The East Carolinian, February 3, 2000






www.tec.ecu.edu
the 1
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 85
DJS FOREGO SLEEP FOR
SHOWS pg. 6
Living to the rhythm of the night
36 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
Basketball
At 7 p.m Friday, Feb. 4, the Pirates will
will play James Madison University in
William's Arena at Minges Coliseum.
At 7 p.m Saturday, Feb. 5, the Lady Pi-
rates will will play James Madison Univer-
sity in William's Arena at Minges Coliseum
and at 2 p.m Sunday, Feb. 6, will take on
American University
Real Estate
The School of Business' real estate ap-
praisal class originally scheduled for Friday,
Feb. 4, has been canceled. For more infor-
mation, contact The School of Business
Professional Programs at 328-6377.
I
Wind and Jazz
Concerts
At 8 p.m. on
Friday, Feb.4, in
' Wright Audito-
rium, the ECU
Symphonic Wind
Ensemble and the
Jazz Ensemble will
perform. The concert
is free and open to
the public.
District Honors Band
The Eastern District Honors Band is
coming to ECU. A public performance by
the band is scheduled for 7 p.m on Satur-
day, Feb. 5, in Wright Auditorium. Contact:
The School of Music, 328-6851.
Music Faculty
Charles and Joanne Bath, School of
Music faculty, will give a recital on the piano
and violin at 3 p.m on Sunday, Feb. 6, in
the Recital Hall. The program is free and
open to the public.
Art Expo
The Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center will host "Synergy: Art Expo
Explosion and Night of Jazz" featuring work
by ECU art students, a jazz flautist and lec-
turer Galen Abdur-Razzaq on Friday, Feb.
4.
Lecture
The History of Jazz lecture will take
place from 2 p.m3 p.m. in Room 244 of
Mendenhall Student Center.
Art Expo
The jazz performance art expo and po-
etry open-mic will take place at 6 p.m. in
the Bloxton House. Light refreshments will
be served. To dis-
play your artwork
or for more infor-
mation, call 328-
'1680.

Anniversary
The School of Nursing will celebrate its
40 year anniversary with a reception from 4
p.m7 p.m Friday, Feb. 4, at Sweetheart's
in Todd Dining Hall.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you think it's fair for
students to pay for building
maintenance ?
PIRATES STOMP EAGLES pg. 8
American U. comes up short 62-59
THURSDAY. FEBRUARY 3. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Sunny, high of 53'
and a low of 30�
Students say discrimination still problem
CM owners refuse
to comment
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Despite the efforts of univer-
sity and city officials to open
lines of communication about
alleged discrimination against
African-Americans at downtown
clubs, many students say they do
not feel steps have been taken to
remedy the situation.
Dr. Garrie Moore, vice chan-
cellor of Student Life, reported in
late January that he had received
12 reports from students com-
plaining that clubs were employ-
ing unfair admittance policies.
Moore said he grew con-
cerned after the vast amount of
reports stated basically the same
type of concern� racial discrimi-
nation.
Moore and City Manager Rob
Kimble set a up meeting with the
bar association and city officials
to discuss the allegations. Moore
said the meeting went well and
that the downtown club owners
assured him that issue would be
investigated and addressed in a
timely fashion.
Moore said he hm not re-
ceived any formal discrimination
reports since the Jan. 20 issue of
The Last Carolinian, but he did
comment that a student came by
his office while he was out and
left a written remark stating that
"there is definitely a problem
downtown
According to Moore, due to
content contained in the Jan. 20
TEC article about discrimination
downtownthe owner of
Pantana Bob's, Bernett LaPrade,
contacted him with concerns.
Pantana Bob's was named in the
reports as the club most likely to
discriminate agaianst African-
Americans.
"He PB's ownerj told me that
he was not aware of the problems
occurring Moore said. "And
that he would do anything to
solve the problem Moore said
that he feels continued commu-
nication will help reach a reso-
lution.
However, when TEC con-
See RACE, page 4
Religious leader speaks about tolerance
IBM, Microsoft
donate computers
Flood victims to
receive laptops
T. L. Register
STAFF WRITER
Imam W. Deen Mohammed, leader 2.5 million Muslim-Americans, gave a speech entitled "Diversity and
Cultural Sensitivity: Living Together in the New Millennium" yesterday in Wright Auditorium, (photo by
Garett McMillan)
Microsoft, IBM and the ECU
Workstation Support Group
have combined efforts to give
computers to those students
who lost theirs in the flood.
IBM first contacted ECU af-
ter the devastation of Hurricane
Floyd and the subsequent flood.
After approximately three
months of preparation, the
laptops are ready for distribu-
tion.
"It took longer than we
would have preferred said
Ernest Marshhurn, director of
Strategic Initiatives for Comput-
ing and Information Systems.
"IBM approached us and offered
some laptops they had in stor-
age for distribution to help re-
engage students in the learning
process who had lost everything
during the flood
Microsoft agreed to donate
the licenses for the software to
the computers. These two contri-
butions allowed the ECU Work-
station Support Group to com-
bine the donations and bring the
laptops to near current standards.
The laptops are IBM
Thinkpads with a minimum hard
drive of 800 MB with 24 MB of
RAM and a 486 processor. The
software supplied by Microsoft is
Windows 98 with Microsoft Of-
fice 97. The total estimated worth
of both donations is $22,000. Of
this amount, approximately
$14,000 was used for the licenses
of the software and $8,000 for the
IBM Thinkpads.
The first of these computers
was given away this past Tuesday
to Dustin Morris by Judy Wain-
wright, a member of the team
that helped get the laptops ready
for distribution.
See COMPUTERS, page 4
New drug offers relief for asthma sufferers
Medication removes
allergen antibody
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
A new form of relief is on the
way for asthma sufferers.
An article in the December,
1999 issue of the New England
Journal of Medicine, co-written
by Dr. James Metzger from ECU,
features this new drug.
This new treatment, called
Anti-lgE, aims to provide a side-
effect free method of treatment,
and to reduce or eliminate the
need for oral or inhaled corticos-
teroids.
"It's designed for people who
have moderate-to-severe chronic
asthma Metzger said.
The medication, which is ad-
ministered by injection, has been
shown to alleviate symptoms in
people who suffer from asthma
due to allergic reactions.
"It's a lot like an allergy shot
Metzger said. "It reduces the lev-
els of antibody so it can't re-
spond when it encounters the
antigens .
These antigens are produced
by allergic reactions which can
be triggered by pollen, animal
dander, mold, dust mites, insect
bites, food allergies and hay fe-
ver, among other things.
"The important thing about
this medicine is that it is the first
type to remove the allergic anti-
body from the body Metzger
said.
IgE (Immunoglobin E) is an
antibody within the immune
system that causes allergic reac-
tions by attaching to certain
body cells. At the time of an al-
lergic asthma attack, the levels of
IgE in the blood are highly el-
evated.
Anti-lgE binds with IgE and
removes it from circulation,
thereby eliminating many aller-
gic symptoms, such as tightness
in the chest, wheezing, coughing
and swelling of the air passages
in the lungs.
In a 1998 study, iOO individu-
als, some from ECU, with asthma
were given Anti-JgE intrave-
nously weekly for a total of 20
"It's a lot like an
allergy shot"
Dr. James Metzger
VICE CHAIR OF INTERNAL
MEDICINE. ECU SOM
weeks. In patients given the drug,
the IgE level was reduced by
more than 95 percent. In the
group receiving a high dosage of
the drug, allergic reaction symp-
toms were reduced by 42 percent.
Those receiving lower doses had
a 40 percent improvement.
All patients used inhaled
andor oral corticosteroids to
control their asthma. Thirty-
three percent of patients in the
large dosage group and 43 per-
cent in the low dosage group
were able to eliminate their us-
age of the steroid.
This new drug will be widely
used as asthma, and asthma re-
lated deaths are on the rise. More
than 15 million people suffer
from this disease.
About Asthma
asthma
A ftraalc foptoakwy
Dr. James Metzger co-wrote an
article about Anti-lgE, published in
the 1999 edition of the New England
Journal of Medicine, (file photo)
In eastern North Carolina,
asthma and allergies are particu-
larly hard to manage because of
the high humidity and warm
temperatures, which make an
optimal breeding ground for
molds, mildews and other aller-
gens.
This writer can be contacted at
cherold@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
During mi ntbon attach.
the Urtertcr walls o� the
Attacks migs hi jsrait
fiwB SMfltf of I
MbMtass to JKHPJNi trtpii
ECU
ACS and ALA to train
student volunteers
to
i nicotine use by 25 percen
Josette LaChance
STAFF WRITER
The American Cancer So-
ciety, the American Lung As-
sociation and
teamed up !i to re-
duce nicotine use on campus.
Th
program
Ith a $10,
grant from the American Cancer
Society. The money will be used
to fund Fresh Start, one element
of the "Tobacco and EC Does
it Affect U?" program.
Founders of the Fresh Start
program would like to see a 25
percent decrease in nicotine use
by students and Involvement by
at least 10 percent of 249 organl-
Fresh Start is taking a new
approach to help students stop
ing and using other tobacco
products. The American Cancer
the American Lung
Association will train 25 student
volunteers to teach approxi-
mately 10 classes of smokers how
to quit smoking. Volunteers will
be trained In counseling skills,
especially in the areas of dealing
with stress and cravings.
The directors of the pr
plan to encourage smoki
tend the classes by oi
scholarships and free
which have been paid f
money from the grant. I
recommend s
gram who thi
Fresh S
student parti
ho- Bob Morphet, a counsi
10k- the Center for Counseling and
Student Development, the
t h e only qualifications volunteers
hat need is a willingness to be
� to trained and to work. A train-
ing session for volunteers will
Ive- take place from 5-8 p.m. on
t the progi
ib at
I at





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Thursday, ft
www.tec.ecu
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
VIRGINIA TECH�Spring Break
travel scams can bring the best va-
cation plans to a grinding halt. As
students prepare for trips to such
places as Jamaica, Cancun or
Florida, they should be careful to
avoid deals which sound too good
to be true.
Many Virginia Tech students
have their own horror stories about
Spring Break adventures.
� �we were flying out of Raleigh
to Cancun last year said Kim
Ascue, senior human nutrition,
foods and exercise. "We arrived two
hours before our flight to find out
that our vouchers were wrong and
our flight didn't leave till 7 p.m
Problems can arise at any time
during travel. Many people seem to
have difficulty with their flight
plans.
"When we tried to check in they
wouldn't let us on the plane because
the company hadn't paid for our
seats and now the plane was full
Ascue said.
"After being given the run
around from a travel company
they arranged a flight for us from
Newark, so we flew to Newark and
left at 3 a.m. for Cancun she said.
Hotel reservations can also be-
come difficult if not made properly
or confirmed.
"We were told that since we had
such a large group that the hotel
wouldn't bump us but since they
were overbooked, they did Ascue
said.
"Since we arrived a day later
than expected we were supposed to
get an extra night but the hotel told
us we had to check out early and
then they only gave us 30 minutes
Ascue said. She said her group con-
tinued to have travel problems on
the way back from their week in the
sun.
"We caught our 3 a.m. Saturday
morning flight back to Newark
Ascue said, "but we could not get
through to the company to find out
how we were going to get back to
Raleigh to our cars
e
atalog
bnnection
Division of UBE
PENN STATE�On Groundhog
Day the most hearty of partygoers
were already gathered at Gobbler's
Knob in Punxsutawney�including
a Pennsylvania State University
bunch.
After a party from 9-11 p.m.
Tuesday at The Rathskeller All-
American, about 90 ardent ground-
hog fans boarded two buses and
were on their merry way.
Bill Medland, day supervisor of
the bar, hoped the alcohol from the
party would keep the travelers warm
until the groundhog emerged at
around 7 a.m. that nippy February
morning.
Drinking at the event is illegal,
so the group must choose between
finding other ways to amuse them-
selves while there or stealthily cir-
cumventing the law.
"It's not necessarily a drinking
event Medland said. "We will, of
course, be obeying all laws
Hypothetically, though, if some-
one on the trip were to get a little,
well, thirsty, Medland wouldn't be
too worked up.
" 1 think if they ha ve a small flask
or something, just to stay warm,
there won't be any trouble he said.
"The police are going to be look-
ing for someone drinking out of a
keg, being stupid and acting drunk
Medland said.
The Punxsutawney police de-
clined to comment on any security
measures that were being taken.
A board member of the
Punxsutawney Chamber of Com-
merce said there would be no toler-
ance for alcohol or drugs, and there
would be a significant number of
police to take care of any problems
that might arise among the ex-
pected crowd of 12,000 to 15,000.
He said in past years it's been
mostly the younger crowd that dis-
obeys rules.
Of course, the scheduled activi-
ties may just be so entertaining that
anyone in the crowd scheming to
drink will abandon those plans in
favor of more wholesome fun.
Ambassador to China
calls for human rights
BEIJING (AP)�Badgered by
Beijing for seeking its censure before
the U.N. Human Rights Commis-
sion, the United States said Tuesday
it wants a wide-ranging dialogue on
human rights with China, not just
occasional prison releases.
Speaking to U.S. business execu-
tives, U.S. Ambassador Joseph
Prueher said Washington was
pleased with China's release last
week of Song Yongyi, a librarian at
Dickinson College in Pennsylvania
who had been detained in Beijing
since August.
"I think it's important that hu-
man rights discussions with China
not be a series of spikes, of individu-
als, but rather a broader dialogue
where we get more philosophically
in tune the ambassador said in a
talk to the American Chamber of
Commerce-China.
"A secure, stable and prosperous
China is what's in the interests of
the United States Prueher said.
A secure country, he added,
means having an economy that can
sustain its population, a military
capable of defense and a system of
government that inspires confi-
dence and whose leaders are not
"clinging to power all the time
The United States has an-
nounced it will bring a resolution
calling for censure of China for hu-
man rights abuses when the U.N.
Human Rights Commission holds
its annual meeting in Geneva in
March.
China broke off human rights
talks with the United States in an-
ger over the bombing of the Chi-
nese Embassy in Belgrade in May
during the war in Kosovo. Vice For-
eign Minister Wang Guangya said
the "anti-China resolution" the
United States plans to offer in
Geneva would make restoring bilat-
eral talks on human rights impos-
sible, state media said Monday.
Prueher also said the United
States should support China's
changes from rule by individuals to
rule of law, from a planned
economy to an open market and
from a closed society to a "world
player
Some of the ways it is trying to
do this is by backing China's entry
into the World Trade Organization
and working on better military re-
lations to prevent miscalculations,
the ambassador said.
Jan.31
larteny�A staff member re-
ported that a large amount of,
money was stolen ftOin a safe at
the Wright Place.
Damage to Property�A staff
member reported that the front
radio antenna of a state vehicle
was bent.
DA says office faced several
obstacles in Internet slaying case
LENOIR, N.C. (AP)-Prosecu-
tors struck a plea bargain with a
dead woman's accused killer in
part because they worried jurors
wouldn't grasp technical evi-
dence linking the Maryland
woman with a man she met on
the Internet.
Robert Glass pleaded guilty
to voluntary manslaughter and
other charges last week, three
years after he was charged with
first-degree murder.
Prosecutors said Glass and
Lopatka met in a sex-oriented
Internet chat room. Authorities
believed the messages between
them described how Glass
planned to sexually torture and kill
Lopatka, 35, of Hampstead, Md. Her
body was found buried near Glass'
mobile home in 1996.
Prosecutors were challenged to
make sense of potential evidence
stored on the computers of Glass
and Lopatka.
"Neither my attorneys nor the
defense attorneys are what you call
whiz-bangs at the computer David
Flaherty, Caldwell County District
Attorney said. "We never had any-
thing like this before
Prosecutors struggled with how
they could prove that e-mail trans-
missions on Glass' computer came
from Glass. Investigators called on
specialists from the FBI, North
Carolina's State Bureau of Inves-
tigation and the Maryland State
Police.
Glass agreed to kill Lopatka in
the online chats, but their corre-
spondence also discussed many
other sexual fantasies that never
happened, Flaherty said.
"The defense was going to ar-
gue this was two people talking
crazy Flaherty said. "Both sides
had good arguments
In addition, the jury would
have been drawn from a county
that fondly remembers Glass' fa-
ther, who helped start the local
Ruritan club.
larceny�A staff rneniber re-
ported that a student had money
stolen from his wallet in Joyner
Library. The wallet was left at the
window of the security office and
given to a cashier who placed it
in the safe. Staff reported that the
safe Is not locked during the day.
Auto Accident�A non-student
reported that he was involved in
a one car accident on College Mill
Drive near 14th Street. She struck
a basketball pole east of Belk Hall,
Feb. 1
Harassing Phone Calls�A stu-
dent in Greene Hall reported that
she had received 12 phone calls,
in the past four days where the
caller was silent and then hung
up.
Larceny, Breaking & Entering of
a Motor VeMcleA student re-
ported that his cell phone and its
car adapter were stolen from his
vehicle while it was parked south
of Jones Hall.
Damage to Property'�A student
repotted that the right door of her
vehicle was damaged while
parked. The victim was unable to
identify where and when the in
cldent occurred.
Communicating Threats�A �
staff member reported that a'
threatening letter had been left;
on his vehicle while it was parked;
east of the Flanagan Building. A;
possible suspect has been named. �
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS & CELLULAH
III
PaH?r$49.95
Includes Activation and 1 Month Service
316- DEast 10th St.
(Across from Kinko's) rufi. Cellular
931-0009
AUTHonurn ACENr
NOW HIRING
Orientation Assistants for 2000-2001
Orientation & the First-Year Experience - 214 Whichard - 328-4173
For more information
contact the Office of Orientation
and the First-Year Experience.
Applications are now available in 214
Whichard Building!
Deadline far completed applications has been
changed to February 18, 2000 at 5:00p.m.
Reality Check

