The East Carolinian, February 10, 2000






www.tec.ecu.edu
i the 1 �
eastearolinian
Volume 74, Issue 87
THE HISTORY OF VALENTINE'S
DAYpg.6
New ways to show your love
30 days to go- until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
IBM visit
Representatives from the IBM Corpora-
tion are on campus today to meet with se-
niors and alumni who are interested In
knowing more about employment opportu-
nities. They will be visiting the computer
science department.
Tonight at 6 p.m. in Mendenhall, a re-
ception for students and alumni will take
place. Jim Westmoreland, director of ECU
Career Services, said IBM has designated
ECU as a "target school" because many of
their employees are ECU graduates. He
said eight of the 48 staff members at IBM's
worldwide accounting office in the Re-
search Triangle Park are ECU graduates.
Contact: Dr. James Westmoreland, Ca-
reer Services, 328-6050.
Lady Pirates basketball
The Lady Pirates will play the women's
team from James Madison at 7 p.m. on
Friday, Feb. 11, in Williams Arena at
Minges Coliseum.
Lecture
Mary France Berry, chairperson of the
U.S. Civil Rights Commission will give a
speech on Tues Feb 15. Her lecture,
"Curbing the Exploitation of Racial Fear
will beginat 7 p.m. in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Storyteller
Donald Davis, a featured storyteller at
the Smithsonian Institution, will present a
workshop for librarians and teachers. On
Friday, Feb. 11, he will tell stories to a pub-
lic audience at ECU.
The workshop, titled "Tall Tales and
Homespun Yams: A Day with Donald
Davis, Master Storyteller will begin 8 a.m.
in Mendenhall Student Center and will
continue until 3:15 p.m.
The public performance will take place
at 7 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 11, in the audito-
rium of the Jenkins Fine Arts Center
(School of Art) and is free.
For more information contact: Patricia
McGee at 328-0427.
Clarinet recital
Nathan Williams, a faculty member at
the School of Music, will perform on the
clarinet at 8 p.m. Friday, Feb. 11, in the
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Chamber music
Ara Gregorian, Christine Gustafson
and John O'Brien of the School of Music
faculty will perform at 3 p.m. on Sunday,
Feb. 13, on the violin, flute and harpsi-
chord at The Music House, 408 Martin
Luther King Drive.
Poet Alicia Osteiker
At 3 p.m. on Tuesday, Feb. 15, at the
Greenville Museum of Art, poet Alicia
Osteiker will be performing "Meet the
Writer Later that night at 7 p.m she will
host a signing and reception, followed by a
formal reading with a question and answer
session.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you think ECU is doing a
good job of promoting
cultural diversity?
The results of last week's question:
Is It fair for students to pay for build-
ing maintenance?
22 Yes 77 No
w . NEIL PUNT PROVIDES SENIOR
(jj RJ LEADERSHIP pg. 8
� Forward brings game to next level
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 10. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Sunny, high of 66�
and a low of 47�
University professors design Web classes
Internet makes
'e-education' possible
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
Some ECU professors are us-
ing the Internet as a way to con-
duct class rather than just for re-
search.
Teachers are beginning to
post notes and assignments on
the Web.
Dr. Dale Knickerbocker, a for-
eign languageliterature teacher
uses the World Wide Web in his
classes.
Knickerbocker said that for
his Spanish literature class, he
has all of the assignments and
study questions on his Web page,
and for all of his foreign language
classes he has a Web site for re-
sources on more Spanish sources.
"The site includes links to
interactive reading and grammar
sites, a Spanish dictionary and
thesaurus, Spanish pen pals, sites
to study abroad, quizzes with
explanations of wrong answers
and links to Spanish TV, radio
and newspapers Knickerbocker
said. "It's a good way to sharpen
your Spanish skills
Knickerbocker plans to have
a graduate level course that is
based entirely on-line. It will be
a reading course, so students will
not be required to speak the lan-
guage. This is a class for people
who will need to be able to read
and understand Spanish text-
books for research purposes.
"There will be set times in a
chat room where students can
discuss things with me, or they
can e-mail me Knickerbocker
said. "I will e-mail the assign-
ments during a certain set class
time and they will have a certain
period of time within which to
respond
Todd Finley, an English pro-
fessor, Is also in the process of de-
veloping on-line classes.
"I'm developing a DE dis-
tance education course called
English 6510-Recent Trends in
English Education Finley said.
"It targets teachers who want to
earn their master's but might
have difficulty traveling to cam-
pus or making time in their
schedule
"For those living far away
from campus, a DE course makes
sense. If a mother in Nag's Head
has to travel three hours to sit
through a three-hour class, then
drive three hours back home,
she's not going to have the time
to do anything more than sur-
vive the experience Finley said.
Finley said that in the future,
a large percentage ECU students
will participate in what he calls
"place-less
timeless edu-
cation
"The fossil-
ized model of
teaching stu-
dents at the
same time,
three times a
week doesn't
make sense
Finley said.
However, a
majority of
ECU students
say that they
are not quite
ready for the
Internet to re-
place the class-
room. Accord-
ing to an Internet-use survey
taken by The East Carolinian, 79
percent of students polled said
that teachers should not hold
class discussions via the Web. On
fim'H-JililkHgHlhWA
How often students use the Internet
68 2-3 times per day
11 Once a day
16 2-3 times per week
5 hardly ever
Is ECU using the latest Internet technology?
68 yes
27 no
5 no opinion I
Do you like the idea of online classes?
16 yes �
79 no
no opinion
the other hand, 84 percent did
favor teachers posting class notes
and assignments on the Internet.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Taking proper precautions prevents alcohol poisoning
Programs work to
promote awareness
Martina Clyburn
STAFF WRITER
In the past few months, there
have been at least four reported
cases of alcohol poisoning
among ECU students.
Alcohol poisoning, which
can lead to death, occurs when
the body has consumed an ex-
cessive amount of the intoxicant.
"The reason your body is un-
able to digest this is because al-
cohol is a depressant, so it de-
presses your breathing and your
heart rate said Dr. Betty Straub,
associate dean and director of
Health Promotions.
Symptoms that may occur
include cold, clammy skin, slow
respirations, vomiting while
"sleeping" or passed out, oblivi-
ousness to surroundings or loca-
tion and unconsciousness or
semi-unconsciousness.
Sargent Stephanie Griffin of
the ECU Police Department re-
ported that she has encountered
several cases involving under-age
students who have abused alco-
hol and have had to be reported
to EMS.
According to Beth Credle,
interim director of Health Edu-
See POISONING page 2
Alcohol poisoning can be prevented by being aware of your limits, drinking in moderation and using common sense, (photo by Emily Richardson)
Teacher suspended
for posting Wiccan Web site
Action highlights
privacy debate
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
A high school teacher in Scotland County
was suspended last month for posting a Web
site that contained pictures of ritual nudity as-
sociated with the Wiccan religion.
Sherri Eicher, an 11th grade English teacher
at Scotland High School, is the leader of a small
sect called the WillowFyre Coven. The Web site
that she and her husband maintained had pho-
tographs of fully nude Wiccans participating in
a body painting ritual, known as "sky clad
Eicher was not one of those pictured.
Her suspension in January brought about a
barrage of discussions and town meetings with
the Scotland County Board of Education
(SCBOE), area ministers, lawyers and citizens
about the fine line between the private and pub-
lic life of a school teacher.
On Jan. 27, the SCBOE released a statement
saying that Eicher would not be returning to
her job at Scotland High, despite the fact that
her most recent performance evaluations rate
her as "above standard
"The direct issue is settled to our satisfac-
tion with regard to the school district and school
district employees said Richard Eicher, Shari
Eicher's husband in a previous interview with
the Laurinburg Exchange.
An agreement made by both parties main-
tained that neither the Eichers nor the school
board would make any further comments about
the issue to the media.
The issue of the dividing point between the
public and private lives of those who have a
direct influence on children is one that is hotly
debated.
"There's quite a lot of law pertaining to what
is personal and private for a teacher said Dr.
Parmalee Hawk, director of Teacher Education
at ECU. "If what they do reduces their effec-
tiveness in the classroom, then the school board
has a right to make a suspension or a dismissal
In 1984, the State Supreme Court made a
decision pertaining to this issue. In the case of
Faulkner vs. New Bern-Craven County Board of
Education, the court upheld that "it is not in-
appropriate or unreasonable to hold our teach-
See WICCAN, page 3
Artful salesmanship
Senior
A I y s s a
B 1 i n d a uer
examines a
pitcher at the
art sale on
Wednesday.
The Valentine's Day art
sale in the Jenkins Fine
Art Building started
Wednesday and will
continue through Friday,
(photos by Garrett'
McMillan)
i





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Feb. 10, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Thursday; I
www.tec.ee
PCMH identifies healthful menu options
��

BISTRO project
now underway
Josette LaChance
STAFF WRITER
Pitt County has been chosen to
serve as a pilot site for a program
designed to identify healthful menu
options at restaurants.
"The BISTRO project Building
Interest and Support for Healthy
Restaurants is a state-wide program
that sends volunteer dietitians into
restaurants in order to identify
healthy meals served said Kim
Shpvelin, a registered dietitian at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital. "For
a meal to be identified as healthy, it
must consist of fruits, vegetables
and grains, while maintaining low
sodium and fat content
, Once a meal is identified as
healthy, it will be identified by a
symbol on the menu.
, Also, the front door of the res-
taurants might hold a sign to let
people know that they are partici-
pating in the program. The direc-
tors of the BISTRO project will also
be distributing pamphlets that con-
tain more detailed information
about the program.
. There are seven area restaurants
that have decided to participate in
the program. The restaurants are the
Mesh Cafe, Staccato Cafe and Grill,
Chef's 505, Upper Crust Jewish
nought About IT Today?
Sushi is a low-faf food that is available at area restaurants, (photo by Emily
Richardson)
Mother, Cicle's and the Cubbie's in
Winterville. Shovelin said that any
restaurant in the state can partici-
pate.
"The BISTRO project is an excel-
lent idea because it will give people
who must maintain a certain diet
the chance to go out and have a nice
meal said Scott McClelland, owner
of the Chef's 505. "I hope it flies.
My restaurant is a good candidate
for the program because it runs a
pretty healthy menu already. When
the dietitians came, they said they
could use practically my whole"
menu
Fred Sullivan, former owner of
the Mesh Cafe, said he is a big ad-
vocate of the BISTRO project be-
POISONING
from page 1
cation, the best way to prevent al-
cohol poisoning is to drink in mod-
eration.
; "You have to know your limit
Credel said. "If friends suspect a
problem they should never leave
that person alonel The best thing to
do is to turn them on their side so
tr)ey can vomit. If this doesn't hap-
pen, the victim is likely to choke
� ;There are many avenues on cam-
pij to educate students on alcohol
and the effects of it's abuse. The ECU
PD also presents workshops at the
beginning of the semester in the
lobby of the residence halls.
Also, Straub hosts a two-hour
workshop twice a week that is of-
fered to any student or campus or-
ganization who is interested in
teaming about alcohol awareness.
Straub said she is currently in the
process of developing a video to
encourage students to "stop the cra-
ziness" of alcohol abuse.
"It involves everyone Straub
said. "The greeks and the athletes
as well as the non-greeks and non-
athletes
ECU is not the only university
that is taking measures to prevent
alcohol abuse. Michigan State" Uni-
versity is partnering with the fam-
ily of Bradly McCue, a junior at MSU
who died on his 21st birthday from
alcohol poisoning.
The family has created an orga-
nization called B.R.A.D. (Being Re-
sponsible About Drinking) which
can be accessed at,
"www.brad21.org The site gives
information about alcohol poison-
ing and allows you to send a card
to a friend on their 21st birthday to
remind them to drink in modera-
tion.
This writer can be contacted at
mclyburn@5tudentmedia.ecu.edu.
cause he believes "we do not live in
a healthy society
. "It will show that we're not just
another restaurant, but will give our
guests a healthy alternative"
Sullivan said.
Some ECU students said that
knowing which restaurants offer
healthful menu choices will make a
difference in where they chose to
eat. "I'm concerned about fat con-
tent and staying healthy said jun-
ior Daniel Hunt.
Freshman Jeanne Czarnecki
agreed. "I would chose a meal that
had received the sign if it sounded
good because I like healthy foods
Czarnecki said.
This writer can be contacted at
jlachance@studentmedia, ecu. edu.
SGA NOTES
Announcements:
-SGA Members are intend-
ing to volunteer for the Special
Olympics -
-SGA mailed a sympathy
card to Seton Hall University re-
garding the three males who
died in the fire.
-There is a statewide SGA
meeting in Chapel Hill this
weekend. Five members from
SGA will be attending.
-There will be a Penny War
Feb. 14-Mar. 10 winners will be
treated to a Bowl, Meet and Eat
party.
-Cliff Webster will be at a
Board Of Government meeting
this weekend to discuss tuition
� increase.
New Members:
John Wiggen, Crystal
McMillan, Michael Hopkins
and Clark Purvis
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IVWMi
eb. 10, 2000
nedia.ecu.edu
Thursday; Feb. 10, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian -
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu1
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Come be trained and you could qualify for the
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ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
Duke University�Who wants to be a millionaire?
Duke University Trinity senior Drew Fine does, and he'll
get the chance to win it all on the ABC game show this
week.
After calling in to the 800-number and acing sev-
eral rounds of trivia questions, Fine won a chance to
be on "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire his airdate
will be tonight at 8 p.m. or Thursday at 9 p.m.
"It was a whim he said Friday. "Now I'm going to
New York
The hit game show, which has been a ratings bo-
nanza for ABC, features 10 new players every day from
around the country. They compete against each other
to ascend to the seat opposite host, Regis Philbin.
Once in the "hot seat the contestant must answer
15 multiple-choice questions to win the million. He
gets three "lifelines"�which enable him to poll the
audience, call a friend or eliminate two of the four an-
swer choices.
The Chronicle learned Monday night that Fine had
made it into the "hot seat and that, he had reached
the $8,000 round when he called Pratt senior Gabe
Tsuboyama to help him answer a question.
That question�What word is. consistently spelled
backward in the novel The Shining?�stumped
Tsuboyama too. He suggested the wrong answer, but
Fine apparently disregarded his lifeline and guessed
correctly.
Fine could not be reached for comment on his fi-
nal winnings from the game show.
Fine said his subject strengths are sports and geog-
raphy, and his weaknesses are books, authors and '60s
and '70s pop culture. For the latter subjects, Fine can
call on some Dukies to help.
"My lifelines are two of my friends from Wayne
Manor, my dad, a professor at Duke, Martin Lewis, and
one of my friends who's a girl he said.
University of Columbia�Nearly five years after
Harvard was rocked by the deaths of two students in
an apparent murder-suicide, Columbia University is
trying to deal with the same shock.
On Saturday, a 19-year-old sophomore was killed,
followed hours later by the suicide of the suspect, her
former boyfriend.
Kathleen A. Roskot, a star lacrosse player, was found
dead early Saturday morning in her dorm room. Her
throat had been slashed.
Later that day, Thomas G. Nelford, a Columbia drop-
out and alleged cocaine addict known for his artistic'
ability, threw himself in front of a Manhattan subway
train. He was found carrying Roskot's wallet.
According to Virgil Renzulli, Columbia's associate
vice president for Public Affairs, Friday night's security1
tapes show Roskot and Nelford entering her dorm o
gether. Nelford also left his identification card with the'
dorm's security guard.
A New York Police Department lieutenant told Thfe!
Crimson that detectives have no doubt that Nelford'
killed Roskot. The case was closed Saturday with'
Nelford's suicide, the lieutenant said. ' �
Renzulli said the killing was Columbia's second fn1
less than three years. The other murder was also allegJ
edly committed by an acquaintance of the victim. " '�
"Any student death is a tragedy he said. "This is
just a terrible loss � �
Renzulli also said that Columbia is taking steps to'
help students deal with Roskot's and Nelford's deaths.
He said administrators began the process by informing'
all students of the murder-suicide via e-mail messages.I
"The university has made counselors available'
throughout the weekend for any students Renzulli'
said. "There have also been meetings for. people in her1'
dorm, and a hotline has been opened � '
5:00p.m8:00p.m. ECU Counseling Center
For more information, call 328-6793.
WICCAN
from page 1
� ers to a higher standard of personal conduct, given the
youthful ideals they are supposed to foster and elevate
Hawkins said that students in the education pro-
gram are reminded in classes and before being admit-
ted into a teacher education program the importance
of keeping a difference between church and state.
"You have to look at the situation from this stand-
point: did it have an effect on how she was with the'
students? If the students no longer have any respect,
for her, then yes, that's a problem Hawkins said. "But,
if they students didn't know about it, and I suspebtj
many of them didn't, it should not be an issue '
This writer can be contacted at .0
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu. � �
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� The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
� Republican leaders urge gay
marriage question at meeting
BRATTLEBORO, Vt. (AP)�Republican leaders in the
Vermont House and Vermont Senate are urging towns
to ask voters for their thoughts on gay marriage at
March town meeting.
House Leader Walter Freed, R-Dorset, and Senate
Leader John Bloomer, R-Rutland, wrote letters to towns
across the state suggesting they include ballot ques-
tions on Town Meeting Day.
They suggested that two questions be put to voters:
"Do you support same-sex marriage?" And, "Do you
support the creation of a domestic partnership law by
the Vermont Legislature which would allow same-sex
couples the same basic benefits as married heterosexual
couples presently have?"
The Legislature is considering those questions in
the wake of the Supreme Court's ruling that gay and
lesbian couples should be given all the rights and ben-
efits of marriage. The court left it to the Legislature to'
determine how to provide those rights.
The two Republicans said that the request was not
made to support any one particular position, but "to
allow the Vermont public a chance to weigh in on this
issite on an individual basis
Several towns already have put the issue on their
ballots. Among the larger communities seeking voters'
views are Hartford and Rutland City. Rockingham was
the first town to decide on a ballot measure.
Now, it appears that Brattleboro may follow suit.
Town officials scheduled a discussion at a select board
meeting after receiving the letter from Freed and
Bloomer.
The board will vote on Tuesday whether to include
the matter on the 2000 town meeting warning, which
would include a town-wide secret ballot vote.
Robert Fagelson, chairman of the Brattleboro Se-
lect Board, said Sunday that he fully supported putting
the item on the ballot and he predicted Brattleboro
"would be one of the few towns" in the state to en-
dorse the controversial issue.
"I don't have a problem with it at all said Fagelson,
who said he would have a problem adding a third ques-
tion for Brattleboro voters-whether voters supported a
constitutional amendment defining marriage as a
union between a man and a woman.
"I don't like constitutional amendments.in the first
place said Fagelson. "And 1 would be opposed to it
Fagelson noted that when the town endorsed do-
mestic partnerships for its town employees, giving ben-
efits coverage to a town employee's same-sex partner
he didn't hear a word against it.
'�!
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j Terra Steinl
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Feb. 10, 2000
itmedia.ecu.edu
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Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
oasicarolinian
Holly G.Harris, Editor
I Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
j Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
'� Daniel E. Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FJ252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing the regular academic year. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited for decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian
Student Publications Building, Greenville. NC 27858-4353
For additional information, call 252-328-6366.
i The Web site is dedicated to the
Wiccan religion. The controversial
images depicted a religious ceremony.
j This presents a constitutional quandry
; ! for the school board. Is the Web site
0URVIEW
The East Carolinian 5
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
�I protected by the First Amendment?
!
;Should her private life be private? Is the

