The East Carolinian, February 1, 2000






ore
www.tec.ecu.edu
J the 1 � �
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 84
BEHIND THE SCENES OF
"MACBETH"
pg-4
Theater has un'scene' heroes
38 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
Rescheduled Events
Snow has caused changes and cancella-
tions for the following campus events:The
Dedication of the Donald Etherigde Bailey
Conference Room in Brewster, set to be
held Jan. 26, has been rescheduled for Feb.
9. The Jan. 25 screening of the travel film
"Galapagos" and the Jan. 18 performance
on "One Race, One People, One Peace"
have been postponed. The Jan. 28-29 Reli-
gious Arts Festival concerts have been can-
celed.
Lecture
Feb. 2 at 3 p.m. in Wright Auditorium,
Iman W. Deen Mohammed, a Muslim-Ameri-
can Spokesman, will give a lecture presenta-
tion entitled "Diversity and Cultural Sensitiv-
ity: Living Together in the New Millennium
This is a student sponsored program that is
open to the public. For more information,
contact: Na'im Akbar at 328-3755 or
Yolanda Thigpen at 328-4715.
Art Expo
The Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center will host "Synergy: Art Expo
Explosion and Night of Jazz" featuring work
by ECU art students, a jazz flutist and lec-
turer Galen Abdur-Razzaq on Friday, Feb. 4.
The History of Jazz lecture will take place
from 2-3 p.m. in room 244 of MSC. The jazz
performance art exhibition and poetry open
mic will take place at 6 p.m. in the Bloxton
House. Light refreshments will be served. To
display your artwork or for more information,
call 328-1680.
Film
At 6:30 p.m today, the African Film Se-
ries will feature "Wonders of the African
World" in Mendenhall Student Center. The
film will be shown in two parts. Tonight's pre-
sentation is part one.
Alternative Medicine
A lecture on alternative medicine will be
presented by Dr. Wayne Joans of the Uni-
formed Services University of the Health Sci-
ences. Itwill.be held from 12:30 p.m1:30
p.m. on Thursday, Feb. 3 in Room 2E-92 of
the Brody Medical Sciences Building.
Recital
At 8 p.m. Thursday, Feb. 3 in the Recital
Hall of the Fletcher Music Center, three fac-
ulty members of the School of Music will
present a recital. The performers and their
instruments are Ara Gregorian on violin,
Nathan Williams on clarinet and Andre-
Michel Schub on piano. The program is free
and open to the public.
ANNIVERSARY
This Friday from 4 p.m7 p.m. at
Sweetheart's in Todd Dining Hall, the School
of Nursing will celebrate 40 years.
Corrections
TEC apologizes to the Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center for to the misprint in the Jan.
13 story about Mrs. Taffye Benson Clayton.
Virtual ECU can be accessed at
www.virtual.ecu. Dr. Tabrizi said he does not
know of any other similar programs for un-
dergraduates.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you think it's fair for
students to nay for building
maintenance ?
BUTLER LEADS PIRATE
SWIMMERS pg. 6
Senior co-captain is backbone of squad
TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 1. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Sunny, high of 50�
and a low of 30�
Broad adds capital fees to student tab
Money to be used for
building maintenance
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
For the first time in the history of the UNC
System, students will be paying an additional fee
for the maintenance and upkeep of classroom
buildings.
UNC President Molly Broad made this proposal
when the state legislature failed to grant the Gen-
eral Assembly (GA) a requested $3 million construc-
tion bond package last July.
When the Board was denied the bond, it set
the GA back in their goal to increase system en-
rollment by 40,000 students by the year 2008. In
order to make this a realistic goal it was decided
early on that there would have to be vast improve-
ments and additions to the facilities at each of the
16 campuses, especially in the residence hails, class-
room buildings and science labs.
Students will pay a100 capital improvements
fee this fall, another $100 next year, and $75 in
2002.
Some ECU students have expressed their dis-
may at his new fee being tacked onto their educa-
tion costs.
"1 don't think they the Board of Governors!
realize how much $100 is to a student said jun-
ior Brad Davis "I can buy a month's worth of gro-
ceries or a couple textbooks with that money
Sophomore Bonnie Shepherd said she felt much
the same way. "These school of-
ficials just add on100 here, and
$100 there, it really adds up
Shepherd said.
Students at North Carolina
State University and University
of North Carolina-Chapel Hill,
the two public research institu-
tions in North Carolina, will pay
the capital improvement fees
plus an additional $200-a-year to
keep faculty salaries competitive
with those at research institu-
tions across the country.
Broad said that she has opposed student fee in-
creases in past years, but with the denial of the
construction bond package and the other finan-
cial problems the state is facing because of the dam-
age caused by Hurricane Floyd, she had no other
choice.
"The notion of putting this proposal forward
is to acknowledge that we face an urgent situation
Broad said in an earlier interview.
"Extraordinary times require extraordinary
measures said Brad Wilson, head of the BOG's
budget and finance committee.
Broad is working on another proposal for the
state legislature that, if passed, will increase the
amount of need-based financial aid that will be
available in coming years.
Broad has made other decisions regarding tu-
ition increases as well. She did not recommend the
$270 tuition increase at ECU that was approved
by the ECU Board of Trustees, nor did she recom-
mend support for increases at UNC-Charlotte and
this proposd forward is
tocKknowledgethat
we face an urgent
situation
Molly Broad
UNC SYSTEM PRESIDENT
U N C -
Wilmington.
According
to John
Durham,
ECU'S director
of News and
Information,
the total in-
creases recom-
mended by
Broad for ECU
will raise un-
dergraduate
tuition and
fees from
$1,957 this
year to $2,110 for the 2000-2001 school year.
Molly Corbett Broad, president of the UNC system,
recently proposed adding a maintenance fee to student
tuition, (photo from World Wide Web)
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Survey reveals how ECU students spend time
Poll taken for benefit of
students, faculty
Why students miss class
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
The Office of Research, As-
sessment and Testing at ECU re-
cently released the results of a
student time use survey taken in
April of 1998.
According to Kris M. Smith,
associate vice chancellor of the
Division of Student Life, the sur-
veys are conducted for multiple
purposes. The surveys aid the
university in understanding its
students and gaining an aware-
ness of student expectations. The
survey also compares ECU to
other public universities inside
and outside of the state.
"All research analyses and re-
ports are done in aggregate
Smith said. "That is to say that
they are done as group informa-
tion
The survey revealed that stu-
dents miss class 44 percent of the
time due to oversleeping. Being
sick came in second with 15 per-
cent. Other reasons included be-
ing too busy, simply not want-
ing to attend class and being lazy.
"From my experience, more
and more students don't go to
class simply because they are
lazy said freshman Becca
Starkey. "I think that a lot of
times, students just don't want
to admit it
The second area that the sur-
vey explored was the breakdown
of students working by GPA, gen-
der and class. The survey con-
� v.Ws-
� Laziness
� Not wanting to attend
D Too busy
� Sickness
� TiredOversleeping
'April 1998 time use survey conducted by the Office of
Research, Assessment and Testing
eluded that the majority of stu-
dents that work maintain a B
average. It showed more females
hold jobs than males. According
to class rank, the number of stu-
dents holding jobs corresponds
to class rank from senior to fresh-
man.
Senior Tameka I'ate said she
believes that a student's GPA is
dependent on their drive rather
than their occupational status.
"It all depends on your par-
ticular major, motivation and the
number of hours you not only
carry in school but at work as
well Pate said.
The final area pertains to the
socialization process. One area
that surprised freshman Nicole
Radcliffe was the percentage of
males that reported socializing as
compared to females. Sixty-one
percent of males reported social-
izing ten hours a week compared
to 46 percent of females.
"That's really surprising
Radcliffe said. "I would have
guessed that girls socialized a
great deal more than guys
The majority of students do
not feel that their social lives af-
fect their schoolwork. Sixty-two
percent claim that their social life
never interferes with their school
obligations while 30 percent feel
the opposite.
"I would say that in the case
of freshman, especially, social
obligations greatly affect their
school work said freshman
Nick Chaplinski. "I think that
between sports, frats and going
out, it's hard to keep up for a
freshman who is trying to meet
people
Dr. Peter Mather, associate
dean of Student Development
and the director of Research, As-
sessment, and Testing, said he
believes that these surveys are
taken for the benefit of the stu-
dents.
"Our hope is that this infor-
mation will help to shape better
educational practices and poli-
cies affecting students Mather
said.
In addition, it helps give fac-
ulty and staff better insight as to
what students do as well as how
they spend their time.
"Faculty and staff have per-
ceptions about how students
spend their time Smith said.
"But we all know that perception
isn't always reality. Therefore, we
undertook the survey to check
the accuracy of these perceptions
and to educate the university
community about how students
really spend their time
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Crocker named Law Officer of the Year
ECU chief of police
receives county award
Heather Lewis
STAFF WRITER
eresa Crocker, chief of the ECU Police De-
partment, was recently named Pitt County's Law
Officer of the Year for 1999.
The award is given annually to a law enforce-
ment officer in Pitt County who has exhibited
a commitment to his or her position and is out-
standing in their department or field. Several
candidates are nominated for the honor each
year by various departments and the recipient
is carefully selected from those.
"This is a great honor for my department and
for the university Crocker said. "It's a wonderful
feeling any time people salute law enforcement
Crocker, who has been the chief of police since
November of 1993, said that she had reservations
about accepting such a prestigious honor.
"It was especially wonderful to get this award
this year Crocker said. "Our department and
many others worked hard during Hurricane Floyd
and its aftermath. So many other people did so
much during those trying times that I don't feel
worthy to receive this honor
The chief said she hopes that word of her and
the department's accomplishments will encourage
more enthusiastic and hard working officers to
come and work for ECU'S police force.
Many of the officers
that work under Crocker
have expressed their sup-
port and pride in their
chief.
"I think it's terrific
said Christy Smith, ECU
police officer. "It really put
our department into the
public eye and it lets ev-
eryone know what a great
job we're doing out here
This writer can be
contacted at
hkwi$@stixkritmedki.ecu.edu.
Teresa Crocker, ECU chief of police, was
named this year's Law Officer of the Year,
(photo by Emily Richardson)





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES CRIME SCENE
University pf California-San
Diego�Arter almost two months of
debate and uncertainty, Maya
Angelou accepted the University of
California-San Diego's offer to speak
at this year's all-campus commence-
ment, to be held on June 12.
"In a world with only a few
household names, Maya Angelou
has become one Vice Chancellor
Jim Langley said. "She is one of the
most important voices in not only
world literature, but also in mod-
ern thinking
Tesh Khullar, A.S. president,
who headed the search for a gradu-
ation speaker along with A.S. Pro
grammer Scott Mantell, said he is
pleased with Angelou's commit-
ment and said he expects students
to respond positively to her speech.
"I am beyond happy right now
Khullar said. "In my opinion this is
one of the most important things
that the A.S. Council) has done all
year
Langley originally set a deadline
for last Monday at noon for the A.S.
Council to find a speaker. That
deadline was extended because
Angelou's agent did not yet have an
answer; Angelou confirmed early
last week.
Khullar said that everyone he
has talked to is delighted about
Angelou's involvement.
"Now that it has been made of-
ficial, I have heard nothing but
positive comments from people
he said. "Everyone is excited be-
cause of the name of the speaker
Langley said that the adminis-
tration has budgeted $130,000 for
this year's graduation. Angelou will
receive $25,000 for speaking to the
crowd.
Langley said that with Angelou's
fee, it will be a challenge to stay
within the budget. He added that
the campus may look for sponsor-
ships to help fund the ceremony.
' Angelou spoke at R1MAC Arena
last winter and was greeted with a
sold-out crowd. Khullar was one of
the individuals present in the audi-
ence.