"Hey, I went off campus to look for a place to
live. Wow, it's going to be expensive�the place
I can afford isn't near anything�and those
security deposits will use up all of my money
-
o -
o
111
-I
c
� Why wander into the unknown? Why wonder where
your next meal is coming from and how you're going
to keep up with the bills?
Campus residents:
- v Watch your mailbox for more
information on Return to

Campus Living Sign-Up
February 21-25.
G
Up
O
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
RALEIGH (
warmer weathe
and restoring
smacked by twi
One person
storm.
"We're wait
back said Jeff
President Cl
saster declaratii
help communit
digging out froi
Rain that fell
snowfall from ;
night and made
day, however, m
Pr
CONCORD,
(AP)�In a high
mary, president!
heading to fact
ing places Tuesd
New Hampshire
choices in the fi
the 2000 campa
As the orga
swung into play
of the past few
bit, and some (
were happier th;
"Bring your I
family, bring you
said an upbeat Re
McCain, jokingl
our vote out
"This is onec
rating moments
reer said Repul
MSC Hours: Mi





:eb. 3, 2000
edia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3;
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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Warmer weather to help recovery from snow, ice
RALEIGH (AP)Road crews and utilities hoped
warmer weather would help them finish opening roads
and restoring power across central North Carolina,
smacked by two winter storms in a week.
One person was killed during Sunday's ice and rain
storm.
"We're waiting for Mother Nature to take her gift
back said Jeff Winstead, state highway patrol Sgt.
President Clinton on Monday issued a federal di-
saster declaration for NC, freeing federal agencies to
help communities in 31 counties cope with the cost of
digging out from the white blanket of snow.
Rain that fell Sunday helped melt some of the record
snowfall from a week ago, but the water froze over-
night and made roads slick Monday morning. By mid-
day, however, melting sent streams of water across high-
ways
Winstead said motorists should exercise caution
because low temperatures in the 20s at night will re-
freeze the water and turn passable roads into icy rib-
bons.
Students stayed at home or went to school late for
the fifth consecutive school day across most of the Pied-
mont. Delayed starts for businesses meant unusual late-
morning gridlock in the Raleigh-Durham area along
the Interstate 40 corridor.
Main roads were clear but many side streets and
secondary roads throughout the area from South Caro-
lina to Virginia remained difficult to navigate.
Some of Sunday's rain froze on trees and power lines,
knocking out service to 112,000 customers. By late
Monday night, electric utilities were trying to get the
remaining 12,000 customers restored to service.
Duke Power Co. had the most outages; Carolina
Power & Light reported a few hundred scattered cus-
tomers without electricity. Power outages spread from
Union and Mecklenburg counties through Rowan,
Davidson, Stanly, Montgomery, Randolph, Guilford,
and Chatham to Alamance and Person counties.
Neal McCray Frady, 59, of Lexington, an employee
of Energy United, was struck by a car Sunday night
and killed as he stood in a road inspecting power lines.
The accident happened south of Lexington, according
to the state Highway Patrol.
Conditions could have been worse, but were mod-
erated by temperatures that stayed at or slightly above
freezing, said National Weather Service forecaster Mike
Moneypenny.
Had the ice storm developed, Moneypenny said,
there would have been an Inch of ice on trees, power'
lines and roads.
"It was another one that was extremely close to
being horrible Moneypenny said. "We were cold, but
we had so much warm air coming in aloft that we basi-
cally had just rain
The forecast called for more snow Monday on the
west side of the state's northern mountains, but
Moneypenny said that precipitation would stay in the
mountains, in the central counties where snow depths
hit records last week, melting'should accelerate Tues
day with warmer temperatures into the 40s and possi-
bly 50s by the end of the week.
"We're looking for a lot of relief before anything
else happens Moneypenny said.
Presidential candidates greet primary
day with intense final push at dawn
CONCORD, New Hampshire
(AP)�In a highly competitive pri-
mary, presidential candidates were
heading to factory gates and poll-
ing places Tuesday as unpredictable
New Hampshire voters made their
choices in the first state primary of
the 2000 campaign.
As the organizational muscle
swung into play, the fiery rhetoric
of the past few days was muted a
bit, and some contenders clearly
were happier than others.
"Bring your friends, bring your
family, bring your deceased friends
said an upbeat Republican Sen. John
McCain, jokingly. "We have to get
our vote out
"This is one of the most exhila-
rating moments of my political ca-
reer said Republican rival, Texas
Gov. George W. Bush. "It's all down-
hill from here, I'm optimistic
New Hampshire voters tradi-
tionally show up in heavy numbers
for the first-in-the-nation primary,
and there was little reason to believe
that would change. Forecasters pre-
dicted only light and scattered snow
showers�hardly enough to affect
turnout in this small northeastern
state.
In the earliest voting Tuesday,
voters in the tiny northern towns
of Dixville Notch and Hart's Loca-
tion gave Bradley and McCain the
early lead in voting at midnight.
Bradley had 13 votes and Al Gore
five in the Democratic race. McCain
had 19 to Bush's 17 votes.
Though there are only about
700,000 registered voters in New
Hampshire, which otherwise rarely
captures the media spotlight, it has
special significance during presiden-
tial election campaigns.
Candidates with good showings
here can convince voters and poten-
tial donors across the country that
their campaigns are viable. In the
primary, voters choose who they
think is their party's best candidate
for next fall's presidential election.
The primaries determine allotments
of delegates for each candidate who
will choose the party's presidential
nominee at national conventions
this summer.
While Bush may have been op-
timistic, none of the candidates
were taking anything for granted as
they planned to open the
campaign's final day in the pre-
If s Your Place
.To Catch a free Flick
FEBRUARY 3 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Happy Texas (PG-13) Imagine the fun when two escaped convicts arrive in a
small country town and are mistaken for a gay couple who is to host the town's
Little Miss Fresh Squeezed beauty pageant. You and a guest get in free when
you present your valid ECU One Card.
I
To Run Away
FEBRUARY 3-5 AT 7:30 P.M. AND FEBRUARY 6 AT 3 P.M. IN HENDRIX
. THEATRE
Runaway Bride (PG) And the movie you've all been waiting
foranother Julia Roberts, Richard Gere romantic comedy
match-up. A commitment-phobic woman, who has already
left three grooms at the altar, somehow manages to fall in
love with the cynical reporter who writes a scathing ar-
ticle about her marital near misses. You and a guest get
A in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Get the Picture
FEBRUARY 5 - MARCH 5 IN THE GALLERY
Memories of a Single Mother Picture your family, your relationships, and your
community. Now picture all of these in pictures. View the work of Cordelia
Williams in this art exhibit of mixed media photography.
To Jam with a live Band
FEBRUARY 5 AT 10:00 P.M. IN THE
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Chin Ho! equals R.E.M. without the bull. Enough said.
To Relate About Relationships
FEBRUARY 8 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
The Politics of Love � Relationships & Race As the twentieth century draws to
a close, some students still find themselves struggling with racial issues they
have inherited from their parents. Relationships and Race untangles the com-
plex, yet simple issue of interracial romance. Filmmaker Ed Burley will equip
and inspire students to address issues of race on campus and in society. Present
your valid ECU One Card at the Central Ticket Office to receive up to two free
tickets.
To Spread the Word
FEBRUARY 9 AT 4 P.M. IN THE
PIRATE UNDERGROUND
The Word on the Streets: Learn the best ways to
get the word out around campus to promote your
events and programs. Find out what works and
discuss techniques to bring in a crowd with a
campus pro.
MSC Hours: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - MidnightSat. Noon-Midnight Sun. Noon -11 p.m.
dawn darkness.
Polls showed competitive races
on both sides of the partisan aisle.
Vice President Al Gore, "cam-
paigning full blast every minute of
every hour even planned a 3 a.m.
rally Wednesday in New York City.
Democratic rival Bill Bradley was
headed to a factory gate Tuesday in
search of support and was closing
his campaign with a noisy round of
voter turnout rallies.
The fight between Gore and Bra-
dley heated up over the weekend,
but it softened Monday as both ri-
vals focused on energizing their
backers.
"1 hope you will feel if you cast
that vote that you're part of some-
thing new and fresh that is part of a
new beginning Bradley said.
Gun dealers to Branch
Davidians say lives ruined
ST. LOUIS (AP)�Karen
Kilpatrick has nightmares and
sees faces of children dying in
the fire that destroyed the
Branch Davidians' complex near
Waco, Texas, in 1993.
Henry S. McMahonJr. some-
times imagines the faces, too. He
often thinks about David Koresh,
the Branch Davidian leader who
died along with about 80 of his
followers.
Kilpatrick and McMahon,
who now live in Bonners Ferry,
Idaho, were the gun dealers who
sold 223 weapons to Koresh and
his followers in the months be-
fore the disastrous raid by the
federal Bureau of Alcohol, To-
bacco and Firearms nearly seven
years ago.
The two say the ATF irrepa-
rably damaged their reputations
in the gun trade and terrorized
them in the days immediately
following the raid, the St. Louis
Post-Dispatch reported Sunday.
They allege they are now dogged
by questions about their involve-
ment with Koresh. And they say
they have been unable to hold
steady jobs since.
They live on Social Security
disability payments in a small
apartment in Bonners Ferry, an
Idaho panhandle town 2,193
located a 30-minute drive from
the Canadian border.
ATF chief spokesman Jeff
Roehm told the newspaper the
allegations have been investi-
gated and discounted.
Mark A. Ward
ATTORNEY AT
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All Games Are
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FREE COMPUTERS!
Attention ECU Students!
Did you lose a computer due to Hurricane Floyd?
Through the generosity of IBM 8c Microsoft, ECU has limited
numbers of replacement computers to distribute.
Computers will be distributed on a first-come,
first-distributed basis. All requests for computers will be
subject to verification.
Pick up applications in 210 Whichard Bldg.
!f





