The East Carolinian, January 27, 2000






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www.tec.ecu.edu
the 1 � �
eastcaroliman
LET IT SNOW! pg 6
Winter weather brings unexpected holiday
43 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
Library Closed
Joyner Library will be closed until 1 p.m.
this afternoon, providing that the building
has power. Joyner was closed yesterday
when a transformer blew and caused a
power outage.
Jazz Night
The popular Jazz at Night program be-
gins at 8 p.m. tomorrow evening in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Basketball
The Lady Pirates play UNC-Wilmington
at 7 p.m. tomorrow evening in Williams
Arena at Minges Coliseum.
Art
The School of Art Faculty Exhibition
opens tomorrow at the Gray Gallery in the
Jenkins Fine Arts Center. A reception for the
faculty members who are exhibiting their
works is scheduled for 5 p.m.
Music Scholarship
The Friends of the School of Music
Scholarship Benefits Gala will be held at
Rock Springs Center at 8 p.m. this Saturday.
The ECU Symphony Orchestra will perform.
For ticket information call 328-4270.
Irish Rhythms
The up-and-coming musical quartet
"Flook will perform at 8 p.m. tomorrow night
in Wright Auditorium. The group is one of the
most popular live bands in Britain and
blends traditional Irish rhythms with contem-
porary beats. Public tickets are $18. Stu-
dents art youth tickets are $9. Call the Cen-
tral Ticket Office at 328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-
ARTS.
Religious Arts
The East Carolina Religious Arts Festival
begins today with programs and concerts
planned at area churches. Tonight, "An
Evening of Concertos and Cantataswill be
performed at St. Paul's Episcopal Church.
The program starts at 7:30 p.m. and the
public is invited to attend. For more informa-
tion contact Janette Fishell at 328-1261.
Tomorrow the festival will include a pro-
gram entitled "Pageant and Poetry: Sacred A
Cappella Vocal Music from the Fifteenth
Century, Illumined by the Writings of Chris-
tian Mystics" at 7:30 p.m. at St. Paul's Epis-
copal Church. On Saturday, the festival will
present a hymns program that will feature
the Greenville Choral Society, the Greenville
Children's Chorus, ECU faculty instrumental-
ists and guest composer Hal Hopson. The
performance is at 3 p.m. at Memorial Baptist
Church on Greenville Boulevard.
Best Selling Author
Connie Mason, New York Times best-
selling historical romance author will partici-
pate in a special Writers Forum at 7:30 p.m.
on Thursday, Feb. 3 at ECU's Willis Building
on Reade and 1st Streets. The event, spon-
sored by Literacy Volunteers of America of
Pitt County (LVA-PC) will give area residents
an opportunity to engage in dialogue with
celebrity panelists about how to break into
the field of fiction writing and successful writ-
ing techniques. For further information call
(252) 353-6548.
ONLINE SURVEY
Do you think scurvy is just for
sailors?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Is there reason to suspect the police of mis-
reporting crime
78 YES 22 NO
TRACK OPENS SEASON AT VT
pg.8
4x400, throwers steal the show
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27. 2000
Volume 74, Issue 84
TODAY'S WEATHER
Sunny, high of 36
and a low of 17
Students develop Virtual ECU'
Features include book
trader, atuomobile finder
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
Over the past couple of se-
mesters, students taking software
engineering classes have helped
to bring about an online campus
and an array of services called
'Virtual ECU
Dr. Mohammad labrizzi, as-
sociate professor of computer sci-
ence, developed this program in
1998 through his software engi-
neering class, hoping to educate
students in a different manner.
"I educate students by en-
couraging them to learn
Tabrizzi said. "When they start,
they aren't ready, we educate
them
The students run the entire
system under the instruction of
Tabrizzi, demonstrating the capa-
bilities of the students develop-
ing usable software systems.
According to Tabrizzi, no
other university to date offers
students this type of hands-on
experience. Furthermore, no
other institution allows students
the power and ability to work
with these high-tech tools. Stu-
dents are responsible for doing
research as well as designing blue
prints to constantly improve and
update the program.
At this point, some of the
highlighted features include a
virtual map of all of the build-
ings on campus and a walking
route from building to building
in addition to floor maps of each
building to aid in finding the
exact locations of classrooms. In
addition, the program has a
number of goals that are featured
on the Web page including; mak-
ing the adviser process easier,
providing the faculty and stu-
dents online service, automating
some traditional paperwork tasks
and allowing the students to de-
velop the system with help
from the faculty and staff.
In the future, the system will
feature virtual home finders
where a student can locate the
ideal apartment according to
their standards, an online book
exchange and even a system that
helps college students find car
deals by communicating online
with various dealerships.
"This shows the potential of
students and this method of
mentoring should be involved in
all teaching said Daniel Cox, a
senior majoring in computer sci-
ence.
"I honestly think it's a good
cause Tabrizzi said. "It's going
to make it
On Nov. 27,1999, Dr. Tabrizzi
and his students presented a
new idea to the mayor of
Greenville, a project known as
Virtual Greenville. This system is
similar to its predecessor but it
features community support
and will focus on fostering the
community of Greenville.
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Is it hot in here?
Student Rec Center
celebrates third year
Programs avialable
for disabled students
The electrical transformer behind Joyner Library suffered a
malfunction and caught fire Wednesday causes campus wide power
fluctuations and outages, (photo by Terra Stembeiser)
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The Student Recreation Center (SRC) cel-
ebrated its third anniversary this month.
