Glover, 6-4, 6-3.
Freshman Emily Kohl lost a
hard-fought match in straight
sets against Myrna Bawono at
the No. 4 position, 7-5, 6-1.
Sophomore captain Meredith
Spears lost at the No. 5 to Kristen
Nicholls, 6-3, 6-1. Singles was
rounded out with sophomore
Andrea Terrill losing to Landis
Strader 3-6, 7-5, 6-2.
"We played a real tough
match today said Tom Morris,
ECU Head Coach "They played
the critical points in the critical
matches better than we did. We
had chances to win in three
tough, hard-fought matches that
we just did not capitalize on.
Right now we are not winning
matches against tough teams
and we need to work on that
The match was a positive
situation that got out of hand
toward the end with ECU estab-
lishing themselves but they were
unable to keep up the intensity.
"This was going to be our
day Kamthe said. "We could
have beaten this team but we
lost it at the end
Lyndall Jordan who lost a
long match to Loni Worley, 4-6,
6-1, 6-4 was still positive after
the match.
"We played well even though
we lost Jordan said. "This has
been a good season. We have
played better than last year and
have a good future.
"We've had a good season
Morris said. "We had a ten-
game winning streak earlier in
the year and showed a lot of im-
provement from last season. As
far as against State, we had a
chance to win which shows how
far we have come. Last year
they beat us 8-1, and this year
we played a much better match
and lost 6-3.
"We had a lot of close
matches, and in those close
matches State responded bet-
ter at the critical points. We are
heading in the right direction.
We were upset that we lost be-
cause the match did meant a
lot to us, but we are heading in
the right direction. We want to
be competitive with the local
ACC schools, and that is what
we are building toward
The team will close out the
season against the Richmond
Spiders Tuesday.
This writer can be contacted
at rdowney@tec.ecu.edu.
SOPTBAI1
Rifgsisa
At
ECU'S Andrea Terrill smashes a forehand against N.C. State, (photo by Garrett
McMillan)
'�
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���� �� S . pp I V -�.� � , � I
Tuesday, April 11, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
M-tlnal teams: S $��, The
,feamMallbu
K Spike Girts (finalist),
I Whips (�eml- finalists)
The Squad. Richmond
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TANOINGS
PI Kappa Phi A
Sigma Phi Epsilon A
Theta Chi A
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PI Kappa Alpha A
Kappa Sigma A
Kappa Alpha
FRATERNITY PURPLE
Kappa Sigma B
Phi Tau B
Sigma Alpha Epsilon B
Phi Kappa Psl
Sigma Phi Epsilon B
Theta Chi 8
PI Kappa Alpha B
Lambda Chi Alpha B
Delta Sigma Phi B
MEN'S COLD
Northern Lights
Nads
Damn Yankees
White Death II
No Names
Construction Crew
2-0
2-1
2-1
1-1
1-2
1-2
1-3
0-3
3-0
3-0
2-0
2-0
2-1
2-1
1-3
0-2
0-2
2-0
2-0
1-1
1-1
1-1
1-1
Research Commandos
MBrsnjRPLE
Rawdawgs
Southern Comfort
Footphl
Upper Deckers
.Penthouse Softballs
ManerVaden
Nookle Patrol
Foreplayai
Da Hit Squad
2-0
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Carrett Hall Bombers
1-1
1-1
J:l
l-i
1-1
1-1
l-i
1-2
1-2
1-2
0-2
SPORTS
Intramural standings
The Phillies
Silver Duskeys
Greenville Psychiatric Ward
Fast Freddy's Daycare Sweatsho
Hungry Pirate Presents
TheRowdys
WOMEN'S PURPLE
Cheese Nips
Cotten Bailers
Superstars
Clement Catchers
Southern Belles
Brady Bunch
"Mini Me"
Flaming Boxers
The Angels
SORORITY
Zeta Tau Alpha
Delta Zeta
Alpha Phi
Alpha XI Delta
PI Delta
Chi Omega
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Alpha Omicron Pi
The East Carolinian
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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FRATERNITY PURPLE
Sigma Phi Epsilon B
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10 The East Carolinian
comics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
� THEJOEYSHOW
COMICS
Tuesday April 11. 20()Q
by: Joey ellis
31-B
www.tec.ecu.edu
bv: stuart Darks and brad benson
RANDOM
by: noah freeze
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INCLUDE YOUR NAME AND TELEPHONE NUMRER WITH YOUR IDEAS
THE WINNER WILL RECIEVE A CASH PRIZE ($5) AND THEIR NAME IN THE JOEYSHOW COMIC
THE WINNING NAME WILL RE ANNOUNCED ON APRIL 18th IN TEC COMICS PAGE
fill! LICKI
For a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252.328.6004
union
MAN OIU THE MOON (R)
The life and times of Andy Kaufman, who was considered
one of the most innovative, eccentric and enigmatic
comics of his time, provide the basis for this biographical
drama starring Jim Carrey as the master manipulator, a
comic who made up his own rules. Featured players
include Danny Devito as Kaufman's manager, George
Shapiro; Courtney Love as Lynne Margulies, a
documentary filmmaker who fell in love with the comic;
and Paul Giamatti as Kaufman's best friend, Bob Zmuda.