I
I
4 The East Carolinian
�www.tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Evacuation ordered after derailed
train spews possibly toxic smoke
12
PRICE
BETHEL, N.C. (AP)- Authorities
� evacuated a wide area Tuesday after
a CSX freight train carrying phos-
phoric acid and other chemicals '
derailed and caught fire, spewing a
plume of acrid, black smoke.
Ten cars from the 30-car train
left the track and tumbled into
Grindle Creek about 10:45 a.m five
miles east of this Pitt County com-
munity, said Pitt County spokesman
Arlen Holt. At least four cars caught
-fire, he said.
No injuries were reported, but
the potentially toxic dense smoke
from the burning wreckage com-
pelled officials to evacuate the
sparsely populated area around the
crash site.
"We've got a 10-mile area
blocked off in Pitt and Martin coun-
ties Holt said, adding that the
evacuation order may stand
through the night.
Holt said authorities were wait-
ing for CSX officials to reach the site
before deciding whether to put out
the fire and pump out the hazard-
ous chemicals or let it burn itself
out.
He didn't know how many
people were forced to leave the area.
A shelter was set up at the Stokes
Elementary School gymnasium.
"You can see the cloud from
here. It has a dark tint to it said
Art Rouse, principal at North Pitt
High School, about a mile west of
the site.
Winds were blowing the cloud
RACE
from page 1
tacted LaPrade, he declined com-
ment. Mark Saieed, owner of The
Cellar and the Sports Pad also re-
fused to talk about the allegations.
Despite the fact that many stu-
' dents say nothing has changed,
Moore said he remains confident
that a compromise will be reached.
"I believe that while working
together we will be able to resolve
the combating Moore saidIt is
my hope and desire that things will
work out between the bar associa-
tion and students
But to some students, going
downtown is still an uncomfortable
challenge.
"Even though I have good time
downtown I just don't feel like deal-
ing with the harassment said stu-
dent Justin Pender. "I mean, they
PARTY MAKERS
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Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
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away from the school and students
were not evacuated.
The train was hauling ethylene
glycol, a chemical found in anti-
freeze, as well as phosphoric acid,
terephthlic acid and
dichloroproprene, said Tom Ditt, a
spokesman for the state emergency
management office.
Phosphoric acid vapor burns
skin on contact and lungs if inhaled,
while antifreeze is toxic if swal-
lowed, said John Meredith, emer-
gency room physician and director
of disaster services at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
Ditt said the state dispatched air
and water quality experts and its
regional response team from
Williamston to aid Pitt County au-
thorities.
Where the train originated and
its destination were not immedi-
ately known. CSX officials at the
railroad's headquarters in Jackson-
ville, Fla had no information im-
mediately.
The accident occurred in a wet-
lands area. Runoff from the cars
spilled into Grindle Creek, accord-
ing to Tom Harris, a Pitt County for-
est ranger.
Pitt County sheriff's deputies set
up road blocks to the south and west
of the site along N.C. 11 and N.C.
903 leading to the Martin County
line.
atalog
onnection
Division of UBE
ELTORO
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men's hair
styling shoppe
2800 E. 10th St.
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troth
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Will Rogers Caiprt
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75S2Via
play hip-hop music, but have a
problem with the hip-hop culture.
For instance, my home boy couldn't
get into Sharky's because he had on
cargo pants and the bouncer told
him that they were wind pants
Jewel Taylor, a freshman, said
downtown has changed a lot since
her sister, now a senior, started at-
tending ECU.
"I feel that's discrimination
why the clubs are losing so much
business Taylor said. "I stopped
going. Due to the discrimination,
many black students have stopped
going too it used to not be that
bad
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
COMPUTERS
Morris, who is a senior at ECU,
was pleased with the laptop and the
help he has received from ECU since
the flood.
"I think this is a great idea to
help people out Morris said. "But
it shouldn't have to take something
like this flood in order to get com-
panies and the government to help
out people
Krys Smith, associate vice chan-
cellor for the Division of Student
Life, said that students can apply to
receive one of the remaining free
laptops by picking up an application
in Whichard 210. Students must
have documentation of the com-
puter they lost during the flood and
are not eligible if they received com-
pensation from FEMA. IBM donated
94 laptops and they are being dis-
fmm page 7
tributed on a first come, first serve
basis.
"I think it's a great opportunity
Smith said. "It's another excellent
example of how people have
reached out to help the commu-
nity
This writer can be contacted at
tregister@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
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i
Messages will appear in the Feb. 10 issue of The East Carolinian
Phone,
ID
I
$2 for 25
words or
fewer
10C each for
each word
oveT25
All ads must
be prepaid
ONLY FIRST NAMES OB I N I T I A I S
M
Drop off the
form at Messages may be rejectededited on the basis of decency. Only first
Mendenhall names or initials will be used in an ad. The paper reserves the right to
8 our office reject any ad deemed objectionable, obscene or misleading.
I U S E 0.
DEADLINE
FEB. 7 @ 5 P.M.
Thursday, F
wvwv.tec.eci.
Terra Steinbe
Susan Wrigh
Emily Richan
Daniel E. Co)
Why is the
property with sn
them, but some
too far by packing t
break window
LETTEf
Dear Editor,
Normally I v
paper and discu
pass up.
This is in res
umn which ran
the kettle back!
ride to school a
route.
I understand
I find it appallii
effort to relay tt
but to the entire
my opinion, the
than the origina
Furthermore,
now on I will co
ing better going
listening in on n
LETTEF
, Dear Editor,
; This is in resp
to be derogatory
for their shortco
! Let me give
bus driver. First,
sight by this lady
at 5:15 p.m. on
She waited for 4
was at the garagf
ful bus-rider for
already know tr
p.m. on Fridays?
Another issu
Purple route at
swer that one. I
cane Floyd destr
apartment comj
moved to the ne
! This has light
foute, but has pi
route. Many mo
Purple just to ac
ings a second'b
Purple has to un
a second trip doi
flow.
i This would e
15 minutes late
cerned, I can't d
prise, it's WINTE
Our gentlelai
from parking ti





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ig through
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LMj f Carolinian
S E D 6 12 18 24 30 .INE U3
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian 5
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
o; i st Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, Wfe Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studenlrnedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11,000 copies even Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing the regular academic year. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited lor decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to edilor@studentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian,
Student Publications Building, Greenville. NC 278584353.
For additional information, call 252-328-6366
Why is there a need to damage
property with snowballs? We all threw
:
�.
them, but some people took it a step
i
too far by packing them hard enough to
break windows or give someone a
black eye.
OURVIEW
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Should have left well enough alone
Dear Editor,
Normally I would never take the time to write to a
paper and discuss the articles, but this one I couldn't
pass up.
This is in response to Leigh Murphy's opinion col-
umn which ran on Jan. 27. Talk about the pot calling
the kettle back! Ms. Murphy complained about her bus
ride to school and the gossip she had to endure en
route.
I understand her distaste for the story at hand, but
I find it appalling that she would actually go to the
effort to relay that story. And not just to one person,
but to the entire population who reads the paper. In
my opinion, that makes her just as bad, if not worse
than the original source of the gossip.
Furthermore, 1 find it incredibly annoying that from
now on I will constantly be wondering who has noth-
ing better going on, that they would have to resort to
listening in on my conversations and perhaps, report-
ing it in future additions of TEC.
I have no problems discussing things that are of
interest to me on the bus. Sometimes that is the only
time I have to see some of my friends. I don't think she
should feel free to take advantage of that situation.
Finally, I believe that Murphy probably just fueled
the fire of the story she retold. The people involved,
who she claimed were friends, now have a whole other
mess to deal with because she took it upon herself to
play the messenger. The truth would have come out on
its own, she didn't need to report it in the paper.
In regards to future stories in TEC, I enjoy reading
about which trustee made the most recent racist remark,
the sex-crazed campus squirrels and the breakdown of
candidates running for president in 2000. However, I
do not enjoy reading recycled gossip�I got enough of
my own real life gossip to get me through the day.
Lisa Stokes
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Get in, sit down, hold on and shut up
1 Dear Editor,
; This is in response to the young lady (not intended
to be derogatory) who decided to berate ECU Transit
for their shortcomings.
I Let me give you a little first-hand knowledge as a
bus driver. First, 1 will address a very obvious over-
sight by this lady. She stated that she waited for Purple
at 5:15 p.m. on a Friday afternoon at Mendenhall.
She waited for 45 minutes and then learned the bus
was at the garage. Since she said she has been a faith-
ful bus-rider for so many years, then why didn't she
already know that the Purple line shuts down at 5
p.m. on Fridays?
Another issue was the chronic tardiness of the
Purple route at certain times of the day. Let me an-
swer that one. Ever since the floodwaters of Hurri-
cane Floyd destroyed a large portion of the Tar River
apartment complex, many of those occupants have
moved to the newly built Pirate's Cove complex.
! This has lightened the passenger load of the Brown
foute, but has put an additional strain on the Purple
route. Many mornings we have to run two buses on
Purple just to accommodate everyone. Some morn-
ings a second'bus is not available, so the driver of
Purple has to unload at Christenbury and then make
a second trip down to 10th Street to pick up the over-
flow.
'� This would explain why the bus is sometimes 10-
15 minutes late. As far as the 30-degree weather is con-
cerned, I can't do anything about that because, sur-
prise, it's WINTER.
� Our gentlelady also had the idea of using money
from parking tickets to fund more bus purchases.
Again, we have a mix-up of facts. Parking and Transpor-
tation, the people who write those tickets, is a division
of Business Services. ECU Transit, on the other hand, is
a student organization run by SGA.
We couldn't use that money even if we wanted to.
Transit works on a tight budget. We have just enough
money to cover expenses such as payroll, maintenance
and repairs, with a little left over for new vehicles and
equipment.
But with the price of a new bus in the neighborhood
of $130,000, and the fact that they take several months
to build when ordered, getting new vehicles is not that
easy. The buses we do have are driven between 10-12
hours-a-day under very hard conditions. Breakdowns are
inevitable and sometimes buses are being repaired for a
few days, sometimes longer.
The higher powers of ECU are trying to get us more
funds, but that will take time. Until that time, this lady
and other riders will just have to put up with the incon-
veniences. If you don't want to, then just move into a
dorm and walk everywhere.
But if you do continue to ride the bus then cut us
some slack. We are just like other students. We have
classes, exams, papers and bills to pay. We go through a
lot of training and take on huge legal responsibilities to
be able to drive.
So the next time the bus is late, try to understand
what the drivers of ECU Transit have to deal with, and
keep your complaints to yourself.
Jason Boldue
Senior, ECU Transit bus driver
When snowball fights at a university turn into malicious wars that can
injure and damage property, one seriously questions the maturity level of
our fellow studentss.
These past weeks have been a fluke in eastern North Carolina's weather
patterns, and everyone has been out partying in the snow. Now, almost
everyone who attends ECU understands that snow is merely a form of
precipitation, but somehow, it has caused mass hysteria among students.
Why is there a need to damage property with snowballs? We all threw
them, but some people took it a step too far by packing them hard enough
to break windows or give someone a black eye. Last week, Greenville
could have called a state of emergency because of the amount of snow-
ball wars that were going on. In some instances the police even had to be
called to quiet down the ruckus. Wouldn't we all rather have Greenville's
finest doing something else more useful than chasing down grown-up
kids who want to have a jolly at someone else's expense?
We will all miss the snow, but not the problems that it caused. Just
because a couple of flurries stick to the ground, it is no reason to go on a
rampage, destroying everything in your path. Hopefully the 3 a.m. wake-
up calls, blaring music and mattress sledding have come to an end.
Snow is just snow folks, and even though it doesn't happen very often
in Greenville, there is no reason to go crazy. Have fun, by all means, have
fun, but be intelligent about it. Even a 5 year old knows when enough is
enough.
OPINION COLUMN
University inclement weather policy ridiculous
Dear Editor,
My letter is to the ones' that decide on when and if
school closes. It's 9 a.m. (Wednesday, Jan. 26) and all
ECU students are getting ready to battle the morning
by getting ready to go to school. After listening to the
news, we all realized we were the only students that
were in school today. We begin our day by trying to
get out of our driveways. This task was not easy at all
for this day. The ice was thick on most of our apart-
ment parking lots, making leaving a very hazardous
task.
After battling with our parking lots, we try to find
a park. Finding a park is already hard enough, but to-
day it was even harder. If the trucks had not already
pushed snow in our parks, the roads were layered with
ice.
It's 9:45 a.m and a "safe" park is finally found on
Elm Street. Then when we get out of our cars, guess?
Yes, more ice to battle. Do school officials not realize
how serious one can get hurt by trying to walk on ice?
Evidently not.
Many students found themselves going to Student
Health from falls on the hazardous ice. Then by th,e
time we get to class, guess what? Class has been can-
celed! So, we go to the library to wait for our next class
and work on an assignment. Guess what? It is closed.
Let's review this situation. Parks are even harder to come
by. The sidewalks are layered in ice. Teachers did not
make it to school. The library is closed. So, why did we
have class at all?
While all the other schools in Pitt County today
were thinking about their student's safety, what was
ECU thinking about? Nothing but, "Hey they can make
it to class, Greenville Boulevard is clear Listen up
people! We as a majority of ECU students have to waik
to school. Think next time! THINK
Matthew Mayo
OPINION COLUMN
Ignorance is not bliss
ing with people in that field. Don't you all understand
that you must be a well-rounded individual if you are
going to be able to melt into this melting pot of a soci-
ety we have!
If you don't learn anything about many things, you
will be a boring conversationalist, never taken seriously,
seen as an idiot and embarrass yourself and your kids.
That's right: your kids. What are you going to tell your
kids when you can't help them with their homework?
"Sorry, Sally, daddy is a salesman, not a mathematician.
Go ask your mom And what about poor Billy's science
project? "Sorry, champ, I am a bond broker, I don't know
about volcanoes. Go ask your mom
This is especially prevalent when it comes to foreign
languages � no one wants to learn one. Why? You re-
ally want to go your whole life knowing only one lan-
guage? How boring is that! Don't any of you want to
travel anywhere? You have to remember people: only
five percent of this planet lives in America. It is a btg
world out there � check it out.
Everyone, you need to see the trees for the forest.
You need to see the big picture. Getting an education is
not all about getting a job; an education makes you who
you are as a human being. There is a whole world of
knowledge out there and if you choose to only look at
the piece of it that will provide for financial security
and career advancement, then you are in for a long life
filled with "I don't knows And saying that phrase ajl
the time builds a mountain of evidence for people tp
label you as a loser. And who wants that?
Now, I don't expect you to try to become masters of
all trades because no one knows everything, and no one
even knows everything about one thing. But you should
try to read many varied things, ask questions, be curi-
ous about everything. It makes a difference. So go forth
and learn, and if you must ignore something, ignore
those out there that are ignorant.
Chris Sachs
OPINION COLUMNIST
Since becoming a graduate student 1 have had the
opportunity to listen to my students and hear what
they have to say about classes and the school itself,
and by far the news is pretty good. But there has been
a recurrent theme that I have noticed and that is the
whining about what courses are chosen as "needed"
for a degree by the administration. Students express
that they should not have to subject themselves to
the torture of taking classes they feel they will never
use and are not related to their major.
Well, there is a word that describes that mentality
and that word is IGNORANCE. The word contains
what it means, "to ignore I am getting tired of this
small-minded mentality that has done major damage
to this country and to the way we go about our daily
lives. Since WWII we have become the most powerful
nation in the world and we have gotten so lazy we are
slowly dumbing ourselves down because we can af-
ford to do so. Who needs to know how to read when
we can blow up the world? So what do I do about
these morons? I ignore them.
Well not really � I make fun of them. I love dumb
people and the things they do, what they say, and
how they think. It provides me with no end of fodder
for my column and they make me laugh. When some-
one tells me that it is not fair that they should have to
take English classes because they're an accounting
major, I smile. I snicker when the students cry, "Why
should I have to take chemistry if I am a dance ma-
jor?" and "what good is Anthropology when I am a
math major?"
You dummies Why do you think the school sys-
tems,force you to take classes outside your major? Be-
cause if you only took classes that pertained to your
major schools would be cranking out narrow-minded
degree zombies that are only capable of communicat-
This writer can be contacted at
csachs&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION COLUMN
No, Pat, no!
Mark Larado
OPINION WRITER
Sunday, by the cheers of the majority of people
around this country, John Rocker received what he so
rightfully earned�a one month suspension from base-
ball and a nice little fine of $20,000.
But not everyone agrees with this decision. For
instance Pat Buchanan's campaign issued a statement
yesterday about this incident.
"Thomas Jefferson and the other drafters of the
Bill of Rights would all shudder at the thought: A 25-
year-old baseball player has been handed a serious
suspension because of some crude remark he made
Buchanan's campaign statement said.
"We read that some NBA players have sired chil-
dren in virtually every major city, and this year alone,
two NFL players were arrested for murder. Somehow
none of this seems to disturb the cultural arbitrators.
They were looking for a guy like John Rocker to jump�
to pull out of the line and shoot as an example to
others
Other than the fact that it's a softer toilet paper
than that found in Aycock, Buchanan's statement,
does make a valid point: Buchanan's campaign mem-
bers live in a box!
If you didn't already know, the Bill of Rights, espe-
cially the First Amendment, doesn't carry diddly-squat's
weight in most major organization's. This means that
you really can't say absolutely anything you want at
companies like IBM because they reserve the right to
suspend or fire you. The company can't have you ar-
rested for what you say.
I'm not sure why Buchanan runs for president.
Doesn't he know that a majority of the people in America
hate him? He has run for the presidential nomination
for past 8 years and lost every time. Why doesn't he get
the picture and just quit?
He is a man who is about 50 years too late. Back
then, he could get away with everything that he has
said. All he needed was a hood to be elected to any seat
in Alabama.
With Pat's constant political foul-ups, it just makes
that state senator from Illinois's political fund-raising
scheme of raffling off a .50 caliber sniper rifle, look like
he was having a bake sale.
This writer can be contacted at
mlorado@studentmedia.ecu.edu.