In addition to the numerous exercise machines,
indoor track, raquetball and basketball courts,
climbing wall and swimming pools, the Rec Cen-
ter has other amenities
Terry Edwards, a program assistant for A-Rise,
said the SRC has opened many doors for students
and staff with disabilities.
"So many activities and opportunities are avail-
, a)le to students and staff with disabilities
Edwards said. "Before the SRC was built, those with
disabilities could not take advantage of
Christenbury Gym due to its inaccessibilty for the
handicapped. They also had difficulty getting into
Minges and using the equipment because they had
to work around the athletics schedules
Edwards said that in addition to the equipment
available to students at the SRC there are also many
programs available.
"Programs for students with disabilities are al-
ways available for students Edwards said. "This
week alone, the SRC is sponsoring Wheel Power
volleyball, wheel chair basketball and the Wheel
Power dance group
According to John Brown, coordinator of the
adventure program, the SRC offers an alternative
form of recreation, and is a place where Edwards
can sponsor programs for A-Rise.
"We regularly sponsor activities for students
which may not have always been available to
them Brown said. "Our programs range from rock
climbing and skiing to surfing, canoeing and
kayaking
All are welcome to participate in the activities
sponsored. He also said programs are planned for
students with disabilities.
"Last weekend the SRC took students with dis-
abilities to Ski Beach, N.C Brown said. "And we
are in the process of planning a kayaking trip on
open water. Usually students practice in the SRC
pool so we can make out what equipment is best
equipped for them
Junior Caneshia McAllister said the opportuni-
ties at the SRC are endless and have opened many
doors for her.
" never thought I would be able to participate
in so many activities McAllister said. "The pro-
grams and accessibility of them have been very
helpful to me. I've been given the chance to expe-
rience things I never dreamed of, like water and
snow skiing, kayaking and climbing, along with
racquetball, basketball, and swimming. I never
knew that there were other ways to participate in
sports, but the SRC has offered me the insight and
I love it
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@s tudentmedia. ecu. edu.
Students sponsor march for flood victims
More thanS 1,000
raised for Relief Fund
T. L. Register
STAFF WRITER
Students Patrick Charland
and Trevor Austin helped raise
over $1,000 for flood victims by
organizing a walk-a-thon
through the Student Volunteer
Program.
Austin and Charland went to
see Judy Baker, director of the
Student Volunteer Program,
wanting to do something to help
those affected by Hurricane
Floyd across eastern North Caro-
lina after the flooding.
"They came to me and I ex-
plained the nature of how things
work and gave them the names
of people they could contact to
help with advertising Baker
said. "The volunteer program
helped provide volunteers and
we printed the posters, but they
did all of the leg work. They were
very energetic and very respon-
sible about the whole thing
With the help of the Student
Volunteer Program, over 100
hours each of their own time and
energy, along with the aid of stu-
dents and locals around the area,
they were able to hold the "Road
to Recovery March" on Oct. 22.
The event was held at the E.B.
Aycock Middle School track
and raised $1254.75 for the ECU
Family Relief Fund.
"We thought about doing it,
and it worked Charland said.
"It was just nice to see everyone
come out and support the com-
munity
Students from organizations
such as Theta Chi fraternity and
Alpha Xi Delta sorority pitched
in to help raise funds by getting
individual sponsors and walking
during the march.
A small group of students
from Appalachian State Univer-
sity who had come to offer their
help with the clean up efforts
were invited to join in the walk.
Other contributors included
Pepsi, which donated banners,
and LeBlue, which donated
bottles of water.
Austin and Charland offi-
cially presented the check to
James Lanier, vice chancellor of
Institutional Advancement, on
See VOLUNTEER page 3
Goodman appointed by
Domestic Violence Commission
Plans made for helping
battered women throughout state
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Dr. Peggy Goodman, an associate professor of
emergency medicine, has been appointed to a two-
year term on the North Carolina Domestic Vio-
lence Commission by Governor James B. Hunt.
Goodman joined the ECU faculty in 1992. She
is chair of the North Carolina Medical Society's
Domestic Violence Committee and a member of
t
the North Carolina Public Health Alliance Against
Domestic Violence and the Pitt County Domestic
Violence Network. She will remain a full time fac-
ulty member while serving her term.
Goodman was appointed to the Domestic Vio-
lence Commission at the beginning of September,
but her inauguration was delayed due to the flood-
ing.
Goodman said she hopes to enhance domestic
violence resources within the state.
"I hope to improve people's awareness of do-
mestic violence and how prevalent it is through-
out the world Goodman said. "1 and the com
SeeDVC, page 2
From left: Trevor Austin and Patrick Charland present a cheque to Vice
Chancellor James Lanier. (photo courtesy of Student Volunteer Program)
Did you know
? Between 25 and 40 of teens ha
dates. About 80 of these assaults include
shoving, and grabbing. 1 out of 4 teens wl
relationship. Over 70 of pregnant or i
by tht
? .tall sexual assaults invo
friends. 30 of all murdered women in tt
their boyfriend or hn ual;
One out
are ever re nent. Most
16-24 years
? 95 .
ships are committed I
of sexual assault before they turn 18.
Statistics from www.hnwc.orx






The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Funerals held for Seton Hall fire victims crime scene
LONG BRANCH, N.J. (AP)�The
grief-stricken friends and family of
three Seton Hall University fresh-
men who died in a dormitory fire
gathered Monday- to mourn and
wonder why.
