The East Carolinian, April 4, 2000







www.tec.ecu.edu
the 1
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 99
JARVIS' FACELIFTP9 7
Leadership program a first
44 days to go until Graduation
NEWS BRIEFS
Campus planning
The ECU Core Group, a five-member
advisory body, today will discuss the latest
version of the campus expansion plan
along with suggestions by various organi-
zations and individuals. Members of the
Core Group include faculty, staff and a
representative from the Board of Trustees.
The 10 a.m. meeting in Room 212 of
Mendenhall Student Center is open to the
public. Contact Dr. Robert Thompson, di-
rector of planning and institutional re-
search, 328-6288.
Corporate business
William R. Berkley, the Chairman of the
Board and CEO for the W.R. Berkley Corp.
in Greenwich, Conn is the speaker for the
Beta Gamma Sigma Distinguished Lecture
Series. His presentation is at 4 p.m. today
at the Ramada Plaza Hotel. Contact Dr.
Ernest Uhr, dean of the ECU School of
Business, 328-6377.
Playhouse
"The Foreigner" completes its ECU
Playhouse run at 8 p.m. tonight in
McGinnis Theatre,
Early virtual reality
A public lecture program will discuss
"Virtual Reality in Renaissance Europe
The presentation by Stuart Clark of the
University of Wales will examine such phe-
nomena as apparitions, witchcraft and
magic during the time when William
Shakespeare wrote his plays. The lecture
will take place at 4 p.m April 5 in Room
1026 of the GCB.
Baseball
The Pirates will play UNC-Greensboro
at 7 p.m April 5 at Harrington Field.
Music change
The chamber music concert scheduled
for at 8 p.m April 5 in the Recital Hall has
been canceled.
Writers series
Novelist Leslie Marmon Silko will be
the last speaker in the Writers Reading
Series and she will meet the public at 3
p.m on April 6 in Mendenhall Student
Center. Silko will read from and autograph
her books at 7 p.m. in the Great Room in
Mendenhall. She is considered one of the
country's top American Indian writers. Her
books include "Laguna Woman "Cer-
emony "The Delicacy and Strength of
Lace "Almanac of the Dead "Yellow
Woman and a Beauty of the Spirit" and the
recently published "Garden of the Dunes
Contact Julie Fay of the department of En-
glish, 328-6578.
Recital
Jeffrey Bair, a faculty member of the
School of Music, will perform on the saxo-
phone on at 8 p.m on April 6 in the A.J.
Fletcher Music Center Recital Hall. The
public is invited.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you think it makes a
difference if you vote in the
SGA elections?
Results of last week's question:
Did you find your adviser to be
knowlegeable and helpful during regis-
tration?
52 Yes 18 No
D TOPS IN TENNIS pg.9
ECU men's and women's teams fall
today's Weather
Showers, high of 70�
and a low of 39�
TUESDAY. APRIL 4. 2000
Players question coach's methods
Trainer fired following
locker room brawl
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Following a late season brawl
that erupted in the locker room
of the ECU basketball team that
left one player injured and two
players suspended, many ECU
players are questioning the
rhetoric of Head Basketball
Coach Bill Merrion. The after-
math of the incident has also
claimed the job of respected
trainer, Jim Bazluki.
Numerous players have
stated that Herrion often told the
team to be more physical adopt
a more violent style of game and
a more confrontational attitude
among themselves.
The players stated that
Herrion said:
� "At Drexel, I would come in
at halftime and someone would
be pinned against the wall by
their throat. Why can't I get that
here?"
�"If 1 could hit you, I would.
But then I'd get fired. By this time
at Drexel there would have been
three or four fights by now
�"Be a man, knock
somebody's head off
�"We have enough bodies, so
I don't care if you get hurt
�"If you foul somebody take
his fing head off
�"We haven't had one fight
this year. You guys are so soft.
There's not an ounce of competi-
tiveness in anyone on this team
�"One time at Drexel, I had
two guys start just swinging at
each other and told 'em, 'Let 'em
go So I just sat back and
watched them go after it. Finally
after a while we broke it up
According to players who did
not wish to be identified,
Herrion's comments contributed
to the altercation that took place
between the two teammates.
The fight that occurred on
Feb. 29 followed a practice in
which Herrion was reportedly
upset with the team's lack of in-
tensity.
According to statements ob-
tained from the players, the fight
took place in the film room fol-
lowing a heated speech by
Herrion in which he made eye
contact with center Alphons Van
Ierland. Following the speech the
coaching staff left the room. At
that point, guard David Taylor
mentioned that Herrion was
looking at Van Ierland for much
of his talk.
Following that remark,
Quincy Hall, apparently of-
fended by Taylor's comment to-
wards Van Ierland, confronted
Taylor. The two exchanged words
and then Hall struck Taylor. The
two then fought until Hall began
choking Taylor, allegedly render-
ing him momentarily uncon-
scious. The players then broke up
the fight and summoned
Bazluki, who was still on the
court. Bazluki entered the room
and found Taylor conscious and
began to tend to his injuries. At
this point Taylor reportedly
picked up a chair and attempted
to throw it at Hall. The chair was
taken away and the fight was
over.
The fight left Taylor with a
cut below his eye that required
six stitches and several smaller
cuts. Hall was left with a small
cut in his mouth that did not re-
quire stitches.
Because of the altercation,
both Taylor and Hall were sus-
pended for the CAA Tournament
game that the Pirates eventually
lost, 75-54.
Following the incident,
Bazluki spoke with Herrion
about the altercation. Bazluki re-
ECU Head Men's Basketball Coach
Bill Herrion went 10-18 this season,
(file photo)
portedly voiced his concern over
Herrion's comments and that
they may have played a role in
See COACH, page 3
Student government association elections to be held
Student body to
select representatives
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
Tomorrow, the Student Gov-
ernment Association (SGA) will
be holding elections for the of-
fices of Executive Council presi-
dent, vice president, treasurer
and secretary for the 2000-01
school year.
The executive branch of SGA
is made up of the student body
president, who is assisted by the
vice president, treasurer and sec-
retary. Each of the executive of-
ficers are elected by a majority of
those voting in the student body
elections, which take place every
year.
"A big percentage of student
opinton comes from the SGA
executive council said Cliff
Webster, the current student
body president. "We are at a time
when the student voice must be
heard. That voice will he elected
tomorrow
The student body president
represents the students in work-
ing with the faculty, administra-
tion, official guests and students
from ther � .nools. Other duties
of the president include presid-
ing over meetings of the legisla-
ture, issuing orders to executive
committees and delegating du-
ties.
The president also serves as
a non-voting member of the
Board of Trustees, which is the
body that makes decisions deal-
ing with tuition and fees, con-
struction projects and other uni-
versity issues.
"The most important part of
the job is student representation
and speaking to the administra-
tion on behalf of the students
Webster said.
The responsibilities of the stu-
dent body vice president are to
perform the duties and exercise
the powers of the president if the
president is absent for some rea-
son.
The treasurer's main duties
are to advise the legislature on
financial matters and is directly
Set ELECTION page 4
School of Business seeks tougher admission requirements
Proposal will have
few short-term effects
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
The School of Business at
ECU recently proposed to raise
program admission requirements
in an effort keep the business
school approximately the same
size while the rest of the univer-
sity grows.
The way the admission re-
quirements stand currently, a stu-
dent needs to have completed at
least 45 semester hours with a 2.5
or higher GPA, and a grade of C
or better in seven specific courses
to enter into the school of busi-
ness. The proposal will raise those
class requirements to eight
courses (ACCT 2521 will be
added), scoring a C or better on
all eight courses, while still re-
taining the current requirement
of 45 semester hours and a 2.5
overall.
The proposed changes were
generated by the administration
of the school of business and
passed by a mail ballot without
general discussion among the
faculty or students. The measure
must now be approved by the
university Curriculum Commit-
tee, Faculty Senate and Chancel-
lor Eakin before it can be imple-
mented.
The business faculty voted on
the new requirements by way of
a mail-in ballot three days after
the proposal was made. Typi-
cally when proposals of this na-
ture are made, there is a longer
period of deliberation and a full
faculty meeting for discussion.
"There were faculty and com-
mittee involved said Dr. Ernest
B. Uhr, dean of the school of
r
business. "We ha e been looking
at this since last fall. All of the
requirements were followed
The issue is a sensitive onetx?-
cause some feel thai the school
of business is looking to avoid
their fair share of the enrollment
increase that is expected to hap-
pen at ECU over the next several
years. ECU is expecting an in-
crease of 7,000000 new stu-
. Sec BUSIHESS page 4





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Tuesday, April 4, 2000.
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Brent Queen
PRESIDENT
Activities:
Student Government day repre-
sentativeoff campus, student rep-
resentative on the Faculty Senate as
a member of the Calendar Commit-
tee, student representative on the
Community Connection Network
Committee, social chair and schol-
arship chair of Tau Kappa Epsilon,
representative to the Interfraternity
Council, currently serving as the Ex-
ecutive Chief of Staff for the SGA.
Goals:
"We as a student body have en-
joyed an era of strong student voice
and expression. Student voice is
presently a pivotal movement on
our campus. As president of the
SGA, I will keep that voice alive and
heard. I will strongly advocate in-
put from students. I plan to hold
bimonthly open sessions for any
student who wants to speak on is-
sues that affect our campus commu-
nity, as well as continuous student
organizational visits
Marcus Frederick
PRESIDENT
Activities:
Co-founder of the Minority Stu-
dent Coalition, Co-founder and
Governor of the Black Students'
Union, member of the SGA Judicial
Board, Chair of the Barefoot Com-
mittee of Student Union, member
of the Popular Entertainment Com-
mittee of the Student Union, DJ at
WZMB, Volunteer Student Assistant
for the Admissions Office and host
of the Pirates Crew.
Goals:
"When I am elected SGA presi-
dent, my primary focus shall be as
follows: greater activism by the SGA
(i.e. rallies for major student issues
such as drastic tuition hikes), slower
reduction of parking spaces, more
input via "student body town meet-
ings the introduction of the "Spirit
of Cooperation" regarding SGA and
other campus organizations in an
effort to reduce the elitism of the
SGA and an open door policy for all
students
Activities:
Member of the ECU Honor and
Judicial Board of SGA, SlayUmstead
Hall Council president, Marching
Pirates section leader, ECU Habitat
for Humanity founder, student
body representative to the Faculty
Senate Credits Committee, member
of the SGA's Presidential Cabinet,
.member of Gamma Beta'Phi Honor
Service Society, Honors Program
participant.
Goals:
"As president, 1 would form the
'Inter-Organization Council'
(IOC)-an organization which
would include one representative
trom each ot the over 2UU univer-
sity organizations on campus. I also
feel that I have the personality and
capability to superbly represent all
of the 18,000 students. My in-
volvement in a variety of on- and
off-campus groups has enabled me
to gain in-depth knowledge of ECU,
Greenville, and the UNC system
Activities:
SGA Coordinator of External
Affairs, Sophomore Class Presi-
dent, SGA Rules and Judiciary
Co-Chair, Presidentfounder of
Chi Phi Fraternity, Chancellor's
Leadership Program participant,
Scott Hall representative, Red
Cross volunteer, SGA Award for
"Most Outstanding Piece of Leg-
islation
Goals:
"I want to build a stronger re-
lationship with the administra-
tion. I oppose tuition increases
on the state level. I am planning
to create a Mouse or Representa-
tives so that all 200 organiza-
tions that are represented are
able to embody the 18,000 stu-
dents on campus
Damon Stafford
VICE PRESIDENT
Activities:
Day representative of the
SGA Legislature, member of the
Appropriations Committee, se-
nior sports writer at 'The East
Carolinian treasurersocial
chair of Lambda Chi Alpha, ECU
Club Ultimate Frisbee.
Goals:
"As vice president, 1 plan to
work with the State Student Gov-
ernment and assist at various lev-
els to help generate new ideas to
improve the student body. I
want the SGA to have an "open
door feeling" of students repre-
senting students. I also want to
change the ECU Dining Services
and make sure that the voice of
the students is heard
Eric Gabriel
VICE PRESIDENT
Ml
Activities:
SGA legislator, Resident ad-
viser, News Director at WZMB,
Hurricane Floyd Flood Relief
volunteer, Boys and Girls Club'
volunteer, student staff member
of University Housing Services.