6 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Fe
www.tec.ecu
I
FEATURES BRIEFS
Spring Break Hot Spots
' Mexico
' Enjoy the the
Cancun sites by tak-
ing tours that span
ages of ancient
Mayan civilization-
ruins at Tulum, go
snorkeling or scuba
diving to explore the largest dive site in the West-
em Hemisphere, visit the Temple of Kukulcan at
Chichen Itza or enjoy a cruise through the lagoon
mangrove jungle or through the waters off of
Cozumel.
� Nassau, Bahama .
NassauParadise P5
Island is the home of ���M
the Bahamian national capital. Prized for its shel-
tered harbor, the city has preserved its history
though its beautifully kept Victorian mansions, ca-
thedrals, 18th-century fortresses and a Queen's
Staircase.
Crystal Cay is easily identifiable on the
Nassau skyline by its space-age design and is
one of the world's finest examples of an underwa-
ter park where nobody gets wet. The park was
built around an existing reef, and visitors can ex-
plore a huge array of exhibits both above and be-
low the surface.
Oaytona Beach
Daytona Beach k
Boardwalk offers ex-
citing arcades, tasty
snacks, a wide vari-
ety of souvenirs, go-
kart rides, games of skill and the "Salute to
Speed" exhibits. For a real thrill ride, check out
the "Skycoaster" and the human sling shot. The
Skycoaster at the Boardwalk Amusement Area in
Paytona Beach gives you a free-fall effect second
to none.
Fresh and saltwater diving and snorkeling are
in abundance in the waters off Daytona Beach. In
addition to popular rock-ledge reef systems like
Party Grounds and East Eleven, the area has a
number of shipwrecks. The most famous, the Lib-
erty Ship, is a freighter that was loaded with jeeps
and other war materials. The area is also "home"
to the wrecks of two TB-M torpedo bombers that
crashed in area waters during World War II.
; Panama City Beach
; Panama City Beach
is; one of the world's
most beautiful beaches,
vtp'th over twenty-seven
miles of breathtaking
sand along the Gulf of
Mexico.
5 Museum of Man in the Sea�Owned by the
Institute of Diving and managed by the Panama
Ojty Marine Institute, this one of a kind museum
houses relics from the first days of scuba diving
and underwater exploration as well as treasures
recovered from shipwrecks. Historical displays
trace man's fascination with the underwater world
dating back to 1500. Divers are shown involved in
marine life sciences, underwater exploration, ma-
rine salvage and construction, oceanography and
underwater archaeology. Exhibits include artifacts
from the Atocha as well as from the fleet that sank
of Ft. Pierce in 1715.
: Shell Jsland�Part of St. Andrews State Recre-
ation Area, the island is accessible only by boat.
This natural island of wind-swept dunes is worth a
daily excursion if you're interested in swimming,
sunbathing and just generally getting away from it
all. Shuttle boats leave every hour to take you to
this unspoiled island. While you are on Shell Is-
land be sure to treasure hunt on Spanish Shanty
Point. Legend has it that pirates horded their trea-
spre there.
; Negril, Jamaica
; Until recently, Negril
was considered to be
Jamaica's best kept
secret. Nestled in the
western comer of the
island, Negril is an oa-
sis for those seeking
an escape from the pressures of modern living.
The talc-textured seven mile beach was noted by
several travel magazines as one of the top three
beaches in the world. Negril also plays host to
beautiful, 50-foot jagged coral cliffs where people
congregate for reggae shows with stars like Ziggy
Marley, Third World and Steel Pulse. This is
where MTV chose to headquarter their Spring
Break program in 1998.
; Whether it be the world famous sunsets or an
all-night reggae jam under the stars, Negril has
something to offer for everyone.
Jamaica Carnival�The island's biggest cul-
tural celebration, Jamaica Carnival takes place at
Easter time in Kingston, Ocho Rios and Montego
Bay and includes flamboyantly costumed groups
which parade and dance in the streets. Soca par-
ties, reggae and calypso bands, kiddies' parade
and more. The carnival includes top performers
from Jamaica, Trinidad & Tobago and elsewhere
in the Caribbean.
Volunteers work to lower elevated illiteracy rates
Tutors educate students,
both adults, children
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
For most people, this is a very simple sentence. For
23 percent of the American population, that sentence
just looks like a jumble of words. Illiteracy is a prob-
lem that most people do not even consider, but for
some it is a constant struggle.
Twenty-three percent of Americans are at Level One,
which means they are functionally illiterate. Another
25 percent are just above level one. In Pitt County, the
numbers are a little higher. Twenty-five percent of
adults are at Level One and 26.5 percent are just barely
literate.
According to the Literacy Volunteers of America,
adults who read at Level One cannot read well enough
to help children with homework, get a promotion at
work, read a complete set of instructions, pass a writ-
ten driver's license test, log onto a computer, read the
label on a prescription bottle or even fill out a job ap-
plication.
The Pitt County Chapter of Literacy Volunteers of
America are doing their part to decrease these num-
Aaron Sheib, sophomore, reads easily through a stastics book aided by skills he
learned as a child, (photo by Emily Richardson)
bers. Sharon Schlichting is the program coordinator
for this program. She helps train and interview tutors out
and schedules appointments. �
"The main goal of this program is to teach adults in
Pitt County to read or improve reading Schlichting
said. "The volunteer tutors have to complete a twelve
hour workshop in which they learri
how to work with the adults. The!
students are given a placement test;
and then the tutors and students are
matched up by schedules, interest's
and proximity. !
"The age of the tutors and stu-i
dents range from about twenty to;
senior citizens. You have to be at
least eighteen to volunteer
Jane Mazzie has been a volun-
teer tutor since February of 1992
She is originally from New Jersey
and she said there she didn't no-
tice the illiteracy problem. The el-
evated rate of illiteracy in Pitt
county makes the problem more,
apparent.
"I was working at The Daily Re
flector and I realized that when a lot-
of people came in they would hand'
me pieces of paper and couldn't read'
it to me or couldn't fill anything'
Mazzie said. "I decided to get involved
ve tutored five students so far all levels. We set
ILLITERACY
at the crack of dawn
DJs air seamless
radio shows
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
It's four o'clock in the morning.
Some students are reveling in the
fact that they have at least three
more hours of uninterrupted sleep
before their 8 a.m. class; others are
just crawling into bed after an inter-
esting evening on the town. For
Roxy Malone, 4 a.m. is the start of a
new day in her career as a disc jockey.
Malone, a former radio person-
ality for 93.3 WF.RO and a fourth-
year ECU student, stumbled upon an
interesting job that turned into a ca-
reer option.
"Last summer I was looking for a
job that would be fun, and I thought
I would be pretty good at radio
Malone said.
Malone applied with 93.3 in
hopes of getting a position as a DJ.
G.W. Barker fills the air waves with his personal music mix. (photo by Emily Richardson)
When she approached the program
director, she told Malone that her
strong, confident voice would
sound good on the air and she was
hired for the weekend broadcast.
"I would sit in and watch the
DJs do a show two days a week and
then I would run a pre-recorded
show on the weekends from 7 to
11 p.m Malone said.
After her third day of training
she went on the air live.
According to Malone, her job
included making sure that all the
music was lined up, monitoring all
of the volume levels, loading the
correct ads during the breaks, run-
ning the Emergency Alert System
and following the log of music
scheduled for the day.
"If we get a request for another
song, then we have to switch a song
out of log that is in the same cat-
egory Malone said.
See RADIO, page 7
Stress contorts students' perception of reality
Frustration inhibits
normal functioning
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Some students live on the edge constantly. Stress
is a motivator for some; for others it can have debili-
tating effects.
The amount of stress that is present in a person's
life is partially predetermined by their personality
type. There are two main types or personalities; type
A and type B. The type A personality is more prone
to stress attacks and anxiety problems. Typically, they
are the perfectionists who overcommit themselves.
Nothing is ever good enough for them, and they con-
stantly demand more of themselves.
"People with type A personalities are more prone
to heart disease said Beth Cradle, interim director
of health education.
Type B personalities are more laid-back and re-
laxed; typically stress rolls off their shoulders. They
are often in lower stress jobs, and their lives run
slower and smoother. If you have a type B personal-
ity, stress is probably not a factor in your life.
"Stress affects a person not only physically, but
mentally as well Cradle said.
Someone who is under continual stress can eas-
� ily become sick, have problems with concentration,
and have relationship problems. Stress can also cause
sleeplessness and a constant feeling of anxiety. Ul-
cers are a side effect of stress, but the physical mani-
festations are only a part of the problem.
Students, although they do not typically have full
time jobs, can suffer from the effects of stress de-
pending on extracurricular activities and course
loads. Some students choose part time stress induc-
ing occupations, such as working at the student
newspaper.
Working at a newspaper with constant deadlines
is a stressful job, according to Emily Little, editor of
the Fountainhead.
"Yes, I believe that I have one of the highest stress
jobs in the university Little said. "We're the only
ones here until 2 a.m. making 5 cents an hour.
"I play with my kitty cat to relieve stress
Another method of relieving stress is through
spirituality.
"Spirituality can be a beneficial coping strategy
said AI Smith, assistant director for the center of
counseling and student development. "Prayer can be
looked at as a coping mechanism. It helps people
become calm and more relaxed. The effects of prayer
depend on one's point of view
-P
Kat Fowler, senior, smokes to relieve stress, (photo by Emily
Richardson)
Stress Relief
Make a plan of action and attack the stressor
�Exercise
'Schedule your time more effectively
Eat a variety of healthy foods
�Take care of your body physically
�Meditation
�Prayer
There are several ways to relieve stress. If you live
a high anxiety lifestyle it is important to find some
way of relieving your stress. Stress can be detrimen-
tal to both the body and mind.
This writer can be
features@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
contacted at
'ariorie
Dear Marjorie,
A truly incredible guy who I met at a club called
me the other night, but I wasn't home. He left a mes-
sage on my voice-mail, so I called him back. Unfor-
tunately, I got his voice-mail. He still hasn't called
me back and it has been a week. Should I call him?
�Clueless in Cotten
Dear Clueless,
No, you cannot call him back unless you want
him to think that you are desperate and have noth-
ing better to do. Didn't you read The Rules? It is im-
perative that he call you back. If he does, you have
gained a man who will diligently call you back when
he is supposed to and revere you as the goddess you
are. If you call him back, you will send him the mes-
sage that you are willing to crawl to get to him. Is it
really worth it? I doubt it.
If you are in a committed relationship, however,
call return is acceptable and necessary. By this time,
you have determined that the man is worth your
time and attention, and with any luck, he knows
how special you are and treats you thus. Remember,
the clock swings both ways in a relationship. You
both have to work to stay together.
Dear Marjorie,
I was dancing downtown the other night with
my friends, and this guy came up behind me and
started dancing. At first this was cool, but after a
couple of minutes it felt as if there was a pencil grow-
ing from his pocket and poking me in the back
What's up with that?
�Wondering in White
Dear Wondering,
Girl, if it was a pencil, don't even worry about
him. Move on to bigger and better things�like at
least a roll of quarters.
Dear Marjorie,
I just found out this guy that I have a crush on
may be gay. Is there any way I can get him to swing
the other way?
�Floundering in Fleming
Dear Floundering,
From past experience, you can't get somebody
to swing the other way, no matter how sexy you are
or how hot he is. Sexuality is not a matter of prefer-
ence; many times, it is a part of who you are. Unfor-
tunately, there are some hotties out there who choose
men over women every time. You fust have to move
on and find one of those hotties who are attracted
to you.
M
m
m
EXP
� Fastei
� Cool and
Sanitary Vi
Hours: M-F 8
Call For Yoi
L.Z56-J
The
I
E
$
' Loca
Unlimited
2!
All
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In Front of (





Feb. 3, 2000
nedia.ecu.edu
rates
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Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
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FEATURES
The East Carolinian 1
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
5iJi�irilnTifDgi
GREEKCYPRIOT-AMER1CANS
If you are an ECU student o
nic or Cypriot descent w
sted in meeting, socializi
id participating in cultural"
activities with others, please call
or e-mail Eleftheria at 752-8004,
(elemantzo@yahoo.com) or
Katerina at 353-5081,
(katerina@greenvillenc.com)
aidrLLiij
rrfnio3
ILLITERACY
from page 6
EXPRESS TANNING HERE
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Hours: M-F 8 a.m. to 7 p.m.
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individual goals of what they want
to learn. We reevaluate this every
six months and set new goals
The time each student spends
with a tutor varies greatly. The stu-
dents start at many different lev-
els as well. Situations such as job
changes, pregnancy and other fam-
ily crises can take students out of
their regular tutorial schedules.
Some may have to miss weeks or
months at a time. Mazzie, like other
volunteers, said she just likes to help
people better themselves.
"I get a great feeling of accom-
plishment at helping someone
Mazzie said.
According to Schlichting, the
center currently has 175 tutors and
had 270 students for the 1998-99
year.
The tutors spend approximately
an hour preparing for each session,
which lasts at least an hour and a
half once a week. The materials used
in the sessions depend on the stu-
dent. Some people need to read job
applications, so various applications
are available for use. Other materi-
als such as newspapers, notes from
a child's homework and a workbook
series of basic phonics are available
for the tutors to check out for each
session. The center also has a selec-
tion of general reading for adults at
different levels.
As an efficient reader you are
able to breeze through newspapers
and applications without even
thinking of the hard work that went
into learning to decipher the sim-
plest words. If you don't read flu-
ently, the world is a jumble of let-
ters like hkwochegt.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
RADIO
from page 6
The EnterSoft Network
1 -888-2 76-4ESN
INTERNET
ECU Student Special
$18.95lWonth
Available at:
The little Computer Co.
Located at 106 Trade St. off Memorial Dr.
(behind Outback Steakhouse)
Unlimited Access � 100 Digital, 100 56K � No Busies
252-355-9105
After about a month, Malone
was offered a position on the morn-
ing show from 6 a.m. to 9 a.m. At
first, the schedule worked out well,
but once school started it became
more hectic.
"It was a very exhausting sched-
ule, " Malone said. "As the work load
got harder I just got worn out
ECU has its own station which
gives students the opportunity to
try their hand at radio.
"We have about 45 to 50 em-
ployees�25 to 30 who are DJs said
Bob Smith, WZMB general manager,
"it's great experience for those in-
volved in performance-oriented
majors who want to gain more of
an understanding of radio
Many people assume that to be-
come involved with WZMB, one
must have aspirations to become a
DJ. In reality, the experience is open
to all students.
According to Smith, approxi-
mately half of the DJs at WZMB are
broadcast communications majors
while the other half are from other
fields such as business, marketing
and English.
Senior Ryan Kennemur recently
began working with WZMB, which
is something he always wanted to
do.
"I wanted to bring forth under-
ground music to an unsuspecting
population, and hopefully be enter-
taining as a disk jockey at the same
time Kennemur said.
By gaining experience, many
doors open up once one gets out
into the real world.
Stacy Hickman was the general
manager of WZMB from 1987-88
and now works with the Fox Wash-
ington Bureau in D.C.
"I know the experience I've
gained I will carry on past gradua-
tion Smith said.
Smith started with WZMB in the
spring of '97 as a sportscaster and
moved up the ranks. According to
Smith, it helps for those who want
to get involved in radio to get
started when they are still fresh-
men.
"You start out at the bottom of.
the totem pole and work your way,
up Smith said.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Family of six under psychiatric watch after talking about leaving earth
CORONA, Calif. (AP)�A fam-
ily of six was transported to a Riv-
erside County hospital after police
found them sitting in their living
room with their belongings piled
in the center, telling neighbors
they planned to leave the Earth at
midnight.
Police were called to an apart-
ment on Via De Luna on Friday at
about 5:50 p.m. to investigate pos-
sible cult activity after a neighbor
walked by and saw the family and
thought they needed medical help,
said Police Sgt. John Rasso.
"One of the neighbors was con-
cerned he said. "She saw them all
sitting in the living room floor.
There was a big pile of trash and
personal belongings in the center of
the room
The neighbor told police the
family had made doomsday predic-
tions, believing the end of the world
was coming with the millennium,
Rasso said.
Police got a key to the apartment
and entered the residence after the
family refused to open the door or
answer questions from officers,
Rasso said.
The father, 38-year-old Charles
Brown, awoke from a trance-like
state after police shone powerful
flashlights in the room, Rasso said.
"They said they would leave this
Earth at midnight and as soon as
God took them, their goods that
were piled up would catch on fire
Rasso said.
No drugs, weapons or flam-
mable devices were found, Rasso
said. No one was injured but the
family was hospitalized for psychi-
atric evaluation, he said.
"All of them were adamant
about the dad being God. When
he talked, he said he was God and
he was taking his family from this
Earth Rasso said.
February Specials
75$ Domestic Bottles
All Day Tuesday. Thursday. Saturday
12 Price Appetizers
Sunday After 2 pm
Monday Drafts
$.50 Pitchers of Miller Lite & Bud Light
$.50 Pitchers of Bass. KilliansNew Castle
$3.00 Guinness Pints
167$ E. Firetower Rd.
In Front of Carmike Cinema
353-5600
William Shakespeare's "Macbeth" February IO-15, 2000
McGinnis Theatre � East Carolina University � Greenville, North Carolina
253-328-6829 ffk,
TICKETS: Genera Public $9-$
ECU FacultyStaff and Senior! J8-S7
SludentYoulh S6-$J
February 10, II, 19. 14, and 13 performance! begin at 800 p.i
Sunday, February 13. matinee performance begina 200 p.m.
(T