' "How quickly the show sold out
speaks to her popularity he said.
Duke University�Chilean
President-elect Ricardo Lagos rose to
political prominence during a 1988
television interview. Pointing his
finger at the camera, the socialist
politician became the first national
figure to criticize publicly Gen.
Augusto Pinochet, then-dictator of
Chile.
Lagos rose to academic distinc-
tion in 1966, when he earned his
doctorate in economics from Duke
University. Those who studied
alongside him remember a quiet
and studious man few could have
predicted would become the presi-
dent of one of South America's most
prosperous countries.
When informed that Lagos won
the presidency Jan. 16, William
SchafferHKOnomics professor at
the Georgia Institute of Technol-
ogy�was shocked. A former Duke
classmate of Lagos, Schaffer remem-
bers the new president as a quiet
gentleman.
"Damnation! Who would have
imagined?" said Schaffer, who
graduated in 1967. "He was just an
ordinary economics student when
I knew him
With his election, Lagos takes
charge of a country in which 20 per-
cent of the population lives below
the poverty line. Additionally, his
administration will be asked to re-
form the 1990 constitution installed
by Pinochet.
Lagos came to Duke's econom-
ics department on a scholarship in
1962. He planned to stay in
Durham, N.C. only long enough to
complete the year-long master's pro-
gram, said Lagos' good friend and
classmate Ghazi Duwaji, now an
associate professor of economics at
the University of Texas at Arlington.
Eventually, a professor convinced
both Duwaji and Lagos to apply for
fellowships and stay three more
years for their doctorates.
Duwaji recalled that when Lagos
came to Duke at age 24, he was a
Marxist, but by the time the Chil-
ean left Duke, he was a more prag-
matic socialist.
Nuclear secrets
mistakenly disclosed
WASHINGTON (AP)�The
government's aggressive push five
years ago to declassify historic pa-
pers led to about 1,000 documents
containing nuclear weapons secrets
to be mistakenly declassified, the
Clinton administration told Con-
gress.
While the nuclear weapons
documents were inadvertently
opened to researchers, only one of
the files�on nuclear weapons de-
ployment in foreign countries in the
1950s�was actually examined by
any outsiders before the mistakes
were discovered, the Department of
Energy said in a report.
� The papers were among millions
of pages that were declassified be-
tween 1995 and 1998 under an ex-
ecutive order from President
Clinton directing federal agencies to
lift the veil of secrecy from docu-
ments that are more than 25 years
old.
The openness campaign was
widely applauded as an effort to re-
verse decades of secrecy about the
nuclear weapons programs at the
old Atomic Energy Commission and
about a variety of events from the
Vietnam War and UFO research to
the failed Bay of Pigs invasion of
Cuba.
The declassification effort is ex-
pected to cover about a billion pages
before it is completed in a few years.
The classified report sent to Con-
gress just before Christmas details
the findings of a Department of
Energy (DOE) audit of some 948,000
pages of nuclear weapons-related
documents that had been part of the
three-year declassification effort.
During the review, auditors
found that 14,890 pages containing
secret weapons information were
mistakenly declassified and made
available for public view at the Na-
tional Archives, according to an
unclassified summary of the report.
The material covers "about
1,000 documents many of which
originated in the old Atomic Energy
Commission but had been trans-
ferred to other agencies and declas-
sified there, said a DOE official, who
spoke on condition of not being
identified further.
Jan. 26
Transformer Flre-Officeis
reported that a transformer
south of Joyner Library caught
on fire. Power went out In
Mendenhall Student Center,
the Rec Center and Student
Health Center temporarily due
to the fire. Power was out the
rest of the day at Joyner Li-
brary.
Hit and run-A student re-
ported that the front left panel
of her vehicle was damaged
while parked south of Belk
Hall.
Jan. 27
Harassing Phone Calls-A
student reported receiving sev-
eral harassing phone calls
from an ex-boyfriend, a non-
student.
Suspicious ActivityA stu-
dent reported that she saw two
males with ski masks possibly
leading another male toward
Greene Hall. There has been
no evidence that a crime oc-
curred and no other persons
have contacted the police
dept. regarding this incident.
Communicating ThreatsA
student reported that another
student had threatened her
following an argument they
had over theft of clothes on
their Tyler Hall dorm
floor. Both were issued CATs in
the incident
Jan. 28
Damage to Personal Prop-
erty-A student reported that
the windshield of his vehicle
was damaged when a vacuum
cleaner was thrown on it. The
vehicle was parked east of
Fletcher Hall at the time of in-
cident. The vacuum cleaner
was returned to housekeeping
in Messick.
Jan. 29 "
Alcohol Overdose-A student
in Slay Hall was transported to
PCMH by Greenville EMS for
alcohol intoxication.
Damage to Property-A stu-
dent reported that the driver's
side mirror was damaged while
parked in Reade Street Lot 1.
Jan. 30
Assault with a Deadly
Weapon Affray-A student in
Belk Hall and a student in
Fletcher Hall were involved in
an altercation in Fletcher
Hall. A Smith&Wesson knife
was produced in the incident,
later dropped and the two got
into a fist fight. No injuries
occurred. Two more knives
were found during a room
search at Fletcher Hall and the
student was issued a CAT.
First Degree Burglary-A stu-
dent in Jones Hall reported
that someone entered his
room and stole a wallet and
keys. The room was unlocked
at time of entry.
LarcenyA student re-
ported that her planner was
stolen from her White Hall
room. It was later returned
with no itemsjnissing.
Wave of school violence in
France keeps some schools closed
BONDY, France (AP)�At the Jean Zay Junior
High, in a troubled neighborhood outside of Paris,
� students huddled Tuesday in the freezing morning
darkness, locked out of school for yet another day
by angry parents and teachers demanding an end to
school violence.
"My son is in his final year here, and I don't want
,to have to come pick him up from the infirmary or
,the hospital said Marie Cuillerat, 38, who was
blocking the school's doors with other determined
parents. The school has been shut down for a week.
After a wave of vicious attacks swept through Jean
Zay and other French schools in recent weeks,
France's education minister is expected to announce
on Thursday a series of measures, mainly financial,
aimed at curbing the violence committed by chil-
dren.
But many discouraged teachers, parents and even
students say far deeper changes may be needed to
remedy a complex, long-ignored problem.
Schools from the northern town of Roubaix to
Montpellier in the south have closed their doors re-
cently to protest rising levels of violence. Some are
still closed.
Reports of brutal school tortures surfaced last
week when junior high school students were accused
of attempted murder for catapulting an 11-year-old
boy over a railing. The child survived but suffered a
broken arm after falling 10 feet.
In another case, a vocational school student
claimed three fellow classmates burned him with
hot irons and cigarettes.
At Jean Zay, students set off handmade bottle
bombs in the corridors, torched a gasoline-soaked
door and attacked a classroom monitor;
"Students came to us and said, 'We're afraid
said Pascal Fournier, a history teacher at the school
in the working class suburb of Bondy.
Monday Nights Are
Pasta A �!�!
Wednesday Nights Are
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WED. FEB. 2nd from 8 -11 p.m.
For Rides Call:
Thorn Kincaid s
830-9494 or
757-0128
A
, 500 E. 11th St. e
JIH
r -
Reality
� .
. . . . . � . �� �,
"Hey, I went off campus to look for a place to
live. Wow, it's going to be expensive�the place
I can afford isn't near anything�and those
security deposits will use up all of my money
7
in

C
O
Why wander into the unknown? Why wonder where
your next meal is coming from and how you're going
to keep up with the bills?
Campus residents:
y Watch your mailbox for more
information on Return to
6 �r Campus Living Sign-Up
February 21-25.
H i
Up

UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD
U.P00-09J
uesday, Feb
vww.tec.ecu.i
VI
Terra Steinbei:
Susan Wright,
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The East Carolinian
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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vww.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
easl Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, fitfo-
Terra Steinbeiser, Afetts Editor Stephen Schramm, Szwft fizto-
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, MfeZ A�� Z?�c0- Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@sludentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolin-
ian prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday dur-
ing the regular academic year. The lead editorial in each
edition is the opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board
and is written in turn by Editorial Board members. The East
Carolinian welcomes letters to the editor, limited to 250 words
(which may be edited tor decency or brevity at the editor's
discretion). The East Carolinian reserves the right to edit or
reject letters for publication. All letters must be signed and
include a telephone number. Letters may be sent by e-mail
to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu or to The East Carolinian,
Student Publications Building, Greenville. NC 27858-4353.
For additional information, call 252-328-6366.
Wake up and smell the coffee
boys and girls-we're here to
learn not to make sure that
the doors in GCB have no
nicks and cracks. Please,
you're going to make us work
longer hours to pay to school,
we'd like to at least be
bankrolling an education
OURVIEW
How come every time we look around tuition fees are raised? The
newest $270 fee increase proposed by university departments was sup-
posed to enhance funding for, among other things, the unendingly open
palm of the athletic department (big surprise). When this plan was pre-
sented to our SGA, it was immediately denied. But, instead of listening to
the advice of our elected student voice, for the first time in history the
chancellor went around the SGA and had the proposal approved by the
Board of Trustees anyway.
This plan was then sent to Molly Broad, president of the UNC school
system, who said she rejected it because she deemed the raise excessive.
However, this was not done out of her good benevolent heart and deep
respect for poor college kids. Broad rejected the hike in favor of her own
increase of $100 for all UNC schools to "help maintain the buildings and
structures Now the question arises, to what extent can we fairly burden
our students until their financial backs begin to break?
Our fellow universities, NC State and UNC Chapel Hill, will even be
charged a whopping additional J200 to help keep employee salaries "com-
petitiveat least a more noble reason. It seems our administrators judg-
ment as to the monetary troubles college students face has become clouded
by their six-figure paychecks.
The $100 that has been added is much more money than the 'powers
that be' realize. Weren't these people college students at one time? This
money can be spent for much better purposes: What about parking? What
about extending the hours for the library?
One-hundred dollars could easily buy a college student's groceries
and gas money for a month, not to mention allow one to treat oneself to
a dozen Krispy Kreme doughnuts on his or her birthday.
Wake up and smell the coffee boys and girls-we're here to learn not to
make sure that the floors in GCB have no nicks and cracks. Please, if you're
going to make us work longer hours to pay to school, we'd like to at least
be bankrolling an education.
OPINION COLUMN
I Maybe Internet advertisers should get drunk
Ryan Kennemur
SENIOR WRITER
Howdy folks! This is something that has bothered
Tie for some time now�even more so now, seeing how
I the quintessential opinion columnist, am affected
y it. In fact, you might say that I'm a part of it. Yep,
'm talking about the commercials.
Now, don't get me wrong. This topic could never
)e shown any justice in just one short, little opinion
:olumn. No, it deserves an entire series, each part de-
rated to one aspect that needs to be evaluated exten-
iively. But you know what, good people? I'm going to
iefy the odds and cover the whole thing in just one.
Isn't it strange how they (advertising people) get
mch inappropriate, famous people to endorse their
aroducts? I'm not talking about the new Wilfred
jiimley life insurance commercial. His blood has been
�eplaced with enough Quaker Oatmeal to help him
esist death's collapsing grip for the next decade.
But so many times these ads make the celebrities
ook like they're so desperate that they would've prob-
ably done it for free just to get their face back on televi-
sion. Having Tony Danza and that choad who married
Courtney Cox tell me what number to dial for long
distance is just enough to make me remember how
annoying they were when they were actually in the
spotlight. And George Jefferson is not going to make
me wear "performance" fleece pullovers.