Goals:
"I plan to incorporate cam-
pus residents in student govern-
ment, work with Housing and
Dining Services to enrich on-
campus living, increase student'
organization involvement in '
community service projects and
increase drunk driving aware-
ness amongst them
Christopher Williams
TREASURER
Activities:
Member of the SGA Legislature, member of the Appropriations Com-
mittee of SGA in 1998, chair of the Appropriations Committee 1999-2000,
student representative on The External Environmental Analysis Commit-
tee, co-founding member of East Carolina University Black Students' Union
and former secretary.
Goals:
"As SGA treasurer I intend to further distribute money to student orga-
nizations on basis of need rather than size of membership. My main ob-
jective while holding office would be to promote awareness of the fund-
ing process to student organizations as to eliminate confusion and mix-
ups with in the procedure. To achieve this goal I would hold funding work-
shops to explain the process and review the funding packet to all eligible
organizations
000
Liane Bailey
TREASURER
Activities:
SGA Screenings and Appointments Chair, AOII New Member Educa-
tor, AOII Property Manager, Pitt County Humane Society volunteer
Goals:
"I plan to simplify the SGA budget so that organizations are more
aware of the process, establish a Web page for students to comment and
complain on any issue they feel needs attention
Sadie Cox
TREASURER
Activities:
Rules and Judiciary chair of SGA, Chancellor's Leadership Program,
Chapter Relations chair and recording secretary of Alpha Omicron Pi So-
rority, member of Swim Club Team and member of Water Polo Team.
Goals:
"In the past, it has been difficult for organizations to obtain the money
they ask for through funding. So my main goal, if elected treasurer of
SGA, will be to have funding workshops. With these funding workshops,
organizations will meet and learn the proper procedures they need to go
through to obtain the money they ask for and need
Whitney Bishop
SECRETARY
Activities:
Sophomore Class Vice President, Chi Omega Rush Day Chair
Goals:
"I plan to reconstruct the adviseradvisee program by holding a forum
for students to give their input and enhance the process
Sarah Evans
SECRETARY
Activities:
Member of Pi Sigma Alpha, participant in the Chancellor's Leadership
Program, member of the SGA Rules and Judiciary Committee, Philanthropy
chair and Programs vice president of Alpha Xi Delta, WZMB news director,
member of Omicron Delta Kappa
Goals:
"My primary goal as secretary would be to increase communication
between the student body and the SGA. I feel that all students should
know what is going on in the SGA and have the opportunity to express
their suggestions and concerns. To accomplish this, I plan to improve the
SGA Web page, meet with 'The East Carolinian and implement surveys to
find out what students want j
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I
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Tuesday, April, 2000
Wvvw.tec.ecLf.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@studentmedia.ecu.edtl
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
0
Duke U.�Elvis is alive and the government is about
to shut down Krcyzewskiville�no foolin Unless it
happens to be April Fool's Day and you're looking at
Duke University's Web site or the Duke Basketball Re-
port.
In honor of the April 1 holiday, the Duke News
Service superimposed Elvis Presley into the pictures that
normally appear on the University's homepage. With
this addition, Elvis was present at President Nan
Keohane's inauguration, a field hockey game and sev-
eral other places.
While seemingly few students actually reported that
they noticed the King in the Web site pictures, staff at
the Duke News Service were proud of their prank.
"We thought It was so cool that it would make a
good April Fool's joke said Dennis Meredith, assis-
tant vice president and director of the Office of Re-
search Communications. "Nan thought it was a real
honor to have Elvis at her inauguration
The idea for the joke originally came from Vincent
Budnick, a systems administration analyst in the Of-
fice of Information Technology, while he was super-
imposing images of Elvis into pictures for fun, Meredith
said. The choice of Elvis for the superimposed images
was simple.
Cause Elvis is cool Meredith said. "He's the King.
And Duke doesn't accept anything less than the King
The Duke Basketball Report, a privately run Web
site which features up-to-date basketball information,
is frequented by many Duke fans.
The site also puts on an annual April Fool's prank,
and this year it created a phony story claiming that
the Environmental Protection Agency was shutting
down K-ville as an environmental hazard.
"Each year we try to do an April Fool's joke that
knocks people for a loop said DBR co-director Boswell,
a 1980 Duke graduate who prefers the one-word moni-
ker. "So each year we try to do something that's a bit
realistic, something that actually might be true
This year, the site creators decided to use K-ville
because it is one of the "great, hallowed traditions at
Duke We knew it would touch a nerve if some gov-
ernment bureaucrats came in and tried to interfere with
it Boswell said.
Along with the fake press release the creators made
a link to the actual EPA letter that had been sent to
Executive Vice President Tallman Trask.
And although this year's idea originally came from
his wife, Boswell said, It is in keeping with other April
Fool's pranks the site has pulled.
Last year, DBR created a mock-up of The Herald-
Sun of Durham's Web site, and posted a story claiming
that Bill Guthridge had retired and Dean Smith was
coming back as his replacement.
The story was so widely believed that wire services
in Iowa and Missouri picked it up, and the real Herald-
Sun was forced to run an announcement about their
lack of involvement with the prank.
This year's prank was more confusing to people than
anything else, Boswell said, with people writing in ask-
ing why DBR had fallen for such a prank.
"A couple�and these are probably the funniest re-
actions�told us what idiots we were for falling for an
April Fool's joke he said. "We had to tell them we
were the ones that came up with it
Georgia Southern U.�Four former Georgia South-
ern University students who were arrested and con-
victed of participating in an April 7,1999 bombing and
burglary conspiracy were sentenced on March 23 to
varying prison terms and probation.
Shane Thomas McKevlin, Jason William Guest and
Michael Tyson Miller�all charged with two counts of
possession, manufacture, or transportation of a destruc-
tive device and one count of conspiracy to commit
burglary�were sentenced by Judge John R. Turner to
10 years in prison, to be probated except for a 300 to
360 day period of incarceration in a detention center.
Each of the three was fined $7,500 and banished
from the Ogeechee Judicial Circuit, which includes
Bulloch and three other counties.
McKevlin and Guest must perform 200 hours of
community service; Miller must put in 300 hours.
Miller, who worked as a student escort with the GSU
Police Department prior to and during the incident,
was fingered by prosecutors as the mastermind of the
plot.
Haley Melissa Berryman, convicted on one count
of possession, manufacture, or transportation of a de-
structive device and one count of conspiracy to com-
mit burglary, was sentenced to 10years, probated, with
60 to 90 days to be served in a detention center. She
also received a $2,000 fine, 200 hours of community
service and banishment from the Ogeechee Judicial
Circuit.
The students planned to detonate a bomb near the
Recreation and Activity Center (RAC) on campus, while
three of them carried out a robbery of Deal Hall. The
plot was uncovered by investigators and they appre-
hended them the same night as the attempt.
The bomb was made of household materials and
placed near a dumpster at the RAC, but did not ex-
plode because rain falling that evening put out the fuse.
Investigators also discovered that the defendants
had detonated a test bomb the day before in order to
determine how much noise the bomb would create.
This was done, according to prosecutors, so they could
gauge whether or not the bomb would be an accept-
able diversion.
The sentencing phase had been rescheduled numer-
ous times over the past few months following the plea
agreements reached by the state and the defense. Vari-
ous expert witnesses and family members testified, each
hoping to affect the sentencing decision of the judge.
Video presentations were submitted by both the
state and the defense, with the state retaining the ser-
vices of the GBI to construct and detonate a bomb of
similar composition and the defense hiring an inde-
pendent bomb expert for $21,000 to do the same.
The difference between the two test was that the
GBI agents used firecrackers in their bomb, like the
defendants, while the defense's expert did not. The
state's tape was meant to show the unpredictability of
a bomb explosion, while the defense's showed that the
bomb did not even have enough force to knock down
the wooden boards propped nearby.
At issue during the proceedings Thursday was
whether the materials used in the bombs were danger-
ous enough to cause harm or damage.
Attorneys for the defense argued their clients did
not think the bomb would cause harm to any indi-
viduals, with McKevlin's attorney reading statements
from the four indicating that the area of placement for
the bomb used the night of the intended burglary was
chosen because they felt no one would get hurt if it
was detonated there.
COACH
from page 1
the fight.
Many players said they feel that Herrion's
comments were indeed contributing factors
for the altercation.
"When someone gets hurt, it crosses the
line said one player. "You've got to know
what type of players you've got and what
they can take
Herrion was unable to be reached for
comment.
After his discussion with Herrion, Bazluki
traveled with the team to Richmond for the
CAA tournament.
On the Wednesday after the tournament,
Bazluki was informed that his contract,
which ends June 30, would not be renewed
by ECU.
"The unofficial reason given is that there
is irreparable damage between the coach and
myself Bazluki said.
"I just think it's unfortunate said one
player. "He was standing up for the players.
Bazluki has been around enough players
and coaches to know when to sit back and
be a trainer
"When the incident has nothing to do
with practice, somebody has got to stick up
for the players
Bazluki has worked at ECU for seven years
and was named the North Carolina Athletic
Trainers Associations' CollegeUniversity
Athletic Trainer of the Year in 1997. Accord-
ing to Bazluki, there was no attempt made to
move him to a different team.
"What happened to me is not really the
issue Bazluki said. "The issue is the envi-
ronment and the way people are being
treated, rather than my situation
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia. ecu. edu,
SGA NOTES
Meeting called to order.
SGA Treasurer Overton
Harper said $40,000 was loaned
to students during the aftermath
of Hurricane Floyd. He said 219
loan's were issued and so far only
90 have been fully paid back.
"Students that have not fully
paid back their loans have had
their records tagged Harper
said. "Those students will not be
able to register or graduate un-
til payments are made in full
SGA President Cliff Webster
said the SGA T-shirts would be
distributed along with the cer-
tificates at the annual awards
banquet.
Webster made a State of the
Student Government Address.
Overton proceeded over the
votings for the most outstand-
ing committee member, legisla-
tive member and piece of legisla-
ture.
Vice President John Meriac
did a briefing of the COSGA
meeting held last month in
Texas.
SGA representative Jenny
Stein said the Campus Safety
Walk will take place at 7 p.m.
April 12. She said the walk will
begin at Mendenhall and repre-
sentatives should bring any con-
cerns they have about campus
safety.
Student elections will be held
tomorrow at the Student Recre-
ation Center, Joyner Library and
Mendenhall and Todd Dining
Halls. Voting booths open at 9
a.m.
Meeting adjourned.
CRIME SCEN
March 30
Traffic Accident�A staff member reported that
she was driving a state vehicle when it was rear-
ended on College Hill Drive.
Miscellaneous Call�A student reported receiv-
ing a tetter In the mail that she was denied cellu-
lar telephone service. She reported that she had
not applied for such service and felt that some-
one may have used her social security number,
There are currently no signs of criminal activity.
Possession of Drug Paraphernalia, Possession of
Marijmna-h mm-student was issued state cita-
tions for the referenced charges after being
stopped on Reade Street for a traffic violation. The
contraband was discovered during a consent
search.
March 31
Provisional Driving While Impaired�A student
was Issued a state citation and Campus Appear-
ance Ticket CAT) for Provisional DWI after be-
ing stopped for passing a vehicle on the right
hand side at 5th and Reade streets.
, Breaking, Entering and Larceny from a Motor
Vehicle�A student reported that his passenger side
window was broken and someone entered his car
stealing his car stereo and IS CDs. The vehicle
was jparked south of Belk Hall at the time of inci-
dent
Driving While License Revoked�A non-student
was arrested for DWLR after he was stopped for
exceeding the posted speed limit on Busbee
Drive.
Worthless Check�A student in Scott HaH was
served a criminal summons for a worthless check
Miscellaneous Call�A student reported that a � -
female had written an obscenity on a mirror in
the female restroom of Slay Hali. It was found
that she Is a non-student visiting a student The
obscenity was removed with a cleaning agent and;
she was banned from ECU properties and Issued t
a CAT for delaying a police officer and refusal to -
comply with ECU officials.