It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at University of Tennessee, Knoxville,
TN, the weekend of Feb. 18-20,2000. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline -Feb. 1, 6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Recreation Programs Office, 328-4738, for more information.






&� The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Wesley charged
. in Phills accident
Charlotte Hornets guard
David Wesley has been charged
in the car accident that claimed
the life of teammate Bobby
Phills. Wesley and Phills were
racing when Phills lost control of
his car and slammed into oncom-
ing traffic.
Mecklenburg County Assis-
tant District Attorney, Anne
�fcmpkins, announced that
�Wesley will be charged with reck
jess driving and speed competi-
tion. Both charges are misde-
meanors. If convicted, Wesley
could face up to 60 days in jail.
Wesley was driving with a
suspended license when the ac-
cident occurred.
Gailey hired
by Dolphins
Former Dallas Cowboy Head
Coach Chan Gailey was hired
this week to become the new of-
fensive coordinator for the Miami
Dolphins. Gailey joins former
Cowboys assistant Dave
Wannestedt on the staff in Miami
Wannestedt took over for another
former Cowboy head man,
Jimmy Johnson, who retired last
month. I
"It's going to take a lot of
study and a lot of work
Wannestedt said. "Everybody will
start from scratch
Heels, Devils
tangle tonight
Duke will take their top five
ranking into Chapel Hill tonight to
renew college basketball's grand-
est rivalry. The Tar Heels are
unranked but have surged to two
straight wins. The Blue Devils
have not lost since December
and currently sit atop the ACC.
Duke has not lost a conference
game yet this year and they have
not lost to Carolina since January
1998.
Forsberg will miss
NHL All-Star game
Colorado's Peter Forsberg
will miss Sunday's NHL All-Star
game with a mild concussion.
Forsberg, who missed much of
the early season recovering from
shoulder surgery, has scored 10
goals and 25 assists for 35
points in 28 games. Forsberg
suffered a concussion when he
was checked into the boards in
the second period of Tuesday's
2-1 victory over Vancouver.
Melvin leads Lady Pirates by example
Senior provides
much needed experience
Matthew Geraghty
STAFF WRITER
This year's Lady Pirate basketball
team is loaded with experienced tal-
ent. Danielle Melvin is one such
player.
Melvin, the Lady Pirates' for-
ward from Roseboro, N.C. has
helped lead the team through the
ups and downs of the young season.
The Lady Pirates have begun the
first half of the season behind the
6'0" senior forward. Danielle, the
CAA's top rebounder last year and
Pirates' second leading scorer, has
opened up this season in similar
fashion. Melvin has lead the team
in scoring 11 times this season, scor-
ing 20 points or better on six differ-
ent occasions. Meanwhile, she has
also lead the team in rebounding
onlO occasions.
Against American on Friday, Jan.
23, Danielle had a double-double
scoring 15 points and pulling down
10 rebounds. She followed up this
performance with a 28-point night
against the Patriots.
"The team is great, but we could
do a lot better Melvin said. "There
have been some great wins along
with some bad losses
Ever the true team player,
Danielle exhibits her unselfishness
by acknowledging her teammates
and their efforts.
"I'm excited, because players like
'Camilla Murray, Millette Green and
Sancha Cargill have really stepped
it up Melvin said.
Junior guard Jennifer Moretz de-
scribes Melvin.
"Danielle is a team leader that
goes far beyond the basketball
court Moretz said.
"Danielle has a lot of confidence,
and we will look for big things from
her this season head coach Dee
Gibson said.
Danielle responded when asked
about the schedule for this season.
"I. think it is a great schedule,
with a number of challenging
games Melvin said.
However, she did note that she
would have liked to play NC State
one last time.
Some of Danielle's off court in-
terests include reading and writing
Pirates edge Eagles, 62-59
ECU defeated American 62-59, Monday night in Minges
Coliseum. Sophomore Brendan Hawkins paced the Pirates
with 15 points and four three-pointers in the second half. In
addition to leading the team in scoring, Hawkins also hit the
two free throws that put ECU on top for good, (photos by
Garrett McMillan)
Track teams head north for meets
Pirates rack up
wins in Delaware, NYC
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
The ECU men's and women's
track teams headed into the frozen
Northeast for a pair of split squad
meets this weekend.
Both teams sent half the squad
to the Jasper Relays in New York
City and the other half to the Dela-
ware Invitational.
The Lady Pirates had a fine
weekend. They scored nine first-
place finishes and six ECAC quali-
fying marks at the two meets.
"Overall we did very, very well
said sophomore Toni Kilgore.
In Delaware, the women's squad
dominated. The Lady Pirates fin-
ished first in the pole vault, long
jump, triple jump, 60 meter high
hurdles, shot put, weight throw, 800
meters, 4x800 meter relay and 60
meters.
"Overall we felt that this was a
good meet for a young team said
l.en Klepack, assistant track coach.
"We really thought that the team
did very well. This could quite pos-
sibly be the most balanced team in
the history of East Carolina
women's track
ECU first-place finishers
Delaware Invitational
WOMEN
Becky Postpole vault1st10' 4"
Toni Kilgoretriple jump1st38' 11"
Toni Kilgorelong jump1st17' 11 34"
Marshari Williams60 meter hurdles1st9.24
Crystal Fryeshot put1st45'4 14"
Margaret Claytonweight throw1st52' 7 14"
Kay Livick800 meters1st2:18.17
4x800 meter teamrelay1st9:40.37
Demiko Picott60 meters1st7.92
MEN
4x800 meter teamrelay1st8:08.47
Justin Englandmile run1st4:21.48
JASPER RELAYS
Rasheca Barrow 1 i60 meters1st7.64 ,
Kilgore earned two of the victo-
ries, in the long jump and triple
jump. In winning the triple jump,
Kilgore also qualified for the ECAC.
However, she was not thrilled with
her effort.
"I did terrible. I qualified, but I
wasn't pleased Kilgore said.
Kilgore was followed by a duo of
Pirates in the long jump, as ECU
took the top three spaces. Leana
Anding and Marshari Williams fin-
ished second and third respectively.
In addition to the third place fin-
ish, Williams added a victory in the
60 meter high hurdles.
In the field events, a pair of
freshmen broke school records en
route to high finishes. In her first
collegiate meet, Colleen. McGinn
broke the school record in the high
jump, clearing 5'6 12 and quali-
fied for the ECAC. Fellow freshman,
Becky Post broke her own school
record in the pole vault and also
qualified for the ECAC with a vault
of 10' 4
The Pirates throwers also put on
a strong performance, grabbing two
first place finishes. Junior Crystal
Frye won the shot put with a throw
of 45'4 14 Frye was joined by
Margaret Clayton who notched a
first place finish in the weight throw
with a personal best toss of 52'7
Frye finished in third place in the
weight throw.
In the 800 meters, freshman Kay
Livick won with a time of 2:18.17.
In the 4x800 meter relay, the team
of Livick, Abby Hayes, Lauren
Chadwick and Fran Lattie also
Danielle Melvin
Class: Senior
Major: EnglishPre-med
Position: Forward
Career Highs: 38 points
against Richmond, 2 games with
15 rebounds, 3 blocks against
Ricnmond,4 games with 4 assists,
4 steals against Elon
Roseboro's Danielle Melvin has scored
more than 20 points six times this
season, (file photo)
poetry. After graduation Danielle
looks forward to going to medical
school and possibly to the WNBA,
where her older sister, Chastity,
plays for the Cleveland Rockers.
The Lady Pirates' next game is
against American at 2 p.m. on Feb.
6 in Minges Coliseum.
This writer can be contacted at
mgeraghty@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Pirate Notes
Stephen Schram
SPORTS EDITOR
Pirates announce signees
Wednesday was National Letter-of-lntent Day, the day when high
school football prospects sign to play for a school and recruiting ends.
ECU had received 13 letters when this went to press.
Derrick Collier�WR, 6T, 190, Albany, Ga. (Albany HSGeorgia
Military College)
Terrance Copper�WR, 6T, 192, Washington, N.C. (Washington
HS)
Dexter Davis�WR, 5'10 162, Jacksonville, Fla. (Georgia Military
College Edward White HS)
Charlie Dempsey�L, 6'4 275, Jacksonville, N.C. (Southwest
Onslow HS)
Wes Herlocker�WR-P, 6'3 190, New London, N.C. (North
Stanley HS)
Vonta Leach�LB, 6'2 240, Rowland, N.C. (South Robeson HS)
Greg Lefever�LB, 6T, 246, Ocean City, N.J. (Garden City (N.J.)
Community College)
Hagen Mason�OL, 6'2 300, Tallahassee, Fla. (Lincoln HS)
Brandon Ranier�DB, 6'1 175, Laurinburg, N.C. (Scotland HS)
Desmond Robinson�QB, 5'11 180, Rock Hill, S.C. (Rock Hill
HS)
Mark Strickland�LB, 6'2 225, Wilson, N.C. (Butler County, Kan.
CC Hunt HS)
Clifford Timpson�DB, 5'10 175, Durham, N.C. (Southern
Durham HS)
Donald Whitehead�CBQB, 510 175, Leggett, N.C. (North
Edgecomb HS)
Five players leave team
Five football players announced last week that they will not be re-
turning to the team. Bobby Weaver, who started five games at quar-
terback in 1998, played sparingly at H-back and safety this year. His
1998 season was cut short following a pair of leg injuries. Weaver
would have one season of eligibility left.
Offensive lineman Anthony Nobles and safety Chris Satterfield are
both slated to graduate in May. They will both not return for a fourth
campaign next fall. Nobles, from Randleman, N.C, did not see much
action as a Pirate.
Satterfield saw much playing time after injuries forced him into a
starting spot at safety. Satterfield was third on the team in tackles.
Also leaving the program are defensive back Erik Hines and tight
end Elliot Hartgrove. Both are leaving for personal reasons.
Staff adds new coach
ECU announced last week that former Army assistant Tony Oden
will join the Pirate coaching staff. Oden, an Ohio native, will work with
the wide receivers. He has previous assistant coaching experience at
Boston College and Millersville University.
Oden was a two-time all-conference linebacker at Baldwin-
Wallace College.
J
placed first.
On the men's side at the Dela-
ware Invitational the 800 meter run-
ners took center stage. Justin En-
gland took first in the 800 while his
4x800 meter relay squad also fin-
ished first.
In the 60 meter dash, junior Britt
Cox took second.
While some members of the
team competed in Delaware, most
of the Men's squad traveled to New
York City for the Jasper Relays. The
meet turned out to be one of the
more bizarre meets of the young
season.
The armory in which the meet
was held, had its water shut off prior
to the meet. The teams were unable
to run until after midnight and the
Pirates were forced to run without
the aid of starting blocks.
"You were supposed to bring
your own starting blocks, but I
didn't know that said Bill Carson,
head men's track coach. "It wasn't
in any of the stuff they sent me
The Pirates were led by the
4x400 meter relay squad which
came in to the meet looking to im-
prove on last weeks IC4A qualify-
ing time. The "A" team of Lawrence
Ward, Damon Davis, James
Alexander and Darrick Ingram fin-
ished second behind Essex Commu-
nity College. The Essex team was
anchored by two Olympians from
Ghana.
"Lawrence (Ward) came out and
really pounded the other kids, but
Damon didn't really bust the
thing Carson said. "The second leg
has really got to go out and bust it
and run with abandon. We didn't
do that
The "B" team finished fifth.
Individually, Davis took second
in the 400 meters, followed by
Ingram who came in third.
On the women's side, Rasheca
Barrow took home second in the
200 meters. Kiona Kirkpatrick fin-
ished second in the 400 meters and
Ayana Coleman placed third in the
500 meters.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Mi
rviu ty
4