But there were no answers. Not
at St. Jerome Roman Catholic
Church, where Frank S. Caltabilota
Jr. was remembered in a 90-minute
Mass.
Not at St. Francis of Assisi in
Vineland, where John Giunta was
laid to rest.
And not at St. John the Evange-
list Roman Catholic Church in
Dunellen, where Aaron Karol was
remembered as a "near-perfect kid
"Today our faith cannot answer
the question why said the Rev.
William Sheridan, assistant director
of campus ministry at Seton Hall.
"Why did three die? Why did John
die? Why?"
Caltabilota, of West i.ong
Branch, was a three-sport standout
at Shore Regional High School who
aspired to a career in medicine. An
honor student, he compared him-
self in his Seton Hall application
essay to a basketball player who
chooses to pass to an open team-
mate instead of shooting the ball
himself.
"My school counselor says that
I am a natural caretaker. Maybe she's
right Caltabilota wrote.
More than 8(X) people filled St.
Jerome for the service.
Caltabilota's girlfriend, Frin
Brown, 18, had to pause several
times during a five-minute eulogy
to gather herself. "You touched the
lives of so many people, even if
you'd only known them five min-
utes Brown said.
In Dunellen, about 450 people
crowded into St. John the Evange-
list Roman Catholic Church to say
goodbye to Karol, of Green Brook,
a soccer enthusiast and criminal jus-
tice major who hoped someday to
work for the FBI.
"He was just an all-round, near-
perfect kid said Jimmy Byrnes, 17,
a socceT teammate at Watchung
Hills Regional High School. "He had
everything � sports, popularity,
smarts
Weeping teenagers carried the
coffin down the aisle, followed by
Karol's family.
"Learn from the loss of this
young man how precious life is
said the Rev. John Morley, a Seton
Hall priest. "And it does not come
with guarantees
In Vineland, about 500 people
� including three bus loads of Se-
ton Hall students �turned out for
Giunta's funeral Mass at St. Francis
of Assisi Roman Catholic Church.
Giunta, an elementary educa-
tion major who aspired to teaching
in the inner city, was remembered
as a generous, loyal guy with a great
future.
"He seemed like he had a dream
ahead of him. Fie knew what he
wanted to do said John
Henderson, 21, of Vineland, a high
school classmate.
Classmates consoled each other,
holding hands or patting one an-
other on the back.
"We say that Seton Hall is a fam-
ily, and it is said Seton Hall chan-
cellor Thomas Peterson, who spoke
at Karol's funeral Mass. "We, like
yourselves, have lost a son
There were prayers for the three
elsewhere, too.
� In Rome, a group of Ameri-
can priests at the Vatican offered
Mass for the victims Monday,
Morley said. One of the priests was
a former Seton Hall faculty mem-
ber.
� In Washington, U.S. Sen.
Frank Lautenberg read a resolution
honoring the three on the Senate
floor.
� In Trenton, Gov. Christie
Whitman departed from the pre-
pared text of her annual budget
message to say, "We want the fami-
lies to know they are in our hearts
and in our prayers
At Seton Hall, meanwhile, some
freshmen returned to their rooms at
Boland Hall for the first time since
the fire.
Residents of the first two floors
were allowed to move back into
their rooms, while third, fourth and
fifth floor residents were relocated,
university officials said.
A memorial service scheduled
for today on the South Orange cam-
pus was postponed as a major snow-
storm hit the East Coast. It was re-
scheduled for 10 a.m. Thursday.
Classes were to resume this after-
noon, but they too were called off.
The fire broke out around 4:30
a.m. Wednesday on the third floor
of Boland Hall, a six-story dormitory
that housed 640 people. Five remain
hospitalized, four in critical condi-
tion with burns.
Gonzalez's grandmothers leave Miami without seeing him
MIAMI (AP)�Elian Gonzalez's
grandmothers flew to Miami on
Monday in hopes of meeting with
their 6-year-old grandson before
they returned to Cuba, but the
women left town without seeing the
boy because of a dispute over the
site of the get-together.
The boy's maternal grand-
mother, Raquel Rodriguez, and pa-
ternal grandmother, Mariela
Quintana, shunned an invitation to
have dinner Monday night at the
home of Elian's relatives in Miami,
who insisted the meeting take place
there.
The grandmothers wanted to
meet privately with Elian at a neu-
tral site. After flying in from New
York, they spent about five hours at
the airport before departing for
Washington.
The two women arrived late
Monday in Washington where they
were scheduled to meet Tuesday
with several members of Congress.
The private Lear jet was met on the
Washington airport tarmac and the
two women were whisked away in
cars.
The grandmothers left Miami
while a group including Elian's two
great-uncles and Ms. Rodriguez's sis-
ter were heading to meet the
women at the airport. They did not
bring Elian along, and Spencer Eig,
an attorney for the Miami relatives,
said they were told the grandmoth-
ers had no interest in meeting with
the great-uncles.
"Elian is disappointed Fig said.
"I know the grandmothers are dis-
appointed. The situation is heart-
breaking for the Gonzalezes
The Reverend Hob Edgar, general
secretary of the National Council of
Churches, who sponsored the
women's trip, said the grandmoth-
ers were scared to come to Miami
because of protests by Cuban-
Americans who want Elian to stay
in the United States.