Web site so threatening?
.i'
I!
The case of Sherri Eicher and her dismissal from her job as an 11th-
grade English teacher raises many questions. The Scotland County High
School teacher who was dismissed for the content of a Wiccan Web site
she ran caused many to ask "Should teachers be held to a higher stan-
dard than everyone else and should what a teacher does out of class
affect her employment?" Many people would say yes.
Obviously, nobody wants a teacher breaking laws or setting a bad
example for children. However, it is when you get closer to the center of
the moral spectrum that the answers to those questions become less
clear. If certain aspects of Eicher's case had been different, a quick and
clean answer to the problem could be had.
If Eicher had taught second grade, there would probably be more
support for her firing. Likewise, if she had been a college professor, would
her decisions outside of the classroom garner as much attention? Prob-
ably not. But this case does raise the issue of equality-how can we set
concrete standards if no one can agree about what the proper definition
of decency should be. And, should anyone be trying to answer that ques-
tion on a public level in the first place?
A teacher does work with the youth of the community and they do
shape the views of their students. However, at what point does the in-
class life end and the out-ofrclass life begin?
Another thing that makes the Eicher case so sticky is the exact con-
tent and purpose of the site. The Web site is dedicated to the Wiccan
religion. The controversial images depicted a religious ceremony. This
presents a constitutional quandary for the school board. Is the Web site
protected by the First Amendment? Should her private life be private? Is
the Web site so threatening?
The Eicher case proves that a-situation that at first seems open and
shut can have other aspects that can cloud a decision.
ECU ?mtix Tfmm�tSSu.
OPINION COLUMN
Those drugs are killing you, stupid!
Patrick McMahon
OPINION COLUMNIST
(OPINION COLUMN
0
I
Vote LaradoBastard for 2000 President
Mark Larado
POLITICAL COLUMNIST

,� Quite frankly, this year's election could just be the
ipjdst boring ever. Watching the campaigns is a lot like
�tching the amateurs play at the AT&T Pebble Beach
If Pro Am. You don't know the names of the old
jateurs playing, but a lot of people clap for them, so
tpey must be famous.
!To spice up this year's presidential race, we need to
ajiolish the law that snuffs out the young idealists from
the presidential race, like NSYNC. That rule is in Ar-
tfcle Six of the Constitution-and firmly states that the
president must be a minimum of 35 years of age. It
ajfeb states, "No shoes, No shirt, No elected president"
(jofrry candidates from West Virginia).
So, I'm pushing for a petition that will overturn
ttils oppressive law, and while I'm doing that I might
asjivell throw my hat into the topless mud wrestling
rif g for the presidency, too.
Here's how an interview between a distinguished
journalist (Katie Couric, for example) and me might
gi-
1 Question: Why should we vote for you for presi-
dent?
Answer: As president, I will return the "wholesome-
nass" and "dignity" to the presidency that was absurdly,
m&rred in the last term. I will focus my campaign on
education and health care reform, while battling the
evils of censorship.
' Q: Really?
� A: Of course not, unless you find legalizing prosti-
tution "wholesome
I Q: Who will be your running mate?
I A: You may know my running mate from the en-
tertainment industry. He is widely known and could
b� considered a household name. My running mate
fof vice president is Ol' Dirty Bastard. Some of you may
aljo know him as Big Baby Jesus or Rikers Island in-
nate 45876.
Q: How could Ol' Dirty' Bastard be qualified for a
position of high office.
J A: I thought you might ask that question. I assure
ycju he is very qualified because he can drink just about
enough and has had as many run-ins with the law as
any Kennedy has had.
IQ: What is your view on gun control?
A: Although my running mate is pro-uzi, I feel I
cannot express my views about gun control freely be-
cause we have marines and a clock tower here at ECU.
� Q: I've noticed that the Republican and Democratic
primaries have already started, so this means that you
will have to run as a third party. What party will that
be? The Reform party perhaps?
A: The Reform party is already filled. The likes of
Buchanan and Trump are fiercely battling it out now
for one percent of the American vote come Nov. 2. So
with this knowledge, Ol' Dirty Bastard (ODB) and I held
a crusade to find the right political party that will back
us up, with a little help from Politics.com.
From our research, we've found that there are oodles
of political parties out there. Many have a unique plat-
form that sets themselves apart from the typical "meat
and potatoes" parties, like Republicans.
For instance, we found the Pansexual People Party
(PPP). Their credo is "The primary purpose of the PPP
is to promote positive political progress and partner-
ship through prurient propaganda. Their platform in-
cludes budget reform, anti-censorship and most impor-
tantly, the PPP is pro-transvestitism. Along with their
views on gun control and war reform, you can also find
a guide to the multiple male orgasm on theii Web site.
I wonder what Steve Forbes' view on the multiple male
orgasm is? He always looks a little tense.
Of course we came upon numerous marijuana re-
form parties like the Pot Party. I find this party interest-
ing because they have two candidates already running
for nomination. I'm voting for Nathaniel Brown be-
cause not only does he agree with my views on gun
control, but he received "High Times Bong-of-the-
Month award in 1994.
ODB and I didn't look at some political parties' Web
sites because of their oxymoronic titles�like the Free-
dom Socialist Party or the Democratic Socialist Party.
How could you be free or democratic, if you have to
wait in a line for your state-rationed bread every week?
Also there is the Utopian Anarchist Party. If you vote
for an anarchy, wouldn't that still be considered a de-
mocracy?
ODB and I came to the conclusion that the major-
ity of the parties have already given out nominations
for the presidency. In order for a successful LaradoBas-
tard 2000 run for the White House, we had to resurrect
an inactive party that we both agreed on: the Free Pony
and Ice Cream Party. In '96, their candidate for presi-
dent was a parakeet named Bob. They have scientific
research that backs their claim that millions of Ameri-
cans love ponies and ice cream. If ODB and I joined
this party we would be shoo-ins if we stick to party
promises.
So vote for LaradoBastard and every family can re-
ceive a free pony (weight and color at our discretion)
and free ice cream on every third Friday (ice milk and
fat free also available).
This writer con be contacted at
mlarado@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Over this past weekend, I viewed some little im-
ages that have left an indelible mark upon my im-
pressionable little brain. After a long, hard night down-
town having a good time with my sister and some of
her friends, I waited patiently in front of Cubbies for
my ride to come and pick up me and my friends.
It just so happened that this very night was the.
holy grail of Rave parties at the Sports Pad. Literally
hundreds upon hundreds of people lined the streets
for nearly a block and a half so they could take part in
what I'm sure must have been a helluva party. But
what struck me so profoundly was the manner in
which these people had prepared themselves for the
event. I saw a cross-section of ravers, from the regular
guy in cargo pants and American Eagle shirt to the
girl with see-through glass platform shoes and pink
hair with so many piercing that it would take her hours
to get through an airport metal detector.
The scene disturbed me. Make no bones about it, I
like raves. The lights and beating music can put you
in some sort of trance that is truly a treasure in its
own right, but I draw the line when I see people smear-
ing Vicks' Vapo-Rub on the inside of surgeon's masks
so they can inhale the fumes to get a rush. What does
Homer Simpson say when he does something stuoid7
DOH! v
The same people doing this are already rolling (for
you professors and parents out there, this means tak-
ing ecstasy.) Now, I don't claim to be the smartest guy
in the world but mixing huffing and X can't be the
most beneficial thing you can do to your body. That
brings me to the whole drug thing. WHY? WHY7
WHY?
I was always raised to believe that the body is a
temple that God gave us to preserve and experience.
Maybe I'm not perfect in taking care of my body, but
drugs just seem stupid. Most people out there have
done some herb and that plant is one thing, but co-
caine? Special K? What are you thinking? These drugs
are slowly killing you from the inside where you cannot
see it.
How does the old saying go? What you can't see can't
hurt you? DOH! Maybe this isn't comparable but right
now, my hearing is slowly deteriorating. A decade of
abuse by ear infections and obscenely loud music have
made them about 65 percent scar tissue and the fluid
build up is nothing short of amazing. I'm just two de-
cades old but if the hearing doesn't get better, I'm look-
ing towards a life of making Miracle Ear my Jesus Christ.
All those drugs are doing the same thing to your
bodies. They slowly eat away at you until one day you
realize you can't hear certain tones and that cd you love
so much doesn't quite sound the same. No wait, that's
me. Drugs still suck though. Why take a drug when you
can do the same thing naturally.
I don't know about you but when some urban, jungle
or techno comes on, it just lifts me away into a pulsat-
ing world full of bumblebees and candy canes. I can
probably imitate any drug in existence by just training
my mind to do it naturally. Try it some time. Instead of
rolling, just keep dancing. While dancing, tilt your head
back and close your eyes. Let your whole body become
one with the sounds. You'll find that after just a few
seconds, you'll be able to predict the changes in the
music and go with the flow, entirely without drugs.
You may not believe it, but I would give my own life
to ensure that all of you lived to be a hundred so you
could experience the joys of life without having to spend
money on rehab and methadone. I care about each and
every one of you and it pains me to no end to see you
killing yourselves like this.
Drugs ain't cool folks. I'm not trying to be an over-
protecting dad or nothing but just turn it down next
time. The more you don't do it, the easier it is to live
without it.
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahon@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION COLUMN
University faculty, staff should get dibs on parking I
Chris Sachs
OPINION COLUMNIST
I try to stay away from articles about parking be-
cause the situation is old news, it sucks, and it is not
likely to change. Students are willing to yell about
parking to anyone who will listen�and I try to never
listen. But as of recently, professors have been express-
ing their opinions about parking and all the hassles
they have to endure. We students are not the only
ones getting hosed.
I refuse to buy a parking sticker. I know spaces are
rare and I don't want to stress myself out driving 45
minutes to find a spot. I park far away and I walk. I
used to park at Darryl's but the situation there has
gotten out of control. Students have found ways to
pack cars in there in such a way that they defy funda-
mental laws of physics and geometry. So I gave up. I
walk long distances and I don't mind anymore. It al-
lows me slow down and gives me time to think. But
that's me. Now with all the construction and deci-
sion-making going on about parking, professors are
being forced to walk long distances as well.
Now the thought of some of my professors having
to park in Kinston and trudging it to work is a fun
fantasy to have, but in reality it's unfair. How would
you like to get hired to' work when you graduate and
be told you have to park a 15 minute walk away to get
to work? You would hate it and you would complain.
And that is what ECU professors have done. But the
complaints have fallen upon deaf ears. That is because
they were yelling at the decision maker's cars while
they drove by them in the street on the way to their
cushy parking spaces.
Camus had it all wrong about the myth of
Sisyphus. The benighted king of Corinth endlessly
rolling that rock up a hill in Hell is not symbolic of
life, just parking at ECU. Surely there is some answer
that we can all agree to.
Now I know students will hate me on this matter,
but hey, that's why it's an opinion column. I think
the students should have to park far away, walk or
take the shuttles to classes, not professors. Now be-
fore you all burn me in effigy and call my mother
vulgar names hear me out.
As of today they're about 1,600 parking spaces On
campus. There about 1,100 faculty and about 500 staff
employed here. There are just enough parking spaces
for each and every person that works for ECU. I think
the professors should have full and complete access to
all those spots. It's the professors and staff that have to
be here all day for their jobs. Students get to go home
for lunch, take off and do some errands for a few hours,
or maybe have only one or two classes, whatever. But
professors and staff hold longer hours that they must be.
here, many have to stay late and many have to come in
at night to do work.
But the upper administration wants the professors-
to take a proposed shuttle service for off campus park- j
ing. Parking and Transportation Services (PTS), in their j
infinite stupidity, have worked with the upper adminis-
tration and hired Chance Management, a consultation
firm, to study the parking problem.
What a waste of money. We have a campus filled
with brilliant teachers and researchers who can easily
solve this problem with a little brain storming for free,
yet we now have to pay for some biased firm to come
and tell us what they already decided: A parking shuttle
is what the school needs. This idea falls somewhere in
between worth-little and worthless. It is a logistical night-
mare and it will never work.
PTS has answered professors concerns about late
nights when the shuttle services stop. They say that they
will be able to call and be picked up. They have given
an option of three numbers professors can call for rides,
the last one being the police. The police! Yeah, call the
police to get a chauffeur-driven ride to your parked car
two miles away. That makes sense. Some girl is getting
gang raped by Klan biker members and Mango the cop "
is away driving some nervous professor back to their
Honda.
Now I know not all professors work late (some barely
work at all), but if this school is to really grow and be
taken seriously, then they darn well should �This
column will continue in next week's TEC�
I This writer can be contacted at
csachs@studentmedia. ecu.edu.