Feb. 3, 2000
Tiedia.ecu.edu
: Senior
jlishPre-med
i: Forward
hs: 38 points
d, 2 games with
blocks against
es with 4 assists,
linst Elon
iuation Danielle
;oing to medical
y to the WNBA,
sister, Chastity,
land Rockers.
es' next game is
it 2 p.m. on Feb.
urn.
be contacted at
tmedia.ecu.edu.
ay when high
ecruiting ends.
HSGeorgia
(Washington
eorgia Military
southwest
. (North
Robeson HS)
en City (N.J.)
coin HS)
cotland HS)
(Rock Hill
County, Kan.
uthern
Z. (North
will not be re-
nes at quar-
his year. His
. Weaver
Satterfield are
for a fourth
lot see much
d him into a
n tackles,
les and tight
ms.
t Tony Oden
will work with
ixperience at
Idwin-
im of Lawrence
)avis, James
ick Ingram fin-
Essex Commu-
ssex team was
lympians from
) came out and
other kids, but
illy bust the
The second leg
sut and bust it
Ion. We didn't
ished fifth,
'is took second
i followed by
i third.
s side.Rasheca
second in the
:irkpatrick fin-
KX) meters and
ed third in the
? contacted at
iia.ecu.edu.
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Dick Vermeil retires as Rams coach
Harris Teeter
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ST. LOUIS (AP)-Dick Vermeil's
retirement plans don't center
around sitting in a rocking chair all
day surrounded by h'is grandkids.
"I'd like to try to get a job in
television again and finish out a
couple years in broadcasting
Vermeil said Tuesday after an-
www.attic-nightclub.com
FRiy L f R$
Harris WV.
buV�gItone
fRtt
1 "tri VIC Cord A
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teeier
Harm
nouncing he is leaving the St. Louis
Rams. "Carol's not real excited
about that
Vermeil and his wife celebrated
their 44th anniversary two days be-
fore the Rams beat the Tennessee
Titans 23-16 in the Super Bowl, and
during the buildup, much was made
of Carol Vermeil's statement that
her husband has nothing to prove.
But Vermeil said he and his wife
only had a couple of 20-minute con-
versations on retirement�one
Monday and the other Tuesday
morning.
Vermeil got out because he real-
ized it's impossible to top a Super
Bowl victory as an exit.
"I think the time is right
Vermeil said in an emotional fare-
well. "Very few people in this pro-
fession get this opportunity
Carol Vermeil, who attended the
news conference, did not contradict
her husband.
"It was his decision she said.
"There's a time for everything. But
the worst thing is overstaying your
time, isn't it?"
The decision elevates offensive
coordinator Mike Martz to coach.
The Rams signed Martz, who di-
rected the NFL's top-rated offense
(33 points a game), to a two-year
contract in January that assured he
would inherit Vermeil's job.
Martz, scheduled to undergo
surgery today for a neck problem,
didn't attend the news conference.
A Rams spokesman said Martz
would postpone surgery and hold a
news conference.
Vermeil's voice broke often and
tears flowed freely at Tuesday's news
conference, attended by several
players, assistant coaches and per-
sonnel director Charley Armey.
Team president John Shaw intro-
duced Vermeil, referring to him as
"Champ
"I don't have the ability to ver-
balize how I feel he said. "I'm so
appreciative of what my coaching
staff has done. And these players,
these guys are unbelievable
Vermeil's quick decision had a
lot to do with emotion. He didn't
want to be involved with the free
agency period that starts Feb. 11, so
he leaves with two years to go on a
five-year, $9 million contract.
"I don't want to participate in
that Vermeil said. "1 don't want
to cut the squad. These are my
guys
Rams players just wanted the
best for the coach who made it a
point to get to know all of them.
Tripp's
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H The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
THEJOiySHOW
COMICS
by Joey ellis
31-8
Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
comics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
by stuart parks and brad benson
WHATTHH SoMON. LrT A
?5R?CTLY C-OOO CONDOM IN -? p

SUPER HERO UNIVERSITY
by noah freeze
CAA PUNKS
by bruce satterfield
OVtf fAPA? MIGHT.
X
RELATIONSHIPS & RACE:
The Politics of Love in Black & White
Filmmaker Ed Burley combines the spirit of activism
with the power of film in this head-on treatment of a
complicated racial issue.
Tuesday, February 8
8:00 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall Student Center
ECU Students may get two free tickets when valid ECU One Card is presented.
All other tickets are $3.00 each.
Tickets available at the Central Ticket Office.
6
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Thursday,
www.tec.ei
ONE BEDROI
Cove $375. I
own bathroonr
1677 or (919)!
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central AC; a
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$300month
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Call 758-6596
IF YOU have
gar Wall at 321
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Feb. 3, 2000
nedia.ecu.edu
brad benson
FT A j
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Thursday, Feb. 3, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
ONE BEDROOM for sublease Pirate's
Cove $375. Includes cable, utilities,
own bathroom. Will neg. call (919) 851-
1677 or (919)549-2278 ask for Paul or
Len.
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rage, washer dryer hookup, backyard.
$450.00month, available now. call
756-9339.
NAGS HEAD. NC- Relatively new
house in excellent condition; fully fur-
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central AC; available May 1 through
August 31; $1600 per month call for
details (757) 850-1532 or e-mail ten-
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NEAR ECU 3 bedroom 2 baths fire-
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WALK TO ECU, 1 bedroom apt.
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Call 758-6596.
IF YOU have high utility bills call Ed-
gar Wall at 321-2700 days or 551-0971
nights. I have 1 Br apts for rent $320
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SPRING BREAK. PANAMA CITY
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NEXT TO SPINNAKER OWNER DIS-
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With a back deck overlooking the riv-
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TWO BEDROOM houseapt. ECU
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Washer Dryer provided, immaculate
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CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
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Rent from February to May. Owner oc-
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NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
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For reservations or Rep registration call
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DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
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Make your own schedule. If interest-
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COACH NEEDED for J VV Girl's Field
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ested, call Lydia Rotondo at (252) 329-
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ENGLISH MAJOR wanted. Must be
computer literate to work in a medi-
cal office. 756-8160.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the
Spring Youth Soccer Program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the abili-
ty and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18. in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are form 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from early March
to early May. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more information
please call Ben James. Michael Daly
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call (843) 272-3259.
ADVERTISE IN
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IT WORKS!
ADMIN. ASSISTANTRECRUITER"
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Great Opportunity
Large Research Company in Greenville is seeking ajull-
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telephone surveyors.
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PAID INTERNSHIP! Learn Myothera-
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APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
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ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Hearth insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
LOCAL WEB design firm considering
candidates for the following positions:
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PERSONALS
AFFORDABLE LEGAL Services. All
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OTHER
THE CARD Post Report 351 Tight
Inn. After the fall of the Berlin Wall &
the lowering of the Iron Curtainwhat
remains, that precededis the Titan-
ium Walliethe language barrier.
The Card Post has progressed via fax-
ing Report 350 & related reports to
the Russian newspapersIzvestia &
Moskovska Pravda in Moscow&
Vecherniy in Sr. Petersburg& is in pro-
cess of faxing to Munich A Bendzei-
tung (Germany). Geneva Journal Oe
Genve et Gazette De Lau sanna (Swit-
zerland). Nevskoye Vrema (Russia) Bo-
hemia Daily Standard (Czech Repub-
lic) Berliner Kurier ani A bend (Germa-
ny) & Express Wieczorny (Poland). In
finding Anne's writing of Atlas
Shrugged' stimulating intellectual ex-
ercisewish to share the following
poem; In respect to Human poten-
tial-Atlas's Shrugis though a mere
flinch. MirPeace. Tom Drew. P.S. Re-
lated reports accessible via
www.news-observer.come-classj-
fiedSundayindex02html. .
ALPHA KAPPA Psi COED business
fraternity wants you! We're the nations
oldest & largest Professional business
fraternity Rush events scheduled for
February 1.3.4.8.10. For more infor-
mation & rides call Shaun 561-8137
Brandy 216-0899.
THE CARD Post 352. Equate Inn
laresponse to Einstein's "Politics is for
the moment. An equation is for etern-
ity (N&O 122000 - 21A)The Card
Post now in the process of exporting
Democratic technology to Russia & all
post-Soviet stateswishes to state the
equation of it's essence of being: F.S.
P.A.D. Prosper 'n Live Long. Tom
Drew.
GREEK PERSONALS
TO THE brothers of Lambda Chi.
thank you for a great time Saturday
night. Congratulations on a great
Spring rush. Lcve the sisters of Delta
Zeta.
TAU KAPPA Epsilon we would like to
congratulate all of your new members.
Hope we showed them a good time
Saturday night. Best of luck. Love Al-
pha Phi. p
CONGRATULATIONS ALPHA Xi
Delta on 40 years of sisterhood!
DELTA CHI you danced, you sang, you
showed us a great time, and-you won
our hearts! Thank you for a great night.
Love the sisters and new members of
Zeta Tau Alpha.
LADY MACBETH we are so proud of
you. We cant wait to see you opening
night Cara! Love the sisters of Zeta Tau
Alpha.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Sig
Ep for the awesome social Friday
night. Lets do it again soon!
THE SISTERS of Zeta Tau Alpha
would like to welcome their new mem-
ber class- Myra Barnes. Amanda Cook.
Elizabeth Creech. Jessica Francis. Holly
Lewis. Kristen Oldham, Amanda Pen-
dergrass. Abby Owen. Patty Shaugh-
nessy. Amberly Turlington, Jamaa.
Rachael Waszkiewicz and Ashley Wilh-
ite. We love you!
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO RE-
SERVE YOUR SPOT FOR SPRING
BREAKI DISCOUNTS FOR 6 OR
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REPS NEEDED-TRAVEL FREE. 800-
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SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $75 &
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1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun.
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es guaranteed! Free parties & cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NORTH CAROLINA Zoo. Feb. 19.
Come explore one of the regions best
natural habitat's zoo's. The zoo is well
known for detailed natural settings for
animals nestled in and among the
trees in the park. Don't miss your
chance to visit. Cost is15mem-$20
non-mem. Registration deadline is
Feb.9. 5pm. For more information call
328-6387.
ALPHA OMICRON Pi announces
Spring Sorority Recruitment for all girls
.interested in finding out what sorority
' life is all about Thursday. Feb. 3. 5
p.m and Tuesday, Feb. 8 5 p.m. at
Alpha Omicron Pi house. For informa-
tion or rides, please call Missy and
Ryan at 757-0769 or 329-2856.
BASKETBALL SHOOTING Chal-
lenge. Feb. 2. 4:30-7pm and Feb.3,
8:30-11 pm in the SRC Forum. Do you
think you have the skills? Come prove
it at the ECU Intramural Basketball
Shooting Challenge. We'll see you
there! For more information call 328-
6387.
GROUP FITNESS Instructor Training.
Feb. 19-20 8:30am-5:30pm. This date
is an intensive two day introduction to
group exercise leadership. You will
learn basic exercisetraining principles
as well as participate in practical teach-
ing drills and masterclass. Cost is
$75mem-$125non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb.16. For more in-
formation call 328-6387.
ADULT SWIM lessons. Beginner and
Intermediate. Beginner is designed for
the non-swimmer to receive instruc-
tion on basic stroke skills in a suppor-
tive, fun environment. Intermediate is
for the average swimmer to receive
instruction on intermediate stroke
skills, turns, and workouts. Cost is
$20mem-$30non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb.4. for more infor-
mation call 328-6387.
DISASTER ASSISTANCE- Grants,
loans & other financial & technical as-
sistance will be discussed Feb. 11. Reg-
istration: 9am- Meeting: 10am. Char-
lie Rose Agri-expo Center. NC coop-
erative extension meeting room. Lo-
cated 301 South. 121 East Mountain
Dr. Fayetteville, NC 28306. Meals will
be provided for the first "200"people.
Sponsored by USDA. Call Eddie Miller
at (919) 873-2011 if you any questions.
GREENVILLE-PITT County Special
Olympics needs volunteers and coach-
es for its Track and Field 2000 Spring
Games. If you would like to volunteer
in the Greenville community please
contact Kelvin Yarrell at 329-4844.
Spring Break 2000
CANCUN�JAMAICA�NASS.MJ
Space is limited "
CALL TODAY
800-293-1443
v ww.StudentCity.com
NEED A JOB?
YOU'RE LOOKING IN THE RIGHT PLACE!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
BECOME A CERTIFIED
PERSONAL TRAINER OR
AEROBICS INSTRUCTOR
Classes are forming now for
those interested in becoming
part of the fitness industry.
Certification is provided by
Cost. S250 Space is limited.
Call Buddy Ginody al (252) 355-0717 for
more information.
SPRING
"M "�
f.pnng tVfak Travfl RM 1 of 6 smt" busmtMM in B US In 1998101
fecogmnd to outtttTAng MM by Council of Better Businen Bureau'
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 Mrs � Moil Meilf � F:w Partiei � Indudes UiM
Panama $139
City � Boirtw. HoMW wi mm 1 M��
Florida $149
7Mglrti � Ortuna, South Beach, Cocoa Bexh
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7 fflht � Air HoW � Free f ood S 36 Hr� ot DnnW
npringbrcaktravcl.com - Our I 3th Year!
1-800-678-6386
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SEA KAYAK Spring Break. March 11-
17 at Gulf Islands National Seashore.
FloridaAlabama. Come paddle the
waters of the Guff of Mexico and en-
joy sun. sand, and surf. Cost $196
mem-$230non-mem. Registration
deadline is Feb. 23. 6pm. For more
information call 328-6387.
UNDERGROUND VIRGINIA. Feb.
18-20. Explore two wild caves in South-
western Virginia. If you are looking for
a unique adventure experience in a
fragile environment then join us for a
weekend underfoot. Cost is $110
mem-$125non-mem Registration
deadline is Feb. 4. 5pm. For more in-
formation call 328-6387.
FEBRUARY CONTRA Dancel Music:
The Elftones: Caller: Bree Kalb. Willis
Bldg. 1st and Reade st. No experience
needed. Free lessons. 7-7:30pm;
dance 7:30-10:30. Sat Feb.5 come
alone or bring a friend! Students S3,
public $7. Sponsors: ECU Folk & Coun-
try Dancers. 328-0237.
HIKE AND Camp Spring Break. March
10-17 in the Smokey Mountains. NC
Tenn. Come hike, camp, and enjoy the
best NC and TN have to offer. Experi-
ence campground camping, lots of hik-
ing and a laid back good time. Cost is
$150mem-$175non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb. 23 5 pm. Call 328-
6387 for more information.
The East Carolinian If
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SUMMER TRIP to Spain and Mafqq-1
co. Two weeks. First session 3-6 hours j
credit. Scholarships, loans available.
For more information, leave name. '
number at 328-4310 or mer-
cercOmail.ecu.edu
BOULDERING DAY Trip. Feb. 13 Ex-
pect a day of bouldering and short top
rope problems. Get out of the gym for
the day and get on the real stuff. Don't
let the winter blues keep you down
and get fired up about getting outside.
Cost is $30mem-$40non-mem. Reg-
istration deadline is Feb. 2 pm. For
more information call 328-6387.
ADULT SWIM Lessons. Beginner and
Intermediate. Beginner is designed for
the non swimmer to receive instruc-
tion on basic stroke skills in a suppor-
tive. fun environment. Intermediate is .
for the average swimmer to receive
instruction on intermediate stroke
skills, turns, and workouts. Cost $20
mem-$30non-mem. Registration
deadline is Feb. 4. For more informa-
tion please call 328-6387.
ARISE OFFERS Climbing Wall Instruc
tion. Feb.3, 7-9pm. This instructional
session teaches proper use of the har-
ness, various climbing strategies,
equipment and belaying. Cost is FREE
to members-$5non-mem. For more
information call 328-6387.
Where can you hear the
Lady Pirates vs. American
basketball game
.Sunday afternoon?
Just one place.
W?MB
91.3 FM
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING.
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE, A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEL FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vernon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10. 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP-
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UHITEB
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED,
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 & 8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITEO
METHOBIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTTING-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AND VICTORY
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-6621
Services: 9 & 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600 ;4�
Services: 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed, Bible Study
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 & 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30, 9:45, 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME 1
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.