DEUCE BIGALOW MALE GIGOLO (R)
Deuce Bigalow is a fish tank cleaner until he gets a
temporary job watching over a gigolo's house. But when
Deuce accidentally wrecks the house, he is forced to
compensate by becoming a gigolo himself! He takes on
interesting clients (a tall Swedish woman, a rotund eater in
drag, a roommate who curses every five seconds, a
nurse)and together with a detective chasing Deuce down
W� �SPONSORED BY "��C
FEATURING �
ILLUMINA
2QOO
NOW SHOWING
MSC GALLERY
Q5TOIDll�W reran. riEreh
10PM � THE MENDENHALL BRICKYARD
RAIN SITE - MENDENHALL
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MERCURVCINEMA BLOCKBUSTER
Fri@ 7:30 & 10:00 p.m.
Sat. @ 7:30 p.m.
& Sun. @ 3:00 p.m.
NO SCREENING ON THURSDAY
due to BEACH BLAST!
Hello my name is Andy and this is my ad
JIM CARREY
AIAN
ON THE
MOON
mm r
on-rKff noon com
APR 12 & 13
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For additional information contact the: Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University
Greenville NC 27858-4353, or call 252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or VTTY 252.328.4736, 8:30 a m - 6 p m
Monday -Friday. Individuals who require accommodations under ADA should contact the Department for Disability
Support Services at 262.328.4802 forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program.
Mercury Cinema:
Man on the Moon (R)
7:30pm Hendrix
13THIRSTY THURSDAY
Mercury Cinema:
Man on the Moon (R)
10pm Hendrix
Blockbuster Film:
Deuce Bigalow Male Gi0Oo (Rl
7:30 & 10:30pm Hendrix
Outdoor Concert: BAABA SETH
10pm Mendenhall Brickyard
Rain Site - Mendenhall
Blockbuster Film:
Deuce Bigalow Mala Gigolo f Rl
7:30pmHendrix
H
Blockbuster Film:
Deuce Bigalow Mala Gigolo (Rl
3pmHendrix
5
Tuesday
www.tec.
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rooms avails
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APARTMEN1
Eastgate Villa
bath, WD hoc
ceilings. Only
$485.00 mom
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CANNON COl
bath townhous
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and accepting c
ter. Wainright I
756-6209.
CHEAP RENT
mem available I
August 15. No
ECU bus route.
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Amy at 919-786
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www.tec.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
SUBLEASE PIRATE'S Cove 1-2
rooms available with own bathroom,
free cable, water and electricity includ-
ed. Available starting May. Rent ne-
gotiable call Matt at 758-5286.
3 BEDROOM house. Available May
1, pet with deposit, fenced in back-
yard. Located at 1300 Charles Blvd.
For more information call Dogwood
Hollow Apts. 9 752-8900.
LOOKING FOR female roommate to
share duplex close to campus for sum-
mer months. Parking and back deck
available. 329-0983.
SUBLEASE 2 bedroom 2 full bath
apartment in Arlington Square. In-
cludes water, sewer, cable. WD hook-
up, dishwasher, and fireplace. Access
to pool and weight room. $500 month.
Available mid-May. 754-2526.
FOR RENT. 3 BR Condo. Each BR with
private bath, all appliances washer
and dryer, computer and phone con-
nections in each BR. 5 blocks E. of
campus (flood free). Available Aug.