Also, after watching yesterday's Super Bowl (like
there's one for each day), I have come to a couple of
pretty sharp conclusions. The first one is that Internet
people truly have the sense of humor of a stuck pig. So
many techie companies spent two million big ones for
thirty seconds of boring sorryness. This is because these
people sit in front of a computer screen all day won-
dering about the next big virus (thought I assume STDs
never have to cross their mind) and how many chain
letters and forwards to send to Sir Hacks-a-lot.
The beer advertisers, on the other hand, have got
something going for them. All they have to do to come
up with a good commercial is sit around for a few hours
sampling their product. Think about it. Would a sober
person come up with a commercial featuring a dog talk-
ing about the beer that he gives his master? Would a
sober person come up with the Bud-weis-errr frogs and
the little Joe Pesci-esque iguana who fights with the
ferret? Would a sober person come up with the pen-
guin that says "Doo-be-doo-be-doo?"
I think you get the point. Granted, these advertise-
ments don't make me want to go out and buy their
products, but at least they are clever. Now if you'll ex-
cuse me, I have to eat some oatmeal.
This writer can be contacted at
rkennemur@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Nation of Islam leader visits campus
Na'im Akbar
OPINION WRITER
Today's column is being written to inform the ECU
family of a historical event that will take place on cam-
pus this week.
At 3 p.m on Wednesday, Feb. 2 in Wright Audito-
rium, Imam W. Deen Mohammed, Muslim American
spokesman and son of the late Elijah Muhammad, will
leliver a public address entitled "Diversity and Cul-
tural Sensitivity: Living Together in the New Millen-
nium
W. Deen Mohammed was born Oct. 30, 1933 to
Elijah (Poole) and Clara (Evans) Muhammad. He is an
Imam (Muslim religious leader) in the Society of Mus-
lim-Americans.
Imam Mohammed succeeded his father as leader
5f the Nation of Islam on Feb. 26,1975. He is the leader
3( an estimated 2.5 million American-Muslims and is
recognized as the Muslim-American spokesman.
His service for the promotion of universal human
excellence is well documented as he has established
direct and genuine dialogue between leaders of Islam,
Christianity and Judaism.
Recently, Imam Mohammed led a delegation of
Muslim-Americans to the Vatican to participate in an
(nterfaith dialogue of world religious leaders upon the
Invitation of Pope John Paul II. He also recently ac-

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OPINION COLUMN
What makes this kid so special?
Stephen Kleinschmit
OPINION COLUMNIST
Has anybody really kept up with this whole Elian
Gonzalez thing? I know our generation of Abercrornbie-
uniformed drones don't seem concerned with any sort
of national news, (unless it's on "Total Request Live"
or printed on the label of a beer bottle) so I'll give you
the Cliff's Notes.
Group of Cuban migrants head to America in
shoddy raft. Raft sinks. Only survivor is a small boy.
Coast Guard saves boy from sea. Boy not returned to
Cuba like the other tens of thousands of refugees. Col-
umnist wonders why this guy is so special.
I mean, I thought this thing was really cut and dry.
United States laws state that unless a refugee lands on
the coast of the US, they must be returned to their coun-
try of origin. But for some reason, someone insists on
keeping him here even though he still has a father liv-
ing in Cuba.
I don't see why he is any different than anybody
else who has been returned to Cuba. The U.S. Coast
Guard interdicts thousands of illegal migrants every
year in make shift rafts, and they're returned.
Now we have a dilemma. Why are we choosing
some migrants over others? I thought one of the main
beliefs in American society is equal treatment under
the law.
Is Elian more aesthetically pleasing than other mi-
grants? Is a cute 6-year-old kid better than an ugly 12-
year-old? Are we just using this little boy as some pawn
in a political chess match?
Probably. I think the US just loves to get back at
Cuba for that whole missile crisis thing.
So, where do I stand? I say send him home. This
poor kid can't take a crap without somebody taking a
picture of him, and if I were a father, I could never
forgive a country that was holding my kid hostage.
He's being held here by re-election-wary congress-
man who are using him mostly for political gains and
propaganda. If we are going to give refuge to one mi-
grant, we should give refuge to them all. It's not fair to
everybody else.
This writer can be contacted at
skleinschmit&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Downtown club owners need to reconsider policies
Dear Editor,
I am writing in response to the article written in
Our View, Jan. 20, 2000, discussing racial bias in down-
town clubs.
Even though 1 am a minority student, I have never
faced the issue of being discriminated against because
of the color of my skin, until I went downtown one
weekend. The excuse the club managers came up with
was that you had to be dressed in an appropriate man-
ner to be let into the club. Well, 1 know for a fact that is
just not true.
One Saturday night, my girlfriends and I went to
The Cellar. We were all dressed nicely. We stood in line
for like 20 minutes only, to be turned away at the door.
The excuse was that we needed membership to enter
the club that night. Wert they afraid that we were go-
ing to cause trouble? Really, what can three girls no
taller than five-feet-four-inches do?
I would like to respond to what Leigh Richards said:
"If you want to be let in, then dress and act in an ap-
propriate manner because if you don't respect yourself
it's a safe bet you will not receive any respect or special
treatment from the doormen Well, what happens
when you dress and act in an appropriate manner and
are still turned away? I am a firm believer in That you
have to give respect before you can receive respect. But
in a one-minute conversation with the doorman, how
can he determine if you are being respectful if you re-
ally don't say anything to them? How can you say that
it is a privilege to be allowed into a public place? It's a
right guaranteed by the Constitution of the United
States.
Discrimination is partiality or bias, in the treatment
of a person or group, which is unfair and illegal. Maybe
people don't realize what they are doing or saying is
considered discrimination. So my advice to everyone
is to think before you speak so you can avoid saying or
doing something you'll regret later. As we all know, the
courts in our nation seriously frown upon
discrimination. Maybe when some of the club owners
end up being sued over their employees' bad judgments,
they'll change their policies.
Marjorie Gibbs
cepted an invitation to, and visited Israel and Jordan.
Imam Mohammed's clear and appreciable represen-
tation of the religion of Islam, and his unparalleled
contribution toward building respect for human life in
America has merited countless awards and many un-
precedented acknowledgments.
Imam Mohammed is the first Muslim to deliver an
invocation on the floor of the U.S. Senate; he also de-
livered the first address by a Muslim on the floor of the
Georgia State Legislature.
He is the recipient of the Presidential Medal of Free-
dom, the highest civilian honor in the nation. In 1995,
Imam Mohammed was selected as the President for the
World Conference on Religion and Peace. He is also a
member of the World Supreme Council of Mosques.
Among Imam Mohammed's publications are
"Prayer and Islam "Focus on Al-Islapn "Al-Islam
"Unity and Leadership" and "Islam's Climate for Busi-
ness Success
Imam Mohammed's visit is one of many initiatives
on ECU'S campus to promote positive race relations
and cultural sensitivity. It is believed this public ad-
dress will serve to foster positive relationships among
students, faculty, staff and the general community.
This writer can be contacted at
nkabar@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
ECU buses need to get on the road
Dear Editor:
For a school that's trying to become a pedestrian
campus, the transit system sure needs some improve-
ment. Don't get me wrong�I've been happily riding
the bus for all my years at ECU, but this semester has
gotten off to a bad start. The Purple line in particular
seems to have punctuality issues.
I am frequently waiting outside for 10-15 minutes
after its supposed arrival time. And it always seems to
be on those days when it's 30 degrees outside. I under-
stand delays are expected when there's ice on the roads,
but this has happened on many snow-free days. Speak-
ing of snow, how can we even be expected to go to
class when the buses are 45 minutes off-schedule?
A couple of Fridays ago I was waiting for the Purple
line at Mendenhall at about 5:15. I'd had a horrible
day and just wanted to get home, but the bus was late.
I kept waiting and waiting, thinking it would come
any minute, but it never did. After 45.minutes, I asked
another bus driver where it was, and he informed me
that Purple was in the garage and wouldn't be running
again until Monday. I was already frozen from stand-
ing there, and then I had to deal with finding a ride
home!
All I want is for the buses to be on schedule. Maybe
that's too much to ask of ECU, but if they want stu-
dents to quit driving and start using the bus service,
they need to improve it. If that means getting more
buses, then so be it. I think enough parking tickets are
issued to fund the purchase of an additional bus or
two.
The transit system needs to address these issues with
their drivers, if that's where the problems lie. And I
didn't even touch on the issue of overcrowding!
Mimosa Mallernee
Senior, Art Major





4 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, Feb. 1,2000
Tuesday, Feb.
www.jec.ecu.�
FEATURES BRIEFS
Famous African-Americans

Frederick Douglass (1817-1895)
The most prominent African-Ameri-
can orator, Journalist and antislavery
leader of the 19th century. Douglass, an
escaped slave, campaigned for the end of
slavery and published three versions of
his autobiography. In these works, he de-
scribed his experiences as a slave in the South and as a fugi-
tive in the North. He also depicted life as a free black before
the American Civil War and his rise to national prominence
during and after the war. Later in life he continued to work
for full civil rights for blacks and held several government
positions.
Booker I. Washington (1856-1915)
Born on April 5,1856, Washington
was an American educator who urged
blacks to attempt to uplift themselves
through educational attainments and
economic advancement. In 1879, he be-
came an instructor at Hampton Insti-
tute, where he helped to organize a
night school and was in charge of the industrial training of
75 American-Indians.
' In 1895, in Atlanta, Ga Washington made his famous
compromise speech. In this address he urged blacks to accept
their inferior social position for the present and to strive to
raise themselves through vocational training and economic
self-reliance.
Malcolm X (1925-1965)
Malcolm X, later known also by the religious name El-
Hall Malik El-Shabbazz, was an African- American activist. His
militant views that Western nations were inherently racist
and that black people must join together to build their own
society and value system had an important influence on black
nationalist and black separatist movements of the 1950s and
1960s. His beliefs gained a broader audience through "The
Autobiography of Malcolm X" (1965), published after his as-
sassination.
George Washington Carver (1864-1943)
Carver was an American educator
and an outstanding innovator in the ag-
ricultural sciences. Following his gradu-
ation in 1894 from Iowa State College
of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts,
Carver Joined the college faculty and
continued his studies, specializing in
bacteriological laboratory work in sys-
tematic botany. Carver developed sev-
eral hundred industrial uses for peanuts, sweet potatoes and
soybeans and developed a new type of cotton known as
Carver's hybrid. His discoveries induced southern farmers to
raise other crops in addition to cotton. He also taught meth-
ods of soil improvement.
Langston Hughes (1902-1967)
This American writer is known for the use of jazz and
black folk rhythms in his poetry. James
Mercer Langston Hughes was bom In
Joplin, Mo and educated at Uncoln
University in Pennsylvania. In 1925, his
literary skills were discovered after he
left three of his poems beside the plate
of American poet Vachel Lindsay, who
recognized Hughes's abilities and
helped publicize Hughes's work In the
1920s, when he lived in New York City, he was a prominent
figure during the Harlem Renaissance and was referred to as
the Poet Laureate of Harlem. His innovations in form and
voice influenced many black writers.
Sojoumer Truth (circa 1797-1883)
� American abolitionist and advocate of women's rights,
Truth was bom into slavery in Hurley,
Ulster Couhty, N.Y and originally
named Isabella. A mystic who heard
voices she believed to be God's, she
arrived in New York City in 1829,
where she preached in the streets. In
1843, obeying her voices, she took the
name Sojourner Truth and went
preaching along the eastern seaboard.
Encountering the women's rights movement in 1850, she also
added its causes to hers. During the American Civil War she
also solicited gifts for black volunteer regiments.
Maya Angelou (1928)
' American author, poet and entertainer, Angelou is best
known for her portrayals of strong African-American women.