I The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Feb 10,2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Jazz's swingin' beat, intense rhythms enchant Greenville
Interest growing in
America's own music
Time for the old lame
pick up lines its
almost Valentine's Day,
you know!
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
As the sounds of "Spain" float
out of the Fletcher Music Building
one Friday afternoon, Carroll
Dashiell, director of jazz studies, re-
hearses with the ECU jazz band.
Many Greenville residents have
begun listening to jazz, and the
popularity of the music shows in
An alto saxophone is often featured in
jazz band, (photo from the World Wide
Web)
the number of business that now
feature jazz as well as the increased
profit margin for those that do.
In the past year, The Jewish
Mother has started featuring jazz
musicians. Staccato's and Mesh Cafe
also feature jazz groups on a regular
basis. The residents of Greenville
have been exposed to more jazz
than ever now because of these non-
ECU affiliated businesses opening
their doors to the music. Staccato's
business improves when the bands
come.
"Our business does seem to in-
crease a little when we have the jazz
bands come said Eva McKeel, as-
sistant manager at Staccato's. "We
have had Paul's Tardiss, Adrian
Duke, We Three and Joe Distesano
perform and on an average night
they come we will probably have a
hundred people, which is every
table being full
Mitch Butler, a graduate student
of jazz studies, wants to play pro-
fessionally before teaching jazz. But-
ler said the jazz studies staff has had
a lot to do with the increase of in-
terest in jazz music.
"Mr. D. and faculty do a lot of
playing around town and they re-
ally work with the kids Butler said.
Dashiell says that the growing
BS3S
Uptown
Greenvii
t 209
25th Ar
Trumpets utilize a wide variety of
pitches in play, (photo from the World
Wide Web)
interest in jazz comes from students
exploring their musical tastes.
"We have more interested stu-
See JAZZ, page 8
1. Excuse me, but I just
lost my phone number. Could
I have yours?
2. Hey,
sweetie, do
you have
some (enter
nationality here, ie�Cuban)
iri you? Would you like some?
Celebrate day of lew in ncntraditicnal Marc

3. Are you
tired? You
should be, be-
cause you've
been running
through my
mind all day.
4. Do you
have a quarter?
I told my mom i
would call home
when I met the
womanman of
my dreams.
jj 5. Somebody better give
heaven a call be cause an an-
gel has gotten loose and is
standing be-
fore me.
j 6. Girl
Boy, milk is
certainly do-
ing your
body good.
. 7. Girl
Boy, I love
your (article of clothing)
it'll look so much better at the
end of my bed.
' 8. If I flip a coin, what are
my chances of getting head?
! 9. If I could rearrange the
alphabet, I would put "U" and
"i: together.
10. If I followed you home,
;would you keep me?
Valentine's Day began
as fertility festival
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
In 469 AD, Valentine's Day
was set to commemorate the
death of St. Valentine, the pa-
tron saint of lovers and epi-
lepsy. Now, people celebrate the
holiday in a variety of ways.
In Greenville, there are ac-
tivities for
both
singles �
who aren't
sitting
home and
eating Ben
& Jerry's�
and couples.
St. Valen-
tine died in
269 AD for
protecting
Christian
martyrs after
torture. He
died at the
hands of Em-
p e r o r
Claudius II on
Feb. 14. Origi-
nally, St. Val-
entine was
age to the wolf deity Lycaeus. She
was the mother of Romulus and
Remus, the founders of Rome.
This day was a fertility festival,
and the Catholic Church added
the pagan tradition into the ob-
servance of St. Valentine's Day.
Thus, St. Valentine became the
patron saint of lovers as well.
Since Valentine's Day wa's
incoprporated into the calea-
dar, people have used it as
a time to celebrate those
who they love, espe-
cially their signifi-
cant other.
Jennifer Williams sophomore, takes
her best shot at the pins, (photo by
Emily Richardson)
only the patron saint of epilepsy,
but the Catholic Church incor-
porated Roman traditions into
hfs memorial day.
On Feb. 15, the Romans cel-
ebrated Lupercalia, a day of hom-
Tra
ditiona
a person
spends the
evening with
loved ones on
Valentine's Day.
L o n e s t a r
Steakhouse, a'
popular restau-
rant in Greenville,
has double the
business on
this night
than a typi-
cal evening.
"On average, Monday sales are
about $5,000 said Jimi Woodruff,
Lonestar manager. "On Valentine's
Day, we expect sales to be about
"On holidays, business tends
to pick up said Bruce DePlanche,
assistant manager at AMF East
Carolina Lanes. "There will be
the standard Monday
night special on
Valentine's Day.
There is a fun atmo-
sphere here. You can
come and sit down
without worrying
that you may be sit-
ting next to an unde-
sirable
Bowling is both a
group and couple ac-
tivity and it offers some
competition as well as a
game to play.
"A bit of friendly rivalry
adds a little spice to life
DePlanche said.
If you don't want to be
alone on Valentine's Day, and
there is no special somebody in
your life, go out with a friend
like ECU alumnus Chris Shook
is planning to do.
"I am going to Barnes &
Noble on Valentine's Day with
a good friend Shook said.
"Nobody wants to sit home
alone on Valentine's Day
Whether you choose to cel-
ebrate the fertility festival in a
traditional manner or you go
bowling for a good time, there
are many options for Monday
night.
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Ifii
There are alter-
natives to the traditional dinner
date, however. At AMF East Caro-
lina Lanes, there is a Monday
$11,000. The wait will only be 30 ight special and a relaxed atmo-
minutes to one hour, however sphere that can draw a crowd.
Erin Martin, junior,
browse Barnes &
Noble while others
drink beverages and
converse with friends,
regardless of the day.
(photo be Garrett
McMillian)
Fiery recipes heat up cold February night!
ii.
Hey
baby,
�what's
your
sign?
. 12. Where have I been all
of your life?
, 13. Hey, how did you do
toSat?! (they say Vhat?") Look
so good!
14. You
look so good, I
could put you
on a plate and
sop you up
with a biscuit.
15. Baby you must be a
broom, be-
cause you
j(ist swept me
Off my feet.
CHILLED RED PEPPER-
TOMATO SOUP
2 large red bell peppers
6 5 12-ounce cans tomato
juice
1 garlic clove
2 green onions, minced
14 cup minced fresh basil
Plain nonfat yogurt
Preheat broiler. Holding bell
pepper at stem, cut into 3 flat
pieces. Discard stem end, core and
seeds. Repeat with remaining pep-
per. Place pieces skin side up on
broiler-proof pan. Broil bell pep-
pers until skin is charred and black-
ened, about 8 minutes. Transfer
bell peppers to plastic bag. Twist
bag to seal and let stand until pep-
pers are cool. (Can be prepared 1
day ahead; chill.)
Peel peppers and cut into
thirds. Combine with tomato juice
and garlic in blender. Puree until
smooth. Stir in green onions and
basil. Season generously with pep-
per. Refrigerate overnight.
Garnish with yogurt and serve.
Serves six.
TOMATO SALAD WITH RED
ONION AND HERBS
Can be prepared in 45 minutes
or less.
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 tablespoon Sherry vinegar
(available at specialty foods shops
and some supermarkets)
1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard
1 garlic clove, minced
12 teaspoon sugar
14 cup olive oil (preferably
extra-virgin)
2 12 pounds (about 6 me-
dium) tomatoes, cored and cut
into 12-inch-thick slices
1 2 cup thinly sliced red onion,
separated into rings
2 shallots, sliced thin
13 cup minced mixed fresh
herbs such as basil, parsley, tarra-
MENU
Chilled red pepper-tomato soup-
Tomato salad with red ohxcks and herbs
Boneless chicken brents with red chili sauce,
gingered red cabbage- with- carrots
Red potatoes with wilted qreens
Blood orange, grapefruit &. pomegranate
compote J
Cranberry and raspberry star cookies
��
gon, andor mint plus a herb
sprig for garnish
In a small bowl, whisk
together lemon juice, vin-
egar, mustard, garlic, sugar
and salt and pepper to taste,
add the oil in a stream,
whisking, and whisk the
dressing until it is emulsi-
fied. Arrange the tomato
slices on a deep platter, scat-
ter the onion and the shal-
lots over them, and pour the
dressing over the saladChill
the saiad for 20 minutes,
sprinkle it with the minced
herbs, and garnish it with
the herb sprig.
� Serves four to six.
BONELESS CHICKEN
BREASTS WITH RED
CHILI SAUCE
For red chili sauce:
4 dried New Mexico red
chilies, stemmed and
J
seeded (wear rubber
gloves)
1 small onion (about
14 pound), halved
3 large garlic cloves
2 tablespoons raisins
1 12 teaspoons salt
For chicken:
2 tablespoons nonfat
plain yogurt
2 large garlic cloves,
minced and mashed to a
paste with 12 teaspoon
salt
12 teaspoon ground
cumin
four 5-ounce skinless
boneless chicken breast
halves
1 teaspoon vegetable
oil
1 tablespoon coarsely
grated Munster available
at some specialty foods
shops
Preheat oven to 400�F.
Make red chili sauce:
In a saucepan simmer chilies,
onion and garlic in water to cover
20 minutes and with a slotted
spoon transfer to a blender. Add 1
2 cup cooking liquid, raisins and
salt and blend until smooth. Sauce
may be made one week ahead and
chilled, covered.
Make chicken:
While chilies are simmering, in
a bowl stir together yogurt, garlic
paste, cumin and salt to taste. Add
chicken and coat with marinade.
Marinate chicken, covered and
chilled, at least 15 minutes up to
one day.
In a 10-inch non-stick skillet,
heat oil oyer moderately high heat
until hot but not smoking. Add
chicken with marinade clinging to
it, skinned sides down, and saute
one minute on each side, or until
golden-brown patches appear.
Add chili sauce to skillet and
bring to a simmer, uncovered,
scraping up any brown bits. Trans-
fer chicken mixture to a shallow
baking pan just large enough to
hold chicken and bake, covered, 15
minutes. Remove cover and
sprinkle Munster over chicken. Re-
move pan from oven and let stand
one minute to melt cheese.
Serves four.
GINGERED RED CABBAGE
AND CARROTS
Can be prepared in 45 minutes
or less.
14 pound carrots (about 2 me-
dium)
12 pound red cabbage
2 teaspoons unsalted butter
12 teaspoon minced peeled
fresh ginger root
1 teaspoon soy sauce
12 teaspoon sugar
See RECIPES, page 7
HM
initiillii
Dear Marjorie,
Do you have any suggestions for pager eti-
quette? If I page someone repetitively, and then
they page me back, but I get their page and don't
have anyone to call but their pager, what do I do?
I hate playing pager tag but sometimes it seems as
if there is no other way to get in touch with people.
�Perturbed about Pagers
Dear Perturbed,
There are documented sources for telephone
etiquette, dining etiquette and classroom etiquette,
but there are none that address pager etiquette. I
understand your frustration with playing pager
tag. Personally, I would go by the same rules that
one adheres to for telephones. If you have already
called them once, don't call again unless they call
you. True, the tedium of pager tag could go on
forever, but at least you will be playing by the rules.
Always try to get an actual phone number that
connects to an answering machine. That might
end the silly game of pager tag sooner.
Dear Marjorie,
I have been dating my boyfriend for about a
year. The other day, however, I was walking across
campus and 1 saw this guy who just exuded this
incredible sexual energy. I had to have him. He
looked at me, and we ran Into the library and had
sex on the copier machines. Did I do something
evil and wrong, or is that just a part of human
sexuality?
�Puzzled and Passionate
Dear Puzzled,
Depending on your age and your boyfriend's
age, one of you may be nearer to your sexual peak
and this may be causing a rift In your relation-
ship. A man peaks at approximately 19 years of
age and a woman peaks in her early 30s, so age
plays a role in sexual compatibility. What matters
more than the wild fling with this random man Is
the fact that you were emotionally and physically
unfaithful to your steady boyfriend. There are
women who would give their right arm for a good
and loving man (I know quite a few), and you
threw that all away for five minutes of passion I
sincerely hope that it was worth it, because you �
may have lost one of the best things you had be-
cause of your infidelity.
Marjorie can be contacted at
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
n
J Friday, Feb.
: mm
Hun
not El
ma nee i
Candle:
Creme.

Naug
Not Rat
fun, Adi
candles,
with you






want to be
ne's Day, and
somebody in
with a friend
s Chris Shook
to Barnes &
ne's Day with
Shook said.
to sit home
re's Day
choose to cel-
y festival in a
er or you go
d time, there
i for Monday
e contacted at
dia.ecu.edu.
pager eti-
and then
and don't
at do I do?
it seems as
ith people.
telephone
etiquette,
tiquette. I
ing pager
rules that
'e already
i they call
ild go on
the rules,
nber that
at might
� about a
rig across
�ded this
him. He
and had
mething
human
rfriend's
ual peak
elation-
years of
so age
matters
i man Is
ysically
lere are
a good
nd you
ssion. I
iseyou �
fiad be-
at
WINTER
CLEARANCE
In progress
onnection
WWWVWWHV
Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
RECIPES
from page 6
WWW
ft


Valentine
From Baskets �








���������
Hunk q Hunk of Burning Love
not Elvis, but candles A Basket fulrof ro-
mance complete with Yankee Fragranced
Candles, Chocolate Body Paint & Whipped
Creme. Perfect to show your burning desire.
$35
Queen of Hearts
Adorn your Queen with a heart for her neck.
Ladies sterling silver omega or wire choker with
floating heart pendant and matching earrings.
$65
Sweets for my Sweet
Chocolate lovers heaven in a basket. Full of
Goodies for your sweetie.
$25
Naughty but Nice
Not Rated "X" but yummy for an evening of
fun, Adult fingerpaints, Whipped creme,
candles, massage oil and more. Get passionate
with your valentine.
$35
Chocolate Body Paint $9so
Arlington Village
Greenville
321-8182
Mon � Sat 10 � 6
Separately cut carrots and cab-
bage into julienne strips. In a sauce-
pan of boiling salted water, cook car-
rots two minutes or until just crisp-
tender, and transfer with a slotted
spoon to a bowl. Cook cabbage in
boiling water one minute, or until
just tender, and drain in a sieve.
In a skillet melt butter over mod-
erately high heat until foam sub-
sides and saute in ginger root, stir-
ring, 30 seconds. Add carrots, cab-
bage, soy sauce and sugar and saute,
stirring, two minutes.
Serves two.
BLOOD ORANGE, GRAPE-
FRUIT,
AND POMEGRANATE COM-
POTE
1 12 cups dry white wine
14 cup dry Sherry
14 cup honey
12 cup firmly packed light
brown sugar
6 pink grapefruits
3 blood oranges or 1 12 navel
oranges
1 pomegranate
CRANBERRY AND RASP-
BERRY STAR COOKIES
Cookies
34 cup (1 12 sticks) unsalted
butter, room temperature
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
14 teaspoon grated lemon peel
1 cup sugar
1 large egg
1 egg yolk
2 14 cups all purpose flour
14 cup comstarch
14 teaspoon (generous) ground
cloves
Filling
1 cup fresh cranberries
14 cup sugar
34 cup raspberry preserves
Powdered sugar
In a saucepan bring white wine,
Sherry, honey and sugar to a boil,
stirring until sugar is dissolved.
Transfer syrup to a heat-proof bowl
and chill until cold.
Cut peel and pith from grape-
fruits and oranges and cut fruit into
sections. Halve pomegranate and
squeeze gently to yield seeds with
juice. Divide citrus sections, pome-
granate seeds and juice and wine
syrup among six dessert bowls and
chill, covered, at least 15 minutes,
up to one hour. Stir compote before
serving.
Serves six.
For Cookies:
Using electric mixer, cream but-
ter, vanilla and lemon in bowl until
light. Gradually add sugar and beat
until blended. Beat in egg and yolk.
Combine flour, cornstarch and
cloves. Beat half of dry ingredients
into butter mixture. Stir in remain-
ing dry ingredients. Gather dough
into ball (dough will be soft). Divide
dough into four pieces; flatten each
into disk. Wrap each in plastic and
chill one hour.
Preheat oven to 350. Butter
heavy large non-stick cookie sheets.
Roll one dough piece out (keep re-
mainder refrigerated) on floured
surface to thickness of 18 inch. Cut
out star-shaped cookies using
floured 3-inch star cutter. Transfer
to prepared cookie sheets, spacing
12 inch apart. Repeat rolling and
cutting with second dough piece.
Gather scraps and reroll, chilling
dough briefly if soft. Cut out more
3-inch star cookies. Transfer to pre-
pared cookie sheets. Chill cookies
10 minutes. Bake until edges are
goldenabout 10 minutes. Cool on
rack.
Roll third dough piece out on
lightly floured surface to thickness
of 18 inch. Cut out star-shaped
cookies using floured 3-inch star
cutter. Cut smaller star out of cen-
ter of each 3-inch star using 1 34-
to 2-inch star cutter. Transfer star
outlines to prepared cookie sheets
using floured metal spatula as aid.
Repeat rolling and cutting star out-
lines with fourth dough piece.
Gather scraps and star centers and
reroll, chilling dough briefly if soft.
Cut out 3-inch stars. Cut smaller
stars out of each 3-inch star. Trans-
fer star outlines and centers to pre-
pared cookie sheets. Chill cookies
10 minutes. Bake until edges are
golden brown, about nine min-
utes. Transfer cookies to rack and
cool.
For Filling:
Finely chop cranberries and
sugar in processor. Transfer mix-
ture to heavy medium saucepan.
Mix in preserves. Cook over me-
dium-high heat until mixture "is
reduced to scant one cup, stirring
occasionally, about eight minutes.
Pour into bowl and cool.
Using metal icing spatula
spread one teaspoon jam filling in
center of each 3-inch cookie,
spreading slightly toward points of
star. Lightly sift powdered sugar
over star outlines. Place star out-
lines sugar side up over jam-
topped cookies. (Can be prepared
ahead. Place in single layers in air-
tight containers. Refrigerate up to
four days or freeze up to two
weeks. Let stand 10 minutes a(
room temperature before serving.)
Makes about 36 sandwich
cookies.
LOVE
YOU
TODD.
LOVE.
COPPER
ALEffllNE'S DAY!
�v
You drank.
You danced.
You had se)
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
Valentine's Dy special!
�JET �' J �
j wy any dozen, get �
j second dozen glazed i
! doughnuts FR�fi
300 E. 10th St.
Offer good with coupon, Saturday - Monday Feb. 12-14 -
? keswick
Facilities
APARTMENTS
Amenities
� Clubhouse with swimming pool
� Lighted tennis court
� Sana Volleyball court
' Children's playgrouna
� Fully-equipped Fitness Center
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Greenville, NC 27834
Telephone: 252-355-2198
Fax: 252-355-4973
www.rent.netdirectke8wick
� Stepsaving kitchens with
frost free refrigerator,
continous clean range,
dish washer, disposal
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� Private balcony or patio,
with outdoor storage
� Energy saving heat pump
� Wood-burning fireplace
with mantel
� Carpeting, miniblinds and
vertical blinds
� Ceiling fans
� Walk-in closets
� On site laundry facilities
� 21 hour emergency
maintenance
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� ADA Compliant
Apartments available
� Pets welcome
www.geeksnet.com
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ask about our
"Student Special"
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From the people
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COMPUTER
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William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" �� February IO-15, 2000
MeGinnia Theatre � East Carolina University � Greenville, North Carolina
35g-3a8-6829 f(�
TIC
K'E
TS, General Public 9-J8
ECU Faculty'St.If and Senior! $S-$7
StudentYouth $6-Jj
February 10, II, II, 14. and 15 performance! begin at o0l p.m.
Sunday, February 13, matinee performance begin! 9tOb'p.m.
ELTORO
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men's hair
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2800 E. 10th St
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MonFri. 9-�S
752W1H