1st $285. per BRmonth, Leave name
and phone with mgr. at 329-1162 or
e-mail: rentgvieearthlink.net
WESLEY COMMONS North. 1 bed-
room $340. 2 bedrooms $410. Wa-
ter and sewer included. Available now
and pre leasing for fall semester. Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
3 BEDROOM 1 bath $700, 2 Bed-
room 2 Bath $450 1 Bedroom $320
utilities included. All near campus, all
available April. Do not call for rentals
later than April please. 551-0971 leave
message.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE June 1.
Eastgate Village. Two bedroom, one
bath. WD hookup, balcony, cathedral
ceilings. Only one previous owner,
$485.00 month. Call 830-0903.
CLASSIFIEDS
ROOMMATE WANTED
FOR SALE
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed. Move
in now $260 per month rent plus 13
utilities. Close to downtown and cam-
pus. Call 215-0953 leave message.
HOUSE TO share preferably female
grad student, nonsmoking serious
student but laid back. Available mid-
May or short term summer session.
Leave message at 830-2158 Abby.
ECU MALE or female student to share
2 bedroom apt. starting in mid-June
at Wyndham Circle through Fall and
Spring semester. Rent $220 12 util-
ities. Call Rich. 931-9266.
STUDIOUS NONSMOKING male
roommate needed ASAP. Three bed-
room, private bath, washer, dryer, etc.
$300.00 month plus 13 utilities. Call
752-7136 or email
gcm07290mail.ecu.edu
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP 13
rent. 13 bills- Nice'duplex with wash-
er and dryer, personal drive, gas logs,
and small yard. All appliances and
small storage. Please call 551-6939.
MALE ROOMMATE needed. 3 BR
(each with private bath). All applianc-
es washer and dryer, computer and
phone connections in each BR. 5
blocks E, of campus (flood free), avail-
able June 1st, $285month. leave
name and phone with mgr. at 329-
1162 or e-mail: rentgvieearthlink.net
FEMALE NONSMOKING studious
roommate needed to share 3 bedroom
3 bath new apartment. $250 plus 1
3 utilities for June-May 2001. No pets,
private phone line. Call 931-9467.
RESPONSIBLE NONSMOKING fe-
male roommate to share two bedroom
duplex. Washerdryer. 262month
plus 12 utilities. Grad student pre-
ferred. Available in May. Call Emily
329-0499.
QUEEN SIZE waterbed with two at-
taching side tables $80. Call Angela
at 355-3598.
SURF BOARDS: 5 10" Mayhem. 6'4"
Xanado. 6'11" pintailTravel Gun- nev-
er ridden. Prices neg. All under $200.
Call Mike 329-8848.
BEAUTIFUL, HEALTHY Iguana look-
ing for great home! Must be seriously
interested in care-taking. Some acces-
sories included. Call 757-2064.
�89 BUICK CENTURY Limited, silver.
108k miles, loaded, power everything.
Runs great! Needs paint, headlinder.
Asking $1950. Call Jim at 756-7220
during day, 321-0938 night.
HELP WANTED
NEED TUTOR for college level Eng-
lish with experience in writing essays
in Jr level English will pay a good hour-
ly rate. Call Ashley. 746-7531.
SEEKING GOAL-oriented individual
with strong self-initiative, good com-
munication, time management skills,
and professionalism. Position involves
finance, volunteer recruitment, and
program coordination. Bachelor's de-
gree and relocation required within
Eastern N .C. Fax resume to Scout Dis-
trict Executive 252-522-9707.
WANTED: PAYING $6 50hr plus bo-
nuses for qualified telemarketers. No
Friday or Saturday work. Hours 5:00-
9:00 PM Monday - Wednesday: 4:00-
9:00 PM Sunday. Call Energy Savers
Windows & Doors. Inc. at 758-8700.
SERVICES
DON'T LOSE your deposit for leaving
your carpet a mess. Have your carpet
professionally steamed cleaned. We'll
clean it so you don't have to. Call Ad-
vance Carpet Cleaning 493-0211.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER RECEPTIONIST. Looking
for an outgoing person to help in a
fast paced office. 8am to 5pm Mon-
day-Friday. Send resume to 3481-A
South Evans Street Greenville, NC
27834.
LOSE WEIGHT and make $money$l!
Lose 7-29 lbs per month. Earn up to
$ 1200 month. 19 years of guaranteed
results! Call 757-2292 for Free Consul-
tation!
LOOKING FOR a place to live?
www.housing101.netYour move off
campus! Search for apartments. Free
roommate sublet listings.
WALK TO ECU, 1 bedroom apt.