Much of Angelou's writing stresses
the themes of courage, perseverance,
self-acceptance and realization of
one's full potential. In her works she
frequently presents strong female role
models. Angelou read her poem "On
the Pulse of Morning" at the inaugu-
ration of President Bill Clinton in
January 1993. She has received many
awards and honorary degrees, including Grammy Awards
(1994 and 1996) for her recordings of her poetry on the al-
bums "On the Pulse of Morning" (1993) and "Phenomenal
Woman (1995). In 1998 Angelou made her directing debut
with the release of the motion picture "Down in the Delta
Mary Bethune McLeod (1875-1955)
McLeod was an American educator, bom in Mayesville,
S.C and educated, at Scotia Seminary and the Moody Bible
Institute. She taught school in Florida and Georgia from 1897
to! 1903, and in 1904 she founded the Daytona Educational
and Industrial Training School for Negro Girls (now Bethune-
Gokman College).
Harriet Tubman (1820-1913)
Tubman was an African-American
who fled slavery and then guided run-
away slaves to freedom in the North for
more than a decade before the Ameri-
can Civil War. During the war, she
served as a scout, spy and nurse for the
United States Army. In later years she
continued to work for the rights of blacks and women.
Black History Month creates educational opportunities Ice c
African-American
accomplishments recognized
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
American People. In 1926, the second week of Febru-
ary nationally became known as Black History Week.
This week was chosen to include the birthday of
Fredrick Douglas and Abraham Lincoln. In 1976, it was
changed to include the entire month of February
Black History Month was started to educate people
on the contributions and history of African-Americans.
February was
designated as
Black History
month in 1976.
This month is
intended to be a
time that the ac-
complishments,
contributions
and successes of
African Ameri-
cans are
reognized.
Black History
Month has been
a part of the cur-
riculum for chil-
dren since it was
initiated in
1976. During Black History Month, school-age children
focus on the contributions of African-Americans, such
as Fredrich Douglass and George Washington Carver.
The teachers let the elementary students draw pictures
of these people to hang in the halls. The local middle
and high schools feature one African-American person
in the afternoon announcements every day in Febru-
ary.
"Carter G. Woodson created the Association for the
Study of Negro People in 1915 said David Dennard,
an associate professor in the history department. "To-
day this is the Association for the Study of African-
Woodson initiated the Association of
Negro People, (photo from World Wide
Web)
Malcolm X and Martin Luther King. Jr worked for equality,
(photo from World Wide Web)
George Washington Carver invented hundreds of uses for
peanuts, (illustration from World Wide Web)
Freshman Kimica Davis said she does not feel that the
schools are doing enough to educate people about Af-
rican-American achievements.
"It should be a year-round thing, Davis said. "Afri
can-American history is just as important as everything
else Davis said.
Dennard said he thinks Black History Month is not
publicized enough.
"It's not recognized enough among African-Ameri-
cans and certainly not enough among white Ameri-
cans Dennard said. "It's going to take a lot of work
See HISTORY, page 5
Macbeth sets laden with dark imagery,
I- J
ill
Powerful stage
creates intensity
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
As the curtain is drawn and
the actors take their final bows,
thunderous applause resonate
throughout the theater. The per-
formance was a great success.
But wait�everything that was
seen on stage did not just appear
magically. Productions take a lot
of preparation in order to become
what the audience sees on open-
ing night.
"There is an equal and perhaps
a greater number of people that
the audience) never sees that are
working behind the scenes said
Ken White, lighting and sound di-
rector.
The production aspect of
Macbeth is broken up into differ-
ent sections which is overseen by
five individuals who are working
together to make this play set in
Scotland come to life According
to costume designer Jeffery
Phipps, it is a collaborative art in
which all of the designers come
together to create this idea.
"It's important that we all
communicate Phipps said.
The seed of development be-
gan when director John Shearin
started envisioning what he
wanted to see on stage. He wanted
something that emphasized de-
cay, rot and decadence.
"The idea of 'Macbeth meets
Swamp Thing' was kicked around
a little White said.
But the main inspiration for
the final idea came from an expe-
rience very close to home. White
said during the time when Shearin
was searching for the look for
Macbeth, Hurricane Floyd had just
Neil Williamson cuts plywood to construct the set. Macbeth sets, pictured above, were designed and
built in a process that took months. The show will run for only six days, (photos by Paul Coenen)
hit. The wet, dank and dark look
was on everyone's mind.
"The particular look we went
with is related to the flood
Shearin said. "I noticed how every-
thing looked after the water re-
ceded and thought if I put this look
in twilight, it would be really
scary
Once the idea was planted,
Shearin got the ball rolling by con-
tacting scenic designer Bob Alpers
to draw up the plans. The two
worked together to decide what the
production should accomplish,
how it should look and how they
want to use the stage.
"Shakespeare is always fun to
design because he is poetry and he
gives you a lot of leeway on how
to interpret it Alpers said.
One comment that Shearin
made to Alpers was that it should
vaguely mimic the Elizabethan
stage. With all of these thoughts in
"mind, Alpers conducted research to
find the precise look, coming across
Celtic and Scottish pict ruins.
"That was the kind of look John
was describing Alpers said.
Sketches began in the middle of
October and Alpers had a basic
model and draft done the first week
in November. This is unusual for
the Playhouse because designs usu-
ally begin the same semester of the
production. Since Floyd came
through, the second show of the
season was canceled and prepara-
tions for Macbeth ensued.
Alpers took the "blue prints" to
technical director Leonard Darby,
who oversees the construction of
the scenery. Once Darby looks at
the designs, he calculated what it
would take to make this project
work. He does some of his own
technical drawing consisting of the
construction of the set.
"Bob draws what the audience
See MACBETH, page 5
Groundhog Day celebrated in Punxatawney
Hundreds make trip
to Gobbler's Knob
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
"I'm dreaming of the Great Groundhog,
just like I do this time each year when he
brings nice weather, and brings us together
to wait for him to appear sing many
groundhog groupies as they make the trek
to Gobbler's Knob annually. Every year,
Punxatawney, Penn. goes all out for the little
rodent who peeks at his shadow.
The myth surrounding the Groundhog Day celebra-
tion is that one groundhog, also known as Punxatawney
Phil, predicts whether or not the winter will continue.
If he comes out of his hole and sees his shadow, it scares
him and he retreats back into his hole. This means six
more weeks of bad weather are to come.
If Phil doesn't see his shadow, it means that spring
is on its way.
The first Groundhog Day was held in 1886 and can
be traced back to the Germans who were the first set-
tlers of Pennsylvania. They used the groundhog to pre-
Groundhogs kiss for the camera, (photos from the World
Wide Web)
diet what their crops were going to be like for the
next month and a half. There have been 98 years
where he saw his shadow, 14 where he didn't see his
shadow and nine where no records were kept.
Today, Groundhog Day is a highly publicized
event that hundreds of people from all over the coun-
try come to see. The 1993 movie, "Groundhog Day
starring Bill Murray heightened the interest of
groundhog followers everywhere. According to the
Groundhog Day Web site, "In the years following the
release of the movie, record crowds numbering as high
as 30,000 have visited Gobbler's Knob in
Punxsutawney
Phil the groundhog also appeared on the "Oprah
Winfrey" show in 1995. Phil has made public
appearancesbefore n order to support a cause, such as
prohibition, th space race and hostage situations. He
See GROUNDHOG, page 5
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Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2000
wwwjtecrecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian S'
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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Ice Cafe freezes over for Restaurant Week
NEW YORK (AP)�The champagne was on ice. So
were the guests, who had to sit on frozen chairs at fro-
zen tabj.es (with frozen fruit bowls and iced bouquets)
as icy chefs tolled over giant ice pots, atop stoves made
of�what else�ice.
Welcome to Manhattan's very own Ice Cafe.
The chilly cafe at Rockefeller Plaza was con-
structed�for view on Thursday only�to promote Win-
ter Restaurant Week, from Jan. 31 through Feb. 4, when
more than 80 of the city's top restaurants freeze lunch
prices at $20 for a three-course prix fixe menu.
"One year we did a tower of bagels; we did the
world's largest iced tea publicist Melanie Young said
as she huddled in layers of wool near the ice lattice-
work marking the entrance to the cafe. "We always
come up with something larger than life. And because
it's winter we wanted to do something with ice.
"Somebody said 'Let's do something like that fa-
mous ice hotel And then somebody just said 'ice res-
taurant And that was it she said, with something
between a shrug and a shiver.
The inspiration was the Ice Hotel in Jukkasjaervi,
Swedergrwhich is made of entirely of snow and ice.
The weather in Manhattan, which stayed well be-
low freezing, perfectly suited the concept -carved from
6 tons of ice. But there were glitches.
Although the strawberries and cream at each place-
setting looked fresh, the blush champagne resembled
frozen strawberry shakes.
"This is totally new to us said Kay Nelson of the
Convention and Visitors Bureau, which organized the
program complete with icy launch. "The blush cham-
pagne froze. And one of the glasses actually broke and
expanded because of the cold
"It was our first try at an ice restaurant noted Vic-
tor Modic of IceArt in Cedar Grove, N.J which de-
signed the cafe.
He said the chairs, the lifelike chefs and the lattice-
work were the trickiest parts of the project.
"The chairs were pretty challenging because of the
detail work and the assembly Modic said. "The tables
weren't too bad, but the lattice work on the side, that
was technically very challenging to put together with-
out breaking it.
"The chefs were pretty difficult too, with the facial
features and making sure that they look like somebody
The two toiling ice chefs featured big bushy eye-
brows and mustaches, crisp-looking toques and pro-
fessional kitchen-wear�all in ice.
"It's gorgeous said Jill Stacey, who took a quick
break from her work in a nearby law firm to admire
the strange winter setting. "I'd like to just freeze it all
and take it home, especially the ice vases with long-
stemmed red roses she said.
MACBETH
from page 4
HISTORY
from page 4
GROUNDHOG
from page 4
and change in the classrooms
Students need to learn how black history and
white history interrelate with each other. You can't
understand one without the other. For example, you
can't study about Thomas Jefferson without also
learning about his mistress Sally Hemings
Chrystal Page, a worker at the Cultural Center,
said she is sure there is something for everyone dur-
ing ECU'S month-long celebration of African-Ameri-
can history. There is a long and varied itinerary of
events for ECU students.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown@studentmedia. ecu. edu
had long been using his image to support the cause at
the time.
During Prohibition, Phil threatened to impose 60
weeks of winter on the community if he wasn't allowed
a drink. In 1958 Phil announced that it was a "United
States Chucknrkrather than a Soviet Sputnik or
Muttnik that became the first man-made satellite to
orbit Earth. In 1981, Phil wore a yellow ribbon in honor
of the American hostages in Iran. Phil met Pennsylva-
nia Governor Dick Thomburg in 1987, the same year
he met with President Reagan in the Oval Office.
Freshman Stephanie Suber said that although she
doesn't really believe his predictions, she can't help
but watch the event.
"It's everywhere�on the news, Internet Suber
said. "Groundhog Day is a quirky event our society rev-
els in for some strange reason�I guess it's just an Ameri-
can thing
Even though the Germans started the tradition,
Groundhog Day began in the United States and no
other countries seem to have anything similar to it.
"I know that France does not have a similar tradi-
tion said Dj. Fredric Fladenmuller, a professor in the
foreign language department. "I think it is mainly an
American celebration, although Canada does recognize
it
sees from the front and I draw what you would see if
you were standing in the back Darby said.
From there, Darby consults with his crew, mainly
made up of students, to begin the building process.
"All of the scenery seen on stage is built by stu-
dents Darby said. "It's a part of their learning
According to Darby, stu-
dents on average work about
40 hours per week on the set.
"There's a lot of
Styrofoam, paints and tex-
tures being used to create the
dark look Darby said.
� "When the audience
walks in we want them to
smell moss, Mood (and) a
sense of eeriness within the
space Alpers said.