8 The East Carolinian
WWW (Ju
FEATURES
Thursday, Feb 10, 2000
JAZZ
from page 6
dents checking out different styles and periods of jazz
music Dashiell said. "We've been able to educate the
students and the public and now it's showing
Dashiell and the music department have brought
in a number of famous musicians that have played for
and spoken to the jazz band. According to jazz stu-
dents, during rehearsals Dashiell is very relaxed and
comical. He keeps students interested and encourages
them to have fun with the music. �
"Everybody's part is really insignificant unless it all
goes together Dashiell said, talking to his students
during rehearsal. Dashiell has encouraged not only a
large number of students to get interested in jazz and a
few non-students play asplay as well.
Jay Wright is a piano player with the jazz band who
was first exposed to jazz music when he was in the
drum and bugle core in college 10 years ago.
"Musical taste is becoming much more diverse as
we continue to get a much more diverse audience
Wright said.
Kahamele Youssef is a senior at ECU who is major-
ing in jazz performance and communication. She is
also one of the alternating vocalists for the jazz band.
"The jazz program here is definitely helping to in-
crease the interest in jazz music Youssef said. "I think
it's great. Jazz is a lot harder than regular music, but it
has given me more of a desire to carry on with jazz. It's
America's music
This writer can be reached at
jbrown@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
www.harristeeter.com
OPEN
24
HRS.
Arizona balloonist to try circling world alone
SCOrrSDALE, Ariz. (AP)�Balloonist Kevin Uliassi
knows a Swiss team was the first to circle the world in
a balloon. He wants to be the first to do it alone.
Uliassi was sidelined a year ago by bad weather and
international politics when Bertrand Piccard and Brian
Jones succeeded in 19 days. He also was foiled in 1997
and 1998.
Now recharged and supported by enough sponsors,
Uliassi is ready to try floating into history again�this
time, solo.
Typically, around-the-world balloon attempts are
made by teams of triree.
"To me, the appeal is I don't have to worry about
the other person Uliassi said. "It makes everything
so much simpler. For other people they identify with
that, especially when it's an ordinary person.
"But you can't really say why it's important. Some
people think it's just plain silly. People don't see b'al-
loons as rational things like airplanes.
"if I can do this, it may have some meaning to
people who are interested in the sport he added.
Uliassi, 36, was planning to take off as early as the
wee hours of Sunday depending on the weather. But
on Saturday, according to his website, the launch was
called off for the time being because of unfavorable
weather patterns.
In a 160-foot balloon named J. Renee, for his wife,
he would lift off on his 20,000-mile journey from a
stone quarry near Rockford, III in a town called Loves
Park. He'll rise to about 30,000 feet for what he expects
to be a journey of 18 to 20 days.
The J. Renee will be on autopilot when Uliassi sleeps,
and he'll be in contact with medical advisers should
he get sick at such high altitudes.
"You have to force yourself to drink water he said.
"It's not a natural craving when you're at altitude
I�H
110 billion cows are alive in the world
In a day
60-200
100
pounds of milk are produc
pounds of manure are produced by one cow.
wtl pounds of food are consumed by one cow.
I vBOlf gallons of water are drunk by a cow.
12pk. cans
Diet Coke or
Coca-Cola
With
VIC Card
12 Gallon
Hunter
All Natural
or
Homemade
Ice Cream
M B M A I
Premium Quality,
Velvety Textured,
Long Stem
Roses
With
VIC Card
1 Dozen
with greenery
With VIC Card S baby's breath
Mark A. Ward
T T O R N
� DVVI, Traffic, cind Felony Defense
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
Criminal Law
� 24 hour message service
www.GreenvmeNCLawyer.com
13-1702.
Marie
Callender's
Entrees
With
VIC Card
AMERICAN
tCANCER
f SOCIETY
lOQJ pURI
FLORIDA
29.2-30 oz.
Tombstone
Oven
Rising
Pizza
With
VIC Card
128oz.
Harris
Teeter
Orange
Juice
With
VIC Card
16-24oz.
Italian
Village
j Mini
Ravioli
n. NOW HIRING
For more information
co�lTXHomJe �P�entation
and the First-Year Experience.
Applications are now available in 214
Whichard Building!
Dc�Zfr�Tpktedanlications h� been
r changed to February 18, 2000 at 5:00p.m.
17.2-20 oz.
Post
Shredded
Wheat
With
VIC Card
With
VIC Card
mnc
mm
i
25.4 oz.
Head&
Shoulders,
Pantene
Pro-V or
Pert Plus
b Haircare
100oz.
Dry or Liquid
Fab
Laundry
Detergent
With
VIC Card
With
VIC Card I
16oz.
Plax
Dental
Rinses
Prices Effective Through February IS, 20OO
Priew In This Ad EffcetH WWn.tay. February 9. Thiough February IS 2000
In Our Greenville store only. We Reserve Tha Right To Limit Quantiti.
NonaSoldTo Dealers. We OtadlyAccept Federal Food Stamps
Wlih
VIC Card
J





Vjfcliw 9JS?:yJ!r
DPEN
24
HRS.
npane our quality
o floral shops
Quality,
sxtured,
item
es
1 Dozen
with greenery
i baby's breath
128oz.
Harris
reeter
inge
luice
99
With
VIC Card
-24 oz.
talian
iUage
Mini
yioli
00 oz.
Liquid
Fab
dry
lent
49
With
VIC Card
l6oz.
Plax
ital
ses
�9
With
rlC Card
)
Reality Check
Maybe you can get a place off
campus, but consider the reality
of campus living

o -
d
o
Q
O
o
o

P
Ifl
C


O
O
T
-



6

We cook for you. � 6
We clean up after your meals.
We give you priority on your room and
roommate selection.
We provide all the comforts of home, and then some.
What more could you ask for?
Take advantage of an economical campus
living package that's out of this world.
If you currently live on campus and did not receive your Return to
Campus Living Sign-Up packet or, if you live off campus and would
p like to move into the residence halls, stop by the University
Housing office on the ground floor of Jones Residence Hall

to pick up sign-up materials.
s
r
ft
Up
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD





The East Carolinian
wlvw.tec.ecu.edu
r �
SPORTS BRIEFS
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Senior Neil Punt sparks men's basketball
k iiMuaalA' . 1.1 ti lAiai ,ri t t ri : . �
Chiefs'Derrick
Thomas dies at 33
Kansas City Chiefs line-
backer Derrick Thomas died
Tuesday at Jackson Memorial
'Hospital in his hometown of Mi-
' SiVii. The exact cause of death is
unknown. Although Thomas was
' dn medication to prevent clot-
ting, his death is suspected to
be caused by a massive blood
clot.
Derrick was admitted to the
hospital on Jan. 23 after his car
rflipped during a snowstorm on
an interstate in Kansas City,
-�ne of Thomas' two passengers
' died following the accident while
another was treated and re-
leased. Neither Thomas nor the
; passenger who died were wear-
ing their seatbelts.
"He epitomized the heart,
courage and spirit it takes to be
r an outstanding player said
Broncos quarterback John
; Elway, who, as a division rival,
faced Thomas many times.
I "More importantly, Derrick Tho-
� mas, the man, was a philanthro-
pist who gave so much to his
family and his community
v ;
Minnesota native
excels in final season
Matthew Geraghty
STAFF WRITER
In ECU's up and down basket-
ball season one thing has been con-
stant- Neil Punt. The senior forward
has brought his game to the next
level in his final season at ECU.
As Pirate basketball gears up for
the CAA tournament this week with
a three-game road swing against
William & Mary, Richmond and Old
Dominion, senior forward Punt
looks to his experience to lead the
way.
"We are less likely to give up, we
realize that we still have a chance
Punt said when asked to compare
this year's Pirate team to previous
ones.
The consensus among the play-
ers as to the reason for the renewed
devotion is coach Bill Herrion, and
the revamped coaching staff.
"They have worked very well
with all of the players said senior
Garrett Blackwelder.
"I'm enjoying this season much
more than last Punt said. "The
coaching staff allows us new oppor-
tunities
A major plus for the Pirates this
season has been the marked im-
provement of Punt's game. Punt at-
tributes his improvement to off-sea-
son weight training, running and
pick up ball. Punt also praises the
personal coaching that the players
receive in the preseason.
"It helps us develop specific ar-
eas of our own games Punt said.
"Neil is the type of player that
coaches love to have Herrion said.
"I wish I had him returning for three
more years
"He's our go-to guy
Blackwelder said. "He's done a lot
of work to earn that position. He is
definitely an inside presence, and a
proven scorer
Punt is a 6'8" senior from
Chanhassen, Minn. He finished
third all-time in scoring at his high
school, with over 1,300 points.
Throughout his college career, Punt
has seen a somewhat limited play-
ing time, due in part to a broken
foot.
, Off the court Punt has many
hobbies including rollerblading and
watching the X games. He and his
wife, Karen, have their son, Chase,
to keep them busy. Following gradu-
ation Punt would love to work with
the State Patrol investigating insur-
ance fraud.
"I'd rather not put all my eggs
in one basket Punt said after say-
ing how he'd love to play pro.
Neil Punt and the Pirates con-
tinue their road toward the CAA
tournament with their next home
game on Feb. 19 against VCU.
This writer can be contacted at
mgeraghty@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Neil Punt
Senior
Position: Forward
Hometown. Chanhassen,
Minn.
Height: 6'8"
1999-2000 stats: 6.1 rebounds per
game, 10.4 points per game
Career highs: IS points vs. UNC-
Wilmington, 13 rebounds vs.
Old Dominion
� T
; Appeals process too
slow for Barkley
4
4
' Eric Barkley, point guard at
j St. John'sUniversity, has been
; suspended from the next three
j games due to suspicion of pref-
j erential treatment.
JS Barkely allegedly traded his
JjjBfep Cherokee for a Chevy
�Suburban which belonged to a
f3ng-time family friend.
1 Although the NCAA does
'have an appeals process, it is
Jjqfortunately too slow to keep
up" with the college basketball
Schedule.
J "We're disappointed and
Jhink the ruling is unfortunate
jaid Athletics Director Ed
Manetta Jr. "We appealed imme-
diately and that's the process
we're in right now, and that
started Saturday. We have
moved on to the next committee
jn the process and are hoping
for a ruling from it by late Thurs-
lay or Friday morning
: Rose unable to
I
icelebrate with Reds

it.
I Even Pete Rose's extreme
fjublic popularity isn't enough to
qV-pass his 1989 ban from base-
qfell; a ban he incurred himself
qtecause of gambling.
; Rose will not be allowed to
participate in the Reds' 25-year
remembrance of the 1975 World
Series Championship win which
'j; slated for June 3,2000.
"Obviously, this is a very sen-
ftive subject, and a very misun-
derstood one said Commis-
oner Bud Selig. "But as things
istand, there's been no change.
"I did make an exception for
e all-century team because
ns were voting and I didn't do
anything to stop that. But we said
�was a one timfe thing
�rsrsrsss1�
Pirates blank Blue Devils
OPINION COLUMN
Football schedule
offers quality once again
�t F.CU took on Duke Monday af-
ternoon at Harrington Field to
open the 2000 season.
The Pirates beat the Devils 5-0
with ECU pitchers Foye Minton
and Davey Penny combined for a
no-hikw. The Pirates did not allow
a Blue Weevils baserunner until the
fifth inning when Duke's Larry
Broadway reached base on an er-
ror. Minton pitched through the
eighth inning. Penny came into
the ninth to keep the no-hitter
intact.
The no-hitter is Minton's sec-
ond as a Pirate. He no-hit N.C.
State in his first outing last season.
"It's pretty hard to believe that
Minton could come out and work
a no-hitter again for the second
year in a row said Head Baseball
Coach Keith I.eClair.
The Pirates scored four runs in
the first inning. F.CU tacked on an-
other run in the seventh to finish
with five runs.
"Overall this was a good win
for us to start the year with
I.eClair said.
Freshman Davey Penny (above) came
on in the ninth to preserve the Pirates'
no-hitter. Outfielder Erik Bakich (left)
got some instruction from a Pirate
coach prior to Monday's game. ECU'S
Lee Delfino (below) attempted to steal
a base on the Blue Devils, (photos by
Garrett McMillan)
Virginia Tech headlines
ECU'S 2000 opponents
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
So, what are you going to be
doing on Sept. 7? If you're a fan of
Pirate football you'll be in Ficklin
watching F.CU take on Virginia Tech
in ECU's home opener.
ECU'S 2000 football schedule
was released last week and the
Thursday night match up with the
Hokies was the game that garnered
the most attention. The game will
be nationally televised on ESPN and
will feature two of the most inter-
esting teams from last season.
The Hokies went 11-0.en route
to a Sugar Bowl match up with even-
tual National Champion, Florida
State. Tech had an offense that fea-
tured the nation's most exciting
player, Michael Vick. Vick will come
into the 2000 season as a favorite
for the Heisman and the game
against ECU may be one of his first
chances to impress the voters.
ECU's season kicks off with a
date with Duke in Durham. ECU
easily disposed of the Devils when
the two teams met in Greenville in
September of last year.
The Pirates will then return
home to face Virginia Tech on
Thursday night. The game against
the Hokies will also represent the
first of three match ups with teams
from the Big East on the docket. The
Pirates will also tangle with Syracuse
later in the month and West Vir-
ginia in November.
ECU will then face two more
opponents at home, Tulane and
Syracuse, and have a by-week before
heading West to Memphis for a tilt
with the Tigers. The game with
Memphis starts a stretch where ECU
faces five straight conference oppo-
nents.
ECU then returns home for a
contest with Army, before traveling
to Louisville to take on the Cardi-
nals.
ECU then has back-to-back
home games with conference foes,
UAB and Houston. The Houston
game will be the home finale for the
Pirates.
To end the season, ECU will
have a tough road swing that in-
cludes visits to West Virginia and C-
USA champ, Southern Miss on
Thanksgiving weekend. The South-
ern Miss game will be a rematch of
the conference's best game of 1999.
The Pirates will face the best of
C-USA. They will take on the other
two bowl teams from the confer-
ence, Southern Miss and Louisville.
The 2000 schedule will be com-
petitive. While it does not contain
N.C. State or North Carolina, it does
offer the Pirates several chances to
sell out home games aVid showcase
their program.
Of their 11 games, five have a
chance to be nationally televised.
The home games with Virginia Tech
and Syracuse, as well as the match
up with West Virginia will be shown
on ESPN or ESPN2. The games with
conference foes, Louisville and
Southern Miss will be shown on Fox
Sports Net.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
2000 ECU Football Schedule
Sept. 2 (Sat.)
Sept. 7 (Thurs.)
Sept. 16 (Sat.)
Sept. 23 (Sat.)
Oct. 7 (Sat.)
Oct. 14 (Sat.)
Oct. 19 (Thurs.)
Oct. 28 (Sat.)
Nov. 11 (Sat.)
Nov. 18 (Sat.)
Nov. 25 (Sat.)
Duke
Virginia Tech
Tulane
Syracuse
Memphis
Army
Louisville
UAB
Houston
West Virginia
Southern Miss
Durham, N.C.
Greenville
Greenville
Greenville
Memphisjenn.
Greenville
Loulsville.Ky.
Greenville
Greenville
Morgantown, W.Va.
Hattiesburg.Miss.