$300month. available now. 125
Avery Street Call 758-6596. ask for
Thomas.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS & Jasmine
Gardens accepting deposits for fall se-
mester. 1 bedroom $350 per month.
2 bedroom starting at $410. Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
NEED SOMEONE to take over lease
of 3 bedroom house on May 15-16.
' Call ASAP 757-8724. Located on 2nd
' Street right off Summit Street.
1 BEDROOM, 2 person apartment for
sublease for the summer. Rent is
$367.00. Call 752-2529. ask for Can-
dace or Cherry.
NEEDED ASAP roommate nonsmok-
ing to share four bedroom house. Want
responsible school oriented people to
apply. $215.00 mthly utl. Call 752-
0281.
CANNON COURT 2 bedroom 1 12
bath townhouse. Basic cable includ-
ed. $475 per month. Available now
and accepting deposits for fall semes-
ter. Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
FEMALE STUDENT wanted to share
2BR 2B duplex. $365.00 includes util-
ities, basic cable, wd. Must love pets.
Call Suzanne at 752-1351.
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students. Cam-
pus three blocks. Prefer graduate stud-
ent. Central Air. Ceiling fans. Washer.
Dryer. $250.00 plus utilities.
(703)680-1676.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom. 1 12 bath apt.
starting late Mayearly June. Call 754-
0755.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
to share large four bedroom house.
Close to campus, across from art build-
ing. $189month washerdryer. Small
yard. 329-8354, great place to live!
CHILDCARE NEEDED for 8 year old
boy (June 12-August 11) Monday-Fri-
day 8 a.m. -2:30 p.m. Must have own
transportation, be able to swim, pre-
fer non-smoker, and have references.
Please call 355-7597 after 3 p.m.
WANTED: NON-smoking, depend-
able student with own transportation.
To care for energetic five and seven
year olds for the summer break. Ref-
erences needed. Call 752-7787 after
5:30 pm to set up interview.
QUADRIPLEGIC SEEKS assistance
bathing, lifting, driving morning or af-
ternoon. Call 353-9074.
APPOINTMENT SETTING7elema7-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
BASEBALL: EX-highschool pitcher
needed to throw Little League batting
practice: Must throw strikes: April
through June: $10.00session. 756-
9172.
SSFUNDRAISERSS OPEN to student
groups or organizations. Earn $5 per
MC app. We supply all materials at
no cost. Call for info or visit our web-
site. 1-800-932-0528 X 65 www.ocm-
concepts.com
ANDY'S CHEESESTEAKS and
Cheeseburgers now hiring cookswait-
staff for upcoming locations at Bells
Fork and Frontgate Shopping Center
near PCC. Stop in and pick up appli-
cation at 10th St. location between
3pm-6pm. No phone calls.
SUMMER SITTER three days per
week for two boys ages 13 & 10. Call
756-5350.
CHILD CARE needed for 2 children
ages 4 yrs and 3 mos. Flexible hours
(10-20 hours) week days. Child care
experience a must. Call Becky at 355-
1604.
SUMMER CAMP counselors needed
for premier camps in Massachusetts
& New Hampshire. Positions available
for talented, energetic, and fun loving
students as general counselors and
speciality counselors in all team sports,
all individual sports such as Tennis &
Golf. Waterfront and Pool activities,
and speciality activities including art.
dance, theater, gymnastics, newspa-
per, rocketry & radio. Great Salaries,
room, board, and travel. June 17th-Au-
gust 16th. Enjoy a great summer that
promises to be unforgettable. Check
out our web site and apply on line at
www.greatcampjobs.com or call 1-
800-562-0737.
CHEAP RENT two bedroom apart-
ment available to sublease May 15 to
August 15. No security deposit, on
ECU bus route. Call ASAP 329-2842.
FOR SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apartment. Wesley Commons- 102
Brownlea Dr. Available immediately!
$350 No deposit required! Please call
Amy at 919-786-9809 if interested.
FOR SALE
WE NEED 10-12 girls to participate
every weekend in a traveling bikini con-
test. Training provided. Cash awards
for winners, $25 "gas money" if you
do not win a cash prize. I have worked
with dozens of ECU girls in photogra-
phy. Please contact Carolina Mer-
maids- Paul Hronjak, 4413 Pinehurst
Dr Wilson, NC 27896 or call (252)
237-8218 or e-mail me at hronjak&sim-
flex.com
ADULT ENTERTAINERS and dancers
needed. Must be 18 own phone and
transportation. No drugs. Make $1500
weekly. 758-2737.