While the scenes are be-
ing designed, Shearin began
discussing costume designs
with Phipps. Since the play
takes place in the 11th cen-
tury, this affected how the
style of the clothing looked.
To go along with the dark
theme of the production, the
look they wanted for the cos-
tumes was rugged, heavy
and reminiscent of dried
blood.
"We did a lot.of shopping
for fabrics, but it was a chal-
lenge due to the limited re-
sources here in Greenville
Phipps said.
So Phipps visited local
cities Raleigh, Wilson and
Goldsboro for the right fab-
ric. According to Phipps, this
show has approximately 30
characters, each with at least
one costume change. Once the characters were casted,
he had a better idea of what to look for.
"We started fittings (recently) Phipps said. "We
go through about two to three fittings before they are
ready to go on stage
"Lighting is the last thing to join the party White
said.
After seeing a fun-through of the play, White can
now determine where to place the lighting instrument
to get the optimum effect.
"Macbeth is a world of contrast White said. "This
was a time period, before electricity so there is a lot of
primal forces in play. Light is coming directly from
somewhere and is casting deep, long shadows
But as the last item to be added to the production,
lighting work is never truly complete before the show.
"Up until the moment of the final dress rehearsal
the night before opening, it's all subject to change� '
it's kind of exciting White said.
Sound will also play
a big role in Macbeth.
White said they are go:
ing full out on this pro-
duction. They are pursu- .
ing the atmospheric
sounds such as storms,
wind and battle sounds;
and also musical inter-
ludes.
"The musical inter
ludes will be during the
transitions of scenes,
White said. "Either to
comment on the scene
that just happened or to
foreshadow on scenes
that are about to hap-
pen
All of the technical
aspects of the produce
tion will come together
on Feb. 5. According to
Shearin, the technicians
will go through the en-
tire show without the ac-
tors. He enjoys seeing his
ideas come to life with
the assistance of the
other directors.
"That's the whole
beauty of the collabora-
tive aspect of theater
Shearin said. "A direc-
tor can. have an idea
and, if it's presented in
the right way, then what the designers will come back
with is better when what the director had in his mind's
eye.
"This set very closely resembles what I had imag-
ined, but better than my imaginings �
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Will Brooks, along with other ECU students, put In 40
hours a week to finish the sets on time, (photo by Paul
Coenen)
Double "Q"
Pink Salmon
m
SAll At
Uit904
Head
Lettuce
Caen
5?
"V
Assorted varieties Country Club Froimn roourtpr
country Club
ice cream
Colgate
Toothpaste
�� . .X� fflf?T5r.1 - �
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at University of Tennessee, Knoxville,
TN, the weekend of Feb. 18-20,2000. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline -Feb. 1,6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Recreation Programs Office, 328-4738, for more information.







S The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Agassi, Davenport
take Open titles
Americans Andre Agassi and
Lindsay Davenport won the
men's and women's singles titles
at the Australian Open this week-
end.
Davenport easily disposed of
three-time defending champion,
Martina Hingis in straight sets.
Davenport only needed one hour
and five minutes to win her first
Australian Open title, 6-1, 7-5.
The match could have been
quicker than it was. Up 5-1 in the
second set, Davenport served for
the match. Hingis broke Daven-
port and mounted a comeback
before falling to the 1999
Wimbledon champ.
'� On the men's side, Andre
Agassi outlasted Russia's
Yevgeny Kafelnikov. Agassi cap-
tured the title after dropping the
first set, 3-6. Agassi came back
and won the next three sets, 6-3,
6-2, 6-4.
BCS extended to 2006
The Bowl Championship Se-
ries and ABC agreed, Thursday,
to extend their relationship for
four more years. The deal, that
may be worth more than $400
million, will run through 2006.
Trie BCS is a controversial sys
tern that determines who will play
in the national college football
championship. The system, that
includes the Orange, Fiesta,
Sugar and Rose Bowls, uses
complicated mathematical formu-
las to pit the nation's two best
teams opposite each other in a
national championship game.
; Opponents of the system site
the often confusing and muddled
results of the system as well as a
bigs toward teams in the nation's
larger conferences.
Tyson
pummels Francis
� Mike Tyson needed a little
more than four minutes to knock
out British heavyweight, Julius
Francis in Manchester England,
Saturday. Francis, who sold ad-
vertising space on the bottom of
his shoes, gave his sponsors
ample exposure as he was
knocked down five times in the
short match.
; "My objective was to go right
out there and bang him out
Tyson said.
Soccer
stars end boycott
The U.S. women's soccer
team ended its boycott last week
when it accepted a five-year con-
tract. The stars of the team that
won last summer's Women's
World Cup were embroiled in a
month-long contract dispute with
the U.S. Soccer Federation over
their salaries. Players such as
Mia Hamm and Brandi Chastain
refused to play in last month's
Australia Cup.
The new agreement will pay
the players $130,000 a year. The
entire team will compete in an ex-
hibition with Norway on Feb. 6.
4
Butler catches wave to swimming success
Senior co-captain
backbone of Pirate squad
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
At the core of this year's women's swim team is
Hollie Butler. In addition to scoring points rn the
freestyle, Butler is regarded as the dynamo behind this
season's 9-1 team.
Butler, who will be graduating next fall with a de-
gree in science education, is in the top 10 all rime in all
but one category of freestyle swimming.
"She is probably our most decorated freestyler in
our Lady Pirate swim history; she ranks in the top ten
in the 100, 200, 500, 1,000 and 1,650 top ten all time
said Head Coach Rick Kobe.
Butler, who was born in Palm Beach, Fla but grew
up in Camden, S.C for nine years before moving to
Kinston N.C is a hard worker and a coach's delight.
"She is very easy to coach Kobe said. "Swimming
is hard; you swim up and down the pool for four hours
a day. She ivorks hard and reajly gets after it.
"She is a very likable person, very reliable in- prac-
tice and is always a tough swimmer in our duel meets
and our championship meet. I think everybody respects
that
Butler earned her spot in the ECU record books
through her dedication to excellence. Along with the
ler
Class: Senior
Major: Science Educaion
Event Distance Freestyle
Hometown: Kinston, N.C.
ECU Career: Co-captain,
owns school record in 200 freestyle
among the all-time to five in 100,
500 and 1,650 freestyle
named outstanding
female swimmer in 1997-1998.
rest of her teammates she practices
Monday through Friday as much as
three-and-a-half hours a day. Add
in lifting weights for one hour, three
days a week and one starts to see
the kind of work it takes to make it.
"Through the years, all I've
thought about is working hard and
doing the best that I can Butler
said. "When you're out of the wa-
ter after a race and you feel like you
hadn't worked to your potential,
you really have to ask yourself why
you are doing it at all. If not to show
yourself what you can do, why then
are you doing it for other people?"
As a captain, she has carried
herself in a way that makes people
around her comfortable and confi-
dent, leading not just by example
but also through encouraging
words.
"She is a positive person, she
never says anything bad about the
other girls, she has a good relation-
ship with everybody on the team
said teammate Mike Julian. "She is
very approachable always talking to
people. She is not a quiet person
"She is a really good leader, she
really knows how to get the team
on task said teammate Samantha
Perry. "She always keeps us motivated. She is very goal-
oriented a'nd wants us to do well as a team. Good lead-
ers watch out for their teammates in the game and our
of the game and Butler is no exception to that rule
Perry sites an example of the closeness Butler in-
stills in her team.
"I was in the hospital for ten days last year with a
blood clot and she came to visit me Perry said. "It's
not like she had to, so the fact that she did that really
meant a lot to me. She is a teammate to everybody,
very open and willing to help people
Butler says it is her parents who have been the guid-
ing light.
"My parents are the greatest influence on my life
Butler said. "If I aspire to be like anybody, it is them
Butler is aspiring to be many things once gradua-
tion rolls around for her next fall. For one, a name
change will be needed. Butler has been engaged since
the day after Christmas to her boyfriend, Will Best.
Butler, who changed her major from marine biology
to science education this year, plans to teach school
after graduation.
"The only thing I ever wanted to do in my life was
make a difference Butler said. "1 had always wanted
to work in things like marine biology but I realized
that in that field 1 wouldn't be able to make an impact
on people. Through education, I have a chance to re-
ally make a difference. I had some teachers growing up
that really inspired me to learn and now I want to give
back what I received
This writer can be contacted at
rdowney@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Rams defeat Titans 23-16 in Super Bowl
ATLANTA (AP)�This was why they invented the
Super Bowl.
This one had long touchdowns, record-setting per-
formances, courageous comebacks and a thrilling fin-
ish. Nobody could have asked for more than the St.
Louis Rams and Tennessee Titans supplied Sunday.
That the Rams held on�by inches�for a 23-16 vic-
tory didn't necessarily make the Titans losers. Each team
could leave the Georgia Dome with pride.
"It was a fight to the finish said Rams' receiver
Isaac Bruce, who caught the 73-yard game-winning pass
from Kurt Warner just 18 seconds after the Titans over-
came a 16-0 deficit to tie it. "It was one of the best
games I've ever played in. I am just proud to be part of
this
As were the Titans, who fell just short when Kevin
Dyson was tackled by linebacker Mike Jones at the 1-
yard line as time ran out.
"To come this far and be a half-yard short is just a
sick feeling Dyson said. "But this team leaves here
winners inside
They weren't winners on the scoreboard because
Jones made a classic tackle on the final play. It was the
last of a super series of second-half plays providing a
scintillating finish.
"I said, 'This time, no matter who it is, I can't let
him in the end zoneJones said. We got a chance to
win this game. Get him on the ground
"They've got the hearts of warriors Jones said. .
"They were down 16-0, and a lot of teams would have
tucked tail
At the end, all of these warriors were worn out. The
Rams' defenders barely could stand, and the Titans'
attackers were just as wobbly.
"Football is the most emotional roller coaster you
can be on Dyson said. "It leaves you with nothing
left emotionally
Tennessee could do nothing in the first half, which
the Rams dominated. St. Louis gained 294 yards to 89
for the Titans. The Rams ran 44 plays to 24 for Tennes-
see. League MVP Kurt Warner, who also won the game's
Most Valuable Player award, already had 19 comple-
tions and 270 yards.
But it was1 just 9-0 on Jeff Wilkins' field goals of 27,
29 and 28 yards. Every time the Rams, whose 526 points �
were the third-highest in league history, got near the
end zone, they couldn't get it in.
"We were getting points, but we knew we had to
get the ball in the end zone said Bruce, who would
make six catches for 162 yards. "We couldn't win with
just field goals
I111MBI1MB

Hh'fli"3k
Sm
St. Louis' Mike James tackled the Titans' Kevin Dyson on the one-yard line to
clinch the Rams' first Super Bowl title (photo from the World Wide Web)
They stopped kicking for points on their first drive of the second half,
when Warner found rookie lorry Holt for a 9-yard score. The touchdown
came three plays after safety Blaine Bishop was carted off the field with a
neck injury. He later returned to the Dome after going to the hospital for
X-rays, which were negative.
St. Louis (16-3), a city that never had a pro football champion, was up
16-0 and looking at a potential rout.
Finally, Steve McNair and Eddie George got on track for the Titans (16-
4), who took the difficult wild-card route to their first Super Bowl. McNair
engineered a 12-play, 66-yard drive that included a 23-
yard run to the St. Louis 2-yard line. George scored
from the 1-yard line, but a 2-point pass went behind
Frank Wycheck.
Emboldened, the titans forced a Rams punt for the
first time, and George scored on a magnificent 2-yard
run on which he broke three tackles. Suddenly, it was
16-13, and when the Rams once more went 3-and-out,
Tennessee was in charge.