I n ' 1 '
ast Carolinian
Jentmedia.ecu.edu
ball
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
igam
face two more
ne, Tulane and
a by-week before
emphis for a tilt
Che game with
etch where ECU
inference oppo-
ns home for a
before traveling
e on the Cardi-
back-to-back
onference foes,
The Houston
ne finale for the
ion, KCU will
swing that in-
Virginia and C-
lern Miss on
nd.TheSouth-
e a rematch of
game of 1999.
ace the best of
e on the other
m the confer-
ind Louisville,
e will be corn-
's not contain
irolina, it does
ral chances to
aVid showcase
s, five have a
illy televised.
Virginia Tech
as the match
will be shown
e games with
uisville and
tiown on Fox
contacted at
a. ecu.edu.
ham, N.C.
Sreenville
Greenville
jreenville
�hisjenn.
Jreenville
iisvllIe,Ky.
Jreenville
Jreenville
wn, VV.Va.
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Greenville's Premiere
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SPORTS n
Agassi withdraws from Sybase Open-
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Located in The Plaza Mall, Greenville, 321-4884
SAN JOSE, Calif. (AP)Australian
Open champion Andre Agassi with-
drew from the Sybase Open on Tues-
day because of a lower back strain.
"Everybody here knows it's a
great disappointment for the tour-
nament said Jim Courier, who had
11 service aces in a 6-3, 6-4 victory
over Eric Taino.
"He's the biggest draw in the
game, and he's playing the best ten-
nis of his career Courier said of
Agassi.
Agassi reported cramps while fly-
ing to San Francisco from Zimbabwe,
where he helped the United States
to a 3-2 first-round victory in the
Davis Cup.
He arrived in San Francisco on
Monday and attempted to work out
at the San Francisco Tennis Club on
Tuesday afternoon. After his work-
out, he had severe back pain.
"I talked with Andre directly and
he expressed disappointment
Barry McKay, the tournament direc-
tor said. "We're all disappointed
It was at the Sybase Open in
1998 where Agassi defeated then-
No. 1 Pete Sampras in the final to
begin his comeback to the No. 1
ranking. Agassi has won the tour-
nament four times, all in the 1990s.
Agassi will be replaced in the
main draw by Scott Humphries.
Sampras was seeded No. 1 last
year when he withdrew from the
tournament in the semifinals be-
cause of a left ankle injury.
Third-seeded VTnce Spadea with-
drew because of right shoulder in-
flammation. He was replaced by
Xavier Matisse, who beat Richard
Fromberg 7-6 (5), 0-6, 6-4.
Fourth-seeded Michael Chang
beat Paradorn Srichaphan 7-5, 6-4.
Magnus Larsson, Cedl Mamilt and
Paul Goldstein also opened with
victories.
Larsson beat Martin Rodriguez
6-2, 6-1, Mamiit defeated Julian
Alonso, 6-4, 6-4, and Goldstein
topped James Blake 6-3, 7-6 (4).
No. 2 Mark Philippoussis, the
defending champion, and
Humphries open Wednesday night.
Lewis lawyer: Ray was not involved
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ATLANTA (AP)�After interviewing all the passen-
gers in the limousine that fled the scene of two post-
Super Bowl slayings, a lawyer for All-Pro linebacker Ray
Lewis still doesn't know who held the knife.
But he says one thing's for sure � it was not his
client.
"We're all hearing one voice � Ray was not involved
in knifing anybody or attacking anybody said Lewis'
lawyer, Don Samuel to The Associated Press on Mon-
day. "We have not interviewed the driver, but everyone
else says Ray wasn't the one
Samuel said that he and other defense lawyers and
investigators have interviewed all six men, including
Lewis. He would not release the names of the other limo
passengers.
The Sun in Baltimore reported Monday that limo
driver Duane Fassett, 51, told police that Lewis threw at
least one punch in the fight that resulted in the two
deaths a week earlier.
The affidavit police used to obtain the arrest war-
rant against Lewis cited an unidentified witness who
said Lewis participated in the "punching, beating and
stabbing" of the two men.
Lewis, middle linebacker for the Baltimore Ravens,
is in the Atlanta Detention Center on murder charges
stemming from the deaths of Jacinth "Shorty" Baker
21, and Richard Lollar, 24, both of Decatur. His bond
hearing is scheduled for Feb. 14.
Atlanta police have said they were looking to inter-
view two men thought to have been in the limo�
former University of Maryland football player AJ.
Johnson and Kwame King, a friend of Lewis.
Johnson, who says he was at home in Laurel Md
over Super Bowl weekend, said Sunday that Atlanta
investigators had interviewed him.
Samuel said the defense team has interviewed more
than 30 people, and accounts as to what happen vary
wildly. r '
"We've heard everything from it was a war zone
and there was fighting everywhere to that there were
four total involved, including the two victims Samuel
said.
See LEWIS, page 12
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Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
f
SPORTS
LEWIS
from page 11
Atlanta and Baltimore County
police also searched Lewis' home in
suburban Baltimore early Monday.
Atlanta police spokesman John
Quijleyconfirmeda search warrant
was executed, but would not say
what police were looking for or
wha was confiscated. Officers could
be sfen carrying large plastic con-
tainers from the home and loading
a computer into a van.
Atlanta television station WSB-
TV reported Monday that investiga-
tors also visited The Sports Author-
ity location in Duluth where Lewis
held an autograph session the day
before the Super Bowl.
The store sells hunting knives,
and previously published reports
have said that receipts for knives
were found in Lewis' hotel room,
but the store was not known.
Police and store officials would
not comment on what was asked or
answered at the store.
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Meanwhile a lawyer for Fassett,
the limo driver, said his client
should not be seen as "a star wit-
ness against Ray lewis
"He's told police what he saw
said,David Irwin. "And he's told
police what he didn't set
Irwin would .jot cbmrrSlnt on
what Fassett told police. But he said
Fassett has periodically driven for
Lewis over the past year and is
"friendly" with the 24-year-old
player.
"He's very distraught about the
trouble that has befallen Ray Irwin
said.
Irwin would ;not comment on
previous reports that knives and
blood were found in the limo.
Samuel said Fassett might have
seen Lewis trying to break up the
fight , �
"We don't know what his van-
tage point was orivhat he actually
saw Samuel said.
He also said that the fact that
someone shot at the fleeing limo
and that bullet holes were evident
in the vehicle means someone other
than the victims might have been
involved in the fight.


it
SILVER ,11,
BUILET VOltS I
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. . Touch OfCfoss'
756-6278
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
� Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRlfcSAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
Loot! 5 Ida W� of CmmW oo tU Ak. IMnd AUdh SaiOm ft ttao)




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USED BOOK SALE
Friday. February I 8. 9 a.m8 p in.
Saturday, February 19, 9 a.m6 p.m.
Sunday, February 20, 1-5 p.m.
Ojy�SS ,h i , i.i of books)
Willis Building, 1st & Reacle Sts.
Student Discounts
� Monthly Unlimited
Specials
� New Bulbs
NOW OPEN
Mon-Sat 8-9
Sun 1-6
Walk-ins Welconte
Next door to
A Cut Above Hair
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Greenville, NC 27858 (919) 850-0485
PARTY MAKERS
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Baskets
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Charge By Phone 'Across From Plaza Mall- Pick-Up Or Delivery
Sat'Mon-Tues'Wed 9-6 Th-Fri 9-7 Open Sun. Feb 13
�422 f. Arlington 756-8606
Are You In need of
ASTHMA MEDICATION?
We may have a solution!
If you-have had asthma for at least one year, use daily asthma
medicine and are at least 15 years of age, you may be eligible
to participate in a research study being conducted by Dr. W.
James Metzger and associates of the Section of Allergy, Asthma
and Immunology at the Brody School of Medicine at East
Carolina University. If you qualify for this study you will
receive FREE study-related asthma medication, tests, physical
examinations, and medical care. You may receive up to $600.00
for participating in this 12-month program.
If this interests you, please call the Medical School
Clinical Trials Office at 816-3425 for more details.
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CHOOL OF MEDICINE
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LOOKING FOR A CHURCH HOME?
Unity Free Will Baptist College & Career Class
Unity is a fundamental, Bible-believing church that offers solid preaching and
teaching of Cod's word. We mix this with a blend of traditional hymns and
praise & worship choruses to make it a wonderful day of fellowship, preaching
and singing. Won't you join us?
Our Bible Study Class Offers:
Sunday Morning Bible Study at 10:00 a.m.
(Morning Worship at 11:00 a.m. and Evening Worship at 6:00 p.m.)
Food & Fellowship Nights
Class & Church Trips- Kings Dominion, Skiing, Whitewater Rafting
Recreational Opportunities- Softball & Basketball
NEED A RIDJEM HERE'S OUR SUNDAY VAN SCHEDULE
9:20 a.m. Mendenhall Bus Stop
9:25 a.m. Cotton Dorm
9:30 a.m. Slay Dorm
9:35 a.m. College Hill Bus Stop
9:45 a.m. Unity Church- FREE Doughnuts & Soft Drinks
Unity Free Will Baptist Church
2725 E. 14th Street, Greenville � 7bb-648b
(Lm-ated ,ippro�im,ilely I mile east of ECU'S College Hill)
Hoaqy Carmichael
Centefinial Celebration
Do something a little
different
for your Valentine.
Treat your sweetie.
to a tap-danctn
romartcirtV
musical
extravaganza.
s.
ARTS SERIES
ffldffflR N
MONDAY, FEBRUARY 14,2000 8:00 PM WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Advance Student Tickets: $15
FacultyStaff Advance Tickets: $27
PublicTickets at the Door: $30
Discount tickets will be available
with a valid ECU One Card until 6
p.m. on day of event, providing
tickets remain. All tickets at the
door will be full price.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS: Monday - Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p m
Tel: 252.328.4788 Or 1.800.ECU.ARTS; VTTY: 252.328.4736 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS
Want $25,000
for college?
The Army Reserve can help you take a big bite out of
college expenses.
How?
If you qualify, the Montgomery GI Bill could provide you
with over $7,000 for college or approved votech training.
We'll also pay you over $107 a weekend to start Training
is usually one weekend a month plus two weeks' Annual
Training. By adding the pay for Basic Training and skill train-
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So, if you could use a little financial help getting through
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I E R I E S
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.800.ECU.ARTS
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INTRAMURAL
4-on-4 Volleyball Reg.
Feb. 22 � 10 am - 6 pm � IM Office
Foosball Tourn. (S, D, MD Reg.
Feb. 28 � 10 am - 6 pm � IM Office
Foosball Singles Tournament
Feb. 29 � 8 pm � MSC
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Feb. 12 � 11 am - 12:30pm � SRC Forum
Wheelpower Dance Troupe
Feb. 13 � 3 pm - 5 pm � SRC 240
Aqua Volleyball Kayak Races
Feb. 18 � 7 pm - S pm � SRC Pool
Wheelpower Dance Troupe
Feb. 20 � 3 pm - 5 pm � SRC 240
Wheelchair Basketball Practice
Feb. 26 � 11 am - 12:30pm � SRC Forum
Wheelpower Dance Performance
Feb. 26 � 7 pm -10 pm � Roie High School
Power Yoga II
Feb. 15 - Mar. 2 � Register by Feb. 1 -14
Self Defense
Feb. 16 - Mar. 8 � Register by Feb. 1 -15
Group Fitness Instructor Training
Feb. 13 - 20 � Regiiter by Jan. 31 - Feb. 16
ADVENTURE
Stone Mountain Rock Climbing
Feb. 25-27 � Register by Feb. 16, 5 pm 5X
North Carolina Zoo Road Trip
Feb. 19 � Register by Feb. 9,5 pm 2X
Intro to Surfing
Feb. 7,21 � Register 1 week prior 2X
Hawksnest Weekend Ski Trip 2
Feb. 19-20 � Register by Feb. 9, 5 pm 4X






&�
LJ
.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
THE JOEYSHOW
by Joey ellls
31-0
735 AflL.
SUT HE'i
Nl0r THE
WHO'i
AWAKE
iiHirsuay, rea iu, uuu
comics@iiudentmedia.ecu.euu
by stuart parks and brad benson
Good lord V what is that .
uH�7Qus STSNCH7F X 7v1 GONHk
HAVS TO UC-HT A RieC-iN' -2
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HE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER
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Share
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EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
orkout
To Play With Your Food
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
FEB. 14 - FEB. 20
J oin us all this week and "Share a
Workout" with a friend. All that
week guest passes are free for you
to bring someone who has not yet
experienced the East Carolina
University Student Recreation
Center.
FEBRUARY 10 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
The Dinner Game (PG-13) The Game: To bring the dumbest guy you can find as a
guest. The Winner: Well, you'll just have to watch the movie to find out! You and
a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Fall in Love
FEBRUARY 10-12 AT 7:30 P.M. AND FEBRUARY 13
AT 3 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
The Story of Us (R) This romantic comedy begs the question:
Can a couple survive fifteen yearsof marriage? While making
v�the painful decision to separate. Bruce Willis and Michelle
Pfeiffer wrestle with the paradox that the qualities which
made them fall in love in the first place are now the very
things pulling them apart. You and a guest get in free
when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Hear a Hoagy
� one guest free each day
� one guest free to an
aerobics class (Feb. 17)
� one guest free all week at
the climbing wall
� free samples and discounts
Center Court Juice Bar
Special Gifts you can get at the SRC:
-Membership Gift Certificates -Program Gift Certificates
-Aerobics Passes -Climbing Passes
FEBRUARY 14 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Hoagy Carmichael that is. Celebrate Valentine's Day in style with a Vaudeville-style
tribute to this famous songwriter. The Hoagy Carmichael Cen tennial Celebr ation
will capture the life and musical career of the man who brought us the songs
Georgia on My Mind , Stardust, and the ever-famous Heart and Soul. Get your
advance discounted tickets now by showing your valid ECU One Card at the Central
Ticket Office. All tickets at the door tickets will be full price.
To Knock 'Em Down
Drop by Outer Limitz Bowling Alley in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center's basement for a game or two on the brand
new Brunswick lanes equipped with automated scor-
ing. Give your Monday a boost from 1-6 p.m. with 50
cent bowling (shoe rental included). Turn Wednesdays
and Fridays into discount days by rolling 10 frames for
just $1 (shoe rental included) between 1-6 p.m.
To Get Your Meeting On a Roll
Bring your group for meeting, eating, and a knock down good time at Outer Limitz
Bowling Alley in Mendenhall Student Center's basement. When you make your
reservation for the Bowl, Meet, & Eat (reservations must be made one week prior to
the event) Outer Limitz will reserve all eight lanes just for your group provide a
bowling attendant, free shoe rental, pizza, drinks, cups, plates, utensils 'tables and
chairs for the meeting, set-up and clean-up all for the low price of iust $5 ner
person. Call 3284740 for more information. P
To Sneak Off to Woodstock
CALL: 328-6387
FEBRUARY 16 AT 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
A Walk on the Moon (R) It's the Summer of 1969, free love, and nobody seems to
mind except for Marty whose wife ran off to Woodstock with a peddler who was
selling blouses at their campsite. After Marty finds out about the affair he con
fronts her. Does he leave her? Does he stay with her? Wait and seel You and a
guest get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card
MSC Hours: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - MidnightSat. Noon-Midnight Sun. Noon
p.m.
Thursd
www.tt
3BDRM
side availi
tance to
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$450.001
756-9339.
JASMINE
bath, all ar.
pets. $410
erty Manat
RING
Now
1 bedn
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FEMALE RO
share 3 bedroc
located 5 m
$275.00 mom
phone, call Jai
ROOMMATE
females, (one
dergrad.) 3 BR
ities. Located i
hood. Near EC
329-8682 ASA
ROOMMATE
kitchen, living r
and Rec. Cente
more informati
)JO CREDIT ch
.Pagers. ABC Pr
Cast 10th St. (n
Iza).
SPRING BREI
iParty Cruise! 5
imeals! Aweson
(Departs from
Iroom with kitch
'ties Et free drink
�with kitchen
!open until 5 a.m
'(near Disney) S
iel.com 1-800-6;
�1 PANAMA
;Beachfront�T
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Walk to best bar
.All major credit c
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FOR SALE: Wet
;Curl $75.00 Sn
. $70.00 call Mat
I AFFORDABLE I
'� moving traffic v
tickets. Unlimitec
I with an attorney
' your behalf. Law;
D.J. F
affli
Fit All FUNC
Call
ORGANI
J.Arthur