NEED RELIABLE trustworthy person
for cleaning service. Daytime hours.
Residential cleaning. Flexible hours.
Vehicle, phone, valid driver's license
required. Maid Spotless 321-6599.
CYPRESS GARDENS 1 bedroom
$395-$420. 2 bedrooms $475-$500.
Basic cable & water and sewer includ-
ed. Available now and accepting ap-
plications for fall semester Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8t
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
SOFA AND recliner.175. Bedroom
set- queen headboard, nightstand.
large amoire and bureau. $200 all
great condition! Call 757-8758.
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
East 10th St. (next to Papa Oliver's Piz-
za)
98 SEADOO XP limited 2 seater. Cov-
er. 3 life jackets Triton trir. Asking
$7000 252-985-0165 after 5pm.
FOR SALE: drop leaf dining table with
4 chairs. Microwave oven. 2 end ta-
bles, coffee table. 2 halogen lamps,
blue hide-a -bed sofa. Call David or
Stacey at 329-8976.
FOR SALE: couch and loveseat100.
kitchen table with four chairs $120.
TV stand $10. bookshelf $20. Great
for just starting out. Call 830-0903.
� want"a break? 1
I S100 off Security Deposit '
I until May 5,2000!
1 or 2 bedrooms, �
1 bath, range
refrigerator, free
watersewer,
washerdryer
hookups, laundry
i facilities, 5 blocks ,
i from campus, (
I ECU bus services, i
Wesley
Commons
South:
i
-All properties have 24 hr.
emergency maintenance
Pets Allowed with Deposit.
Call 758-1921
Part-Time Jobs
Earn Money and Resume
Experiance Working for
ONLINE
COLLECTIONS
Earn Up To
$700
BEVERAGE CART and Snack Bar At-
tendant needed at the Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Dept. Bradford
Creek Golf Course. Excellent working
conditions. Employee is responsible for
greeting guest, taking and filling or-
ders for food and beverage, and col-
lecting payments. Light set up and
cleaning duties in Snack Bar and Bev-
erage Cart. Also works on Beverage
Cart selling beverages on the course.
Approximately 50 of work is indoors,
50 outdoors. Must be available &
willing to work 4-5 hour shifts between
10am & 6pm Monday through Friday
and Weekends from 9am to 6pm.
Must be at least 18 years of age and
have dependable transportation. Pay
is $5.15 per hour plus tips. Applica-
tions are available at Human Resourc-
es, City of Greenville. 201 Martin L.
King Jr. Dr. For additional information
call Human Resources at 329-4492 or
Bradford Creek Golf Course. 329-4657.
WORK AROUND your schedule!
$500-$ 1500 PT per month $2000-
6000 FT per month. Full training.
Earn expense paid vacations. Only 5
people needed. Call 757-2763 M-F 9-
5. EXT 1229.
RESTAURANT RUNNERS now hiring
drivers 2-way radios allow for unpar-
alleld freedom to study, watch tv, or
visit friends while waiting for an or-
der. Perfect hours for students 756-
5527.
PERSONALS
WWW.THECOMMENTATOR.COM
GREEK PERSONALS
HEATHER BURGESS, CONGRATU-
LATIONS on your new job at BB&T
Love the sisters of Gamma Sigma Sig-
ma.
NEED A good DJ at an affordable
price? Cakalaky Entertainment offers
good times at a great price! Late
nights, formals. semi-formals. or any
occasion (references available)! Call
Jeff (252)531-5552.
lj�p2SlL1'
onoQBment
Per Hour
Mon-Frl 5 to 8 p.m.
Sat. 8 a.m. to Noon
ONLINE Collections Is
looking for the 5 most ag-
gressive people in Greenville
to work as telephone collec-
tors. The perfect part-time
job. Exellent pay. Our grads
get hired based on their
experience working for us.
Minimum 20 hours per week.
Contact Henery Parker at
757-2151.
EARN $6.50 and up. Tuition Painters
now hiring in Greenville. Washington,
and surrounding areas. No experience
necessary. Chances for advancement.
Call 347-1366 or 353-4831.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly. Legal lap dancing. No experi-
ence needed Age 18 up, all national-
ities. 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
UFEGUARDS POOLS AND Beaches
Atlantic Beach. Greenville. Raleigh. Wil-
son, and Rocky Mount- availability.