"They were frightened F.dgar
said. "They see the thousands of
people here in Miami marching and
protesting and you can imagine as
very simple, loving, caring grand-
parents that they would be fright-
ened to come
Edgar said the women were will-
ing to return to Miami, or go any-
where else, to meet with Elian as
long as there is agreement on a neu-
tral location for a visit.
The Miami relatives have been
caring for Elian since he was found
clinging to an inner tube off the
Florida coast on Nov. 25. His mother
and 10 other Cubans died in their
ill-fated attempt to reach the United
States.
The Immigration and Natural-
University of Alabama told
to suspend use of humans in research
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP)�Alabama's largest medi-
cal center has been ordered to stop enrolling human
volunteers in hundreds of federally-funded studies af-
ter a government citing potential safety concerns
among the test subjects.
University of Alabama at Birmingham officials said
Friday that about 25 percent of its 2,220 research
projects � including those on AIDS and cancer � could
be temporarily affected.
The order, made public by the university, was is-
sued this week by the National Institutes of Health's
Office for Protection from Research Risks, which over-
sees patient safety procedures at federally funded insti-
tutions.
The order made no mention of any harm to research
volunteers, and it was unclear how long admissions to
the programs would be baited.
Last year, a similar moratorium at Duke University's
medical center lasted four days.
The NIH office found flaws in UAH's internal over-
sight of its research projects involving human subjects,
including failure to adequately review patient risks and
insufficient tracking of research participants lor follow-
up information.
Calls to NTH officials were not returned Friday.
"The NTH order means new patients cannot enroll
in about 40 AIDS research programs that already in-
volve as many as 150 people said Dr. Michael Saag,
head of UAB's outpatient AIDS clinic. "People already
involved in studies will continue with the tfiafs Saag
said.
"This is a serious issue, and the university is ad-
dressing it very seriously and thoroughly Saag said.
The university said the order meant some research
projects must be reviewed again by its internal watch-
dog panel, known as the Institutional Review Board.
"Many of these items had already been addressed
at UAB and were in the process of being implemented
said Dr. Joan I.orden, the university's associate provost
for research.
At least six other research institutions have under-
gone similar moratoriums since 1998.
. Federal regulators restricted research at Duke for four
days last May because the school didn't meet the agency
time line for making changes after an inspection.
UAH said that, unlike other schools that have been
placed under tighter restrictions, it can continue ap-
proving new research projects. In addition to AIDS and
cancer, the university has major centers for treating
and researching heart disease, kidney ailments and eye
injuries and disorders.
The federal action had no immediate effect on pri-
vately funded research.
The university, with an enrollment of 15,000 stu-
dents, receives about 5300 million in research grants
each year, an amount higher than the total given to all
other Alabama universities combined. Of that, about
5212 million is from federal sources.
DVC
from page 1
mission hope to better educate
doctors, nurses and EMS personnel,
while also educating the state
Goodman said she and the com-
mission plan to help with the con-
struction of more shelters for bat-
tered women and their children
throughout North Carolina.
According to Jeannine Hutson,
an information specialist for ECU
News and Information, the North
Carolina Domestic Violence Com-
mission was established by an ex-
ecutive order of Governor Fluntand
is one of only two such boards in
the country.
The commission is composed of
state and federal law enforcement,
community domestic violence
victim's rights advocates and legal
and health professionals. The com-
mission is also responsible for evalu-
ation and development of legal,
health appropriate resources, legis-
lation and interventions for domes-
tic violence survivors, their children
and their abusers.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Dr Peggy Goodman was appointed to the Domestic Violence Commission in
September of '1999 by Governor James B Hunt. (File photo)
ization Service (INS) has ruled that
Elian must be sent back to Cuba to
live with his father, but the Miami
family is suing in federal court to
block the boy's return.
On Monday, the first day of the
new congressional session, Senate
Majority Leader Trent Lott and
Florida lawmakers introduced a hill
to give FTian U.S. citizenship, which
would free him from INS jurisdic-
tion.
The grandmothers, wno "evv
from Cuba to New York on Friday,
had asked Attorney General Janet
Reno over the weekend to arrange
a meeting with Elian. Reno backs
the INS decision to return Elian to
Cuba, and the Justice Department
tried to arrange for a neutral site lor
the meeting.
In a letter to the INS, an attor-
ney for the Miami family said a din-
ner at the home of l.azaro
Gonzalez�Mrs. Quintana's brother-
in-law and Elian's great-uncle�
would let the grandmothers "see
and feel for themselves how well
Elian is doing and how much he
wishes to remain in the United
States
Elian had spoken by telephone
with his father in Cuba and was
excited as he prepared for his grand-
mothers' arrival, said family spokes-
man Armando Gutierrez. The fam-
ily had bought cameras so Elian
could take pictures of his grand-
mothers, the spokesman said.
Gutierrez said the family would
only allow the meeting to take place
at the home.
"Ibis is where they live
Gutierrez said. "This is where Elian
lives, no budging on that
The family had planned to wel-
Jan. 24
Damage to Property�A staff
member reported that an exte-
rior window was broken on the
east side of the Whlchard An
nex.
Larceny�A student reported' � '
that his resident parking decal
was stolen from his vehicle. The '
location of the theft is uri- !
known.
Larceny from Motor Vehicle�
A student reported that his book
bag was stolen from his vehicle
while it was parked south of '
Joyner Library.
Harassing Phone Calls�A stu ;
dent reported receiving three
telephone calls from a male sub-
ject she believes assaulted her in '
Raleigh, N.C.