April 1
WSk
Hit and Run�A student reported that she had'
found a note on her vehicle while parked east of
Fletcher Music. It stated that a Wayne County
Public School bus had struck her vehicle and left
the scene. Contact was made with a representa-
tive from the school system.
Damage to Property�A student reported that
the passenger side mirror was broken while parked
south of Jones Hail. Scratches were also found on
the passenger side door.
April 3
Damage to Property�A student reporte
her vehicle was damage while parked in the tot
southwest of the Cashier's Office.
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4 The East Carolinian
vwwv.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Tuesday, April 4, 2000 j
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, A
www.tec.ect
Klan threatens civil-rights challenge to city mask law ELECTION
from page 1
BARBOURVILLE, Ky. (APM Ku
Klux Klan group vowed Sunday to
file a federal civil-rights lawsuit
against Barbourville for hastily pass-
. Ing an ordinance forbidding the
' group from wearing masks in pub-
lic.
Klan members went ahead with
a rally Saturday, but complained
that the March 28 ordinance damp-
ened the turnout and infringed on
their First Amendment rights.
"It stopped probably another SO
people from coming. They would
have lost their jobs Jeff Berry,
National Imperial Wizard of the
American Knights of the Ku Klux
Klan, told the Associated Press Sun-
day. Berry spoke in a telephone
interview from his Butler, Ind
home.
Seventeen Klan members at-
tended rallies in Barbourville and
Pineville on Saturday.
Berry said his group plans to ar-
gue in federal court that the ordi-
nance had a chilling effect on Klan
members' individual rights to at-
tend the rally and express their
views.
"If they look in the Constitution
it says everyone Is entitled to free
political speech anonymously
Berry said.
The ordinance bans the wearing
of hoods or masks for anyone 13 or
older in public places or on
another's property. The city first
considered the ordinance on March
27, and gave it final passage at a
special meeting the next day, four
days before the rally.
Klan members also did not wear
hoods in Pineville, where an anti-
mask ordinance has been in place
responsible to the legislature for all
financial transactions that happen
within the SGA.
Minutes of all SGA meetings and
any legislative correspondence is
taken care of by the secretary.
Students can vote tomorrow at
Todd Dining Hall, Joyner Library,
The Wright Place and Mendenhall
Student Center beginning at 9 a.m.
"It's really important that every-
one go out and vote said Overton
Harper, the current student body
treasurer. "The SGA can't be the
voice of the students if they don't
use their vote to voice their opin-
ion
For more information on the
candidates running in tomorrow's
election, see page 2.
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
DISCRIMINATION
from page 1
BUSINESS
from page 1
on in the year 2000. It's devastat-
ing, especially for the young
people
Marcus said the scene was dis-
; gusting.
"I can't.believe that in the year
. 2000 discrimination is still being
! practiced in public places he said.
African American sophomore
Shamika Spencer, another member
of the Minority Student Coalition
who went downtown to test the ac-
cusations of racism downtown
agreed that the actions are horrible.
"I was very offended by the
� whole scene Spencer said.
African American senior
Yolanda Thigpen said she too was
disgusted by the incident.
"It is very sad and dishearten-
ing Thigpen said.
Akbar said next week the class
action law suit will be taken to the
justice department to stop discrimi-
nation downtown and request com-
pensation for those that have been
discriminated against.
"We will be suing downtown
under Title II of the Civil Rights
Act Akbar said. "We have various
written documentation we will be
using as testimony
Title II of the Civil Rights Act
state? "all persons shail be entitled
to full and equal enjoyment of the
goods, services, facilities, privileges,
advantages and accommodations of
any place of public accommoda-
tion, as defined in this section,
without discrimination on the
ground of race, color, religion or
national origin
� Ben Irons, university attorney,
said he is very concerned with the
allegations of downtown, but is
willing to cooperate with the stu-
dents in any way that he can.
Ron Kimble, city manager, said
he hopes dialogue can be further
shared between the coalition and
downtown before the issue is taken
to the next level.
"I think their different views
need to be shared Kimble said.
"But, the coalition has the right to
do what they feel is necessary
Spencer agreed with Kimble that
necessary steps are needed.
"We have tried other routes to
reach an agreement Spencer said.
"The class act suit is our last resort
Chancellor Eakin and Dr. Carrie
Moore, vice chancellor for Student
Life are out of town until the end
of the week and could not be con
tacted for comment.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
dents by 2008, which will increase
the university's enrollment by 40-
S0 percent. If the business school's
proposal is approved, the new stan-
dards may hold the size of the
school of business at a constant or
shrink enrollment.
Had the proposal been in effect
this year, admission to the 'school
of business would have been re-
duced by 13 percent, according to
Associate Dean for Academic Af-
fairs, Dr. Louis Zincone, Jr. Cur-
rently there are 700 declared ma-
jors with around 1,200 pre-business
freshman and sophomores enrolled
in the school of business.
"We are just cleaning up some
odds and ends that should have
been cleaned
up long ago Zincone said.
Uhr said that the new require-
ments will mainly have long term
effects.
"The short term effects are mod-
est. We deliberately tried to make
minor adjustments Uhr said.
"Eighty-five percent of our students
meet the 2.5 GPA requirement al-
ready. For the real long term effects,
I hope that the school of business
will have more space
This writer can be contacted at
cherold@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Tuesday
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ECU BASEBALL
APPAREL & GIFTS!
Sale runs Monday, April 3 through Friday, April 7 at Wright Building
and Medical Bookstore locations only. 25 discount taken of( of
regular price baseball related hats, t-shlrts, and baseball related
merchandise. No other discount or coupons apply. Not valid on
prior purchases. Drawing box located at Dowdy Student Store In
the Wright Building and at the ECU Medical bookstore In Brody 1S-04
Enter our drawing for a chance to
THROW OUT THE FIRST PITCH of the
ECU vs. Coastal Carolina baseball
game on Wednesday, April 12th!
Plus, you'll win 4 FREE TICKETS to
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AUTOGRAPHED BASEBALL! Now
that's one Pitchin' prize package,
compliments of ECU Athletics!
Upcoming Home Games
Wednesday, April S UNC Greensboro
Friday, April 7
Saturday, April 8
Sunday, April �
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Friday, April 21
Saturday, April St
Sunday, April S3
Tuesday, April IS
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nf� H8"? H1 one enay per P��n, per day. One name "
will be selected at the home baseball game on Saturday, April �
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c
Terra Steinbei;
Susan Wright,
Emily Richard;
Daniel E. Cox,
Take a mir
candidates wh
do for you. Ti
compare their
can, with your
individual stateme;
opiNior
�F"
F"s
The words
still ring in m
MacKenzie shai
her then teena
dents had don
ceive a grade lo
be reserved for
or did just half
Mrs. MacKei
think, because!
words. She agre
forward didn't
dent was just sc
work.
Speeches like
those words ha'
tally agree with
project and got
separate me fro
project and rece
and that isn't fa
time and effort i
100 percent coi
I am certain
3010 class wouli
she recently be
reality. Having v
plete with quot
past the requii
grade.
I believe tha
surable amount
the project
opiNior
"We got the t
of stinky, sweat
without soap a
nearby. It does i
of a fun-filled ;
evening, and thi
to discover that
I don't have the
Time is of thi
the end of the se
as George Clintoi
took an hour t
cend to the stag
ticket said 8 p.�
p.m. Oh, ye whe
gan at 9 p.m. v
dents shouting al
abowt the funk,





VpriU, 2000
nedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian 1
erjta@stuJentniedB�XLedu
t student body
A can't be the
its if they don't
sice their opin-
mation on the
; in tomorrow's
m
E
IMP �
on s( Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MA.ILtec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11 000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing the regular academic year. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the rfiajority of the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited for decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian,
Student Publications Building, Greenville, NC 27856-4353.
For additional information, call 252-328-6366.
Take a minute to ask the
candidates what they plan to
do for you. Take notes and
compare their answers. You
can, with your vote, make an
individual statement about what
matters to you.
0URVIEW
Tomorrow is the day when all the SGA candidates will be out with
their crews, dressed in identical T-shirts trying to convince you to vote.
It's no secret that out of a student body of 17,000, hundreds choose to
vote while thousands pass the polls by every year.
We at TEC say you should swallow your apathy and spend the neces-
sary five minutes to make yourself feel involved in campus politics. Make
a choice on a candidate based on reputation, looks or even sheer persis-
tence-just vote!
Voting in campus elections is good practice for voting in the "real
world It gets you thinking about candidate qualities, what changes
you'd like to see and how you feel about different topics around cam-
pus. '�
Take a minute to ask the candidates what they plan to do for you.
Take notes and compare their answers. You can, with your vote, make
an individual statement about what matters to you.
Next year, no matter who wins, you can hold that official account-
able to his or her statements. You may even want to attend some SGA
meetings, just to see if you are satisfied with how things are going.
Sometimes it seems like your vote doesn't matter, and that the
elected student leaders have little effect on what happens, but SGA
officials work hard to represent you in all matters at meetings year-
round. They do more for you than you may give them credit for, and you
should care enough to choose the ones you feel may do the best job. If
nobody votes, the students will not be represented in any way to the
Board of Trustees or to Chancellor EakinAny influence we possess as
students will be lost.
Instead of ignoring your opportunity to vote, take it and use it to
improve your world. If you don't like what the candidates stand for,
start a write-in campaign or run for office next year. But don't just
stand there and let the chance to speak out pass you by, and then
complain all year when things aren't the way you want them to be!
OPINION COLUMN
"F"s should be reserved for incompletion
Dorcas A. Brule
OPINION COLUMNIST
The words of my fifth-grade teacher's son
still ring in my ear. One day in class, Mrs.
MacKenzie shared with us the great insights of
her then teenage son. He said that if her stu-
dents had done the work, they should not re-
ceive a grade lower than an "F That "F"s should
be reserved for those who didn't do the work,
or did just half of the job.
Mrs. MacKenzie relayed this story to us, I
think, because she saw the wisdom of her son's
words. She agreed with him, and from that day
forward didn't give another "F" unless a stu-
dent was just so slack that they didn't do their
work.
Speeches like that impress a young mind, and
those words have been with me ever since. I to-
tally agree with this idea. I mean, if I've done a
project and gotten an "F" on it, how does that
separate me from the person that didn't do the
project and received the same grade? It doesn't,
and that isn't fair considering that I at least put
time and effort into the project, even if it wasn't
100 percent correct.
I am certain that my neighbor in my English
3010 class would agree considering the fact that
she recently became the victim of this harsh
reality. Having written the required paper-com-
plete with quotes, cited works and two pages
past the requirement-she received a failing
grade.
I believe that as long as you've put a mea-
surable amount of effort into
the project, you should at least receive the
minimum passing grade. Say you've had to write
an essay that has a word-count requirement. If
you've fulfilled the word-count requirement-not
with nonsense-with actual research and support,
but failed to miss the point somehow, I don't see
why you would deserve an "F Clearly the effort
was there.
If you've missed the point it is only a sign that
you need further assistance with the subject mat-
ter, not that you didn't care enough to put time
and effort into it. By giving the student a grade of
"F" it is discouraging them from trying at all. I
know that it would make me feel like a complete
failure, especially if thought I had turned in a great
essay when it was due.
Instead, I think that teachers should take this
as a sign that the student must need help-yes even
in college a professor should step up to the plate
when they see that a student is having trouble. In
an ideal world every student would be able to write
a wonderful essay by college, but we all know this
isn't an ideal world. That's why students are given
"F"s even when they have completed the work.
"F"s should be reserved for those who are slack
and simply don't care about what they are doing.
"F"s belong to those of us who didn't do the
projectpaper at all, or have wasted the professor's
time with gibberish in a sad attempt to pull some-
thing over on them.