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Thursday, February 3, 2000 ��� Anniversary of the founding of the Communist Party in Vietnam
0J
HEAD
Five Men - One Image
Who is the better Bond?
Page 3
Spring Break 2
Last yearfc Carribean cruise
Page 4
New CDs
For better or for worse
Page 5
ill
SubctflitutieetHbb
A look into back door skate park






HMWlNf oOf WWZ Voofo
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D. Miccah Smith
FH Assistant Editor
How many sweaty,
smoke-breathing, keyed-up
misfits can you fit into one
room? You can get a pretty
good idea if you drop by Back
Door, a combination of skate
park, shop and underground
music scene on the corner of
5th and Cotanche streets.
The Back Door crowd,
which sometimes starts trick-
ling in for 9 p.m. shows at
about 10:30, seems to hover
somewhere between lethargy
and manic activity. On warm
nights, people shuffle in and
out of the skate park's sole
wooden door to smoke ciga-
rettes and kick gravel in the
parking lots, hands in pockets,
shoulders slumped.
When it's cold out,
everybody waits around inside
for the bands to set up their
equipment inside the un-
heated, ugly room, whose
graffiti-covered walls are now
coated in drab paint. An
antique pressed tin ceiling
looks down on battered skate
ramps, a swimming pool-
shaped bowl for doing stunts
and a narrow flight of blue
wooden stairs leading up to the
second floor.
On a Friday night in
January, girls whose hair and
clothes compete for negative
attention huddle on the stairs,
run up on the ramps and attach
stickers to a bare wall that
seems designated for that
purpose.
Guys from different punk
bands lug piece after piece of
equipment into the room from
their cars outside, setting up for
a show that will draw an
unusually small crowd. The
whole scene is bathed in chilly
fluorescent light, and people
shift around on the steps,
waiting for something to
happen. They've been here for
an hour, at least.
After a few false starts, a
band called Charlie Brown Gets
a Valentine roars furiously into
life, generating an almost
tangible cloud of sound which
saturates the relatively small
space. The vocals are smothered
under that blanket of noise.
But neither bad acoustics nor
biting cold can keep kids away
from the place where they feel
welcome, a freaky home full of
siblings who have put their
indelible mark on the ugliest
room in Greenville.
ECU junior Kellle Gates
waits outside in the cold to get
into a show, roughing it like
everyone else. Asked if there
was anything she didn't like
about Back Door, she said she'd
like "some heat
music equipment and stickers
for sale In a second-story shop
overlooking downtown.
Under that shop, on ground-
level, is an indoor skate park,
Buchanan, whose offer to paint
the wall for free was approved
by Paul Wojciechowski, the
owner of Back Door.
"It's going to take a while, but I
She reflected for a
moment. "I can live without it,
though
Undiscovered by the vast
majority of downtown-loving
ECU students, Back Door is a
gathering place for a growing
loyal crowd of local and out-of-
town students, many of whom
are high-schoolers.
By day, skaters crowd the
back parking lot and sidewalk
facing Cotanche Street, where
Back Door offers wheels, shoes,
also popular during the day.
A half-finished mural
, done in optimistic yellow paint
by ECU School of Art graduate
Brian Buchanan embellishes
the wall facing Cotanche Street.
Buchanan is recovering from a
back injury which prevents him
from continuing the mural
now, but he hopes to begin
again soon.
"That was a huge wall
and I've always wanted to do a
mural anyway Buchanan said.
R decorated wall
hides a skater's
treasures, (photos
by Miccah Smith)
can see it's going to be
real big Buchanan said.
The mural's
impromptu creativity
expresses Back Door's
casual magnetism toward
all things artistic, laid-
back and cheap.
"I really like the
Back Door Buchanan
said. "It seems like the
people who make things
go to Back Door. 1 like that
people come together there
Several nights a week,
fans gather in Back Door's
indoor skate park for the love
of loud music: hip-hop, punk
and hardcore, churned out by
an increasing number of bands
as the venue's underground
notoriety grows by word of
mouth around the country.
"The skate shop upstairs
has been here for five years,
and the park downstairs has
been here for a little over three
years said Billy Rabon, who
works in the store and sets up
the concerts.
"Originally they would
do shows upstairs, but it'd be
maybe only a dozen kids at the
most Rabon said. "Then they
started doing shows downstairs,
but it was very seldom. Then
about a year ago, I took over
the shows on a regular basis,
and we've gone from having
one show every couple of
months to having three to four
shows every week
Rabon books bands with
a discerning eye, and is open to
almost any kind of perfor-
mance, including poetry
readings, that he feels fits into
Back Door's underground
persona.
"We've had bands come
from Italy, Germany, Sweden;
we've had bands from 48 of the
SO states in the continent, and
it's all word-of-mouth. We
don't do any advertising
Rabon said.
It's no mistake that only
crude fliers posted in odd
corners downtown inform
readers of concerts at Back
Door. Fans and bands alike feel
this is the best way to keep the
music sincere and free of the
materialistic tendencies from
which independent music,
especially punk, strives to
disassociate itself.
"We don't do major label
shows Rabon said. "We have
turned away bands because of
who their label was
Rabon has turned down offers
from bands signed to the
Epitaph label.
"In my opinion, Epitaph
was a major label he said.
"The kids have created what we
have downstairs, and I feel 1
owe it to the kids who stick by
that. I'd rather have 10 no-
name bands than one big
name
So far, Back Door has
prospered from the fan loyalty
inspired by Rabon's devotion to
indie music. In fact, sd many of
the concerts pack in an uncom-
fortably full house that a
change of location is already in
the works.
"We're looking to go to a
bigger building Rabon said.
"It's just reached a point to
where there are so many kids at
each one of the shows that we
need to move on. We're
looking to grow downstairs and
then branch out into another
part of Greenville
This writer can be contacted at
msmith@studentmedia.ecu.edu.





Who really does Bond better?
Emily Little
FH Editor
He is a cunning creature
with a license to kill and a
constant libido. Women throw
themselves in front of bullets
for just one of his kisses.
Villains respect him, civilians
applaud him, and even Her
Majesty's Secret Service could
not function without him.
Five actors have at-
tempted to define Ian
Flemming's James Bond 007:
Sean Connery, George Lazenby,
Roger Moore, Timothy Dalton
and Pierce Brosnan. The
character has spurred a casual
debate surrounding the true
nature of the character, a man
who plays the cold-hearted
killer but finds relief in the
arms of "all those willing
women
So who is Agent 007,
really?
The annual TBS "Fifteen
Days of 007" marathon pro-
vided an excellent opportunity
for me to answer this question.
I sat through every single one
of the 20 James Bond films,
even renting the Pierce
Brosnans and seeing "The
World is Not Enough" in the
theater. 1 came up with a list of
categories that define the
character of 007, and rated
each actor on a scale of one to
10.
1 tried not to fault them
for rotten screenplays like "Live
and Let Die just as I tried not
to give too much credit to the
actor for really good screen-
plays, like "Diamonds Are
Forever" (I must admit I am
slightly prejudiced against
George Lazenby because "On
Her Majesty's Secret Service"
gave James Bond a character
setback he could never quite
recover from.)
Let me explain how I
came to my conclusions.
and running from danger.
Dalton, on the other
hand, has no qualms about
shoving some random guy into
a drawer full of meal worms or
sliding down a ski slope on a
cello. Brosnan, although not so
Lookstested in hand-to-hand
James BondMs just about
the sexiest man alive. He has a
look that would send shivers
up the spine of any mortal
woman. For that, Sean
Connery gets credit.
But Bond also has acom-
certain dignified mm LgM V bat,
appearance, aBf the
charmed intensity AMF master
that only Pierce MMof
Brosnan pos-si'ssi's. Timothy AMV moving
f vehicles:
Dalton would AMkr The tank in
have it, but AMSt. Petersburg
that cleft in AW his chin is Am just toofrom "Golden-
eye" and the
motorcycle and
much. aMB remote-con-
Smushy-H trolled car
facedAMsequences from
Roger"Tomorrow
MooreNever Dies" are
and' � some of the
droopy ;�2r1SIh best action
jawedt scenes in any
GeorgeH James Bond
LazenbyK flick.
aren't -Wmmk Lazenby
evenk would he
worthH cool, but
discuss-K the
ing.action scenes
Action HeroH are so
Qualitiessped
Although Moore's stunt�HHB lH up
double rules a pair of skis, helooks like a psychedelic Charlie
just doesn't strike me as a manChaplin film, making it
who likes to dirty his hands bydifficult to tell exactly what he
getting in a fight. He spendsis doing. Connery, on the other
most of his time turning tailhand, actually beats a guy up
with a telephone receiver in
"Thunderball It doesn't get
any cooler than that.
Britishness
Agent 007 does do it all
for queen and country, after
all. Connery is Scottish
and Lazenby, although
he does impersonate a
stuffy Englishman, is
Australian, so they lose out
on this one. Dalton and
Brosnan get points just for
being British, although once
again Dalton gets punished a
point for that cleft in his chin.
But this category is Roger
Moore all over. He loves tea and
has a gift for understatement,
and that is what England is all
about.
Ability With the Ladies
We all know James Bond
is a slut. When Connery walks
into a room, women catapult
themselves at his body. When
Moore walks into a room, he
talks women into catapulting
themselves at his body. Brosnan
is just plain irresistible, al-
though not so much a brutal
womanizer. Timothy Dalton,
however, does not get laid until
an hour and 15 minutes into
"License to Kill and is practi-
cally monogamous in "The
Living Daylights
It's a shame, really,
because despite the cleft in his
chin, Dalton has a lot of sex
appeal. Although Lazenby does
get two women in one night,
he does it by pretending to be a
homosexual, and all too well
for a man who has never before
held an acting job. He is just
too mooney-eyed.
See BOND page 7
007 Scores
(on a scale of II B)
l ooks
onnery:
Moore: 'i
Nrflton: 9
Brosnan: 10
( onnery: t (I
Moore:
Dalton: 10
Brosnan: �
Britishness
Connery: i
i azenby: S
Moore: IP
Dalton: 6
Brosnan:
ij imth tin' I adies
l onnery: to
I azenby: i
Moore: l fl
Dalton: r
Brosnan:
Belieuability
i onnery: i
Moore: i
Dalton: 6
Brosnan: 8
tool Under Pressure
( onnery: 10
I .ii'nhij: fa
Moore: 9
Dalton:
Brosnan: 9
Moore: 18
Dalton
Brosnan: 9
llll.ll lout Ol III
( onnery: 59, l azenb
Moore: 'ill. Dalton:
Orosnan: bO
Sean Connery
Dr.no, 1962
From russia with loue, 1963
Goldtinger, 1964
Thunderball, 1965
Vou only Hue twice, 1967
Diamonds are foreuer, 1971
Neuer say neuer ayaln, 1983
George Lazenby
On her majesty's secret
seruice, 1969
Roger Moore
Hue and let die, 1973
The man with the golden gun, 1974
The spy who loued me, 1977
Moonraker, 1979
For your eyes only, 1981
Octopussy,1983
Rulew to a kill, 1985
Timothg Dalton
Ihe lining daylights, 1987
Licence to kill, 1989
Goldeneye, 1995
Tomorrow neuer dies, 1997 "�
The world is not enough, 1999 ��





What I did w mi) acting foteafe
a
a
a
a.
es
s
(M
n
0)
�a
n
a
JC
c
e
Shannon Meek
Staff Writer
Let's face it: Most of us have the common Spring Break
syndrome. You know the one, where you end up in a place like
Myrtle Beach sucking in your gut, slathering yourself with
coconut oil, drinking warm beer from a can with sand stuck to
the bottom. It's the same dull thing every year.
Last year 1 went a different way. My friend In Miami,
Laura Sharkey, told me we were going on a cruise.
The ship was from the Royal Caribbean and called
Enchantment of the Seas. I watched it from the port in Miami
near the other ship and to me it seemed just as big as the
Titanic, and just as fatal.
The first thing I noticed was the pseudo-tropical feel,
waiters passing out pina coladas, and the steel drums from the
Jamaican band. The ground moved beneath us and we waved
to a Carnival cruise ship plowing through the water. Spring
Break had begun.
The best thing about a cruise, besides at night when you
look out and the wind blows through your hair and the sky
seems to be one endless dark sea, is the people you meet. Most
of the staff is foreign, so you get a variety of accents and
stories. And you meet people from everywhere. Then there was
the night club on the top deck, called the Viking Lounge,
where Laura and 1 danced until our feet ached.
The first stop was Cozumel, Mexico, and 1 must admit, it
was disappointing. It was so commercialized. Fat tourists with
red lipstick, funky shirts and straw hats came in and out of
buildings with small Mexican treasures. The buildings looked �
like I'aco Bell restaurants, all of them, little stucco houses.
We went into a small, genuine Mexican shop where I
bought a small onyx, butterfly-shaped wind chimes and
haggled down the price of a silver necklace. After getting our
small trinkets in Mexico, which I proudly paid for with money
I won from the slot machines in the Casino on board, Laura
and I went to Carlos 'N' Charlie's�a must if you arc ever in
Co.umel.
The bar has these little round plastic tables and
margaritas that you could literally bob in. I made friends with
the waiter, Juan Kancab. lie spoke English, gave us free beer
and laughed at our antics. In Carlos 'Si' Charlie's, Laura started
a tequila line where five big Mexicans stood on chairs and
poured tequila down our throats, and the whole bar danced. I
even won our waiter's pink bandana, my favorite souvenir.
Although I loved Carlos 'N' Charlie's, 1 longed for some
ethnicity that 1 wouldn't get until 1 traveled to Jamaica.
When Laura and I went to Jamaica, we haggled, then
took a cab to The Jamaican Grande Hotel in Rio. This hotel is
absolutely exquisite with its own private beach, a pool crafted
with waterfalls and women who will braid your hair and put
shiny beads on the ends. In Jamaica, the cab drivers are crazy
and weave in and out of the roads.
The people are so laid back in Jamaica. I simply fell in
love with the big sunny atmosphere and the tropical trees. The
beaches are so white, and the water clear as glass.
The cruise line offers different activities you can sign up
for in these various locations, like snorkeling or riding horse-
back on the beach. Laura and I decided to go on our own. Not
only did it save money, but it also gave us a chance to explore
and see the things we wanted to for ourselves.
I ended my day in Jamaica by sitting in the hot tub with
the exotic man-made waterfall and had the waiter bring me
rum runners.
The ports are not the only good part of the cruise. There
are these shows, with comedians and dancers, and art auc-
tions. My favorite part of the ship was the champagne bar,
where musicians would play the piano and the violin and
these woman would sing. They would also have planned
parties, like a toga party or a New Year's Eve party.
The last night of the cruise, my heart was heavy. As
Laura and I sat on the deck, we said goodbye to the dark sea
before we rushed out in the morning, leaving forever The
Enchantment Of The Seas.
This writer can be contacted at smeek@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
FOUNTAIN
HEAD
Holly The Boss Harris
Emily Maugwai Little
Patrick 12 PBRs McMahon
D. Miccah Amazon Smith
Melyssa Two Dogs Ojeda
Emily Jolie Richardson
Photo Editor
Melissa Dee-lite Massey
I mould like to giue
special.thanks to Joe,
mho I null neuer see
again, but mho said I was
beautiful at the Sports
Pad Friday night.
Imily L.
Top - The ship's dining
robm, sans Leonardo.
Bottom - Shannon
and Laura share a
moment with Juan at
Carlos 'N' Charlie's in
Cozumel, Mexico,
(file photos)