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Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian 15
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
3 BDRM House and Duplexes � Dock-
� side available now. within walking dis-
fcnce to ECU or take the bus. Each
unit comes with a washerdryer, kitch-
en appliances including dishwasher.
With a back deck overlooking the riv-
.er, a carport and storage closet. Pets
allowed in some units. 561-RENT Pin-
nacle Property Management.
NAGS HEAD, NC- Relatively new
bouse in excellent condition; fully fur-
wished; washer 6 dryer; dishwasher;
.central AC; available May 1 through
August 31; $1600 per month call for
��Kails (767) 850-1532 or e-mail ten-
(HleOpinn.net
W. YOU have high utility bills call Ed-
gar Wall at 321-2700 days or 551-0971
fights. I have 1 Br apts for rent $320
Bio includes utilities, near campus.
?�'� duplex. 419 E. 3rd St. 1 car ga-
Mge. washer dryer hookup, backyard.
$450.00month. available now. call
756-9339.
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom. 1
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RINGGOLD TOWERS
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CALL 752-2865
wanta�reak?i
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summer season. Will train, no experi-
ence necessary! Fill out the applica-
tion at www.nsbslifeguards.com-
Email-dudes0nsbslifeguards.com or
call (843) 272-3259.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES,
CLUBS, STUDENT GROUPS.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS EARN
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EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly. Legal lap dancing. No experi-
ence needed Age 18 up, all national-
ities. 919-580-7084 Goldsboro.
POSSIBLY THE best summer of your
life. Presbyterian Point Camp now hir-
ing counselors. L-guards. outdoors
gear specialists, food ser. sailing instr.
Wkly salary, meals, lodging, laundry.
18 7 up. NCVA St line, 1.5 hr from
RalDur, bonus pay for L-guards. Don't
get stuck behind a cash regis or in an
office. Get paid to have fun outdoors
and make a difference in a kid's life
instead! 919-833-1083 David Paul Sum
Prog Dir 804-252-1603 Robert Stod-
dard.
1 or 2 bedrooms,
1 bath, range
refrigerator, free
watersewer,
washerdryer
hookups, laundry
facilities, 5 blocks
from campus,
ECU bus services.
DO YOU love alternative electronic
music? Earn $$ promoting major la-
bel bands around your town. Visit
www.noizepollution.com to fill out and
e application then call Travis � 800-
996-1816.
PAID INTERNSHIP) Learn Myothera-
py, rehabilitation, massage, trigger
point, and counseling skills. 766-8160.
LOSE WEIGHT and make $money$!l
Lose 7-29 lbs per month. Earn up to
$ 1200 month. 19 years of guaranteed
results! Call 757-2292 for Free Consul-
tation!
JOB OPPORTUNITY: St. James Unit-
ed Methodist Church seeks Nursery
workers to serve for programs during
the week and to substitute for em-
ployed workers when they need to be
absent on Sunday mornings. For more
information contact 752-6154.
LOCAL WEB design firm considering
candidates for the following positions:
Graphic Artist. HTML Specialist. Cont-
ent Specialist. Sales Reps, WebData-
base Programmers. Visit http:
www.gidgit.com for details.
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
LIKE BOATS? Like tools? Now hiring
sum camp staff Presbyterian Point
Camp on Kerr Lake 50,000 water-acr-
es. Boat Wrangler (MTR boats, canoes,
sailboats) and maim assts. grounds,
repairs, deliveries, projects. Weekly
salary, meals, lodging, laundry. Re-
member this summer for the rest of
your life 804-252-1603 Robert Stod-
dard. Sit Mgr.
GREEK PERSONALS
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would like
to welcome our new members! Katie
Gray. Trina Sebben. Ainsley Marsh.
Betsy Kelly. Liz Moran, Lynette Hoj-
mann. Meghan Wagoner. Keri Boness
and Courtney Willard. Congratulations
love the sisters.
THANK YOU to the sisters of Alpha
Xi Delta for the use of your house dur-
ing rush from the brothers of Sigma
Alpha Epsilon.
THE SISTERS of Delta Zeta would like
to thank Phi Kappa Tau for a great so-
cial. We fell on our a?. but we had a
blast!
SIGMA PHI Epsilon thank you for the
social Friday night! We had a great
time! Lets do it again soon! Love Al-
pha Phi.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Pi
Kappa Alpha for a great social Satur-
day night. We hope to do it again soon!
PI DELTA congratulates the following
on outstanding scholastic achieve-
ments thus far this semester Heather
Goetz. Tina Overbee, Tammy Burkett.
Stephanie Ragland.
DO YOU need a Valentine's date?
Come to Zeta Tau Alpha's Valentine's
Date Auction. Bidding starts at 9pm
on Sunday February 13th at Hendrix
Theater
Where can you hear the Lady
Pirates vs. James Madison
basketball game
Friday night
at 7 p.m.?
Just one place.
91.3 FM
! Wesley
; Commons
! South:
-All properties have 24 hr. I
emergency maintenance �
Call 758- 1921 �
QftOQemont
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMY NEEDED to share town-
house. Clean, only bedroom furniture
needed. $225 month plus utilities.
Rent from February to May. Owner oc-
cupied, student. Call Wendy 439-2271.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 3 bedroom 2 bath mobile home
located 5 miles from Greenville.
$275.00 month plus 12 utilities and
phone, call Jamie at 321-1305.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to live with 2
females, (one grad. student, one un-
dergrade 3 BR House. 13 rent & util-
ities. Located in nice quiet neighbor-
hood. Near ECU bus stop. Please call
329-8682 ASAP.
ROOMMATE NEEDED 1 bedroom,
kitchen, living room, in between Ham's
and Rec. Center. Call Dan or Brian for
tnore information 757-0204.
FOR SALE
RESPONSIBLE. ENERGETIC student
with reliable vehicle and clean driving
record needed for afterschool care,
and transporting children to sport prac-
tices. Monday-Friday, 2:15pm to
5:15pm. Call 328-6468. ext. 4. days.
PART TIME jobs available. Joan's
Fashions, a local Women's Clothing
Store, is now filling part-time positions.
Employees are needed for Saturdays
and weekdays between 10:00 a.m.
and 6:00 p.m. Individuals must be
available for some Saturday work. Pref-
erence for students who will be able
to work some during Spring Break
andor Easter Break. The positions ate
for between 7 and 25 hours per week,
depending on your schedule and on
business needs. The jobs are within
walking distance of ECU and the hours
are flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job performance
and is supplemented by an employee
discount. Apply in person to Store
Manager. Joan's Fashions. 423 S.
Evans Street, Greenville (Uptown
Greenville).
SUMMER CAMP counselors needed
for premier camps in Massachusetts
& New Hampshire. Positions available
for talented, energetic, and fun loving
students as general counselors and
speciality counselors in all team sports,
all individual sports such as Tennis 6
Golf, Waterfront and Pool activities,
and specialty activities including art.
dance, theater, gymnastics, newspa-
per, rocketry & radio. Great Salaries,
room, board, and travel. June 17th-Au-
gust 16th. Enjoy a great summer that
promises to be unforgettable. Check
out our web site and apply on line at
www.greatcampjobs.com or call 1-
800-562-0737.
MATURE PERSON needed part-time
for showroom sales and various other
duties. Must have good communica-
tion skills. Apply in person at Parrott
Canvas 508 West 14th Street.
DEPENDABLE SITTER wanted MF,
7:30-5:30 during summer. In home
care for two age 9 boys and super-
vision age 13 girl. Must have transpor-
tation. Will consider a team of stud-
ents. References required. Call 321-
4966 or 355-3517 after 5:30
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma would like
to congratulate the Omicron pledge
class on inductions.
CONGRATULATIONS, NEW mertv
bers of Alpha Omicron Pi - Julie Wat-
son, Rachel Hudson, Sarah Chambers,
Amanda Spencer. Lian Oxenham.
Michelle Neptun. Laura Phillips, Abby
Hoffman, and Karen Peaden. Love,
your sisters!
THIS YEAR A LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
PERSONALS
THETA CHI, we had a great time at
the social Saturday night. Lets do it
again soon. Love the sisters of Chi
Omega.
THE CARD Post Report 254 In-
clude Inn. With reviewing information
sought & received from the Surgeon
General's office that was a product of
a workshop he held last summer ad-
dressing the 'suicide crisis one part
addressed various resources in the
community to aid in exploring this mat-
ter. Among a few persons &or groups
' suggested was hairdressers. In ad-
dressing the mental health suicide cri-
sis there is understanding of such an
unique inclusion. This will be explored
in next Sunday's News Argus report.
Prosper n live long. Tom Drew. Report
355 Olivia's V-Day in the land of Wuz
(part 2). Reba not a hussie to be hus-
sied by her best girlfriend said "You
can pet Bubber's dog Budgie
though not Bubber Look 'n er in the
eye n not missing a stroke on Budgie's
coat Olivia replied "one in the same
To which Reba exclaimed "you tickle
me girl The next day: Afta tickling
Bubber down to Budgie's delight &
as one began to pluck the grey from
Bubber's side burns the other whis-
pered in his ear "If you be keep'n with
us 'n our friends you won't see an-
ymore of these no time tooooo
soon T.K.D.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new Pi
Delta officers: Corresponding Secre-
tary- Terrell Floyd. Sargent of Arms- Tyl-
er Blackwelder. Fundraiser- Anqie Rad
OTHER
Other
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MDM 6 BH
SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $75 &
up per person, www. retreatmyrtle-
beach.com 1-800-645-3618.
Under the Army's
Loan Repayment
program, you could get
out from under with a
three-year enlistment
Each yearyou serve
on active duty reduces
your indebtedness by one-
third or$l,500, which-
ever amount is greater,
uptoa$65,0001imit. !
The offer applies to Perkins Loans, Stafford Loans
and certain other federally insured loans, which are not I
in default
And debt relief is just one of the many benefits
youTl earn from the Army. Ask your Army Recruiter
756-9695
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
www.goarmy.com
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
.Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
Cast 10th St. (next to Papa Olivers Piz-
Iza).
SPRING BREAK Specials! Bahamas
iParty Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
imeals! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
(Departs from Florida! Panama City
Iroom with kitchen next to clubs. 7 par-
ties 6 free drinks129! Daytona room
�with kitchen $149! South Beach (bars
!open until 5 a.m) $159! Cocoa Beach
'(near Disney) $179! springbreaktrav-
lel.com 1-800-678-6386
;1 PANAMA City Vacations! Party
i Beachfront � The Boardwalk, Summit
Condo's & Mark II. Free drink parties!
Walk to best bars! Absolute best price!
, All major credit cards accepted! 1 -800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
; tous.com
FOR SALE: Wetsuit Medium-Tall Rep-
Curl $75.00 Snowboard: 154 never
; $70.00 call Matt � 931-9462.
LEARN TO
SKYOIVE!
CMOUN SKY SPORTS
(9191496-2224
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SERVICES
I AFFORDABLE LEGAL Services. All
� moving traffic violations. Speeding
tickets. Unlimited toll-free consultation
' with an attorney. Letters written on
' your behalf. Lawsuits, etc. 355-8858.
ETIQUETTE DINNER. Friday. Febru-
ary 18, 5:00pm. Mendenhall Student
Multi-Purpose Room. Not sure which
fork to use for your salad or how to
pass the salt? After attending this pro-
gram, you'll know how to dine with
style. Impress your date, your date's
mother, an important client, or a
watchful boss. Dinner tickets must be
purchased for $3.50 from the Central
Ticket Office in Mendenhall Student
Center by Friday. February 11. Meal �
plans can be used to offset the dinner
cost. This program is open to ECU
students only.
GROUP FITNESS Instructor Training"
Feb. 19-20 8:30am-5:30pm. This date
is an intensive two day introduction to
group exercise leadership. You will
learn basic exercisetraining principles
as well as participate in practical teach-
ing drills and masterclass. Cost is
$75mem-$125non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb. 16.
WAY TO go Alicia, AKA speed racer!
Love your Pi Delta sisters.
KAPPA ALPHA we had a great time
at the hall crawl Thursday night. Can't
wait to do it again. Love sisters of Chi
Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Robin Wi-
son for her lavalier by Nathan Lloyd
from the brothers of Sigma Alpha Ep-
silon.
THANKS FOR your support, Michal!
Love, your Pi Delta Sisters.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Nathan
Lloyd from your brothers of Sigma Al-
pha Epsilon.
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma would like
to congratulate the Omicron pledge
class officers: Amanda Tedder- Presi-
dent: Ashleigh Hooks- Vice President:
Jen Swanson- Sister Liason; and Emi-
ly Koperniak- Secretary.
�1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
Jamaica. Bahamas & Florida. Best pric-
es guaranteed! Free parties Er cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
ACT NOWI LAST CHANCE TO RE-
SERVE YOUR SPOT FOR SPRING
BREAK! DISCOUNTS FOR 6 OR
MORE! SOUTH PADRE, CANCUN.
JAMAICA, BAHAMAS, ACAPUL
CO, FLORIDA & MARDI GRAS.
REPS NEEDEDTRAVEL FREE. 800-
838-8203 WWW. LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
ANNOUNCEMENTS
KAYAK ROLL FEB. 28. 7:30pm-
9:30pm in the SRC pool. Trying out
kayaking has never been easier, get
into a boat and practice the Eskimo
roll. It's a great way to break into the
sport and a must for any future pad-
dlers. Cost$10mem-$15non-mem.
Registration deadline is ceb. 21, 5pm.
For more information call 328-6387.
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
HIKE AND Camp Spring Break. March
10-17 in the Smokey Mountains. NC
Tenn. Come hike, camp, and enjoy the
best NC and TN have to offer. Experi-
ence campground camping, lots of hik-
ing and a laid back good time. Cost is
$ 150mem-$ 175non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb. 23 5 pm. Call 328-
6387 for more information.
CONGRATULATIONS MARGA-
RETTE AND Will! Way to shag the
night away! Love Pi Delta.
PI KAPPA Phi we had a blast at the
Pajama social Friday night. Flip cup
was fun. Lets do it again. Love the sis-
ters of Chi Omega.
D.J. FOR HIRE
ifHU-hnT
FOI All FUNCTIONS
PARTY
� 8 CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur H 252-412-0971
PERSPECTIVES: MONDAY, February
14. "Cloning and Genetic Engineering:
The Relevance of Huxley's Brave New
World 12:30-1:30pm Brody 2W-50.
Bernard Gert. Ph.D.
PRING
rpnno Bit Trnrl w�' oH Mat bum tin hi P� US In 1996 to W
recoonurt for outEUnSno. eti;j fy Co'jnM of fetier Bowiew Burenu1
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 din � Mot! Me � Free Pifltot � includes Tam
Panama $139
CHy- BairCwiFk. Homy tan SuniptM t Don
Florida $149
7 Htgim Daytona. South Beach. Cocoa Of-
Cancun & Jamaica $439
' � ' Ik � HOW � fm Food 130 Hn � Mitt
springbrcaktravel.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
STONE MOUNTAIN, Feb. 25-27. Try
your feet at multi-pitch friction climb-
ing. Expect great views and lots of
granite. Beginners are welcome but
belaying experience is recommended.
Cost $65mem- $80non-mem. Reg-
istration deadline is Feb. 16, 5pm. For
more information call 328-6387.
POWER YOGAFeb. 14-March9.
MonWed. 5:30-6:45 p.m. in the SRC
238. This is a Western spin on
Ashtanga Yoga, it will be a rigorous
workout that develops strength and
flexibility. The cost is15mem $25
non-mem. Registration deadline is Feb.
14. For more information call 328-
6387
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING,
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE, A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEL FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vemon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10, 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP -
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UHITED
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTDNG-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AND VICTORY
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-6621
Services: 9 & 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600
Services: 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed. Bible Study
Spring Break 2000 i
C.ANCUN�JAMAICA�NASS,U !
Space is limited
CALL TODAY
800-293-1445
it.
v ww.StudentCity.cum
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADEi
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 & 8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 & 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30. 9:45. 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.