This writer can be contacted at
dbrule&s tudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
OPINION COLUMN
I don't have the funk
Because my dear boyfriend had paid $30 for
the tickets, and that roughly equates to 5 boxes
of cereal and three gallons of milk in the real world
(in other words, a whole lot of food!), we patiently
wafted for the band to begin, hoping that the
longer wait was a sign that the band to come would
make it worth our while. They say that it is worth
waiting for, but P-Funk was not.
After about 45 minutes of unimpressive runs
up and down the scalesa skill taught to ECU
music students in their first semester of study,
and then they are told never ever to do it again
because it is obnoxious), a bass line that swallowed
the higher melodies (for your own version, stomp
your foot so hard that you can no longer hear
your own voice) and lighting as random as my
typical conversation style, Danny and I left George
Clinton and all the P-Funkers to an evening of
mediocre music and entirely too much attitude.
"We got the funk" instantly conjures images
of stinky, sweaty guys sitting around in a room,
without soap a bottle of cologne anywhere
nearby. It does not however, conjure up images
of a fun-filled and enjoyable concert. As the
evening, and the concert progressed on, I came
to discover that my initial suspicions were right;
I don't have the funk.
Time is of the essence to college students at
the end of the semester, and it was sadly wasted
as George Clinton and the Parliament Funkadelic
took an hour to compose themselves and as-
cend to the stage. You would think that if the
ticket said 8 p.m the band would begin at 8
p.m. Oh, ye who are so naive! The concert be-
gan at 9 p.m. with 10 minutes of college stu-
dents shouting about how enthusiastic they were
abom the funk, and yeah, they all had it.
State of the Student Government Address
. This address was given at
the SGA meeting on April 3.
The ECU Student Government Association
has worked hard for the past two years to up-
hold standards that were bent and fallen long
before many students that now attend ECU were
here. The steadfast effort of the ECU Student
Government Association Executive Council to
improve the SGA will ultimately benefit all stu-
dents.
Our "student voice" has been exercised with-
out compromise. This can be seen in events
throughout the summer, the aftermath of Hur-
ricane Floyd, student fee increases, tuition in-
creases, and the unfortunate dismissal of Dr.
Ron Speier, dean of students. We refuse to al-
low anyone to harm or deter the image that we
have so wholeheartedly worked for.
Over the past two years we have worked hard
to recover what was dissolved by persons who
were out for their own good. There is no place
in the SGA for students with personal agendas.
Being a part of the SGA Executive Council is
more than $400 a month, a nice office space,
new furniture, socials and cocktails. It is a pas-
sion that we, who take it seriously, will never
loose sight of.
The SGA Executive Council sincerely appre-
ciates what the student body has given to us.
We hope that you have been able to see im-
provements and that you continue to respect
the job we do. Students getting paid twice a
month, a simplified funding process, new tran-
sit buses and a newly energized representation
of the student opinion are only a few of our
accomplishments this year.
SGA will continue to play an integral role in
student life. The vice chancellor for Student Life
has made a promise to have more student in-
put on our campus. If you are unsatisfied with
student relations on campus, now is your chance
to voice your concern. You can vote for students
like you, or you can vote for the suit-and-tie
kind of guy, it's your choice. Your future is in
tomorrow's election.
With 14 days left in our administration, we
must remember that it's not what we did, or
how we did it; it's the one student we affected.
We didn't have to affect 18,223 students to be
successful in our positions. What we did try to
do is strive toward making a difference for those
students. If you touch one life, one heart, one
education, then you have done your job.
Cliff Webster Jr.
Student Body President
OPINION COLUMN
Another birthday goes by the wayside
Patrick McMahon
OPINION COLUMNIST
Believe it not, my birthday was Saturday. Yes
I was truly born on April Fool's Day, which may
explain my personality to those of you out there
who despise me, but oh well. Another one down,
too many left to count. Aren't birthdays supposed
to be fun? Not this one. Despite fighting allergies
and a nauseous stomach the whole weekend, I
had a decent celebration Friday and Saturday
night. But the entire while the birthday had me
thinking about the years that have passed and
the years to come.
A long time ago, I had made a promise to
myself that I would go on a road trip to the West
Coast by the time I hit this birthday. Well, that's
one dream left unfulfilled. I also wanted to have
half of my book finished by now but so far I only
have 268 pages typed. That's two strikes�want
to go for three? Oh, yeah. I also had wanted to
have a beautiful girlfriend with lots of money
and even more class. But, swing and a miss. Strike
three, I'm out.
Birthdays are thoroughly depressing. As I
stand here on the brink of my entire life I look
ahead to the future with dim excitement and 10
times more nervousness. Who else will I offend
with my column and articles? Who out there is
waiting for me to walk through the door to give
me that job in the music business that I dream
of? Who out there is waiting for me to marry them
and make beautiful babies? Who out there is
gonna play a role in my demise, whether know-
ingly or not? What kind of man will I become?
Will I become half the man my father is? Will I be
in debt like I am now? Will I be happy?
Questions aside, the future scares the living
spit out of me. I can deal with the past but the
future is just plain scary. It's almost like birth-
days are the harbingers of evil thoughts regard-
ing one's self. They make you think about things
that aren't supposed to be thought about. LJke
death. Like life. Like success. Like failure.
I still have yet to understand why this birth-
day has made me feel so bad because it really
shouldn't have. I should be happy. I am another
year older and supposedly another year wiser,
but I don't feel it. My birthday has put me in a
funk. A day that should be celebrated has turned
into a maelstrom of self-doubt and harsh reali-
ties. The fact that I am writing about this scares
the spit out of me because I 'm trying to figure
out why I constantly need to come to you read-
ers with my problems and hang-ups. To be hon-
est, it's like therapy.
I wish I had some drastically important mes-
sage to spread this week about love, life, happi-
ness and saving neighborhoods from destruction,
but instead I have come to you with my dilem-
mas. Maybe you can help me figure out this
strange and wonderful trip called life. It's hard
enough when you have to go through it alone.
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahon@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easfearolinian :
located on the 2nd floor of The Student
Publications Building





6 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, Ap
www.tec.ecu
I
FEATURES BRIEFS
Frankenstein's
story:
The Mary Shelley
version
Victor Frankenstein grew up
in Geneva, Switzerland as the
eldest son of a higher class
family. He was brought up with an orphan, Eliza-
beth and also had two younger brothers. He did
not have many friends, Henry Clerval being the
only exception. At the age of 19, Frankenstein be-
came interested in natural philosophy, electricity,
chemistry and mathematics. After the death of his
mother, who succumbed to scarlet fever, Fran-
kenstein left for Ingolstadt, Germany, to attend
university. There, his interest in natural philoso-
phy quickly became an obsession. He was par-
ticularly fascinated with the human frame and the
principle of life.
After four years of fanatic studying, not keep-
ing in contact with his family, he was able to "be-
stow animation upon lifeless matter" and created
a monster of gigantic proportion from assembled
body parts taken from graveyards, slaughter-
houses and dissecting rooms. As soon as the
creature opened his eyes, nowever, the beauty of
Frankenstein's dream vanished: it became a hor-
rible creature. He realized he made a mistake in
creating this monster and fled from his laboratory.
On his return the next day, the monster had
disappeared. On the eve of the return to his pa-
rental home, he received a letter that his young-
est brother had been found murdered. On his
way home, Frankenstein saw the demon he had
created and immediately realized that it is he who
is responsible for his brothe'rs death. Franken-
stein decided not to tell his family about the de-
mon because they would simply dismiss it as in-
sane. As he arrived home, he was informed that
the murderer of his brother had been found. The
accused was Justine, a good friend of the family.
When Justine has been found guilty and has
been hanged, Frankenstein's heart was tortured.
He could not stay in the house and started wan-
dering in the Alpine valleys. There, Frankenstein
was confronted with his creation who tells him his
life story.
. After sharing his experiences, the demon's
Only request from Frankenstein was that he
should create another being: a female to accom-
pany him. If Frankenstein complies, he and his
bade will stay away from other people and keep
to themselves in the wild. Frankenstein saw some
justice in the monster's arguments and also felt
that he has a duty towards his fellow-man, so he
agreed to the daemon's request. Victor left for En-
gland to finish his work accompanied by his friend
Gterval, promising to marry Elizabeth on his re-
turn.
When the work on his second creation was
advanced, he started to question his promise. He
was afraid that they might hate each other, or that
they might produce a whole race of these crea-
tures. When the monster visits to check on the
progress, Frankenstein destroyed his work. The
rhpnster swore revenge and promised to be with
Him on his wedding night. The following day a
body was found and Frankenstein was accused
'�" 6
of inurder. He was taken to the body which he
identified as Henry Clerval. He was eventually
cleared of all charges and returned to Geneva in a
vety bad condition. Frankenstein married Eliza-
beth after promising her to tell her his horrifying
sepret the following day. Remembering the
monster's threat, Frankenstein was convinced
tfjat he would be killed that night. The monster,
however, kills Elizabeth instead. Frankenstein lost
aiipther family member as his father died after
hearing the news about Elizabeth's death. Fran-
kenstein had now lost every sensation except for
revenge. He followed the monster everywhere
which eventually led him to the Arctic region,
where he was taken aboard Walton's ship.
After telling Walton his story, Victor asks him to
kill the monster if he dies before he can do it him-
self. The ship has in the mean time been freed
frpm the ice and pressured by his crew, Walton
h$s decided to abandon his trip and return home.
Victor's health eventually deteriorates and he
dfcs. Just after his death, Walton finds the mon-
ster hanging over Victor's body. The daBmon
speaks of his sufferings. Because of all the mur-
ders he has committed, he now hates himself.
$j�ce his creator is dead, he decides it is time that
tt� too will rest in death. After stating that he will '
tjaild a funeral pile for himself, he leaves the ship
and disappears ?n his ice-raft in the darkness, f
Picnicking popularity
grows as
seasons change
jff
P tp jtfp j0tP
Outdoor dining
requires careful planning
Andrea Schilling
FEATURES WRITER
Picnic, (Pik'nik): an excursion in which the participants carry food
with them and share a meal in the open air. Although most
people know the definition of a picnic, how many students know
how to do it the right way? For those who are uneducated in
thg fine art of picnicking, here are a few pointers for every-
thing from location to possible entrees.
"The beach, national parks, parks that people can visit or a
grassy area" can serve as the perfect area for a picnic accord-
ing to Beth Credle, the interim director of health education at
ECU Student Health Services.
Picnics are meant to be fun and relaxing but you must also try to
play it safe when planning you picnic. You must be picky to avoid
food-borne illnesses.
"As far as food preparation, I would say that foods that need to be
stored at a colder temperature need to be kept on ice Credle said.
"Watch out for things like mayonnaise and other condiments that can
get too hot and can spoil. Food spoilage would be the biggest
health issue
"Marinated salads and vegetables are good to take, as long
as they are chilled said Marilyn Ogaro, the catering manager
at ECU. "Meats, of course the deli meats are ideal because they
already have preservatives in them and the. fact that they've
already been chilled
Be sure to cook the food at the proper temperature and make sure it
is properly cooled afterwards. Take-out food should be eaten within an
hour and a hall' from purchase. Avoid recipes such as potato salad, cole
slaw and other cold dishes that are prepared with raw eggs. After the
meal, if you think food may have been exposed to unsafe temperature
for too long-throw it away.
Food is best kept in plastic containers. While it's sitting out,
cover it with plastic wrap, aluminum foil or waxed paper to
prevent flies and other potential carriers of diseases from touch-
ing the food.
Another factor to consider when planning a picnic, besides
the obvious food, is the climate for your feast. Picnics cab be
anytime, but certain seasons offer a better atmosphere.
"It's up to the choice of the person. Weather wise, I'd prob-
ably say spring or fall Credle said.
Of course you'll need to bring other items besides food.
"You'll need something to sit on whether it be a blanket or
chairs Ogaro said. "Depending on where you are going, you
might want to bring something to repel the insects
Picnics are ideal for a
family gathering, a friendly
get-away or even a date.
There are many different
recipes that are possible-de-
pending on your own indi-
vidual style and taste.
"Meat items are always
good to take, for instance,
smoked turkey or ham and
cheeses to accompany that
Ogaro said. "And croissants
are always nice whether
you're doing something ro-
mantic or casual
Some of the best ideas for a
picnic are finger foods; they
don't require plates or utensils,
and become a perfecf grab-and-
go snack for the active picnicker.