Jan. 25
Larceny�A student reported-
that several clothing items were
stolen "from a laundry room In.
Tyler Hall.
Damage to Property�A non-
student reported that while trav-
eling west on 5th Street near
Reade Street Lot 1, a group of
individuals were gathered
throwing snowballs. One of the
snowballs shattered his rear pas-
senger window.
Possession ofMarijnana, Alco-
hol Violation�A staff member re-
ported a burnt marijuana odor
coming from a room in Aycock ;
Hall. During a consent search
an undisclosed amount of mari-
juana and two forms of drink-
ing alcohol were found. One stu- �
dent was cited for underage pos- �
session of a malt beverage and
issued a Campus Appearance .
Ticket (CAT). Another student!
was also cited for underage pos-
session of spirituous liquor and
simple possession of marijuana j
and was issued a CAT.
75$ Domestic Bottles
All Day Tuesday. Thursday. Saturday
12 Price Appetizers
Sunday After 2 p.m.
Monday Praffs
$.50 Pitchers of Miller Lite S Bud Light
$.50 Pitchers of Bass, Killians � New Castle
3.00 Guinness Pints
1675 i. Firetower Rd.
In Front of Carmike Cinema
353-5800
RATCHABL
the bodies Tue
during a pre-d
hundreds of pa
in the takeover
Two of the
group of exilei
military regime
in Bangkok in
exchange for ft
26 hours.
This time, T
they could not
patients at stak
No civilian;
long assault by
forces Tuesday,
I icemen officer:
Prime Minis
eration had bee
cessful freeing
But the pub






, Jan. 27, 2000
tmedia.ecu.edu'
SCENE
.24
Property�A staff
id that an exte-
s broken on the
Whichard An- "
tudent reported
t parking decal
his vehicle. The
e theft is un-
Motor Vehicle�
ed that his book
rom his vehicle
irked south of
me Calls�A stu-
eceiving three
rom a male sub-
assaulted her in
25
udent reported-
ling items were
undry room in
operty�A non-
that while trav-
th Street near
1, a group of
ere gathered
alls. One of the
red his rear pas-
iarijiiana, Alco-
taff member re-
narijuana odor
3om in Aycock
onsent search,
nount of mari-
orms of drink-
bund. One stu
� underage pos-
: beverage and
is Appearance.
lother student
underage pos-
ous liquor and
l of marijuana j
CAT. :
le
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Student rebel leaders identified among 10 killed in hostage siege
RATCHABURI, Thailand (AP) Thailand displayed
the bodies Tuesday of 10 Myanmar insurgents killed
during a pre-dawn hostage rescue operation to free
hundreds of patients, visitors and medical staff trapped
in the takeover of a provincial hospital.
Two of them were identified as leaders of a tiny
group of exiled students opposed to their country's
military regime. They had stormed Myanmar's embassy
in Bangkok in October and were allowed to escape in
exchange for freeing dozens of hostages they held for
26 hours.
This time, Thai authorities took a hard line, saying
they could not play for time with the lives of hospital
patients at stake.
No civilians were injured in the pre-dawn, hour-
long assault by police coniniandos and army special
forces Tuesday, ending a 22-hour stalemate, live po-
licemen officers were wounded.
Prime Minister Chuan I.eekpai said the rescue op-
eration had been carefully planned and was "very suc-
cessful freeing all the hostages.
But the public display of the bodies seemed an at-
tempt to forestall speculation of summary executions.
Thai police have occasionally killed violent criminals
in cold blood after their capture.
The corpses were wrapped in white sheets, so the
nature of their wounds could not be discerned. At least
six seemed to be bleeding from their heads.
The regional police commander, I.t. Gen. Anant
Heamathanong, said all the hostage-takers had died in
fighting and none had been executed. He said nine
were killed at the scene and the 10th in a gun battle
after fleeing. No other details were given.
The bodies were taken by ambulance to a Buddhist
temple, leaving bloodstains on the concrete where they
had lain.
The takeover has been blamed on a fringe rebel
group of the Karen minority.called God's Army, led by
12-year-old twins believed to have magical powers, and
it may have supplied some of the manpower.
But it became clear that a major, and probably com-
manding, role was played by the Vigorous Burmese Stu-
dent Warriors, which had holed up with God's Army
in the Myanmar-Thai border jungles.
presents
Big Mac
Five of the students seized Myanmar's embassy in
Bangkok in October, holding dozens of hostages. They
were allowed to fly to freedom in Thai helicopters in
exchange for releasing them, angering Myanmar's gov-
ernment for what it viewed as Thai coddling of terror-
ists. Myanmar closed the border for two months in re-
taliation.
Spokesmen for the foreign and defense ministries
identified two of the dead as members of the Vigorous
Burmese Student Warriors known only as johnny and
Preeda, the best-known of the group. Others may also
have been members.
One official who took part in the raid, speaking on
condition of anonymity, said he estimated the dead
gunmen ranged in age from their early teens to early
30s. A full identification was not given.
The twin leaders of God's Army, Johnny and I.uther
Htoo, were not among them and played no apparent
role in the takeover.
The God's Army base in Myanmar came under at-
tack from government forces last week, sending 1,000
civilian refugees to Thailand. The Thais meanwhile
shelled the rebels to keep them from coming as well.
In their demands Monday, the rebels sought an end
to the Thai shelling and refuge for civilians and fight-
ers inside Thailand. They also wanted helicopters tp
escape.