W The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
LOVELINES
Thursday, Feb. 10,2000
adsOstudentmedia.ecu.edu
. m "tmlwfflURm�
HEY BOO Wendi, Susi. Gina we are
finally all together. Happy Valentine's
Day. Lowe you your Bool
ADAM 8. There is something special
about you. I can't describe the feeling
inside me everytime I gaze into your
eyes. It's an honor to be called yours
- Forever. Erika.
CHAD YOU'RE my need and my
want. You're my today and my tomor-
row. You're my heart and my soul but
most of all you're just you! I love you
Dalis.
DARREN, JUST a little something to
leJI you how valuable you are to me. I
couldn't imagine life without you.
You're my sweetiepie. I'll definitely be
yours forever. Dana
DEAR RANDI: I love you very much.
Thank you for loving me for all these
years and for being my inspiration.
Love Ryan
TIM, HAPPY Valentine's Day and year
anniversary. My life was incomplete
until I met you. Your my best friend. I'll
never stop loving you.
MIKE. THANKS for such a wonder-
ful Valentine's Day last year. I want to
give you something special this year.
Thanks for being so wonderful. I Love
You honey! Love Hilary.
DKC. I love you more today than yes-
terday, but only haff as much as I will
in the future. You will always have a
special place in my heart! NCK
BJC- IF you play your cards right, you
can be my bbbabay tonight! I love
you big time! Happy Valentine's Day.
ROCK HAPPY Valentine's Day.
.baby) I love you with all my heart and
soul! Can't wait until the big day! I Love
You! Love. Hunny.
FRANCES, HAPPY Valentine's Day. I
love you so much. You mean every-
thing to me. Wishing us many more
Valentine's Day's I love you, Jeff.
RANDY, MEET me Monday for din-
ner 8:30, my place. Bring a fork and a
smile. Love, your polka-dotted swee-
tie.
ALLIE, FOR all the time we have
shared together. Here is to seeing the
world and all the adventures we will
experience Love, Eddie.
DEAR CHRISSY Happy Valentine's
Day I wanted to let you know that I
love you with all of my heart and that
you mean the world to me. Love, Billy.
JB- LOVE is the most fun you can have
without laughing -unknown. Thank you
for the laughs and the love. Happy
Valentine's Day! Love. Zoopies.
THE BOOGIE monster makes me feel
all warm and gushy inside! I love
himlove your little monkey,
O0000��00.
DEAR MANDY, Happy Valentine's
Day to my pompski. I hope you have a
great day, and I can't wait to see you
in a few days. Love ya 4-life! Brent
KITTYCAT, MY heart beats for yours
when you gaze into my eyes, with your
arms around me our souls intertwine.
I love you. Daddy-O.
TURKEY, AS our lives progress, nev-
er stop remembering those two tiny
clouds. They will carry us through an-
ything. Te Amo.
WANDA, TO the best wife and flow-
er I will ever need, with love from the
weed and husband of your life, Chris.
K AT, LOVE ya girl! Return of the mack
Love Cliffie.
ALLISON, YOU are my sun. Gabrielle
you are my moon. One of you is al-
ways on my mind. You complete me.
Love Andy S.
HS CANT wait to spend Valentine's
day with you! Stay as sweet as you
are. VK
NICK, LOVE at first sight was only in
fairy tales till I saw you. Thanks for
being my charming prince and knight
in armor. I love you. Kelly
MGM, HAPPY Valentine's Day Baby!
I just wanted to say thank you for eve-
rything this past year. I Love You. MDM.
NICHOLAS FEARL you will never
know how much I love you. But, our 4
years together is a small sign of that
love. D.B.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY MDM 8 BH
I
HAPPY VALENTINES day to all of my
friends in Slay and Umstead hall. You
all are great and mean a lot to me.
Your friend Billy.
WES, I just wanted to wish you a very
happy Valentine's Day! I Love You! Rea-
gan.
HAPPY VALENTINE'S Day to Alison,
Brandie, Caroline, Elizabeth, Emily,
James and Meredith. You are all sweet-
hearts!
I THINK I'm the luckiest woman on
earth to have "perfection" as my boy-
friend. Loosing you would make the
mama really sad. I will always love you!
You're one of a kind! Love, the mama.
HOLLY, I'VE got the perfect combi-
nation: you, me, Pugstein. a ring, a yel-
low beetle, and Florida FOREVER Just
say yes. I love you always, Dan.
MIKE F You mean the world to mel
Happy Valentine's Dayl I love youl
Thanks for everything you do for me!
SWEET CAREEN, My Valentine, let
us forget all of our grievances for this
one day. Let us be young children, pure
in love and high on life. Happy Valen-
tine's Day. James
SCOTT, HAPPY Valentine's Day and
happy Anniversary! I love you cutie! I
hope you're surprised! Love ya, Char-
lotte.
AMOR DE mlo, Yo miraba las sendas
que venfan de lejos, pero a ti nunca te
espere, afortunado.
TO ALL my ladies who have been
there & continue to be there for
meThanks and I'll always Lpve you
girls. Love Meg. 'V
DEWAYNE, THANK you for all you
do for me You are so special to me. I
love you so much, forever and always!
Love Sarah
ANTHONY, YOUR warmth envelopes,
your kiss entrances, and your loving
disposition completes me- Your gen-
tleness and patience has enabled my
spirit to fantasize of dreams I'd long
ago forgotten and surfaced them for
discovery once more. You are heaven
sent. I adore you! All my love. Christy.
TIF, WILL you be mine forever? Here's
to many more Valentine's Days togeth-
er I Love You, Love Pat P.S. Can you
RYAN, YOU'VE given me love and
laughter. Your presence in my'life
makeseach day sweeter than the last.
Christy.
GREG, YOU are never far from my
thoughts and heart. Happy Valentine's
Day with love! wwww
hear the dolphins cry?
HEY, CB You're still the one for me
ISLYM HP
DEAR RYAN, you are the love of my
life. I will love you always, Happy Valen-
fcne's Day Love Marty.
MARC, YOUR heart warms my soul.
Yoty smile lights my night. Thanks for
sticking by me and keeping all your
promises. I love you, Lesley.
HAPPY VALENTINES Day! To 3rd
floor Aycock back hall ladies! you guys
are awesome! Keep up the great work!
Love Amanda.

ening
?
Browse over to the only campus-wide
calendar of events at ECU and much
more. Check it often for activities,
events, meetings, etc.
Use it when you need to list your own
campus happenings.
I I ;
m II v SlV V I vL 5d C I V
A web-based service of the ECU Student Media.






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Patrick McMahon
Entertainment Editor
Way back in the early to
mid-70s, Greenville was a
completely different entity to
the ECU student. Back then,
the massive, national retail
chains and outlets that dot the
areas surrounding campus did
not exist and Greenville
Boulevard was just three lanes
of unfettered road (kind of hard
to believe now). The town was
just that: a town. The "City of
Greenville" was years away and
the university was pretty much
the biggest thing going.
Highway 264 was a two-
lane stretch of desolate space
that led right into the heart of
the city, which was, for better
or worse, the ECU campus. The
legal drinking age was still 18,
the war was raging and with
that brought notions of the
male college student desper-
ately trying to maintain good
status so he wouldn't have to
be sent off to die in someone
else's war.
The air was different
then. It was a nervous, yet
excited air and downtown
Greenville was right there to
cater to the college kids' need
for entertainment and distrac-
tion from the world around
them.
Many of ECU's current
students had parents here at
about that time and trust me,
from what I found out, they
had it a lot better then than we
do now, as far as downtown
goes. It is pretty much a crap
shoot to decide where to start.
So much has changed in
Greenville over the last 25 years
that it truly was an undertaking
in futility to track down every
bit of info on every downtown
establishment over the last
couple of decades. So I'm going
to try to narrow it down to the
interesting stuff.
Each and every building
downtown has seen a remark-
able array of different busi-
nesses, and many have come
and gone with the passage of
time. The Cellar has seen some
of the most dramatic changes
over the years, from being a
quiet eatery to the dance haven
it is now. From the late '60s to
early 70s, the building has
housed about five different
establishments, all owned and
maintained by various mem-
bers of the Saleed family.
When It comes to
downtown Greenville, you
don't have to look too far to
find an establishment that a
particular family didn't have a
hand in maintaining or
running. Back in the '60s, the
Saieeds were the first ones to
bring pizza to Greenville. They
even supplied pizzas to the
campus for a spell of time. The
Cellar was actually a Chevy
dealership before the Saieed
family came into the picture.
Before it was turned into
The Cellar, the building served
as a restaurant called Fiddlers
III. Jolly Rogers Disco took over
the building during the mid-
'70s disco craze, which later
became Rafters, a rock 'n' roll
bar. After that, the building was
turned into Bogies, a theme
restaurant and bar, before
finally becoming The Cellar
that it is now. In fact, there are
about 400 squares left over
from the disco days that are
individually lit just like the
dance floor from Saturday
Night Fever. Believe it or not,
the owner is thinking about
bringing it back out if the
demand is high enough.
Another downtown
mainstay that just recently
relocated to the collection of
shops by the Harris Teeter on
Charles Boulevard Is Scully's.
Specializing in eclectic material
and used music, the owners
had maintained a downtown
presence since approximately
1981, when it was located in
the BW-3's courtyard in a
building that has since burned
down. Known as Quicksilver
ofStkMuimeM
RoSerVamrnererT SP�rtS � ,0Cati0n� bBf0re B�S bMt-(photo cour,e$!l
to bet you a thousand bucks
you'd never guess the building
used to be a horse stable. Go
figure.
Back before the drinking
age was 21, the bars would
have Happy Hours from about
4 p.m6 p.m. that the college
kids used to attend after their
classes got out. The students
would go in the afternoon to
drink and socialize, then go
1958 - 5th Street from the future Alfredo's, (photo
courtesy of Roger Kammerer)
Records, it was mainly a music
shop but also catered to other
interests. At the same time, the
owners maintained Eponymous
Books�Progressive Reading For
The Unfettered Mind before
Barnes and Noble came in and
squashed most of the book-
stores in the downtown area
and across town. I'd be willing
home and sober up and come
back at night when the bars'
late shift worked. Can you
imagine doing that today?
Some more points of
interest: Alfredo's II used to be a
head shop called Pipe Dreams,
specializing in "tobacco
accessories (aka bongs and
bowls). The business was
booming in those days until
the governor's office got
involved and squashed that
idea. For more on Pipe Dreams,
check out 1998's edition of
ECU's annual arts publication
The Rebel for a personal
account of it. Also, the location
that now houses Chico's was
called Jason's, which was
nothing more than a regular
hang-out for the college crowd
that had cheap sandwiches and
good beer on tap. BW-3's was
formerly a Belk's department
store.
Probably the biggest,
most well-known downtown
establishment in Greenville
was The Elbo Room. We all '
know about The Elbo
from our orientation
days, but how many
of you know that it
was still in the same
location in 1970? It
hasn't moved or
renamed Itself in 30
years�up until a few
weeks ago, that is. It
is now Cabana's, a
retro and top 40
dance club. From
what I understand, it
is a pretty nice place.
The music scene
hasn't changed much
over the years. The Attic,
Greenville's most popular and
longest lasting name In music,
has withstood the test of time.
After existing in Its present
location for a few years after its
initial opening, it moved to a
building that burned to the
ground not long after it moved
In. After that, It returned to the
present locale and has been
there ever since. It has seen
numerous major acts pass
through its doors. From the
Pointer Sisters to Widespread
Panic to Jeff Foxworthy, the
possibility of seeing a major
talent in the making at The
Attic is pretty much a given.
Some buildings have
humorous histories. Backdoor
used to be called Super Ego,
which was a hair salon and
barber shop. Tiki Bar was
formally a Goodyear Supply
store and The Sports Pad was
Leder Brothers, a clothing store.
This writer am be contafted at
prncmalumesttidentmedia.ecu.edu.
1918 - before Peasant's,
(photo courtesy of Roger
Kammerer)