Hors d'oeuvres such as deviled
eggs, stuffed tomatoes, minia-
ture sandwiches, cheese balls
and ham roll ups are intended
to be served cold, therefore, they
can be made the day before and
refrigerated. This will leave you
more time to relax and enjoy the
day while still serving an array
of bite-sized treats everyone is
sure to enjoy.
This writer can be
contacted at
aschilling@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Suggestions for
picnic edibles
Meats that are precooked
and will not spoil in a short pe-
riod of time are ideal entrees.
Hors d'oeuvres
Desserts
Be sure to bring along
plenty of beverages, as one
would for any outdoor activity.
Don't forget the napkins!
Prayer box offers intercession
for those who believe
Campus Ministry Association
offers opportunity for requests
Kristen Monte
FEATURES WRITER
Scott Wilkenson, minister, stands outside the Dowdy Student
Stores, the new location of the ECU prayer box, a confidential
outlet for students' most personal prayers, (photo by Emily
Richardson)
The ECU Campus Ministry Association (CMA)
erected a prayer box in Wright Plaza, it is a place
for students to place prayer requests, offering
the ECU community a unique opportunity.
The CMA, an interfaith organization united
by a common belief in God, moral values and
service to others, established the prayer box on
Feb. 17, 2000, so that students have a chance to
communicate their aspirations, concerns and in-
nermost thoughts.
According to Carol Woodruff, ECU Hillel ad-
viser and member of the CMA, this service gives
students the opportunity to offer prayers about
any of their concerns.
"The prayer box seems to be fulfilling an impor-
tant need Woodruff said. "When we open the. box to
collect the prayers prior to the meetings, we consis-
tently find notes and requests
The prayer requests are collected before each CMA
meeting and are read aloud during the meetings by
ministry members who then pray silently on behalf of
the requesters. This innovative program welcomes
prayers of students from all religions and also prayers
of students not belonging to any particular religious
conviction. All prayers are kept confidential and Woo-
druff said that all requests are prayed for, whether they
agree with what is written or not.
See PRAYER, page 7
Southernprideor
racism disguised
Confederate battle flag
controversy rages on
Dorcas A Brule
STAFF WRITER
Confederate battle flag, considered by many to be
a symbol of Southern traditions and the pre-Confed-
eracy lifestyle, is now the hot topic in much of the
South. In Columbia, S.C. a Confederate battle flag flies
on top of the State Capitol Building, leading to a boy-
cott by the NAACP. Some see the flag as a representa-
tion of democracy in action; others feel that its pres-
ence in politics perpetuates racial inequality.
The Confederate flag as we know it today is one of
six flags used during the Civil War.
"The flag that is in question was never the national
flag said David Long, ECU history professor. "It
was just a banner the troops carried into battle
with them.
"The Stars and Bars was actually the national flag
of the Confederacy, and, it is very different from the
battle flag. When people claim the flag was representa-
tive of the Confederacy and slavery, they don't know
what they're talking about. Originally, the only thing
it symbolized was the courage and valor of the Con-
federate soldiers who went into battle and fought for
what they believed in
Following the war, many racist groups used
the battle flag to represent their animosity and
feelings of superiority. The Ku Klux Klan adopted
the flag as a sort of calling card to leave at the
sites of lynchings.
"The flag, to black people, represents slavery
and all of the negative things that happened to
black people because of slavery said Gaston
Monk, president of the Pitt County Chapter of
the NAACP.
Because of tthe way that these racist groups
used the flag as a symbol, the original meaning
has been tainted in the minds of many.
"It has come to be a symbol of racism Long
said.
The flag controversy in South Carolina spawns
from the conflicting views of the flag; is it a sym-
bol of valor or a sign of a racist think-tank?
South Carolina's Capitol Building didn't start fly-
ing the flag until 1962, in the midst of the battle over
integration. In defense, South Carolina govern-
ment offically said that it put up the flag for the
centennial anniversary of the Civil War. But, the
flag did not appear until a full year after the 1961
anniversary.
The NAACP however, takes a different perspective
on the flying of the flag and the significance of the
particular time South Carolina began flying it.
"Obviously it was because the government was
dragging segregation into everything, housing, schools,
etc Monk said. "They hung the flag to say 'we want
to do what we want to do. We are still a Confederate
state, and we want to keep Southern traditions such as
segregation and Jim Crow
Many support the idea that the Civil War was about
resisting the federal government's unconstitutional ef-
forts to subjugate sovereign states. To these believers,
demanding removal of the flag reopens the old wound
of states'rights.
"Well, to be honest, I feel bad about the situation
said Steven Clodfelter, Winston-Salem native. "I agree
that the flag is offensive not only to African Ameri-
cans, but also to those Caucasians who aren't proud of
their own heritage.
However, if South Carolina cannot decide for them-
selves whether or not to fly the flag then where lies
the power vested in statehood?"
Still, those of African-American descent feel that the
flag is a symbol of the oppression that their people
endured for centuries. If the Civil War is viewed as a
fight against slavery, then this view of the flag is com-
pletely justified. Not only does the flag remind people
of the war, but it also reminds them of white-supremacy
events such as attempts at overturning the amendments
granting freedom and rights to African Americans and
Ku Klux Klan involvement.
The NAACP has placed an economic boycott on
South Carolina's tourist industry in an attempt to pres-
sure the state into removing the flag from its capitol
building. In reality, this boycott might, in the end,
have adverse effects on South Carolina's African-Ameri-
can population because they hold a disproportionate
share of service jobs in the state.
"When you start losing money, you get the mes-
sage that we are trying to send because you can't func-
tion Monk said.
The bottom line is that South Carolina can't decide '
what to do with their flag. Georgia and Mississippi :
both found ways around the pesky "Southern pride" i
symbol. In 1894, Mississippi combined their state flag !
with the Confederacy flag, placing it in the up-
per-left corner. Georgia didn't change their flag
until the racial unrest that began in the 1950s. !
The Confederacy flag holds a more prominent !
spot on Georgia's flag. Both states are closely
following the proceedings in South Carolina in :
fear that they might be asked to remove the Con-
federate flag image from their state flags.
This writer can be contacted at
dbrule@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
:
PRAYE
Bob Leith,
trial technolc
prayer'box. 1
est campus a
ECU Wesley Ft
ter), brought
"I saw sorr
est and immei
a wonderful
nity Wilkins
somewhat un
organization ;
and religions
According ti
rian Campus N
box is for the st
any kind of pn
comfort in a nc
press their pe
the CMA.
Life's a beai
in Puerto Ri
(And caves,
mountains,
and nightlifi
All-you-can-c
Menu: Ambro
cherry liqueu
grouper with
carrots; saffr
T R A V
TUE
HENDRIX
Films are free to
$12 each. To rest
by April 6 and pa
CENTRAL TI
Tel: 252.321





Vpril 4, 2000
;dia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian r
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu'
deor
dsed
flag
on
: by many to be
le pre-Confed-
n much of the
battle flag flies
ading to a boy-
s a representa-
2l that its pres-
lality.
today is one of
er the national
professor. "It
;d into battle
e national flag
;rent from the
as representa-
ey don't know
the only thing
oroftheCon-
ind fought for
groups used
nimosity and
Klan adopted
leave at the
sents slavery
happened to
said Gaston
i Chapter of
acist groups
nal meaning
iny.
acism Long
slina spawns
i; is it a sym-
k-tank?
dn't start fly-
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lina govern-
flag for the
ar. But, the
ter the 1961
t perspective
canceofthe
ingit.
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ising, schools,
say 'we want
Confederate
tions such as
'ar was about
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at
PRAYER
from page 6
Bob Leith, a retired ECU professor of indus-
trial technology, constructed and donated the
prayer box. This idea came from the Wake For-
est campus and Scott Wilkinson, pastor of the
ECU Wesley Foundation (Methodist Student Cen-
ter), brought it to ECU.
"I saw something similar done at Wake For-
est and immediately thought that this would be
a wonderful opportunity for the ECU commu-
nity Wilkinson said. "What makes this service
somewhat unique is that we are an interfaith
organization and we invite people.flf all fjBths
and religions to utilize this service.r
According to Ellen Crawford True of the Presbyte-
rian Campus Ministry, the main goal of the prayer
box is for the students to feel comfortable asking for
any kind of prayer, big or small. Students can seek
comfort in a non-threatening environment and ex-
press their personal concerns and problems to
the CMA.
"I think it's an easier way for students to ex-
press concerns and feel the concerns are taken
seriously Crawford True said.
"Students can express, in faith, their troubles, bless-
ings and concerns said Father Tom Bonacci of the
Newman Catholic Student Center.
The CMA consists of 18 members, all representing
different religious groups. They hold meetings twice a
month where they pray for the requests from the prayer
box. According to Woodruff, The CMA is also involved
in different service projects for ECU and the Greenville
community.
The CMA values the ability to fulfill the heart-felt
concerns of students.
"Our goal is to lift the aspiration of prayer of the
student and to give students an outlet Woodruff said.
This writer can be contacted at
krnonte&studentmeda.ecu.edu.
mian
Then you may be
; just the person we
are
looking for. We are
now accepting appli-
cations for all posi-
tions.
� Apply at our officebn the second floor or the Student
Publications Building (across from Joyner Library).
Life's a beach
in Puerto Rico.
(And caves, and
mountains, and casinos,
and nightlife, and luxury hotels)
"�Hss- "
All-you-can-eat-dinner: Mendenhall Great Room, 6 p.m.
Menu: Ambrosia (fresh oranges, coconut, and maraschino cherries in
cherry liqueur); sweet and sour pork with fresh pineapple; baked
grouper with asparagus, crabmeat and Newberg glace; cinnamon baby
carrots; saffron rice with pecans; onion rolls; coconut bread pudding.
TRAVEL-ADVENTURE F I LM r
AND THEME DINNER SERIES
TUESDAY, APRIL 11, 2000 4PM & 7:30PM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One Card. Student dinner tickets are
$12 each. To reserve student dinner tickets visit the CT0 in Mendenhall Student Center
by April 6 and pay with cash, check, credit card, meal card, or declining balance.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS: Monday Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Tel: 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS; VTTY: 252.328.4736 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS
g��?&
PIRATES'COVE
JAMAICAN RESTAURANT 4 BAR
Restaurant
Reopening
April 4
Late Nite requires member-
ship & ID; 21 and over
Tuesday: The Jamaican Jerk
comes to town
Jerk Wings 6 for $2
Thursday: Members Nite Out
$1 Domestics
$2 house hi-balls and shooters
Assistant
Sports Editor
Needed!
y
Wenesday: Greek Night
500 Draft - Shot Specials
$1 off cover with college ID
Friday: Dance Night
Dance to R&B,
Reggae, Hip Hop
Saturday: Live Bands
(Reggae, Top 40)
Must have excellent grammar & editing
skills and knowledge of sports.
Also an interest in writing.
Apply at the second floor of the Student Publications Building
or call 328-6366
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina i
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
i-888-732-3362
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tueslw






I
1 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
NOTCH ABOVE THE
EssiAkakpo
FEATURES WRITER
Carl McCurley, a professor in the
ECU political science department,
faces the challenges of his job with
the friendly support of fellow staff
members and the drive of his inter-
ested students' support
McCurley earned a doctorate in
political scienc'e from Indiana State
University, and then went on to ful-
fill a personal goal by becoming a
professor. He has been at ECU since
1994.
"The job market for a political
science teacher is very competitive,
but E( 11 had a vacant post for some-
one with my training McCurley
said. "I have always wanted to teach
at the college level
;His family's influence played a
major role in his choices and ambi-
tion.
"My parents placed education
above everything and they have
always encouraged me to go as far
as I could in my ambition
McCurley said. "I chose political
science because my family was very,
involved politically
He describes his position as "a
constantly stimulating, usually
challenging, never boring, some
times frustrating job
McCurley feels that the most
rewarding part of his job is the time
he spends in class. He is always ex-
cited about his class sessions be-
cause not only does he teach, but
he also learns from his students.