Please call (252)321-1214.
MARY RUTH, Thank you for all your
hard work with formal. You did a great
job! Love the sisters of Gamma Sigma
Sigma.
OTHER
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.Carolina sky sports .com
Wanted: Summer Help at the BEACH!
Graduating Senior Preferred;
Undergraduate Applications Accepted Also
Great Pay: EBEE Housing
All Interested Email at RISKYB@lnterpath.com
Wilson Acres
Summer Pool Memberships
available
$100.�vithECUPCCI.D.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath 1000 square
feet Village Green includes water, sew-
er, cable. ECU bus route $420month.
Available as early as May. Call 931-
9917.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SOFTBALL HOME RUN DERBY. Do
you feel good about your Softball abil-
ities. If so. come on out to Blount Fields
April 12 at 8:00pm and show every-
one your power. For more information
please call 328-6387.
SUPPORT GROUP for Hepatitis B and
C. PCMH Regional Rehab Classroom
Third Thursday of each month 7pm-
9pm. Contact: Vicki or Dennis Davis
252-321-5662 or vicdenGgreenvil-
lenc.com
DISC GOLF Tournament. The ECU
Disc Golf Club is throwing a Fax Day
Tourney, Saturday. April 15th . Regis-
tration is from 9-9:45 am. $3 for stud-
ents w ECU ID. $5 for non-students.
Lots of prizes! All abilities welcome!
Call 752-6180 FMI.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING RE-CERTIFI-
CATION. April 25 and 27 6pm-10pm.
You must have a current American Red
Cross Lifeguard Certification. This class
includes CPR-FPR. No materials such
as books and masks are provided. This
certification lasts 3 years. Cost is $55
mem-$65non-mem. Registration is
now through April 24. For more infor-
mation please call 328-6387.
CAPE LOOKOUT. April 21-23. Come
develop your paddling skills in an open
water environment. Expect about 10
miles of paddling in varying sea and
weather conditions. While the light-
house may be the first thing that pops
inyour mind when you hit the Cape,
the wildlife and unspoiled beauty are
thethings you will remember the most.
This is a very popular trip so signup
quick. Cost is $65mem-$80non-
mem. Registration Deadline is April 12,
5pm. For more information please call
328-6387.
The East Carolinian ft
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GOLF SINGLES REGISTRATION. To-
day 10am-6pm. Those interested in
participating in singles golf should
come sign up in the Intramural Office.
This will be a great opportunity to
show off your golfing skills to every-
one. For more info call 328-6387.
"TIME IS On Your Side Wednesday.
April 12. 4:00pm. Mendenhall Under-
ground. Presenter: Ms. Shelly Myers.
Director. Adult and Commuter Stud-
ent Services. If you have ever wished
that there were just more hours in a
day. this workshop is for you. Learn
how to manage yourself so that time
becomes an ally, not an enemy. This
workshop will be well worth your time!
BE A hero, give blood- Wednesday.
April 12th at Mendenhall Student Cen- .
ter from 12-6pm. Free pizza and
doughnuts. Sponsored by Army ROTC
and American Red Cross.
GOOSE CREEK. April 19. Develop
your paddling skills in a river environ-
ment The mouth of the Pamlico River
is the setting for this great afternoon
of paddling. Goose Creek is a para-
dise for nature lovers. The creek al-
lows for open water paddling as well
as shallow water "swamp" paddling
too. So. don't miss it! Cost is15mem
$20non-mem and the registration
deadline is April 12. 5pm.
SHENANDOAH NATIONAL PARK.
April 20-23. Cover the basics of back-
packing in the mountains of Virginia.
Expect moderate to strenuous terrain
over 10-12 miles in varying weather
conditions. We will spend the wee-
kend in the backcountry of the Blue
Ridge Mountains. Sign up quick so you
won't be left behind. Cost is $65
mem-$80non-mem and the registra-
tion deadline is April 12, 5pm. For
more information please call 328-6387.
THE ECU Buddhist and Meditation
Group is offering a Meditation class
Mon April 10th and Mon April 17th
at 7:30-8:30pm at the Unitarian Uni-
versalist Church 131 Oakmont Dr
phone 328-1070 or 756-8315. No fees.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet Thurs-
day April 13 at 5:30pm in Mendenhall
244. For more info: www.ecu.edu
orggbp
ADVERTISE IN THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
IT WORKS!