"In the second half, the guys buckled down and
made things happen said McNair, who showed no
signs of a painful toe injury that has plagued him for
the last month.
They had to make things happen one more time to �
even things, and thanks to Mike Horan's 30-yard punt,
they did.
Al Del Greco made a 43-yard field goal with 2:12 to
go, and the first overtime in Super Bowl history seemed
likely.
Then again, the Rams don't believe in the prob-
able. After all, this was a team that went 5-11 and 4-12
in coach Dick Vermeil's first two seasons following a
14-year hiatus. This was a team quarterbacked by a
former Arena League and NFL Europe player wh"o pnce
stocked shelves in a supermarket.
And this was a team that has struck quickly quite
frequently this season. So why not win a Super Bowl
that way?
"Isaac is our go-to guy said Warner, who set a Su-
per Bowl record with 414 yards passing. "He's made
big plays for us all year and we knew he could make
another one
Warner came back for a deep pass that was a bit
short. Cornerback Denard Walker fell as he tried to go
for Bruce, leaving an alley that Bruce sped down for
the winning touchdown with 1:54 remaining.
Tennessee, of course, had other ideas. And McNair
got the Titans as close as possible to overtime.
He led them from their 12 to the Rams 10 with time
for one play. That play was the in-cut to Dyson, who
stretched and stretched, but couldn't reach the goal
line.
"You just want to get them down any way possible
Jones said. "First you think, 'Lock this guy up and then
get him down I stood up and looked at the clock and
time was out, and I knew we were Super Bowl champi-
ons
"You dream of making an interception or a sack, �
not necessarily a tackle to win the game Jones said.
"But we'll take that. Without a doubt, it's the.tSggest
play of my career. It won a Super Bowl on the last play
Braves' Rocker suspended for racial, ethnic remarks
NEW YORK (AP) �John Rocker
was suspended until May 1 by base-
ball commissioner Bud Selig on
Monday for racial and ethnic re-
marks that "offended practically
every element of society
The Atlanta Braves' reliever also
was fined, $20,000 and ordered to
undergo sensitivity training for dis-
paraging foreigners, homosexuals
and minorities in a magazine inter-
view.
The players' union said it in-
tends to fight the ruling.
"Major league baseball takes se-
riously its role as an American in-
stitution and the important social
responsibility that goes with it
Selig said.
"We will not dodge our respon-
sibility. Mr. Rocker should under-
stand that his remarks offended
practically every element of society
and brought dishonor to himself,
the Atlanta Braves and major league
baseball. The terrible example set by
Mr. Rocker is not what our great
game is about and, in fact, is a pro-
found breach of the social compact
we hold in such high regard
The players' association said it
expects to file a grievance over the
penalty, believed to be the longest
against a baseball player for an ac-
tion not related to drug use since
Lenny Randle of Texas got 30 days
in March 1977 for punching his
manager, Frank Lucchesi.
"1 do not believe it is appropri-
ate that I should be harshly disci-
plined for my misguided speech un-
accompanied by any conduct on my
part Rocker said in a statement
released by his agents. "I have pre-
viously apologized for my unfor-
tunate remarks and stand by my
apology
A grievance would force the
matter before Shaym Das, the
sport's new independent arbitra-
tor.
"We have been in consultation
with Mr. Rocker and it is our
present intention to appeal said
Gene Orza, the union's No. 2 offi-
cial. "It is literally unprecedented
to impose a penalty on a player for
pure speech, offensive though the
speech may be. That, coupled with
the magnitude of the penalty, just
as unprecedented, makes us opti-
mistic about the outcome of the
appeal
With the season to start April
3, the suspension technically is to
last 28 days. A suspension will not
affect his salary, expected to be
between $200,000 and $300,000.
"It really is about what I antici-
pated happening Braves general
manager John Schuerholz said of
the penalty.
The 25-year-old pitcher was
barred from joining the Braves at
spring training. A high-ranking
baseball official, speaking on the
condition he not be identified,
said the commissioner's office did
not want Rocker to report with
other Braves' pitchers and catch-
ers, thus minimizing the number
of media descending on
Kissimmee, Fla when camp opens
Feb. 17.
Rob Manfred, baseball's executive
vice president for labor relations, dis-
puted that, saying it was not a factor.
Braves president Kasten said he
hoped Rocker will not appeal.
"I hope we can separate the legal
ramifications from John personally
Kasten said. "It's most important to
get through this thing and get
through it successfully. That's much
more important than winning a
couple of days ZH-
Rocker's comments drew a strong
response from Braves executive Hank!
Aaron and civil rights groups. Several
Braves players have said they expect
Rocker to have a difficult time when:
See ROCKER, page 7
at


trt
n
flM v






Iiesofay, Feb. 1, 2000
v.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian 7
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
he is very goal-
m. Good lead-
game ind out'
to that rule
less Butler in-
been the guid-
:e on my life
ly, it is them
i once gfadua-
one, a'name
engaged since
nd, Will Best,
wrine biology
i teach school
in my life was
ilways wanted
but I realized
akean impact
chance to re-
;rs growing up
I want to give
included a 23-
3eorge scored
went behind
is punt for the
lificent 2-yard
ddenly, it was
:nt 3-and-out,
ed down and
io showed no
igued him for
! more time to �
30-yard punt,
quickly quite
a Super Bowl
who set a Su-
"He's made
e could make
vay possible
y up and then
the clock and
Bowl champi-
on or a sack, -
Jones said.
's the.tfiggest
the last play
ill's executive
relations, dis-
s not a factor,
isten said he
jppeal.
rate the legal
l personally
important to
ng and get
That's much
i winning a
drew a strong
ecutiveHank!
oups. Several,
1 they expect
It time when
I0SKER
from page 6
e rejoins the team.
"We believe that even after this process is complete, there are still two
kurdtesthat remain Kasten said. "John still has to reconcile himself with
pis teammates. After that, he has to reconcile himself with the commu-
nity, h'&xkox automatic. But with the right effort and the right attitude, I
hink it's possible
The, pitcher, whose fine will go to groups that promote diversity, was
prderedby Selig on Jan. 6 to undergo psychological tests, but the results
of thqsejests have not been disclosed.
Katefl and Schuerholz met about two weeks ago with seven senior
lembers of the NL champions.
"T.bJf.cpnsensus in that room was that while they believed John should
! punished in some fashion, they were willing to give him a second chance
as a teammate Schuerholz said. "But he must redeem himself and rectify
he wrongs he has done
R9�k!r said in a Sports Illustrated story published last month that he
vquld never play for a New York team because he didn't want to ride a
5ubway;train "next to some queer with AIDS He also said, "I'm not a
very big fan of foreigners. How the hell did they get in this country?"
Heaiso called a black teammate a "fat monkey
Braves owner Ted Turner has said Rocker deserves a second chance,
knd pointed out the reliever had apologized.
"I don't think we ought to hold it against him forever Turner said.
He didn't commit a crime
Rocker told ESPN last month that he had lost his cool and said things
e, dida't .mean about New York fans because he wanted "to inflict some
motional pain in retaliation to the pain that had been inflicted on me
RqcJfer, said he was frustrated by Yankees fans who threw batteries at
m during the World Series. He said Mets fans spit in his face and poured
fcer on him during the playoffs.
Intramural Basketball Standings
Women's Gold
Quiet Storm
L.O.C.
Soccer Chicks
The El-Dog Pound
1-0
1-0
0-1
0-1
Men's Residence Hall
Penthouse Gigolo's1-0
Bass Boosters1-0
BSU - Da Bears0-0
Infectious Staff0-1
Clement Crazies0-1
Fraternity Gold
Delta Chi A0-0
Kappa Sigma A0-0
Sigma Pi0-0
Pi Kappa Phi A0-0
Lambda Chi Alpha A0-0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon A0-0
Sigma Nu0-0
Pi Kappa Alpha A0-0
Phi Kappa Tau A0-0
Alpha Sigma Phi A0-0
Theta Chi A0-0
Delta Sigma Phi A0-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon A0-0
Fraternity Purple
Delta Chi B0-0
Phi Kappa Psi0-0
Theta Chi B0-0
Alpha Sigma Phi B0-0
Delta Sigma Phi B0-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon B0-0
Kappa Sigma B0-0
Lambda Chi Alpha B0-0
Pi Kappa Alpha B0-0
Phi Kappa Tau B0-0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon B0-0
Sports writers needed!
Contact Stephen at The East Carolinian: 328-6366
The Rattlesnakes1-0
The Shooters1-0
Cotton Bailers1-0
The Black Widows1-0 �
Flaming Boxers0-1
Electrical Storm0-1
Ruff Ryders0-1
Absolute0-1
Men's Gold
Hot Boys1-0
The Bailers1-0
Youngbloodz1-0
CFW1-0
STR8 Ballerz0-0
The Vikings0-1
Whateva Man0-1
Team Fabulous0-1
Get it Wet0-1
.X Kappa Sigma KZ
Presents: j J
st: Annual Greek r dx
Shag Contest
Tuesday, Feb. 1st
at Cabana's
h" 10:30 p.m.
Brown & Brown
A'lTORNKYS AT LAW
presents
McDonald's
QUARTER POUNDER
w Cheese
Medium
Medium
$3.29

Tux
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Chi Omega1-0
Alpha Xi Delta1-0
Delta Zeta1-1
Alpha Omicron Pi0-1
Zeta Tau Alpha0-1
Co-Rec
Extreme1-0
Da Freaks1-0
Knuckleheadz1-0
Easy Majors0-1
Baptist Student Union0-1
Biscuits and Graw0-1
Quik Five2-0
No Shenanigans2-0
The Naturals2-0
Runnin' Rebels1-0
So Quick1-0
Attic Staff1-0
Chi Phi1-0
Big Bailers1-0
SMO Pals1-0
Hellraisers1-0
Gators1-0
Big Bob's Trucking & Tow1-0
The Blue Ballerz1-0
Pawn Starz1-0
Los jugagores1-0
WAP1-0
Fighting Fog Dogs1-0
DC Stimulators1-0
The Nickel & Dime Boyz1-0
Older and Wiser1-1
Stratford Arms All-Stars1-1
The Flyers0-0
P-Cove Playerz0-2
Irish Connection0-2
Spring llrmk 2000 Panama (itv Bwh. Florida!
' UEACOH A"
BEACH RESORT
� I iw lnQ Khrr Kklr. 1M Ch. llavqiKiiid.
mkI WiiJiT Shir � 2 lanj' Onfikior Sw'mwwvj.
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enervations: I 800188 8828
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Professor
Eating ADrinkingS st
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Every Day From 4 til 7 (dine in only)
� Sattelite Subscription to All NBA
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� $1.50 Domestic Beer Special Daily
� All WWF & WCW Pay Per Views
605 Greenville Blvd. � 7 D gj?
In The Winn-Dixie CTR 355-2946
Easy Majors0-0
Outkastz0-0
The Matrix0-0
Westside Knuckleheadz0-0
Greenville Dream Team0-0
Rock Bottom0-0
7-up Yours0-0
Rough Riders0-1
BW3 Bombers0-1
Ubers0-1
Weather-related0-1
Emotion Sickness0-1
Pray for Rain0-1
Whitebread0-1 .
A-TeamO-l
Reservoir Dogs0-1
Almighty Gringos0-1
Larry's Legends0-1
The Big Daddies0-1 '
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ask about our
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COMPUTER
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:e
Tuesday, 0 - 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
THE JOEYSHOW
The East Carolinian 8
www.tec.ecu.edu
by joey ellis
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Let Me CoiWt
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Lynn is 40
HAPPY BIRTHPAY
from the staff at CCSD
irnmzznrzif:
www
things Really Move
In the Classifieds!
us in
The East
Carolinian.