"I feel like my students need to
know what I'm teaching
McCurley said.
In the political science depart-
ment, he is a political science and
public administration instructor.
He teaches classes in American na-
tional politics and voting behavior.
In public adrninistration he teaches
statistics and computer applications.
Also, he sometimes teaches United
States cultural politics.
He-has good relationships with his
students and tries to help those who
seem to have difficulties with his sub-
ject
"I think my students perceive me
as a demanding and a bit strange in-
structor McCurley said. "It increases
the level of attention in class and I like
that
He tries to keep his students atten-
tion focused on his subject by choos-
ing any topic related to the subject to
discuss. He says that he thinks that
some students may find this way of
teaching a bit weird.
Since he started teaching at ECU,
McCurley said he feels he has good
relationships with his colleagues as
well as the students who are under his
instruction.
"When I first came here as a new
teacher, I received a warm welcome
from the faculty and staff members
McCurley said. "They made me feel
like I was a member of the faculty
They respect my independence and
my academic work. They are also
very supportive
Besides the eager students and
helpful staff, McCurley also enjoys
. the continuously changing teaching
environment which he sees as a chal-
lenge.
Political science is not a static
subject because of a constantly
changing political environment.
Another challenge McCurley enjoys .
is that his teaching skills have to
match the level of interest and abil-
ity of his students.
"If one has a job that is not chal-
lenging and gets bored by his job,
one should stay at home and watch
TV McCurley said.
This writer can be contacted at
eakakpo@studentmeda.ecu.edu
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You know - strippers, beer, the occasional Indie band.
Stuff that matters.
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Al'lltoilllll AGENT
J
Steve Sawyer
is no longer
dying of
AIDS.
College student Steve Sawyer, a hemophiliac who contracted HIV and hepatitis
C through unscreened blood transfusions, spoke not long ago to hundreds of
students on our campus. His earthly life ended on March 13, 1999.
Steve faced death with great hope and courage. How? He had come to know
"the greatest love in the universe" (his favorite way to describe God). In place
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9 The I
www.tec.eci
SPORTS
Michig
Florida
The Florida
for their first na
ship on Monda;
Dome against t
Spartans.
Florida Hea
Donovan's 10-r
court press and
worked yet aga
Gators in their"
theUNCTarHf
ter an opening-
against Butler, 1
Florida took oul
opponents sue!
and Oklahoma
Final Four.
The Tar H�
third Final Four
four years, havi
national semifir
this is Florida's
ance.
Michigan St
focused on wini
losing to Duke i
semifinals last)
consin Badgers
fourth time this
The Badger
35 percent (15-
one player in dc
were one of twe
the Final Four
top-seeded Ariz
round and then
get to Indy.
MSUtheon
reach the Final
national title 21
Magic Johnson
beating Indiana
Bird.
TVejustdidi
Wisconsin Coac
said. They're b
we knew that
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BellSout
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into beaches on
Sugarloaf as Phi
made a birdie at
hole to deny Gai
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at 11-under 205;
went to the par-3
sudden-death pi;
continuous rain,
had to be cut she
same policy it cit
Payne Stewart w
Beach National F
after 54 holes.
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round" featured c
since the 1997 M
pionship when Ti
Tom Lehman in c
Nicklaus, the
of Jack Nicklaus,
last eight years tr
globe trying to ge
father's shadow.
PGA Tour card ar
$302,400 Sunday
Mickelson ear
for his 15th caree
hopefully the con'
over at The Masti
"It would have
him to break throt
said. "But I didn't
my expense





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lvd.
n AGENT
J
9 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
SPORTS BRIEFS
Michigan State,
Florida in NCAA
The Florida Gators will play
for their first national champion-
ship on Monday night In the RCA
Dome against the Michigan State
Spartans.
Florida Head Coach Billy
Donovan's 10-man rotation, full-
court press and balanced scoring
worked yet again to help the
Gators In their 71-59 win against
the UNC Tar Heels Saturday. Af-
ter an opening-round scare
against Butler, fifth-seeded
Florida took out higher-ranked
opponents such as Illinois, Duke
and Oklahoma State to reach the
Final Four. m ?.
The Tar Heels, making their
third Final Four appearance in
four years, have lost four straight
national semifinal games, while
this is Florida's second appear-
ance.
Michigan State, who has been
focused on winning the title since
losing to Duke in the national
semifinals last year, beat the Wis-
consin Badgers 53-41 for the
fourth time this season.
The Badgers, who shot only
35 percent (15-42) and had only
one player in double figures,
were one of two No. 8 seeds in
the Final Four. They knocked out
top-seeded Arizona in the second
round and then beat Purdue to
get to Indy.
MSU, the only No. 1 seed to
reach the Final Four, won Its only
national title 21 years ago with
Magic Johnson at point guard,
beating Indiana State and Larry
Bird.
"We just didn't get it done,
Wisconsin Coach Dick Bennett
said. "They're better than us, and
we knew that
Mickelson wins
BellSouth Classic
Heavy rain turned bunkers
into beaches on the TPC at
Sugarloaf as Phil Mickelson
made a birdie at the first playoff
hole to deny Gary Nicklaus a
chance to be known for more
than his last name.
Mickelson and Nicklaus, tied
at 11-under 205 after 54 holes,
went to the par-316th for the
sudden-death playoff. Due to
continuous rain, the tournament
had to be cut short using the
same policy it cited when the late
Payne Stewart won the Pebble
Beach National Pro-Am in 1999
after 54 holes.
It was the first time a "final
round" featured only one hole
since the 1997 Mercedes Cham-
pionship when Tiger Woods beat
Tom Lehman in one shot.
Nicklaus, the 31-year-old son
of Jack Nicklaus, has spent the
fast eight years traveling the
globe trying to get out of his .
father's shadow. He finally got his
PGA Tour card and received
$302,400 Sunday.
Mickelson earned $504,000
for his 15th career victory, and
hopefully the confidence to take
over at The Masters.
"It would have been nice for
him to break through Mickelson
said. "But I didn't want it to be at
my expense
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
spcrts@studentiriedta.ecu.edu
Lady Pirates shutout Hampton
Softball team keeps
Hampton scoreless
Scotty Childress
STAFF WRITER
The 24th nationally ranked
Lady Pirates defeated Hampton
twice on March 30th, thanks to
their spectacular defensive
play. However, their offense
was sluggish.
Their first game of the after-
noon produced the most excite-
ment on offense in the 1st in-
ning, when Keisha Shepperson
hit a single to get on first base
and then proceeded to steal
second and third, finally being
brought home by Angela
Manzo's single.
Before the inning was done,
Beth Bridger hit a long single
to the left outfield to bring An-
gela in, making the score 2-0,
ECU.
From there, game one of the
double-header was all about
deffnse. Denise Roagan held
Hampton to only one hit the
entire game and struck out 11
batters while Jessica Critcher
and Eva Herron made some
amazing catches to ensure a
win for the Lady Pirates.
Shortstop Angela Manzo looks to steal second against Hampton, (photo by Garrett
McMillan)
Game two saw no improve-
ment offensively for the Lady
Pirates, the lone run coming
from Bridger's home run in the
bottom of the 5th.
"Thanks to great in-field
play, our defensive strength
was the key to our wins today
said Hillary Halpern, the Lady
Pirates' pitcher for the second
game. Both Halpern and
Reagan pitched terrific games
and had tremendous support
in holding Hampton scoreless
through both games from the
outstanding efforts of their
teammates.
"Our defense saved the day.
We did what we needed to do
to win the games said Herron.
With their offensive
efforts virtually nonexistent
through both games, the ladies
compensated with phenom-
enal defensive plays.
"There are three reasons
why our softball team is doing
so well this year said head
coach Tracey Kee. "Outstand-
ing pitching, great defensive
effort, and consistent hitting.
We did not have consistent hit-
ting, today, but our gjrls hung
in there, stayed tough, and did
what they had to do to win the
game
In the Hudson-Hokie Clas-
sic this weekend, the Lady Pi-
rates continued their hitting
woes against the Virginia Tech
Hokies, losing to the Hokies 4-1
in the opening game Friday.
Manzo obtained the lone run for
ECU when she brought honle
Shepperson.
The Lady Pirates were back on
track Saturday against Harvard,
significantly improving their hit-
ting. They earned 10 hits against
Harvard, winning the game 9-7.
Reagan improved her record to
18-1 while allowing one run and
just two hits as the starting
pitcher before being relieved by
See SOFTBALL page 10
Leftfielder Beth Bridger snags a fly ball against
Hampton, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
Track teams shine at Raleigh Relays
Pirates set two
new school records
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
The ECU men's and
women's track teams took the
short trip two hours west for
the Raleigh Relays last week-
end. The teams set two school
records and the men's 4x400-
relay reached the NCAA pro-
visional qualifying time.
Ayana Coleman, of the
women's team, set a new
school record in the 200-
meter hurdles and qualified
for the ECAC Outdoor Cham-
pionships. Coleman finished
fifth overall with a time of
1:00.18.
"She ran an outstanding
race said head women's track
coach Matt Munson.
Another ECU record was bro-
ken by the 1,600 sprint relay
squad. The team of Rasheca Bar-
row, Carmen Weldon, Martina
Freeman and Lauren Chadwick,
placed 13th with a time of
4:06.89.
Barrow and Weldon also gave
the Pirates some high finishes in
the individual sprint events. Bar-
row qualified for the ECAC in the
100- and 200-meters. In the 100
she placed fifth at 12.4, and in
the 200 she took home 11th
place. Finishing ahead of her in
the 200 was Weldon, who fin-
ished ninth with a time of 24.89.
Weldon also qualified for the
ECAC meet.
ECU's sprinters also made
their mark in the relays. The
4x400-relay team took home
sixth place while the 4x100
placed 12th.
Abby Hayes set a personal
record in the 1,500, with a time
of 4:50.31.
"Abby Hayes did well said
cross country coach. Len
Klepack. "She is learning how
to race. She is learning how to
use her great kick
In the field events, the Pi-
rates were led by their
throwers. Crystal Frye placed
third overall in the shot put
with a toss of 45' 6 12Team-
mate Margaret Clayton placed
13th in the hammer throw with
a distance of 147.11
In the triple jump, Toni
Kilgore placed fourth with a
jump of 40' 2 1 4 In the high
jump, Colleen McGinn placed
fourth with a height of 5' 6 1
For the men, the 4x400-
meter relay team once again
stole the show. The team
reached the NCAA provisional
qualifying time of 3:07.00.
The team of Darrick Ingram,
Damon Davis, James
Alexander and Lawrence Ward
placed second overall with a
time of 3:06.30.
"I expected them to go
3:05 said men's head track
coach Bill Carson. "They went
3:06 and it was a soft track,
not a fast track
The 4x400 "B" team placed
13th in 3:14.09.
"Our 'B' team finished
higher than all the other CAA
teams except Wilmington
Carson said.
The Pirate quarter-milers
were not finished. However,
they provided three of the top
six finishers in the open-400.
Ingram took third, Ward
placed fifth and Davis took
home sixth. In the 400-meter
hurdles, ECU's Lynn Stewart
placed fifth with a time of 52.14
and qualified for the IC4A Out-
door Championships.
In addition to the strong
showing by the sprinters, the Pi-
rates got good performances
from their distance runners.
ECU's Justin England placed
12th in the 10,000-meters,
while teammate Jamie Mance
won his heat in the 5,000.
"They work very hard
Klepack said. "They get about
70 miles a week and they're
hard nosed runners. They al-
ways have a positive attitude
and they don't back off
This writer can be contacted at
sports&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Tennis teams fall to Old Dominion
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
The ECU men's and women's
tennis teams were in action last
week facing tough Old Domin-
ion (ODU) teams Wednesday,
followed by a Friday match-up
between the Lady Pirates and
28th-ranked Virginia Common-
wealth (VCU).
The men picked up a hard
fought 5-2 loss knocking their
record to 15-13 and 2-4 in the
CAA. ODU started by winning
the doubles point which gave
them an early advantage and
from there won four out of .six
in singles action. '
"We had good chances to
win at certain spots said head
coach Tom Morris. "It just did
Senior Asa Ellbnng connects on a volley
against ODU. (photo by Garrett
McMillan) .
not come together for us today.