i
tin.
Uvt�9 In the PAST
Students get a taste of
life in the trenches
D. Miccah Smith
FH Assistant Editor
It's cold outside, but you're sweating, tense, kneeling in a
crude trench cut out of the
earth. You're in a forest; gray
winter trees have been dragging
at your skin and clothes all day
as you march through a rural
area lugging an old-fashioned
rifle, the unfamiliar heaviness
of the weapon weighing your
shoulder down. You're tired
from digging and crouching
and running, but all you can do
now is peer over a mound of
earth, rifle loaded, and hope
you can squeeze off a shot at
your enemies before they
attack.
Suddenly, a figure darts
out from behind a bush. You
brace your rifle, but he shoots
first. You jerk back, then slump
into the damp dirt at the
bottom of the trench, eyes
closed. You hear the crunch of
boots on mulch as the enemy
walks over to have a look at
you.
"Good game he says.
"Now, it's our turn to defend
Welcome to the rough-and-
tumble world of war re-
enactment, a living time
machine of sorts for those with
minds�and bodies�tough
enough to give the gorier parts
of history another shot.
The American obsession
with war has created a new
pastime: the art of meticulously
recreating uniforms, combat
units and battlefield scenes
from history's most docu-
mented conflicts.
Groups from all over the
country train like soldiers and
spend countless dollars on
authentic uniforms (called
"impressions") and weaponry.
They converge on a single point at a single moment in time,
usually for a weekend, where they recreate a specific point in war
history together.
To a younger generation raised on Rambo movies, skilled at
comparing "Apocalypse Now" to "Saving Private Ryan" and
mesmerized by unreal portrayals of the kind of full-scale war
they're likely never to encounter, re-enactment is surprisingly
addictive. A small group of die-hard ECU re-enactors lives for its
brutal shock.
Senior political science major Andy Vincent calls re-enact-
ments "a perfect chance to learn history He's been involved in
re-enactments, mostly of the World War II persuasion, for two
years.
"When you're in the event and you're in the woods for an
entire weekend with 200 people, all of the same era, everyone is
trying to recreate history Vincent said. "You really start to believe
that you're a part of it. People avoid any references to the real
world
Re-enactors delve into a small, concentrated moment in
history, aligning themselves with a particular army and living in
the frenzy of a pitched battle for the weekend, using authentic
firearms or replicas to fire blanks above each other's heads during
combat. They get an education about war that books could never
show them.
"I like the action part said Luke Sanders, 25, who majored
in Spanish. "It's fun. Instead of going to class, you go out in a
field, and you pick up a gun and you shoot at people You learn
a lot about history and culture, and you get to participate in an
active way
Senior history major Kevin Treadway currently leads a unit
of three or four re-enactors in a series of drills, practice runs and
work sessions on a rural tract of land 20 minutes outside
Greenville. With his help, they are meshing into a historically
accurate group capable of holding their own in some large-scale
re-enactments this year.
Most wars, especially those in the distant past, pose expen-
sive challenges to re-enactors on college students' budgets. Making
or purchasing a perfect "impression" requires money and luck.
That's why the ECU group sticks to World War II. Their army of
choice? Russian.
"It's the cheapest said Treadway, who enjoys portraying a
World War H-era Russian. "You can get a decent impression for
around $150
"The Russian army basically destroyed some of the best
German formations during the war Treadway said. "The Eastern
front was a big meat-grinder for the German army
The Russian army is also a convenient choice for Lisa O'
Donnell, a senior computer science major. Since Russia was the
only army during the war, and throughout most of history, to
actually employ female soldiers during combat, she, unlike most
female re-enactors, needs not disguise her femininity on the
battlefield.
O' Donnell says the feeling is "liberating and empowering.
There is nothing like being in
uniform, holding a rifle and
knowing that you're authentic,
being a woman in uniform,
holding a rifle and shooting at
Nazis
Treadway, who has re-
enacted World War I and the
Revolutionary and Civil Wars,
is a veteran to the very real
emotions shared by re-enactors,
a wave of experience that
probably draws more "soldiers"
than anything else.
"It's a fairly safe but
intense environment that
creates a remarkably accurate
view of combat Treadway
said. "When you're in a forest,
and several guys outfitted as
Germans open-fire on you with
machine guns, your mind tells
you that they're just blanks, but
your emotions scream, 'Fight or
flight' and dump adrenaline
into your system. It's an
incredible high
Although quite popular
with re-enactors, World War-II
is only a plot point on a time
line. If a battle was fought, it's
re-enactment fodder for some
dedicated group. Unbeknownst
to most Americans, the United
States is a vast playground for
the re-enactors, who tear
through fields and forests from
Pennsylvania to Oregon to
Ohio, girded in everything
from Medieval armor to
Vietnam-era camouflage. Across
the pond the mania is just as
apparent. Not even Ireland or
Top- re-enactors march in
full battle gear
Bottom- pretend Germans
take pretend Russian
Pums. (file photos)
Wales are safe from stem-
faced Roman armies and
bands of Celts waving battle-
axes.
Nonetheless, realism
and respect for war are at the
heart of re-enactment, and if
it's done right, it contains
some of the essence of war
that so fascinates our genera-
tion. A battle can become
real; a college student can
become a soldier for one day.
"If you allow yourself
to fully participate, you
realize the horror Vincent
said. "You literally stop
having a future. You're just in
the battle
For information on re-
enacting, contact Kevin
Treadway at 329-9121.
This writer can be contacted at
msmith@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
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Shannon Meek
Staff Writer
New Orleans: there's no other city like it. It is a city where
there's music and a blend of cultures in the streets. It is a city of
muses, voodoo queens and author Anne Rice's fabled vampires.
It is a wonderful place to travel, full of night life, Cajun
cuisine and a history rich as the city itself. When going to New
Toifaij'd de&tkaiiw: ttw Onhcm
where Dixieland Jazz plays. In a small room, about 20-foot-wide
and 20-foot-deep benches are set up for the audience to listen to
the Dixieland Jazz for a small donation.
New Orleans is also known for its rich flavor of food. There
are Cajuns spices blended, crawfish served everywhere and fried
Orleans, the birthplace of jazz, you can party in the streets as well fro8 legs for the more daring tourists. But for the most part, you
as the various clubs. What better place than this to spend a week
off from school?
New Orleans is original in that it is legal to drink in the
streets. With sleazy Bourbon Street strip clubs and hip uptown
blues, the streets are usually a cacophony of sounds. With a 24-
hour-long drinking day, the music often doesn't get going until
midnight or after. It is one of the best places in the nation for
night life. New Orleans has a superb live music scene, a plethora ofa nint: Never order it black). Here are some top
amazing festivals and cool bars. The cover in the bars can go from Picks for places you should go to eat when
as low as non-existent to as high as $15, so it is common to gather you're there:
outside some of the bars with a drink to go and dance in the
streets.
Here are some of the places you should check out if you
choose to head to New Orleans for Spring Break:
can find gumbo, a thick soup consisting of a blend of seafood,
chicken, vegetables or a combination of the
three and jambalaya. The food is spicy and
very Creole, coming from a blend of French,
Spanish, African and Cajun cultures.
New Orleans has maintained a European
influence in its reputation for good coffee (just
T
Pat O'Brien's�Located on Bourbon Street in the French Quarter,
it's the birthplace of the drink, hurricane, and a wonderful place
where anything can be, and usually is, seen.
Dooky Chase's�Found on New Orleans Avenue. It has what we
traditionally call Soul food, and Black Creole.
Acme Oyster Bar�Located on Iberville Street, this restaurant
serves pa-boys, fresh crawfish (which you have to try at least once
while in New Orleans) and oysters which are shucked on marble
counters. Very reasonably priced.
Galatorie's�On the famed Bourbon Street. Top-of-the-range
Funky Butt�Located on North Rampart Street, this place is great Creole food served in a mirror-lined dining room, but if you go
for live music. It is a stylish jazz club, which resembles an art deco tn�re during the evening or on Sunday a jacket and tie is required
bordello. Cover is Bayona�Dauphine Street, reasonably priced with funkv creative
about10. Southwest entrees mixed with the Creole dishes.
Donna's�On North
Rampart Street, this
is a hip place where
you can get both
barbecue and the
sounds of brass
bands.
Mid City Lanes-
Located on South
Corrolton Street, this
place is as kooky as
V
W
Cafe Du Monde�Translated literally
to mean the "world's coffee this is a
bjg must. Located on Decatur Street, in
the French Market, it is a 24-hour cafe
with cafe au lait and wonderful, light
beignets (pronounced ben-yah), sugary
doughnuts you can dine on for only a
few bucks.
Eating and drinking are not the
only things to do in New Orleans.
During the day, while recovering from
your night out, there are so many great
New Orleans itself,
only here can you places to see, such as the Marie Laveau Voodoo Museum. You can
find zydeco bands playing a packed dance floor alongside bowling ,ake the Carleton Street trolley cart to the Garden District, which
'anes- is a beautiful array of houses, one of which belongs to author
Tipitina's�Located on Napoleon Avenue, this place is for those Anne Rce, and come back to the Quarters (what people there call
who want to experience the Cajun music scene. Tipitina's hosts a tne French quarters) and shop on the streets to find bargains,
variety of bands ranging from the small Cajun types to some of Like the old saying goes: eat, drink and be merry for tomorrow we
the biggest acts. may die. In New Orleans you can accomplish the eating, drinking
New Orleans' music has been shaped from a diverse heritage31111 being merry. The city is odd, eccentric and fun.
of African Slave music, Civil War brass bands, plantation spirituals For more information about restaurants, festivals and hotels
and work songs. Names to look for while in New Orleans are go to httpexplore-New-Orleans com
Charamaine Neville, Nicholas Payton and James Andrew, to name
a few. During the day, you can travel to the Preservation Hall n"s wrill'r contacted at smeek@smdentmedta.ecu.edu.
Bigger models strut new lingerie
NEW YORK (AP) - For years,
supermodel Kate Dillon starved
herself to be thin. Then she got
fed up. She started eating and
stopped working as a "skinny
model
Today, the 5-foot-ll-
inch, 175-pound Dillon is
showing off revealing lingerie
on the runway as part of
retailer Lane Bryant's effort to
kick off Cacique - its new line
of plus-size lingerie and
sleepwear.
Lane Bryant, which
already carries plus-size cloth-
ing, hopes to make an impres-
sion with its thongs, plunging
lace bras and sleepwear for
women sized 14 to 28.
The national chain publicized a
Wednesday night Webcast of its
"intimate runway show" in
major newspapers and trade
publications. Its ads featured
generously proportioned
women stripping down to their
underwear, and the words: "Big
girls take back the night
The runway show, held
Tuesday in New York, included
the likes of former Playboy
Playmate of the Year Anna
Nicole Smith, actress Kathy
Najimy of the NBC show
"Veronica's Closet" and Mia
Tyler, daughter of Aerosmith's
Steven Tyler. Before and after
the show, movies of women
posing seductively blanketed
the walls of the packed studio.
Like most lingerie
runway shows, this one had
models, most close to 6 feet
tall, strutting to the beat and
sporting garter belts, bustiers,
camisoles and see-through
nightgowns.
But unlike those typically
seen on television and in
magazines, some of these
models had cellulite and stretch
marks.
"They are very sexy, even
if they are bigger said audi-
ence-member Corrado Speziali.
"A slim model gives you the
wrong idea
But slim models have
been the norm until recently.
"You couldn't have done
this five years ago said Julie
Lewit, founder of Mode maga-
zine, which is targeted at plus-
size women. "There was no one
manufacturing the clothes and
no retailers selling them
Holly Boss Hog Harris
Emily Cooter Little
Patrick Roscoe P. McMahon
Entei I ditor
D. Miccah Bo Smith
Melyssa Daisy Ojeda
Head Copy Editor
Emily Gen, Lee Richardson
Melissa Luke Massey
Layout Designer
"I want room seruice!
I want the club sandwich,
I want the cold Mexican
beer. I want the $10,000-
a-mght hooker! I want m
shirts laundered
-Johnnu Mnemonic





$fl what we found �
Emily Little
FH Editor
The remote just
doesn't seem to be the
gateway to adventure that it
once was. If it weren't for the
Sci Fi Channel's "Farscape
TV would be a wasteland of
reliable comedy and roman-
tic struggle, tempered with
the occasional pro-wrestling
match or all-out-expose on
the latest scandal to hit the
cover of the Inquirer. I am a
connoisseur of television,
and I haven't been excited
by anything in months.
All that changed last
Monday night when I
returned from doing the
laundry to find Eminem and
Dr. Die performing an
incredible rendition of
"Forgot About Ore" on USA.
When they stepped off the
stage to do an interview with
the great Matt Pinfield, I
turned up the volume and
took a seat.
The show is called
"Jimmy and Doug's
Farmclub and it's a modern
piece of artistic genius. The
first of its kind, the program
is a totally interactive
welcome wagon for the new
century.
It all begins on the
Web site, Farmclub.com,
where unsigned bands
upload their songs to a
database. Anyone can log
onto the site,
listen to the
songs and vote
on which
performers
they'd like to
see on the
show. The
winners get a
visit from Matt
Pinfield and a
one-time gig on
the Farmdub
stage, in front of
a TV audience of
millions. The
big winners get
a record deal
too.
In be-
tween the new
acts, Farmclub
schedules
current favorites.
The premiere
included two
energy-charged
performances
from Eminem
and Dr. Dre, as
well as a mushy
version of "I Do
by 98 Degrees,
fueled by scream-
ing girls in the
front row. The
boy band's performance was the
only nod to MTV to interrupt the
tone of the program; it was a little
out of place for a show that seeks
out true musical talent. And
anyone who's heard Pinfield's
Limp Bizkit tirade knows he must
have been slamming his head into
rarmclub.com: the homepage, world wide web photo)
a wall the whole way through
the song.
98 Degrees, in fact, was
the only band he didn't
interview. They got to talk to
the Doritos girl who was in
their video, one of two hot
chicks flanking the Bald Man
during the show. He did sit
down with Eminem and Dre, as
well as the new bands before
they performed and as they left
the stage. It was one long easy-
going discussion about good
music with the man who
knows more about it than
anyone else from MTV land.
The best thing about the
show is its uncensored feel.
Definitely not a program for
the kiddies, hence its late-night
scheduling, musicians are not
made to change their lyrics, no
matter how violent or disgust-
ing. Although heavy cuss words
are silenced, the words are still
allowed to be said onstage, and
the content of the song is never
touched, like the cheesy radio
version of Everlast's "Ends
where we're not even allowed
to hear "smoke" when "weed"
is scratched out.
98 Degrees aside, there is
no foolish MTV act here. This is
all about the music and striving
musicians. Rock bands, singing
DJs, metalheads, punk rock-
ers�it doesn't matter. Someone
has.finally produced music
television worth watching.
Farmclub comes on
Monday nights at 11 p.m. on
USA. I urge you strongly to see
it. If you don't have cable, this,
if repeated showings of "Back
to the Future" isn't enough,
should be reason to get it.
Screw MTV. They've been
overshadowed by something
better.
This writer can be contacted at
ftnmhimlmidaistudentmedia.ecu.edu.
College students play to eat like a millionaire
PHILADELPHIA (AP)-
"Who Wants to Eat Like a
Millionaire?"
. Dozens of Philadel-
phia college students do,
and were hungry enough to
bring their appetites to
campus Thursday to
compete for a six-course
French meal in a crystal-lit
room surrounded by silk-
covered walls at one of
Philadelphia's best-known
restaurants, Le Bee-Fin.
As a spin off of the
ABC's "Who Wants to Be a
Millionaire students at the
University of Pennsylvania
and Drexel University are
taking advantage of the quiz
craze and organizing their
own version of the show to
help bridge the gaps between the
students at the two West Philadel-
phia campuses.
The campus of Penn, the
city's claim to Ivy League status,
sits just blocks from Drexel, a less
prestigious and $ftiller private
institution. The two school's
crowds rarely mix, students say.
To better school relations, several
student associations are coordi-
nating noncompetitive games to
be held next week.
The "Who Wants to Eat
Like a Millionaire?" game will be
conducted very similar to the
popular TV show but instead of
big cash prizes, the booty will be
gift certificates from nearby
eateries like the corner conve-
nience store or a four-star restau-
rant.
"I'm not particularly a
fan of 'Who Wants to be a
Millionaire?' but we thought
that since the two groups of
students live down the block
from each other and don't
hang out, we would give them
the opportunity to meet said
Jon Herrmann, a 21-year-old
Wharton senior and co-
chairman of Penn's Social
Planning and Events Commit-
tee.
Participants must choose
their prospective dinner date
before they compete for the
show. The person they choose
will also serve as their "phone a
friend" life line, Herrmann said.
Besides that game, student
groups also organized a version
of "The Dating Game" to help
motivate more dating between
the two groups.
. "We wanted to get some
love in the air since Valentine's
Day is coming up said 21-
year-old Jason McRae, president
of the Black Student Union.
He pondered organizing "The
Dating Game" last year, and
finally decided to propose it
after discovering that the TV
show was founded by Drexel
alum Chuck Barris. Winners of
this game will win a dinner and
a movie date.
Dozens of students
registered for the university-
funded games over the Internet
this week, McRae said. Organiz-
ers hope to have about 200
other students gather to watch
the games. "The Dating
Game" will take place at
Drexel's student center on
Feb. 9, and "Millionaire" is
happening at Penn's student
center on Feb. 10.
"For me personally, I
think it sounds kind of
cheesy said Penn history
student Greg jenemann, as he
locked up his bicycle on
campus. "1 already have
friends that go to Drexel, but
for the most part 1 think the
two schools are just different
socially. They're both pretty
closed off from one another
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THINGS TO DO IN GREENVILLE
WHEN YOU'RE SOBER
Emily Little
FH Editor
So it's not the most exotic place to spend a
clear-headed evening. But it's free and it's on
campus and I was afraid that if I started with
something more exciting I'd run out of ideas
by March. You probably underestimate the
value of a Mendenhall movie anyway. You
probably don't appreciate the subtleties
of watching a recently-released-to-
video film with a crowd of loud
people who like to throw things and
laugh during the serious parts.
So I went to Hendrix last
Thursday to see Runaway Bride,
to prove to you how exciting the
experience is, but it wasn't really
very exciting. So I'll just talk
about the other times I've been
to Hendrix to see movies over
the years.
It's not like other theaters,
where that one girl keeps talking to her
boyfriend and everybody keeps flashing
her dirty looks but nobody says anything.
There are no expensive popcorn buckets that
10 people couldn't consume or 2-gallon sodas that
make you have to do the mad dash to the bathroom three
times when you think there's a slow part (although the
moment you're gone there will be a major plot twist on
which the entire comprehension of the film hinges. I
know this. I have a small bladder.)
There is, however, The Spot. Here you can buy
candy and soda, both of which you can either throw or
consume�it's up to you. (By throwing soda, I mean you
can suck some up in a straw and then squirt it out at
people.) By the time you've finished the previews, you
can be so full of Raisinets and caffeine that you're too
busy running across the stage naked, screaming, "Look at
me! I'm naked to pay attention to the gradually build-
ing romance that symbolizes man's devotion to his inner
child. The Spot also provides one-stop shopping for all
freshmen who want to use up their declining balance and
gain some of those important 15 pounds at the same
time, although you may work them off again while you
run around naked.
You never go to Hendrix if you actually want to see
a movie. It's kind of like that small party where somebody
put in Howard the Duck just to have something on TV
while everybody talks about how much they hate the
foreign language requirement. Hendrix is more like a
junior version of "Mystery Science Theater 3000 but
with more people. You're basically going to a movie with
all these friends you've never met. One time, my fresh-
man year, we were shown a special preview of Ransom
right before It hit the theaters. Right when Gary Sinese
catches a few bullets to the chest, some guy yelled out, in
his best Forrest Gump: "They shot Lieutenant Dan and
the whole theater exploded in a giant hysterical convul-
sion until nobody could possibly have understood the
dialogue for about 10 minutes. That is Hendrix. That's
FILMS AT HENDRIX
what makes it fun. Those people who don't
shut up, who laugh when the teenagers are
murdered in the prime of their innocent
youth, who make appropriate jokes in the
least appropriate moments�those are the
people who make it all worthwhile. Them
and that girl who sits downstairs and shushes
as loud as she possibly can while the loud
people laugh at her and yell even louder. Then
she gets really mad and starts cussing them out
until they almost get into a fight and the whole
theater can't hear the movie. That's entertain-
ment.
Always go to see an action movie. Explo-
sions are better when accompanied by cheers and
funny comments, especially Lethal Weapon films.
Especially the fourth one, where that Chinese guy
with the rat tail takes a gun apart and knocks
Murtoch and Riggs out with one swift motion. You
know what I'm talking about. You sat open-mouthed in
awe when it happened, too.
Hendrix shows films on Wednesdays at 7 p.m.
and Thursdays at 10 p.m or is it Fridays and Saturdays
at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 3 p.m.? Or Thursdays at 7:30
p.m. and Fridays and Saturdays at 10 p.m.? 1 guess they
show some movies at some time on some day of the
week. Call the Student Union for the times because
frankly, I can never figure out the schedule over there.
The number is 328-4715. Ask for the employee who
answers the phone and tell them I sent you.
This writer can be contacted at fountainhead@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Tonight at
Hendrix: "The
Story of Us"
(world wide
web photo)

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the back
Photos by Bill Keith
PW

Mmm, blue ueluet, a good friend and a mess
of hot uiings make Tuesday a special time
BW-3's is the only restaurant that pays you to eat.
This guy's losing a staring contest with a Bud
Light across the may.
Vou haue tuio shiny neui quarters water now or laundry
later?
Now that you'ue eaten the wings, I must tell
you they're made of PEOPLE!


Title
The East Carolinian, February 10, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 10, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1389
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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