An estimated 900 people had been trapped when
the gunmen seized the hospital Monday morning. But
at least half of them had been freed by their captors or
escaped during the day and overnight before the as-
sault was launched.
Thai authorities said throughout the ordeal that
they were trying to negotiate a peaceful end to the siege.
But at about 5:40 a.m police and soldiers armed
with M-16 assault rifles ran on foot or sped in trucks
and jeeps into the walled, 2.4-hectare (six-acre) hospi-
tal compound.
Reporters kept away from the hospital could hear
explosions, possibly mines and explosives rigged by the
hostage-takers, and automatic weapons fire, which con-
tinued sporadically for an hour.
Freed hostages on Tuesday recalled their ordeal,
some complimenting their captors, other condemning
them.
Decha Yuwang, 32, a laborer, was taken prisoner
with his mother who had come for treatment for a sore
throat. The gunmen guarding them in a small room
with 80-90 other captives assured they would come to
no harm.
"They spoke to us very politely said Decha. "I ad-
mire their bravery
Kheak Im-uerb, 35, was recovering from an appen-
dectomy when the gunmen arrived. He and other post-
operative patients escaped halfway through the siege,
since the small number of gunmen were unable to con-
trol all the hospital's outlying buildings.
"A doctor told us to go if we could Kheak said.
"He said, 'We can always fix your stitches again if they
tear
"They deserved to be punished Kheak said.
VOLUNTEER
from page 1
Medium
Medium
Dec. 2, at the ECU Alumni Center.
"I was really proud of their ef-
fort Baker said. "If every two
people had done something like
this just imagine
Charland and Austin are plan-
ning to attempt another project this
semester, but they have not decided
on the focus.
This writer can be reached at
tregister@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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I
I
4 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
GONZALEZ
from page 2
come the grandmothers with a din-
ner of roast pork, mixed black beans
and rice and breaded chicken cut-
lets, Gutierrez said. Boxes of flow-
ers were brought into the home.
About 300 people gathered outside
holding flowers and signs welcom-
ing the grandmothers.
On NBC's "Today" show, Ms.
Rodriguez asked Congress not to
give the boy U.S. citizenship and to
let him return to Cuba.
"It will be more painful if he gets
the citizenship Rodriguez said,
speaking in Spanish through an in-
terpreter. "I'm asking the congress
people and people of the United
States that have supported us to stop
all this. Please, don't make us suffer
any longer
Although they said they have
not spoken to the boy in five days,
Mrs. Quintana said Elian has told
her over the telephone that "he's
crazy to go back to Cuba
"He misses everything there�
his school, his classmates, every-
body, his father's love Rodriguez
said. "To be able to hug and kiss his
father�he tells us every day
Ms. Rodriguez denied that her
daughter wanted to come to the
United States and have Elian live
here. She said Elian's mother was
pressured to make the trip by her
boyfriend, "a very violent person
Elian's grandmothers planned to
meet Tuesday in Washington with
members of Congress, including
Sen. Christopher Dodd, the
senator's aides announced. The
Connecticut Democrat is a sponsor
of legislation introduced every year
to ease the trade embargo with Cuba
that has been in effect for four de-
cades.
CLEARANCE
SALE
atalog
onnection
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Open Sunday 1-5
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we throw all kinds of
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tuition isn't one of them.
Sure, we'll have you climbing walls. But if you qualify for
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ARMY ROIC Unlike any other college course you can take.
rr
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS CHESS TABLE TENNIS RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
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Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Chess
Sat Jan. 29
Nine-Ball
Mon. Jan 31 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
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ThurJan27 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Social Room
(Men' & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline -Feb. 1,6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student RecreationCenterXall the RecreatigmPrograms Office, 328-4738, for more information, jj
9:00 a.m5:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
O
Prices Effective Through January S, 2000
Prices In Thia Ad Effective Wednesday, January 12, Through January VS, 2000
In Our Greenville store only. We Reserve The Right To Limit Quantities.
None Sold To Dealers. We Gladly Accept Federal Food Stamps. (
Thursday, J,
i www.tec.eci
Terra Steinb
Susan Wrigr
Emily Richar
Daniel E. Co
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that resulted in rr.
lo tear him a new





Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
� www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian. 5
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
(VisI Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studentrnedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11.000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion ot the majority of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Editorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
for decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters (or publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent by e-mail to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian. Student Publications Building,
Greenville. NC 278584353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366.
&QKFP Jas S�rt TTo Cou-Ekf Hill Tb rfet-p
MAAlTAlM" PfA(L� BE7U)fc�AJ vJAKMtr P6W1S
The SRC is head and shoulders
above the student recreation
i
facilities at every other school In
the stale. It is a testament to what
can happen when a university
puls serious thought into the lives
of its students and follows through
with those plans
OURVIEW
The Student Recreation Center is celebrating its third anniversary this
month. The SRC stands as an example of what a university can do when it
focuses on the students. While many university facilities have solely aca-
demic uses, the SRC caters exclusively to the needs of the student body.
While the many exercise machines and basketball courts give students
a place to play and workout, the SRC also puts together trips, organizes
intramurals, and club sports and plans functions that enhance student life
at ECU.
The SRC runs programs such as A-Rise for students with disabilities
and has special programs for students at the beginning of each semester
and during exams.
Prospective students are immediately drawn to the SRC when visiting
the campus on tour. The SRC is head and shoulders above the student
recreation facilities at every other school in the state. It is a testament to
what can happen when a university puts serious thought into the lives of
its students and follows through with those plans.