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tickets wlrofi eu
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valid student I. D.
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Stilootl Ittill. I
"Home ('Ollltilljg
Way From Home'
www.attic-nightclub.com
rrrric
209 E. 5th St.
TICKET LOCATIONS .
i; CD Alley � Wash Pub
East Coast Music � Skully's
WED 3RD & THUR 4TH
MM
WorldS Moat Popular
Hypnotist
www.livewtreonhne.com
by stuart parks and brad benson
"? Call nowanp You Too Cn
&ZT THIS KtHv Tor Oac-
wiTh which you fviv -tot-a.
, fb TAift-S ThhC-5 Fl
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THEY POKE OUT AT VOW
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FREE COMPUTERS!
Attention ECU Students!
Did you lose a computer due to Hurricane Floyd?
Through the generosity of IBM &: Microsoft, ECU has limited
numbers of replacement computers to distribute.
Computers will be distributed on a first-come,
first-distributed basis. All requests for computers will be
subject to verification.
good time
ECU Student Union Hotli
252.328.6004
or bookmark our web site at: www.ecu.edustudent union
Memoirs
of a
Single
Mother"
the
Pirate
Underground
IrpmneLnsnf �
Chin Ho!
Cordelia Williams saRtE�"Z�yhout the bu
MSC Gallery feb 5th thru
MAR 5th
U R I N G
FEB 5th lOpm
Ground Floor Mendenhall
East Carolina
University
a Dining
Services
hew rock"
For additional information contact the: Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina . ,
University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353, or call
252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or
VTTY 252.328.4736, 8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m Monday-
Friday. Individuals who require accommodations
under ADA should contact the Department for
Disability Support Services, at 252.328.4802 forty-
eight hours prior to the start of the progTrntn,
rlendrix Theatre
MENDENHALL
MERCURY CINEMA 111 4M Kill SI I It
Wed. @ 7:30 p.m. & Thur. at 10:00 p.m. Thur-Sat @ 7:30 p.m. & Sun. @ 3:00 p.m.
JAN 2 & 3 FEB 3, 4, 5 & 6
HAPPY
Catch her if von can.
mm
3
IrVfclced Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: Happy Texas PG-
7:30pm Hendrix
m� � mi�i- ii . I , , i j m i mUitaTHttmmmaIm.
Thirsty Thursday
Blockbuster Film: Runaway Bride (PG)
7:30pm Hendrix
i I'ifi
Mercury Cinema: Happy Texas (PG-13)
70pm Hendrix
Fabulous Friday
Blockbuster Film: Runaway Bride (PG
7:30pm Hendrix J7"
RICHARDOBIE
SAYBRIDE
fa Wt�v pQg&. wwwrunowaybrid��novt�.t�M WSt
lOwwmwwiwiwMinnii
Sensational Saturday
Blockbuster Film: Runaway Bride (PG)
7:30pmHendrix
CHIN HO! REM without the tyjlf!
10pmPirate Underground
Cordelia Williams: Merpoirs of a Single Mother
Mixed Media Photography ��
starts March 5th (� the MSC Gallery
Super Sunday
Blockbuster Film: Runaway Bride (PG)
3pmHendrix
, NAGHEl
house in exc
! nisheoTwasI
� central AC;
August 31; i
details (757)
nille@pinn.n






Tuesday, Feb. 1, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian "8
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
PERSONALS
GREEK PERSONALS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANNOUNCEMENTS
itclub.com
TWO BEDROOM houseapt. ECU
area" Completely renovated, new kitch-
en, bat refinished. hardwood floors.
Washer Dryer provided, immaculate
condition. Quiet, responsible tenants
only. No dogs. $685 752-3816.
DOWNSIDE - 2 bedroom, 2 bath, new-
ly renovated duplex townhome with
multi-car covered parking. Includes
wasnerjdryer. $625month. 919-834-
7708�
APARTMENT FOR sublease ASAP-7
3100. 116 Reade Circle Georgetowne
Apartments. Across from the ECU Rec
Center and close to down town. 2 bed-
rooms. 1,12 bath large living room
and kitchen. Female non-smoker pre-
ferred. Fully furnished. $280 per
morfttTplus 12 of the utilities. If in-
terested please call Christine at 758-
9817.
IF VOU have high utility bills call Ed-
gar Wall at 321-2700 days or 551-0971
nights; I have 1 Br apts for rent $320
mo includes utilities, near campus.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt,
$300month, available now. 125
Aveiy-fcreet or 705 East First Street.
Call 758-6596.
NAGS:HEAD, NC- Relatively new
house in excellent condition; fully fur-
nished? washer & dryer; dishwasher:
central AC; available May 1 through
August 31; $1600 per month call for
details (757) 850-1532 or e-mail ten-
; nille@pinn.net
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom. 1
bath, all appliances, free cable, small
pets. $410 per month Wainright Prop-
erty Management 756-6209.
2 BEDROOM house available imme-
diately. Walking distance from cam-
pus. Nice, spacious layout with a hard-
wood floor in living room. Large kitch-
en with washerdryer hook-up. Call
Mike 0 321-0723.
-All Properties have 24 hr. emergency
maintenance- Call 758-1921
ifci
fopemj I jonoQeytiMTt
� r, i: 4 -i � . J
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
take over lease starting in February.
On ECU bus route. Need to pay $210
per month plus half utilities. Call Shel-
lie 329J342.
ROOMY NEEDED to share town-
house. Clean, only bedroom furniture
needed. $225 month plus utilities.
Rent from February to May. Owner oc-
cupied, student. Call Wendy 439-2271.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. One block
from campus. Call ChrisJohn 9 754-
8094.
FOR SALE
TREK 6000 mountain bike with Rock
Shox. Blue aluminum frame with Shi-
mano shifters. Never been ridden! Will
sell for $600 OBO. Call Mark at 215-
0997.
�MlPANAMACity Vacations! Party-
Beachfront � The Boardwalk, Summit
Condos & Mark II. Free drink parties!
Walk to best bars! Absolute best price!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
TONIGHT! OYSTERS, Ladies - half
price pecks. Tripp's Restaurant. 353-
0011.
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
East .10th St. (next to Papa Olivers Piz-
za).
SPRING BREAK Specials! Bahamas
Party Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
Departs from Florida! Panama City
room with kitchen next to clubs, 7 par-
ties & free drinks129! Daytona room
with kitchen $149! South Beach (bars
open until 5 a.m) $1591 Cocoa Beach
(near Disney) $179! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
BIRKENSTOCK CLOGS, brown
suede, never been worn, size 41, great
condition, call 252-514-9856 ask for
Jennifer.
SONY INDASH CD player for sale
$120 call Ashley at 758-8848.
LIVING ROOM furniture in good con-
dition. Neutral colors. Includes sofa
bed. loveseat, chair, and ottoman.
$400. 754-2553.
SERVICES
SIZE DOES Matter! Biggest break
package. Best price from $29.
WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM. 1-
800-224-GULF
D.J. FOR HIRE
YPE UP'YOUR PARTYiM
OR ALL FUNCTIONS S CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur is 2WwM2-Q971
rl
1EARNT0
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(9191496-2224
ONE BEDROOM for sublease Pirate's
Cove $375. Includes cable, utilities,
own bathroom. Will neg. call (919) 851-
1677 or (919)549-2278 ask for Paul or
Len.
BEECH STREET three bedroom two
bath $650.00 a month available Janu-
ary 5th call Wainright Property Man-
agement LLC 756-6209.
2 BR Apts Available Immediately,
above Catalog Connections. $550
Imonth - Call Rick 0 551-9040.
SPRING BREAK. fiUUiMi CITY
BEACH "SUMMIT- LUXURY CONDOS
'NEXT TO SPINNAKER OWNER DIS-
COUNT RATES. (404) 355-9637.
NEAR ECU 3 bedroom 2 baths fire-
place. Fenced in backyard. $850
month 766-3947.
2 Bg.duplex, 419 E. 3rd St. 1 car ga-
rage; washer dryer hookup, backyard,
$450.00momh, available now, call
756-9339.
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: !
1 or 2 bed rooms, 1 bath, range
refrigerator, free watersewer, J
washerdryer hookups, laundry
ifacilities, 5 blocks from campus,
!ECU bus services.
MOVJ PRELEASING
FOR JANUARY
HELP WANTED
NOTETAKER. GET smarter by getting
paid to take notes in class. Versity.com
is now hiring notetakers for more than
fifty of next semester's classes. Earn
$8-$14class. Apply online 9
www.versity.com
ARAMARK, AN international lead-
er in managed services, is hiring a part-
time graphicsmarketing asst. for ECU
dining services. Must have experience
with Illustrator, Macintosh. Pagemak-
er. Freehand. Word and Excel. Duties
include assisting marketing director
with research, special events and creat-
ing promotional materials, hours are
flexible 15-20 per week: Please apply
at Mendenhall Student Center or send
resume to Human Resources, PO Box
3295, Greenville. NC 27836.
BROWSE ICPT.COM WIN a FREE trip
for Springbreak "2000 ALL destina-
tions offered. Trip Participants. Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or Rep registration call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
HELP WANTED: small company lo-
cated walking distance from campus
needs part-time employee for after-
noons to help in shipping department
(average 3 hours per day). Some heavy
lifting involved. $5.50hour. Call 830-
5577.
COACH NEEDED for JVV Girl's Field
Hockey program for Fall 2000 in area
private school. Paid position. If inter-
ested, call Lydia Rotondo at (252) 329-
8080.
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal-Gard 355-0210.
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED. Fun.
high-energy late night and evening
work. Part-time hours. Must be outgo-
ing and dependable with reliable trans-
portation. No experience necessary,
we train. Pay based on performance,
minimum $8.00 per hour. Call Tosha
at (800) 722-7033
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5 50 hour plus bonuses.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212, M-TH between the
hours of 3-6pm.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for the
summer season. Will train, no experi-
ence necessary! Fill out the applica-
tion at www.nsbslifeguards.com-
Email-dudes@nsbslifeguards.com or
call (843) 272-3259
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting part-
time youth In-Line Hockey coaches.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have the
ability and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18, in hockey fun-
damentals. This program will run from
late February to mid-May. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. Applications
will be taken until the positions are
filled. For more information please call
Judd Crumpler. Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2pm.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED for small
law firm of 4 attorneys: full-time or
part-time. If interested, please call 758-
4257 or fax resume to 758-9282.
IF YOU ARE AN ECU STUDENT OF
HELLENIC (GREEK) OR CYPRIOT
DESCENT THAT IS INTERESTED IN
MEETING, SOCIALIZING, AND
PARTICIPATING IN CULTURAL AC-
TIVITIES WITH OTHER GREEKCY-
PRIOT-AMERICANS PLEASE CALL
OR E-MAIL ELEFTHERIA AT 752-
8004, (ELEMANTZO0YA-
HOO.COM) OR KATERINA AT 353-
S083, (KATERINA0GREENVIL-
LENC.COM
ALPHA KAPPA Psi COED business
fraternity wants you! Were the nations
oldest & largest Professional business
fraternity Rush events scheduled for
February 1.3,4,8.10. For more infor-
mation & rides call Shaun 561-8137
Brandy 215-0899.
THE CARD Post Report 349.2 Gross
lnn& Out? Will seek via the Gover-
nor's Citizens ft Community Affairs Of-
ficethe appropriate person(s) to share
an idea to enable ALL city & county
prisons in Eastern N.C. to bail out all
bailable nonviolent detainees by New
Year's Day in exchange for the oppor-
tunity to invest Christmas Day in the
same room with a gross of grossest
detainees in the N.C. prison system.
Prosper n Live Long. Tom Drew. From
theN&O 1022000.