They are a quality, ranked team
that we held up against. We are
starting to establish ourselves
in matches with quality teams
ODU was able to pull out
most of the close matches keep-
ing the Pirates from gaining
momentum.
"I think there is a good
chance that we can beat them
if we meet in the conference
championships said tennis
player Michael Huez. "Going
into the match we expected
them to be very good, but when
we actually played them we
were close in most of the
matches and actually lost a win-
nable match
The Lady Pirates also picked
up a loss falling 6-0 against a
veteran ODU squad.
"We lost four really tough
matches Morris said. "They
were just older and more expe-
rienced than us, but we played
well. We are playing a tough
stretch of matches and this one
was good for us to play
The women were in action
again the following Friday
against 28th-ranked VCU in a
match that the Lady Pirates see
as a learning experience. VCU
was able to win the match 5-1
with the lone singles victory
coming from sophomore An-
drea Terrill.
"It's a good learning ex-
perience said captain Asa
Ellbring. "This is a team we can
watch to see what we can im-
prove. They are more consis-
tent than we are, they know ex-
actly where to put the ball when
they have the opportunity
ECU's Hrushida Kamthe smashes a forehand against ODU. (photo by Garrett
McMillan) ,
Meredith Spears returns a serve against
ODU. (photo by Garrett McMillan)
The Lady Pirates fell to 14-5
for the year in what is still shap-
ing up as one of the best seasons
the program has ever had.
Terrill finished a long match
with her teammates cheering her
on to win. The Lady Pirates have
grown close over the season, mak-
ing them able to endure tough
losses such as this one.
"Our team is a lot closer than
VCU Terrill said. "It had a huge
effect on my win today to have
my team behind me like that. The
most important thing going into
tough matches is being a team
Next, the Lady Pirates will play
two home games against the Rich-
mond Spiders and then N.C. Stare
on Thursday.
This writer can be contacted at
rdowoey@studentmedia. ecu. edu.





Tuesday, April 4, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 10
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SOFTBALL from page 9
Lisa Paganini who allowed six
runs and nine hits.
Against Liberty, the Lady Pi-
rates continued to hit well,
earning 11 hits against the
Flames. Laurie Davidson earned
the win for ECU, allowing no
runs on two hits. Halpern re-
lieved her after 3 12 innings
and finished the game allowing
four runs on eight hits.
The Lady Pirates won the
game 6-4 by scoring two runs
in the 7th, improving their
record to 39-5 for the season.
Addie Chlebnikow was
knocked out of the game in the
INTRAMURAL STANDINGS
4th inning when a runner col-
lided with her at home plate.
She suffered a concussion and
did not see action the rest of
the weekend.
In the semi-final game of the
tournament Sunday, the Lady
Pirates defeated Harvard 65,
earning 10 hits for the game.
Laurie Davidson earned her
seventh win for ECU 7-2, pitch-
ing four innings and allowing
five runs on nine hits. Reagan
relieved her in the 5th, allow-
ing no runs off two hits to pick
up the save.
In the final game of the
tournament, ECU faced the No.l
seed for the championship of
the Hudson-Hokie Classic-the
Virginia Tech Hokies. However,
they were unable to avenge
their loss against the Hokies,
losing the game 3-0. The Lady
Pirates left five on base, includ-
ing three left on base in the 6th
, inning.
They face Campbell in a
doubleheader' at 6 p.m
Wednesday, April 5th at Buies
Creek.
This writer can be contacted at
schildress&s tuden t media, ecu. edu.
The softball team converses following the first game of a doubleheader, Thursday, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
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)4VVVV
i fc, � �?-?�- '?' �.��'�,
12 The East Carolinian
comics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
�THE JOEYSHOW
t
COMICS
Tuesday April 4. 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
by: Joey ellis
AND NOW A WORD FROM OUR SPONSORS
6uY How AfJp
WHATS MY NAME FOOIP
THE JOEYSHOW HAS BEEN INFORMED THAT THE NAME "III IS ALREADY USED IN
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FOR THE NEXT 2 WEEKS YOU CAN E-MAIL JIE1205@MIL.ECI.EII
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"firs
who' StfAJfO !�� i
mMm�
CRADLE WILL ROCK (R)
A Burgeoning cultural revolution provides the backdrop for this
period drama set in New York city in 1936. Nelson Rockefeller
commissions Mexican Artist Diego Rivera to paint the lobby of
Rockefeller Center. Italian propagandist Margherita Sarfatti
sells Da Vinci paintings to fund the Mussolini war effort; a
paranoid ventriloquist tries to rid his vaudeville troupe of
communists; and a company of eccentric artists, led by Orson
Welles and John Houseman, rally together to stage Marc
Blitzstein's groundbreaking musical. Stars Hank Azaria, Ruben
Blades, Joan Cusack, and John Cusack.
THE TALENTED MR RIPLEY (R)
Matt Damon stars as Tom Ripley, a youthful grifter who is
commissioned by a wealthy industrialist to bring his errant
son, playboy Dickie Greenleaf, back to America. Upon
arriving in Italy, Ripley is so smitten with Greenleaf's
charmed existence and his girlfriend, fellow expatriate
Marge Sherwood - that he schemes to preserve his
newfound way of life, believing "it's better to be a fake
somebody than a real nobody
� SPONSORED BY �
TiHEIPIRAT.E UNDERGROUND
ECU'S 7th ANNUAL
'FEATURING
6:00PM THRU 7:30PM
LOAD IN SOUND. SOUNDCHECK (THE BANDITOSI, JUDGES ARRIVAL
8:00PM THE BANDITOS
8:50PM POINT O EIGHT
9:40PM LOGOSOPHIA
10:30PM THE FLAMING SKUNKS
11:20PM WINTER LAND
APPROXIMATE 30 MINUTE SET CHANGES BETWEEN BANDS
11:50PM WINNERS ANNOUNCED
WINNING BAND WILL OPEN AT
BAREFOOT ON THE MALL 20001
ILLUMINA
2QOO
NOW SHOWING
MSC GALLERY
6PM @ THE MENDENHALL BRICKYARD
RAIIM SITE - HENDRIX THEATRE
'new rock"x
99 )
lasi Carolina
Unlversitv
liiing
Services
coaiaimE
MERCURYCINEMA BLOCKBUSTER
Wed. at 7:30 p.m. & Thur. at 10:00 p.m.
Thur @ 7:30 p.m. Fri @ 7:30 & 10:00 p.m.
& Sun. @ 3:00 p.m. (NO SCREENING ON SATURDAY)
"�� DOiTT HISS THIS nOW.
mmmO
Ml
an ice w ��� �;� � �.� ?& �e
(Hi
APR 5 &6
APR 6, 7 & 9
For additional information contact the: Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina University,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353, or call 252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or VTTY 252.328.4736, 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday. Individuals who require accommodations under ADA should contact the Department for Disability
Support Services at 252.328.4802 forty-eight hours prior to the start of the program.
WEEKLY CALENDAR
05 WICKED WEDNESDAY
Mercury Cinema:
Cradle Will Rock fR)
7:30pm Hendrix
06THIRSTY THURSDAY
Blockbuster Film:
The Talented Mr. Ripley (R)
7:30pm Hendrix
Mercury Cinema:
Cradle Will Rock f R)
10pmHendrix
07 FABULOUS FRIDAY
Blockbuster Film:
The Talented Mr. Ripley (R)
7:30 & 10:30pm Hendrix
Q8 SENSATIONAL SATURDAY
Outdoor Concert: BATTLE OF THE BANDS
Starting 6pm Mendenhall Brickyard
Rain Site - Hendrix Theatre
09SUPER SUNDAY
Blockbuster Film:
The Talented Mr. Ripley fR
3pmHendrix
For a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252.328,6004
or bookmark our web site at: www.ecu.edustudent union
2 OR 3 BR
diately 804-
mile from ECl
�551-9040.





iPnl 4. 2QQQ
.tec.ecu.edu
INC.
;oo4
ion
'ING
ERY
new rock
99 )
SUBLEASE PIRATE'S Cove 1-2
rooms available with own bathroom,
free cable, water and electricity includ-
ed. Available starting May. Rent ne-
gotiable call Matt at 758-5286.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$300month, available now. 125
Avery Street Call 758-6596. ask for
Thomas.
wSw
)AR
fRl
IR1
BANDS
fRl
Tuesday, April 4, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
HOUSE FOR rent 302 Lewis St. 3 BR
LR DR Kitchen central AC garage 5
mins to campus no pets $800mo.
Call 262-504-2052 for applications.
CANNON COURT 2 bedroomll2
bath townhouse. Basic cable includ-
ed. $475 per month. Available now
and accepting deposits for fall semes-
ter. Wainright Property Management
756-6209.
GLADIOLUS GARDENS & Jasmine
Gardens accepting deposits for fall se-
mester. 1 bedroom $350 per month.
2 bedroom starting at $410. Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
SHORT-TERM lease available for two
bedroom apartment. Pets allowed
$445mo great for summer school
students, on ECU bus-line. Call Julie
or Lisa 757-1363 leave message.
LOOKING FOR a place to live?
www.housing101.netYour move off
campus! Search for apartments. Free
roommate sublet listings.
3 BEDROOM 1 bath $700. 2 Bed-
room 2 Bath $450 1 Bedroom $320
utilities included. All near campus, all
available April. Do not call for rentals
later than April please. 551-0971 leave
message.
LARGE 3 bedroom house, walking dis-
tance from ECU campus available May
15. Large yard in back, washerdryer
hook-up. Call Mike at 830-3735.
WESLEY COMMONS North. 1 bed-
room $340. 2 bedrooms $410. Wa-
ter and sewer included. Available now
and pre leasing for fall semester. Wain-
right Property Management 756-6209.
FOR RENT, 3 BR Condo. Each BR with
private bath, all appliances washer
and dryer, computer and phone con-
nections in each BR, 5 blocks E. of
campus (flood free). Available Aug.
1st $285. per BRmonth, Leave name
and phone with mgr. at 329-1162 or
e-mail: rentgvl@earthlink.net
CYPRESS GARDENS 1 bedroom
$395-$420. 2 bedrooms $475-$500.
Basic cable & water and sewer includ-
ed. Available now and accepting ap-
plications for fall semester Wainright
Property Management 756-6209.
1 BEDROOM, 2 person apartment for
sublease for the summer. Rent is
$367.00. Call 752-2529, ask for Can-
dace or Cherry.
FOR SUBLEASE: 2 bedroom. 1 bath
apartment. Wesley Commons- 102
Brownlea Dr. Available immediately!
$350 No deposit required! Please call
Amy at 919-786-9809 if interested.
APARTMENT AVAILABLE June 1.
Eastgate Village. Two bedroom, one
bath, WD hookup, balcony, cathedral
ceilings. Only one previous owner,
$485.00 month. Call 830-0903.
2 OR 3 BR Duplex available imme-
diately 804-B Johnston Street-14
mile from ECU $550month- Call Rick
9 551-9040.
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALE ROOMMATE needed. 3 BR
(each with private bath). All applianc-
es washer and dryer, computer and
phone connections in each BR. 5
blocks E, of campus (flood free), avail-
able June 1st. $285month. leave
name and phone with mgr. at 329-
1162 or e-mail: rentgvl@earthlink.net
STUDIOUS NONSMOKING female
roommate needed to share 2 bedroom
townhouse available mid-May. Rent
$175 12 utilities. Call Susan at 355-
6453.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
.WANT A BREAK?;
i
Get 12 off security deposit
through March 31, 2000
1 or 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, range
, refrigerator, free
i watersewer,
i washerdryer
hookups, laundry
facilities, 5 blocks
from campus,
i ECU bus services, i
Wesley ;
Commons ;
South:
I -All properties have 24 hr.
� emergency maintenance
Call 758- 1921
FOR SALE
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
East 10th St. (nextto Papa Olivers Piz-
za).
BRAND NEW loudspeakers for sale.