That's what makes the SRC more than just a place to get in a quick
game of hoops.
On a trip to the SRC during the week, you will see honor students
playing alongside frat brothers, day students, freshmen and even the odd
professor.
You just might have to wait a spell for a court to open up.
OPINION COLUMN
Personal intrigues exposed on shuttle
Leigh Murphy
OPINION WRITER
OPINION COLUMN
j Is this political Hell? No, it's Iowa.
Mark Larado
OPINION WRITER
As we stand here at the crosswalk of freedom, wait-
ing to be mangled by the bus of Election 2000, Ameri-
pans must first choose the two main competitors to
compete in this topless mud-wrestling ring of democ-
racy.
On Monday, Iowa held a caucus to help find
tomorrow's presidential scandal, today. For those of
you who don't know, the word caucus sounds a lot
like the French word "causerie" meaning talk show.
Trust me folks, all this election needs is a crack-
addicted, transvestite prostitute or any member of the
midget KKK to have every possible type of candidate
running.
To make it easier for you, I will break down win-
ners and losers of each party.
From the Republican Party, George W. (Wonder
Woman) Bush, won his campaign in Iowa with a big
win over Steve Forbes. This Republican front- runner
is the son of former president, George Bush, who had
the highest American approval-rating in history dur-
ing his presidency.
However by the end of Flection '92, Bush's rating
mirrored that of O.J. Simpson playing golf with the
skeletal remains of his dead ex-wife.
Steve Forbes surprisingly won over 30 percent of
the Republican vote to come in second in the race.
Forbes was a little upset with this, and he blamed it on
an under-financed campaign.
So he went to the bank to take more money out of
his kids near-penniless trust fund in preparation for
another second place victory in New Hampshire.
I would say something about John McCain, but I
fear it'll rub him the wrong way, causing him to throw
a temper tantrum like a two-year-old in the toy section
of Wal-Mart.
On a lighter note, Orin Hatch, whose campaign slo-
gan "Don't mess with me, I'm from Utah quit after
obtaining just one percent of the 10 percent who voted
in Iowa. Leaving the American public holding their
hands to their mouths gasping, "Who?"
The political spectrum of the Democratic race can
be broken down like the mixture of the all-guy band
NSync. That is, a couple of "pretty boys" with good
voices, surrounded by a bunch of ugly, vapid, back-up
singers.
Running in first is Al Gore, who won (because he
was able to get nine out of 10 lumberjacks in'that state
to agree that he's top-grade.
By nearly two votes to one, Al Gore beat former
senator and NBA hall-of-famer Bill Bradley, proving
once again that the Knicks suck.
If your favorite candidate didn't win this time,
maybe he'll have better luck in New I lampshire. That's
the state that has the tough job of keeping all the
whinny French-Canadians from delecting to here.
This writer can be contacted at
mlarado@siudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Everyday, hundreds of students use the bus system
as transportation to and from class. For me, it is an
easy way to get to class without searching for a park-
ing spot. I can drive to Minges from my apartment
and then take the shuttle to Christenbury.
I am very thankful that this service is provided for
us. However, some things do not need to be discussed
on route to school. If you want to learn about your
fellow classmates, ride the bus. Anything and eyery-
thing is discussed.
I really have an issue, or shall I say pet peeve, with
this.
Monday morning there was a great romance story
being told, which appeared to be a replay of the
weekend's events. I can honestly say that I was sur-
prised by the level of details that I heard. Which for
me as a listener, really helped bring it to life.
I do, nevertheless, feel sorry for the girlfriend, es-
pecially since I know her.
I heard about these three people: the girlfriend, the
boyfriend and a close female friend. All three have been,
good friAids for several years, and always seem to be
together.
They had plans over the weekend, but unfortu-
nately the girlfriend had to go out of town, which left
the other two in Greenville to enjoy themselves. The
close friend decided to invite the boyfriend over for a
nice dinner and an evening by the fire, which led them
to cross that friendship line.
To make the story even better, the intimate details
such as the fact that the friend bought a green lingerie
set just for him, were actually revealed. Plus, I now
know even where in the apartment the actual relations
occurred.
After those two actions were presented, the girl-
friend was degraded by the two on the bus.
I do not want to hear this kind of stuff on my way
to class. For some reason I think that information like
this needs to be discussed elsewhere.
What if I am good friends with the actual people
(like I am) and decide to tell them what I heard?
If you have to talk smack, you better watch your
back and make sure who you tell these stories around.
More than that, have a little respect for those around
you. Some of us do not care who you had sex with or
what exactly it was that you did this weekend.
Which takes me to the bus ride back to Minges af-
ter school.
It was around 3 p.m which meant that most people
had already left campus and the bus was rather sparse.
This also means that little conversations can be heard
by everyone riding. This time there were two rather
nice looking guys discussing the tactics in luring a
young girl on a date, or least to have a drink with them.
For example, one of their procedures in capturing
"fresh meat" is to tell them how innocent they are.
The boy approached the girl, tells her that she does not
look like she feels comfortable in the surroundings and
to let him take her where she will be less vulnerable.
Another example from the boy's conversation was
to tell her that either there were a lot of drugs in the
bathroom and they needed to get out, or that a ran-
dom person has a gun and it would be wise for her to
let him take her out of the bar.
I found both of these approaches rather interest-
ing, f really hope that girls do not fall for these tactics.