NEED A DATE?
Try our campus calendar at
clubhouse.ecu.edu.
become a member.
Launch your organization
into cyberspace.
www
clubhouse.
ecu.edu
Monday, April 17
244 Mendenhall Student Center
4:00 - 6:00 p.m. - Open House
5:00 p.m.
Presentation of Greenville Urban
Area Bikeway System with
Question and Answer Session
Visit the "information stations" at the forum to
learn about issues involved in bikeway system
development Give your comments and ideas
about:
� What bikeway treatments to use on various streets
- Bike route signs - options
- Bikes 2 Bus connection locations
- Bicycling for exercise
For more information, please call .3.20-44(






1510 Briie Circle T -p QT Y"f f "XT' a i510 Br' clr(l
GrmviVt, NC 27834 JJt!l O W 1 V JX. GKtffflk, NC 27834
APARTMENTS
FREEDOM
Are you a student who would like the freedom of renting an apartment
without the worry of your roommate paying their portion of the rent ??????
if the answer is yes then
KESWICK APARTMENTS IS THE PLACE FOR YOU
j. ,j n We offer , , ,
Mmdual lam " on silc laundry facilities
9 month hue terms walk-in closets
fully clipped Fitness Center 24 hour emergency maintenance
Lighted tennis courts wood burning fireylaces
Summing pool Mini blinds and vertical blinds
Sand volley I court Ceiling fans
washerDryer hookups Pets welcome
For more information call 355-2198 to experience
iJJ The Keswick Style - Make it yours
Thank You ECU
Sophomores
Over ninety percent of you re-
sponded to the Sophomore Insti-
tutional Evaluation Form promptly
and efficiently. Your opinions of
ECU instruction, offices, and ser-
vices will be compiled into re-
ports that will be available for
your review on the Planning and
Institutional Research website
(www.ecu.edupir) this summer.
ATTENTION
ECU Alumni Association
jostens"
A compilation of your responses will
be sent to the University of North
Carolina General Administration
where it will be compared with re-
sponses from sophomores at each of
the other UNC campuses. These
reports will be provided to the North
Carolina legislature.
Your opinions are also important
within ECU. ECU administrators and
faculty will review compilations of
the data you provided to identify
areas of strength to build upon, as
well as weaknesses to be corrected.
Again, Thank You for helping to
improve ECU's programs!
GRADUATES!
IF YOU MISSED THE
PREMIERE OF THE NEW,
UNIQUE ECU ALUMNI RING -
a blending of white and yellow gold -
YOU CAN STILL SEE IT AND
HAVE IT BEFORE GRADUATION.
place: UBE - 516 S. COTANCHE ST.
DATES: APRIL 10-12
TIME: 11-4 MONDAY
10-3 TUESDAY
10-3 WEDNESDAY
SPONSORED BY THE ECU ALUMNI
ASSOCIATION, UBE and JOSTENS
Call toll free to ask questions or
order over the phone: 1 -888-433-0559
www.tec.
Privm
NC crimi
� An open I
in attending E
Saturday, Api
TheECUAdr
to draw aboui
program that
will continue t
guests will sU
Great Pirate F
Party. Contac
328-6133.
Pi.
The Great
Pigout Party o
continues thro
Ficklen Stadiu
rides, shag dai
test. The festiv
works are sche
pigs will be del
cooking contes
day. Judging fc
begins at 7 a.n
grilled pork go i
morning.
The ECU sp
Closes out the s
the Pirates, stai
the stadium. Fo
replay of last ye
be shown in the
scoreboard. Act
val rides until 9
Lee Workman,
Special Events i
Acti
Graduate stu
cation program v
other informatior
the annual Rese
quium for adult e
. program will be r
Student Center. (
School of Educal

Dr. Thomas S
fessor of the Dep
tion and Theater j
sity, and Editor of
Communication"
titled "The Role ol
and Race Relatioi
at 7:30 p.m. on M
129 of Speight.
Bea
- The Embers, o
and most popular
play at 7 p.m. tonii
reation Center out
Hon
The ECU Horn
at 7 p.m. tonight in
sic Recital Hall. Thi
at 8:30 p.m. by Chr
member of the mus
form on the flute. B
and open to the pul
ONLINI
Vote online
Would you
someone in
met in an on
Results of las
Do you think it n
you vote in ti
50 Ye


Title
The East Carolinian, April 11, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 11, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1403
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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