THE CARD Post Report 350.1 Her
Eyes Inn As introduced in Report
349& the essence of as expresses
in report 350.The Card Post's Build-
ing a Bridge of Peace Into the Next
Mjllenniumis presently seeking com-
munication with the newspaper in
Moscow Russia. The challenge by New
Year's day is to inform the musicians
of Russia & America that both are chal-
lenged to create the benevolent songs
of Peace that the world is living to hear.
To create a level playing fieldThe
Card Post will publish in Russia &
America all Russians 8- Americans
words with identical phonics & mean-
ing, may this be a winwinwinchal-
lenge Prosper n Live Long Tom Drew.
PS. Progress reports via http:
www.newsargus.comclassifiedsun-
dayindex008.html From the N & o
1022000.
REPORT 349. Classify Inn Building
a Bridge of Peace Into the Next Mil-
lennium (12999. 10am) Last Dec.
the Card Post's underwriter Ankwee-
Hanwee Horse Traders-presented 2
of 5 initial Products for Peace Both
are semi-classified. Another was pre-
sented in the east Carolinian' (ECU'S
student newspaper). It wasis semi-
classified. Another was presented in
Report 348. It was is semi-classi-
fied. Another that willalso.benefit a
present international military Peace
projectis CLASSIFIED 'til Christ-
masifone can be found at Seymour
Johnson Air Force Base who can sat-
isfy my mindtodaythat the ideapro-
ject is viable �r should proceed. With
recognizing both ECU and UNC have
Centers for International Studiespri-
or to this report's presentation to
SJAFB's main gatea notarized proof
copy of this report will be faxed to
ECU'S & UNC's chancellor's & student
newspapers. This report will serve as
an invitation for a suggestion of an ace
student who would be interested in
exploring this matter& if finding
agreeableto most, mostmost wel-
come their assistance. Upon confirm-
ing receipt of faxeswill allow 3 hours
for response& then proceed to the
main gate. Hope this completes this
report! Prosper n Live Long. Tom
Drew.
PS. 5pm sow far sow good.
THE CARD Post. Report 350 All
readyAlready Inn. Overcoming tribu-
lations with elations of times to
come. The Card Post's New Year's Re-
port will enable young & Old to enter
the new millenniumthough old-
eryounger.via MUSIC'S presentation
to the World's nations of Russia 6
America.of something newthey al-
ready knew! Prosper n Live Long. Tom
Drew from the N & o 1022000.
GREEK PERSONALS
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu-
late Angie Stender for being 'sister of
the week" You have done a wonderful
job being president. We love you! Your
Alpha Phi sisters.
CONGRATS TO Eddy Howze for be-
ing casted in Dance 2000. You go girl!
We love you. Your DZ sisters.
meem
ca�cu�-tJa�naica'?3haHi3s
sn vn $s?
ENDLESS
?JMMER
KAPPA SIGMA we had a wonderful
time watching the eclipse with you
Thursday night. Thanks for a great so-
cial. Can't wait to do it again. Love Chi
Omega.
THE SISTERS of Delta Zeta would like
to thank all of our dates for a great
time at Rose formal. We had a blast!
PI KAPPA Phi we had a great time at
last weeks social. Love Alpha Delta Pi.
CONGRATULATIONS NEW Alpha
Delta Pi members for getting in last
semester. Neeley Cranford. Pam
Cuthrell, Kim Fetts. Christy Lee. Heath-
er Kearney. Meryl Wahl. Katie Jen-
nette, Liz Weeks. Sarah Wade, Sum-
mey Sarage. Lauren West. Stephanie
Gross, Missy Lund. Angie Shackelford.
Amanda Pollard. Liz Sanders.
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to thank
Phi Kappa Tau for last Thursdays so-
cial.
SIG EP thank you so much for show-
ing our newly initiated members a
great time Saturday night. We had a
blast dancing the night away. Love Chi
Omega.
CONGRATULATIONS JENNIFER Fo-
gleman on your engagement to Pa-
trick. We are so happy for the both of
you. Love, your Alpha Delta Pi sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO Christina
Yarbrough, the new Panhellenic Presi-
dent. We are so proud of you. Love
your sisters of Delta Zeta.
OTHER
SUMMER TRIP to Spain and Moroc-
co. Two weeks. First session 3-6 hours
credit. Scholarships, loans available.
For more information, leave name,
number at 328-4310 or mer-
cerc@mail.ecu.edu
SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $75 &
up per person, www. retreatmyrtle-
beach.com 1-800-645-3618.
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun.
Jamaica. Bahamas & Florida. Best pric-
es guaranteed! Free parties 8- cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO RE-
SERVE YOUR SPOT FOR SPRING
BREAK! DISCOUNTS FOR ,6 OR
MOREI SOUTH PADRE, CANCUN,
JAMAICA, BAHAMAS, ACAPUL-
CO, FLORIDA & MARDI GRAS.
REPS NEEDED TRAVEL FREE. 800-
838-8203WWW. LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SELF-DEFENSE, Feb.16-March 8
Wednesdays 8-9pm. Learn self-de-
fense techniques in a progressive train-
ing system which will allow the indi-
vidual to avoid confrontation and de-
fend themselves as the situation dic-
tates. Basic personal protection theo-
ries as well as some of the more re-
cent philosophies on self-defense will
be covered. Cost is $10mem-$20
non-mem Registration deadline is
Feb.1-15. For more information call
328-6387.
GREENVILLE-PITT County Special
Olympics needs volunteers and coach-
es for its Track and Field 2000 Spring
Games. If you would like to volunteer
in the Greenville community please
contact Kelvin Yarrell at 329-4844.
SMOKING CESSATION Workshop:
This workshop will introduce basic
strategies for ceasing cigarette and ni-
cotine use. Learn ways to help 'break
the habit" and live a healthier lifestyle.
For more information please contact
the Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development at 328-6661.
Spring Break 2000
CANCUN�JAMAICA�NASS.U
Space is limited
CALL TODAY
800-293-1443
www.StudentCity.com
CALL NOW OR RESERVE ONLINE!
18002347007
www endlesssummertours.com
Sonno fir Timi m l 6 smi: txwnnwi Ml B� US in IMS lo Oe
iKogrwed ta ouOU-Wifl MNa by Coyne of Bfltn Bwntu Burrait
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
S 3ys � Mosl KmU � f �� Pirtie � Includes ton
Panama $139
City- Bond. HOhdiy Inn Sunifm S MOff
Florida $149
7 Mflfirt � Diytona South BMCh Cocoa Bctdt
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7rghtj�A�HoW � Fr� Food 8 3C Mrs of Orinkj
springbreaktravcl.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
THE WORD on the Streets' Wednes-
day. February 9. 4:00pm Mendenhall
Underground. Presenter: Todd King.
Assistant Director for Marketing. Stud-
ent Recreational Services. Learn the
best ways to get the word out around
campus to promote your events and
programs. Find out what works and
discuss techniques to bring in a crowd
with a campus pro.
FEBRUARY CONTRA Dance! Music:
The Elftones: Caller: Bree Kalb. Willis
Bldg. 1st and Reade st. No experience
needed. Free lessons. 7-7:30pm;
dance 7:30-10:30. Sat Feb.5 come
alone or bring a friend! Students S3,
public $7. Sponsors: ECU Folk & Coun-
try Dancers. 328-0237.
BOULDERING DAY Trip. Feb. 13 Ex-
pect a day of bouldering and short top
rope problems. Get out of the gym for
the day and get on the real stuff. Don't
let the winter blues keep you down
and get fired up about getting outside.
Cost is $30mem-$40non-mem. Reg-
istration deadline is Feb. 2 pm. For
more information call 328-6387.
BASKETBALL SHOOTING ChaT
lenge, Feb. 2. 4:30-7pm and Feb.3.
8:30-11 pm in the SRC Forum. Do you
think you have the skills? Come prove
it at the ECU Intramural Basketball
Shooting Challenge. We'll see you
there! For more information call 328-
6387.
NORTH CAROLINA Zoo. Feb. 19.
Come explore one of the regions best
natural habitat's zoo's. The zoo is well
known for detailed natural settings for
animals nestled in and among the
trees in the park. Don't miss your
chance to visit. Cost is15mem-$20
non-mem. Registration deadline is
Feb.9, 5pm. For more information call
328-6387.
WikrtuiHG A Broken Heart: this group
assists people going through the grief
process of ending a relationship. This
workshop begins on Feb. 1. 3:30. For
more information please contact the
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment at 328-6661.
COME OUT and help B-Glad plan fun.
informative, and activist activities for
gay and allied students this semester.
Wednesday. Feb. 2. 7:30pm in Men-
denhall room 14.
UNDERGROUND VIRGINIA, Feb.
18-20. Explore two wild caves in South-
western Virginia. If you are looking for
a unique adventure experience in a
fragile environment then join us for a
weekend underfoot. Cost is $110
mem-S 125non-mem. Registration
deadline is Feb. 4. 5pm. For more irv
formation call 328-6387.
BECOMING A Successful Student:
This workshop will give you the op-
portunity to discuss academic issues
and learn effective techniques to make
it in school. The workshop begins 3:30.
Feb. 1. For more information, contact
the Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development at 328-6661
ALPHA OMICRON Pi announces
Spring Sorority Recruitment for all girls
interested in finding out what sorority
life is all about: Thursday. Feb. 3. 5
p.m and Tuesday. Feb. 8. 5 p.m. at
Alpha Omicron Pi house. For informa-
tion or rides, please call Missy and
Ryan at 757-0769 or 329-2856.
TEST PREPARATION: Learn effective
ways to prepare and take exams. For
more information about this workshop,
contact the Center for Counseling and
Student Development at 328-6661.
This workshop is on February 3, 1:30.
ADULT STUDENTS are invited to
meet other adult students on Monday.
February 7. 6-7 p.m. in the Adult and
Commuter Student Services office rn
Mendenhall Student Center (lower lev-
el). This meeting is sponsored by Pin-
nacle Non-Traditional Student Honar-
ary. This informal, social meeting will
be held at the same time and place
on the first Monday of every month.
ARISE OFFERS Climbing Wall Instruc-
tion. Feb.3. 7-9pm. This instructional
session teaches proper use of the har-
ness, various climbing strategies,
equipment and belaying. Cost is FREE
to members-$5non-mem. For rrfbre
information call 328-6387.
THE REAL Crisis Center is recruiting
community people to become volun
teer crisis counselors. We need com-
munity people for daytime and night-
time shifts. We need your experienc-
es! Your achievements in everyday sit-
uations can be useful to others we will
be offering a training course beginning
January 31. 2000. For more informa-
tion call 758-HELP.
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING.
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE. A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEL FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vernon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10, 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP -
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UNITED
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 8-8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 & 11 am,
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTTING-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AND VICTORY �
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-6621
Services: 9 & 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600
Services: 9:4? a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 1C a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed. Bble Study
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 & 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE WILL
RAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30. 9:45, 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30 .
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
I
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CENTER INFORMATION
DESK OR THE EAST
CAROLINIAN OFFICE
BEFORE FEBRUARY 7
AT 5 P.I
ONLY
COMPLETE THIS FORM AND BRING IT TO OUR OFFICE OR DROP IT WITH YOUR PAYMENT IN OUR BOX AT THE INFORMATION
DESK IN MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER. LOVE LINES WILL RUN IN THE FEBRUARY 11 EDITION OF THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Name
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ID
ONLY FIRST NAME'S OR INITIALS MAY BE USED. NO LAST NAME S.
Address
$2 for 25
words or
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Messages may be rejectededited on basis of decency. Only first names or initials may be
used. The paper reserves the right to edit or omit any ad which is deemed objectionable,
inappropriate, obscene or misleading. No purchase is necessary to enter the contest.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 1, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 01, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1386
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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