EflL3:
Lawrence Armstrong
Staff Writer
Like most games
developed by Capcom,
"Resident Evil 3" is one of
the best in its class. In fact,
Capcom invented this class
of game: survival horror.
You begin the game
playing the character Ji
Valentine, a S-foot-4 inch,
108-pound, 23-year-old
babe who knows how to
handle firearms and
specializes in disarming
explosives. She is a
member of S.T.A.R.S a
special task force created
by Raccoon City Police
Department. She uses
her strong will and
good judgment to
survive. At times, you
will have to take
control of the second-
ary character, Carlos
Dliveira. lie appears
every now and then
to assist Jill. He's a
U.H.C.S. soldier
who specializes in
heavy firearms,
security and mission
backup.
The game is
made up of basically �
two elements�solving
simple puzzles, such as
guessing lock combina-
tions and finding hidden
items, and shooting
things. For shooting, you
need guns and ammuni-
tion.
Some helpful items,
such as the grenade
launcher can be obtained
by finding out how to
unlock certain doors.
Ammunition can be made
by picking up different
types of gunpowder. You
can combine these and use
a "reloading tool" to create
all kinds of cool ammo,
including handgun
bullets to wicked
flame rounds for
your grenade launcher.
Some other play
mechanics, besides
mixing ammo, include
the ability to dodge and
a quick 180-degree turn
for retreating, which you
will need. A new feature
called "live selection"
allows you to make a
decision at critical points
in the game. The choice
you make will determine
the direction the game
will take. Since there ar
several possible outcomes,
this increases the replay
value. You can also push
objects, climb stairs and
shoot barrels of oil,
making a mess of your
opponents.
The graphics in the
game feature beautifully-
rendered backgrounds and
clean, textured polygon
characters. The control is
responsive and the game
play is realistic, right
down to the depleted
ammo rounds hitting the
ground as you empty
your assault rifle into the
hoard of encroaching
zombies.
But beware, one
creature, which jumps
out when you least
expect it, seems to be
resistant to any weapon.
Emptying a grenade
launcher into him is
useless. Your only chance is
to run until you lose him.
This creature is a huge zombie
who can only say, "stars
If you like adventure
games or RPGs mixed with
gun-slinging, zombie-splat-
tering action, "Resident Evil
3" is as strong a buy as Red
Hat is on the stock market.
This writer can be contacted at
larmstrong@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Jill Ualentine and
Carlos Oliueira saue
the world from its
third Zombie attack,
(photos courtesy of
capcom)
Patrick McMahon
Staff Writer
tin a scute of 1 tti 5 I'atricktu'ads
KockHip-Hop
(Bizkit style)
Crazy Town�The Gift of
Game
Finally, finally,
finally. After all of the Limp
Bizkit- and Kid Rock-
infested garbage spewing
forth from MTV, someone
from the rockhip-hop
category actually breaks out
with something unique and
truly outstanding. Compar-
ing this disk to Bizkit's
"Significant Other" is like
comparing Mozart to Lou
liega. It is just that good.
Songs like "Lollipop l'orno"
and "Think Fast" truly
shine on a disk that is
littered with standout hits
that come together to form
one extremely large con-
glomeration of sound.
Definitely a must-
have for any music fan.
1111!
RapHip-Hop
DMX� And Then There
Was A
The third album in a
string of platinum mega-
sellers, this one tends to
lean to more of the same
instead or reinvigorating
what DMX had previously
produced. I felt the CD was
at times repetitive com-
pared to earlier works but
some tracks did shine
through the uneasiness,
most notably "Here We Go
Again" and "What These
Bs Want While sure
to please any rabid DMX
fan, the disk leaves some-
thing to be desired for
someone who isn't all about
DMX. Oh, for some funny
listening, check out the
lyrics to the songs�he does
nothing but blast none
other than Cash Money
Records.
Metal
dupe�self-titled
NO, GOD NO! Please
rfever put me through the
torture of listening to this
band ever again! DO NOT
BUY THIS DISK! Every song
sounds exactly the same as
the next. Nothing is differ-
ent but the subject matter of
the songs and how it is
delivered. The drums are the
same and the guitar riffs are
never-ending. The singer has
no vocal talent whatsoever
and has no business singing
alone in his car, much less
on a disk. He is pure poop.
Big smelly poop. This band
reminds me of a zebra. Once
you've seen one, you've seen
em' all and ya can stop going
back to the frickin' zoo. This
disk smells like that really
ugly fat kid with acne in
middle school that didn't
wear deodorant and sweated
all the time.
TechnoUrbanJungle
Aphrodite�self-titled
From the club scene
specific conies the Lord of
the Dance himself,
Aphrodite. Riding the
success of his remix album
(featuring classic rap tracks
remixed to electronical,
Aphrodite returns with a
tremendous album. Some-
what shunned by his
colleagues for making good
club music instead of heavy,
complex, and "mathematic-
esque" sound, he has been
called the Puff Daddy of
electronica. The album is
long enough and flowing
enough that it fits perfectly
for those late-night tin-foil
on the walls raves at your
Player's Club apartment (you
know who you are).
The disk is a steady
continuation of sound,
chopped apart into pieces so
the album would have
singular tracks. Good sound,
great party music. Definitely
need to check this one out.
111! Ill
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahonf'studentmedia.ecu.eduJ
ID
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m
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Peasants
the hollow body's
Jewish Mother
The Plank
Karaoke
14
Underwater Cafe
Restarant Grand Re-
opening
8
Peasants
emma gibbs band
The Rttic
Cowboy Mouth
15
SI
tn
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Peasants
wise monkey
orceshtra
The Rttic
Uertical Horizon,
Stroke 9
Peasants
jiggle the handle
Jewish Mother
The Plank
Tree Huggers House
Rand
The flttic
Comedy Zone
16
Peasants
fat mamma
Peasants
fat apple
The flttic
Comedy Zone
The flttic
Comedy Zone
'easants
:hicken wire gang
TH
The Htin
1ike Messmer "eyes"
Hypnotist
10
Jewish MotherThe
Plank
Ten Feet Thick
n
Peasants
wise monkey
orceshtra
Jewish MotherThe
Plank
Local 99H
Peasants
lake Trout
Jewish Mother
The Plank
Big bump & Stun Guns
The Rttic
Strenght, 7th Stitch,
Normal
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Jewish MotherThe
Plank
Razor Posse
The Rttic
Supergrit Cowboy Band
18
Peasants
jah works
Jewish Mother
The Plank
Trauis Proctor
The flttic
Quiet Riot
Peasants
baaba seth
Peasants �� Sound tribe sector 9
Jewish MotherThe Plank Magic Pipers
The Rttic Unsound, Piuot, Neuersai
15
The Rttic Rreakfast Club
19
Peasants
recipe
Jewish Mother The Plank RoHwood
The Rttic
Treading Euans
Peasants
Great Guiness toast





n
ITS
last
THINGS TO DO IN GREENVILLE
WHEN YOU'RE SOBER
Emily Little
FH Editor
Greenville is boring.
Let's just put that right out
there and get it over with.
Without alcohol, this
place would be about as
as exciting the LPGA
Senior Open in
space, if they
showed it on the
NASA channel.
They call us a
party school, but
really we're just
trying to escape
the reality that we
live in a town so small it
doesn't even have an
overpass.
I spent my first year at ECU
getting drunk three nights a week and
wandering down to the Cellar in my best slut-
gear, dodging greasy boys and pretending to
enjoy hearing "Mickey" every single night
while cigarette smoke clobbered my lungs and
speakers did their best to destroy my delicate
eardrums. Sound familiar?
Fun as it may seem, that does get old after
a while. So I have set out on a mission to find
something else�anything else�to do. There has
to be something to do in Greenville that
doesn't give you that please-don't make-me-go-
to-Perkins-again-l-
can't-stand-greasy-
food-after-leaving-
last-night's-dinner-
in-the-bathtub
feeling in the morn-
ing.
It may not
necessarily be better
than shotgunning Miller
High Life and pounding
an actual purple and gold
bruise into your arm from
running to the dorm room
sink to donate a meal to the
university plumbing system
(which I have done, although in
someone else's dorm room), but it
will be different.
So I give you "Things to do in
Greenville When You're Sober a
handy guide to entertainment on those
nights when you just can't stand the sight of
another beer. If the words, "Let's go down-
town! It's Mug Night! Yay make you sigh
uncontrollably and slump against the wall,
then listen up. I will seek out new adventures
and let you know which ones are worthwhile.
This week, 1 was too bored to come up
with anything.
This writer can be contacted at
fbuntairthead@stf4dentmedUi.ecu.edu.
BOND from page 3
Believabillty
No one is the perfect James Bond, but Connery defined him
and Brosnan has molded him. The other three just aren't cold,
womanizing, quick-witted killers.
Cool Under Pressure
Moore laughs at everything, although he's never really in
any trouble he didn't get himself into. Nonetheless, he is always
calm, even when he's staring straight down the barrel of a gun.
Pierce Brosnan is just cool in any situation. My favorite is the way
he wags his gun at Xenia in "Gokleneye saying, "No, no, no
like he's reprimanding a child. Dalton and Lazenby freak out a
little, although that's partly the director's fault in both cases.
Connery, however, needs no explanation. I mean, come on, he's
Sean Connery. Of course he's cool.
Quip Delivery
The writers take such care to produce these great one-liners,
but James Bond is the one who has to make it come off right.
Dalton fails miserably because he's so into being a serious actor that he resents these comic moments.
He mumbles the lines like they really bug him to say.
Meanwhile, Lazenby sounds like he's talking to himself, which makes him sound like a dorky .
James Bond, and that's something we all want to avoid. Brosnan sounds just slightly too angry when
he jokes.
But Connery and Moore always have perfect delivery. They both have that raised-eyebrow
quality that makes you chuckle instead of groaning at the pun. Despite that, my favorite is George
Lazenby's quote in the intro to "On Her Majesty's Secret Service when the girl drives off and he
loses the bad guys who almost beat him up and he says, "This never happened to that other fella
He means Sean Connery, of course.
So as a result of diligent investigation and hours of explosions and shark tanks and big metal
teeth, I concluded that Sean Connery is, after all, the best Agent 007. But it was a close race, and
Pierce Brosnan is not yet finished with James Bond. If the next film is as good as "The World is Not
Enough (which, incidentally, is the Bond family motto, as seen on the coat of arms in "On Her
Majesty's Secret Service"), then I may just have to change my ruling.
Another strange trip
LOS ANGELES (AP)�Even stacked up against 30 years of
Grateful Dead experiences, drummer Mickey Hart must
concede that this has been one incredible day.
"That was strange he says, exhaling deeply, a sheepish
smile crossing a face that at this moment could be mistaken
for that of a graduate student who has just been put through
his oral boards by a particularly ferocious faculty.
In Hart's case, it's not school but television that has
drained him. He has just finished plugging his new book,
"Spirit Into Sound: The Magic of Music on the "Roseanne"
show.
"I hope that doesn't show in San Francisco he blurts
out more to himself than to anyone else in the limousine that
is returning him to his Hollywood hotel room. He is worried
about what the folks back home will think.
On the show, Roseanne, true to talk-show fashion,
badgered Hart into acknowledging that among other things he
had sex with Janisjoplin in the 1960s, hung out with Jimi
Hendrix and took a whole lot of drugs.
But she also lavishly praised his new book, telling him
that among the rock music groups she has idolized over the
years, the Grateful Dead stand front and center. He's apprecia-
tive of her support and admiration. But then there was all of
that other stuff.
"First of all you don't talk about certain things he says.
"1 don't talk about making love to Janis. It was just a moment
in time. I never forget it. But I don't tell the story
As for the Dead's once gargantuan�and now legendary �drug
habits, he acknowledges that he resents the continued harping
on the subject.
"I don't even smoke pot anymore he says somewhat
defensively. "The strongest thing I take these days is a cup of
coffee�maybe two�in the morning.
"I did use it, it's part of my history he says of LSD.
"It's really hard to explain it in a sound bite. And then
the young kids get the idea that, you know, it's like you're an
advocate for it. And I don't want to be an advocate for any
kind of powerful drug
But yes, Hart says, everyone in the band did drugs in the
early days. As he looks back on it now, he believes if they
hadn't, they might not have produced the ethereal, freeform
music that seems to be standing the test of time.
Yet another critically praised Grateful Dead album has
just hit the stores. This one, a five-CD collection, is both a
retrospective of the group that disbanded after guitarist Jerry
Garcia's death in 1995 and also a collection of all new music;
none of the tracks has been released on any other album.
But that's all part of the past now for Hart, who is
married and the father of grown children, as well as a firm
believer in the healing power of music. Ir-wa� that belief, he
says, that led him to become an author. "Spirit Into Sound
his third book this decade, follows "Planet Drum" and "Drum-
ming on the Edge of Magic
In the first two, he sought to trace the creation of
rhythmic sound from the beginning of time and to show
music's ability to change people.
His new book examines many of those same issues, but
it lets other people do most of the talking, collecting quota-
tions from perhaps the most eclectic group of thinkers as-
sembled on the subject. Everyone from Garcia to Woody
Guthrie to Igor Stravinsky to the Ayatollah Khomeini gets a
say.
At 56, his face has become deeply creased by decades of
hard living, and his once-dark hair is now salt-and-pepper. But
he remains his youthful, peripatetic self, and he scoffs at the
suggestion that he might consider slowing down.
"Desperate man he says, laughing again, as he explains
his penchant for nonstop work.
"I'm desperate for that feeling he continues. "1 love
that feeling of that moment of creation. So I'll do anything for
it. I'll even come to L.A. to do book signings. Or go to Maine
or New York on tour
Or go on the "Roseanne" show and talk about Janis
and those halcyon days of rock 'n' roll.
I
u
en
re
a
to
�o
re
u
j
c
're
This writer can be contacted at fountainhead@studentmedia.ecu.edu.





the back page
Photos by D. Miccah Smith
I
I
Snowmen now come in two
colors: white and earthtones.

Neither rain, sleet nor snow will stop a pothead.
Rnd now, for some half-naked people!


Title
The East Carolinian, February 3, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 03, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1387
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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