For details call Aziz 754-0981.
89 BUICK CENTURY limited, silver.
108k miles, loaded, power everything.
Runs great! Needs paint, headlinder.
Asking $1950. Call Jim at 756-7220
during day, 321-0938 night.
BEAUTIFUL, HEALTHY Iguana look-
ing for great home! Must be seriously
interested in care-taking. Some acces-
sories included. Call 757-2064.
SATURN FOR sale! 1993 four door
automatic is looking for a home. Very
dependable. Higher than average mile-
age. Must see. Asking 2800. Call 758-
6654.
SERVICES
DON'T LOSE your deposit for leaving
your carpet a mess. Have your carpet
professionally steamed cleaned We II
clean it so you don't have to Call Ad-
vance Carpet Cleaning 493-0211.
WANT TO increase your Bench Press
40 pounds in just 6 weeks! Call Derek
355-7249.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER CAMP counselors needed
for premier camps in Massachusetts
& New Hampshire Positions available
for talented, energetic, and fun loving
students as general counselors and
speciality counselors in all team sports,
all individual sports such as Tennis &
Golf. Waterfront and Pool activities,
and speciality activities including art,
dance, theater, gymnastics, newspa-
per, rocketry & radio. Great Salaries,
room, board, and travel. June 17th-Au-
gust 16th. Enjoy a great summer that
promises to be unforgettable. Check
out our web site and apply on line at
www.greatcampjobs.com or call 1-
800-562-0737.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-51500
weekly. Legal lap dancing. No experi-
ence needed Age 18 up. all national-
ities. 919-580-7084, Goldsboro
PART-TIME Library Page- Children's
Library. Monday thru Friday 9 am -
noon. Shelving books, assisting librar-
ians as needed. Complete application
and take shelving test at Sheppard
Memorial Library, 530 Evans Street.
Greenville no phone calls.
SUMMER RECEPTIONIST. Looking
for an outgoing person to help in a
fast paced office. 8am to 5pm Mon-
day-Friday. Send resume to 3481-A
South Evans Street Greenville, NC
27834.
QUADRIPLEGIC SEEKSI assistance
bathing, lifting, driving morning or af-
ternoon. Call 353-9074
CLASSIFIEDS
ROOMMATE WANTED
2 FEMALE students with pets seek
female roommate to share ,3 bedroom
house 14 mile from ECU good house-
keeping expected- smokers wel-
come$200month- call Rick @551-
9040.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
to share large four bedroom house.
Close to campus, across from art build-
ing. $189month washerdryer. Small
yard. 329-8354. great place to live!
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students. Cam-
pus three blocks. Prefer graduate stud-
ent. Central Air. Ceiling fans. Washer.
Dryer. $250.00 plus utilities.
(703)680-1676.
RESPONSIBLE ROOMMATE needed
to share spacious house. Very aes-
thetically pleasing. $225 per month
plus share of utilities. Call Jim at 830-
8828.
HELP WANTED
BASEBALL: EX-highschool pitcher
needed to throw Little League batting
practice: Must throw strikes; April
through June; $10.00session. 756-
9172.
SERVICES
HTTP:WWW.GEOCITIES.COM
MOTORCITYLANE4666BIK-
ER.HTML
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5.50 hour plus bonuses,
make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212. M-Th between the
hours of 3-6pm.
SSFUNDRAISERSS OPEN to student
groups or organizations. Earn $5 per
MC app. We supply all materials at
no cost. Call for info or visit our web-
site. 1-800-932-0528X65 www.ocm-
concepts.com
ADULT ENTERTAINERS and dancers
needed. Must be 18 own phone and
transportation. No drugs. Make1500
weekly. 758-2737.
LOCAL LAW firm has part-time posi-
tion available. Responsibilities include:
opening, closing, maintaining and stor-
ing files. Must be computer literate.
M-F. 12:30-5:30. Please send resumes
to: Legal Administrator. 1698 E. Arling-
ton Blvd Greenville. NC 27858.
WANTED: NON-smoking. depend-
able student with own transportation.
To care for energetic five and seven
year olds for the summer break. Ref-
erences needed. Call 752-7787 after
5:30 pm to set up interview.
WORK AROUND your schedule!
$500-$ 1500 PT per month $2000-
6000 FT per month. Full training.
Earn expense paid vacations. Only 5
people needed. Call 757-2763 M-F 9-
5 EXT 1229.
LOOKING FOR a job with excellent
growth opportunities? Full-time posi-
tion available which includes outdoor
sales and office work. Send resume
to PO Box 4416 Greenville NC 27836.
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210
LOSE WEIGHT and make $money$!
Lose 7-29 lbs per month Earn up to
$1200 month 19 years of guaranteed
results! Call 757-2292 for Free Consul-
tation!
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting individuals
willing to work 15-30hrs a week with
some background knowledge in one
or more of the following areas: in-line
skating, skateboarding and in-line
hockey Applicants will be responsi-
ble for overseeing both the skate park
and in-line hockey rink at the Jaycee
Park. The Skatebike park is open Tues-
day - Sunday from 2:00pm till dark,
and Saturdays 10:00am till dark. Sal-
ary rates range from $5.15 to $6.50
per hour. For more information, please
call Ben James, Judd Crumpler or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2 PM.
S$ NOW HIRING $$ Passion Escorts,
day and evening shifts available. Must
be at least 18yrs. old. No experience
needed. Taking calls from 1p.m
9p.m. 747-7570
Biologists
Ne experience needed
Earn up to 35K after lyr
40K after 2 years
IMS, a biomedical soft-
ware firm in Silver Spring,
MD is offering a free 4
week programming course.
We hire 90 of students
who take this course.
Course starts 61200. For
details see imsweb.com or
call (888) 680-5057.
Wilson Acres
Summer Pool Memberships
available
$100.()()withECUPCCI.D.
unaafjMi
(WattlofJ Ho�nt
Wanted: Summer Help at the BEACH!
Graduating Senior Preferred;
Undergraduate Applications Accepted Also
Great Pay: EBJ�� Housing
. j (.�
All Interested Email at RISKYB@interpath.com
WWW.THECOMMENTATOR.COM
NEED A good DJ at an affordable
price? Cakalaky Entertainment offers
good times at a great price! Late
nights, formats. semMormals. or any
occasion (references available)! Call
Jeff (252) 531-5552.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO Wendy
Braddy. Darwin Chavez. Kristy Partin,
and Melinda Taylor for becoming New
Brothers of Phi Sigma Pi National Hon-
or Fraternity. Great job guys!
SIGMA PI would like to congratulate
Brian Kaiser on his IFC presidency.
ALPHA XI Delta, we had a blast with
you guys skating. We hope to have
more wild and crazy times to come.
The brothers of Sigma Alpha Epsilon.
THE BIG sisters of Alpha Omicron Pi
would like to thank their little sisters
for planning a great biglil night. We
had so much fun!
CONGRATULATIONS TO all the new
officers of Alpha Omicron Pi. Love your
sisters.
OTHER
LOOKING FOR individuals available
full time May-October. Four star resort
in mountains of NC. Front desk and
dining room available. We provide
roomboard. Scholarships available.
Perfect for the student taking time off.
Please call 828 733.4311 for an appli-
cation.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
1-800-SKYDIVE
www.carolinaskysports .com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
MANAGING YOUR Money: Learn ef-
fective ways of balancing your financ-
es while in college and tips on how to
avoid pitfalls that may lead you into
debt. This workshop meets on April
5 at 3:30pm. For more information,
contact the Center for Counseling and
Student Development at 328-6661.
FULL TIME male students interested
in joining Omega Psi Phi Fraternity
should complete information sheets in
the Dean of Students Office. Please
note that you must be a full-time stud-
ent and have a minimum GPA of 2 50.
Information sheets must be complet-
ed by April 10.
CHOOSING A MAJOR AND CAREER:
This workshop is designed to help you
explore your interests, values, and abil-
ities to find out possible career and
major choices. You will learn effec-
tive tools in the greatest hunt of your
life. Contact the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development at 328-
6661 for more details. This workshop
meets every Thursday from 3:30-5:00.
SUPPORT GROUP for Hepatitis B and
C. PCMH Regional Rehab Classroom
Third Thursday of each month 7pm-
9pm. Contact: Vicki or Dennis Davis
252-321-5662 or vicden@greenvil-
lenc.com
GAMMA BETA Phi Society will meet
Thursday April 6 at 5:30pm in Men-
denhall Social Room. For more info:
www.ecu.eduorggbp
HEY STUDENTS, the Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Special Population
Department is currently recruiting vol-
unteers for their 2000 Spring pro-
grams in: Track & Field, Bowling,
Swimming. Recreation Camp, Roller
Skating and the 2000 Special Olymp-
ics Spring Games. For more informa-
tion contact Kelvin Yarrell or Dean Foy
at 329-4844 or 329-4541.
TEST PREPARATION: Learn effec-
tive ways to prepare and take exams.
For more information about this work-
shop, contact the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development at 328-
6661. This workshop meets on April
5 at 11:00am.
Computer
ProgrammerAnalyst
No experience needed
IMS, a biomedical software
firm in Silver Spring, MD,
employs 120 programmers
developing biomedical
systems and software. SAS,
C, C, JAVA, ACCESS,
SYBASE, and many other
languages. Knowledge of
one computer programming
language required. Paid OT
and full benes. Nice work-
ing conditions. BS degree
and 3.0 GPA required. For
details see imsweb.com or
call toll-free (888) 680-5057.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ITCS IS sponsoring a Technology
showcase on April 11 from 10-3 in the
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room.
Twenty vendors will be demonstrating
new computer products.
The East Carolinfj
ads�stud�ntmedia.(
ANN0UNCEMEN1
GOLDEN KEY Honor Society I
meet Tuesday, April 4th at 7:30 in (
1026. For more informs
www.ecugk.8m.com
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING.
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE. A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEl FREE Will
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vernon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10, 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP -
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UNITED
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED,
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 & 8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTTING-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AHD VICTORY
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-662f
Services: 9 6- 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE Will
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600
Services: 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed. Bible Study
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 & 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE Will
BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30. 9:45, 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5f each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 59 each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
. .4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue





VPWWM
VOTE APRILS
MAKE A DIFFERENCE
ELECT YOUR SJUDi
ADERS
STUDENTS AND TRANSPORTATION
Parking and Transportation is a major conceam of fac-
ulty and students alike. At parking and traffic meetings,
proposals which determine the fate of the students are
made. These proposals are passed without much resistance
due to the lack of students presant. For example, at this
past meeting, a proposal was passed that will cause fresh-
men and sophomores living off campus to be unable to buy
commuter stickers. ECU is a growing campus and needs as
much student input as possible. Have your voice heard
and come to the next meeting on APRIL 20th at 3:00 p.m. in
Menclenhall, Rm. 212
$MONEY$
S.G. A. decides what organizations and groups get
money that comes from you (the student) from your vari-
ous student fees. While it is too late to join the S.G. A. this
year, think to the future, and say where YOU want YOUR
money to go.
AROUND ECU
The S.G.A. of ECU has been extremely active in the
community as well as on campus. Recently S.G.A. mem-
bers volunteered for the Special Olympics. SiG.A. also
raised money through a penny drive, which was donated
for the Special Olympics.
EXECUTIVE OFFICERS
PRESIDl CLIFF WEBSTER
VICE PR JOHNMERIAC
TRFASUE1 OVERTON HARPER
JESSICA DOWDY
HEF BRENT QUEEN
PUBLIC RELATIONS
JUNIOR Cl ASS PRES CHRISTY LESJCHl
ORDINATOR
OF INT. AFFAIRS: JENNY STEIN
SENIOR .PRES BOB SMITH
PH. CLASS PRES MIKE ORR
FRE SH; C (. A SS PR; KIM SKINNER
COMMITTEE CHAIRS
APPROPRIATIONS: CHRIS WLLIAMS
STUDENT WELLFARE: DAVID BUCCI
RULES AND JUDICIARY: SADIE COX
SCREENINGS: LEANNE BAILEY


Title
The East Carolinian, April 4, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 04, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1401
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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