I also hope that these two guys have better ways of
getting dates. Either way, I don't care.
There is a time and a place for everything. This
means that the shuttle is not the place for revealing
thoughts or events that might affect others riding.
In the future, I hope that you really will look to see
who is sitting next to you. You really never know when
you are getting yourself into trouble or you might find
your story in the newspaper.
I enjoy digging for information and writing about
it, but it is handed to me, as I was riding the shuttle),
there is no way that I can refuse.
This writer can be contacted at
lmurphy@istudentmedia.ecu.edu.
OPNION COLUMN '
Life's too short�let 'em know you care
OPNION COLUMN
Amusing ideas for snow play
Patrick McMahon
OPINION COLUMNIST
In this hectic, day-to-day college life that we live
in, we sometimes forget the important people in our
life and their effect upon us. The friends we grew up
with that now go to another school, the really sweet
teacher that got you out of trouble, the parents that
helped raise you into the man or woman you are to-
day�all of these people played an integral part in who
you are today.
These people are special to you and they don't even
know it.Tell them how much they mean to you and
lww they touched your soul. A simple letter or phone
call is sometimes all that is needed. How many times
have you heard someone who lost a loved one say "I
never had the chance to tell them how much I really
cared It tears my heart to pieces when I hear this be-
cause I was once in the same boat as they are now in.
Travis Cobb Ellis was one of my best friends in high
school. We were both on the golf team and we both
hung out together on the weekends. Some of my most
memorable high school moments were spent with him
.and our other friends. I eventually went off to school
while Travis looked for something to do after high
school. The last time I saw him was on a golf course at
the end of July in 1998. We got into a big argument
that resulted in me walking off the course and vowing
to tear him a new one. I hung around to wait for him
but decided to go home instead. That was the last time
I spoke with him until his funeral four months later.
Travis was hit by a car that ran off the road Oct. 2,
1998 while working with the Department of Transpor-
tation spraying flowers on the roadside. My whole life
went to pieces after his death because I believed he
didn't know how much I really cared for him as my
friend. He was my boy and I let him die without ever
letting him know. After his death, it became important
to me to tell each and every person I'm friends with
how I feel about them. I tell my friends I love them, I
tell my parents I love them after every phone call, I tell
anyone I can that I love them because when it is all
said and done, I do not want these people to have to go
through what I did.
Fell your parents you love them. You may not get
along too well with them but it is important for them
to hear it. You'll brighten their day. It is a simple ges-
ture that can greatly ease the pain if the person is taken
from you. Some people may say that I'm unlucky be-
cause so many of my friends have died, but I look at it
differently. The Lord is trying to show me how pre-
cious each and every life is, so take nothing for granted.
No matter what, when God decides to return you to
his side, there is nothing anyone can do to stop it. Life
is short. Take nothing for granted. Open yourselves to
others.
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahon@studentmedia.ecu.edu
4
Chris Sachs
OPINION COLUMNIST
All this snow is wonderful. It reminds me of a Rob-
ert Frost poem about the pastoral settings of the North
with the crisp air and the splendid mountain ranges.
Or does this snow remind me of a Edgar Allen Poe poem
about death and dismemberment? Looking at the car
wreck I just saw, it had to be Poe.
I grew up in the North and 1 remember I had to dig
my father's car out of five feet of snow just so I could
go to the DMV to take my driving test. I failed the test,
but it was not because of the snow, it was because I
had the radio on and my arm out the window. But
anyway, I have been driving in snow as long as 1 can
remember and I don't mind it at all. 1 like driving to
school on a sheet of ice�sideways. Having it snow
down here in the South provides me no end of enter-
tainment. It is a gas to watch everyone walking like
they are on a tight rope connected to two unicycles
while wearing stiletto heels. Arms flailing about and
legs wobbling. It looks like downtown at 2:30 am. See-
ing cars on the side of the road gives me a snicker be-
cause that is one less person that can get my illegal
parking spot at Darryl's. 1 know that is evil of me, but
so is the parking situation, and desperate needs cause
for desperate deeds.
Another thing 1 like watch in the snow is the ex-
pression on the faces of all the students who are slid-
ing around the campus. They have a look of money in
their eyes. They are waiting to fall and break their hips
just so their lawyers can get them a fat settlement and
have a building named after them. 1 am not sure which
building I will buy when I fall, but the new chemistry
building will look good with a statue of me in front of
it.
But all seriousness aside, now it is time for fun.
There is so much fun to'be had in the snow. And re-
member the first rule of fun in the snow: the more
dangerous it is, the more fun it is. Tying an old
Volkswagen Beetle's hood to the back of your buddy's
truck and being hauled around the neighborhood at'
forty miles an hour is always fun. Taking a canoe down!
the hill on 4th st. is also fun. (It will be even more furi!
if there are eleven other drunk people in there with!
you.) i!
And what about the snowballs! What fun to be had
Throwing snowballs at cars as they go by has been!
around since snow was first invented. It is pure bliss to!
watch the people scowl as you pelt their windows with!
snowballs the size of grapefruits, knowing they will,
never catch you when they do stop and chase you
Snowball fights are another great time, but remember
putting old batteries in the center of the snowball is'
unfair and should only be used if your side is losing the
battle.
And who can forget the old favorite�Skitching
Now skitching is done by waiting for a car to stop at a j
stoplight or stop sign and sneaking up behind it, grab-
bing the bumper and getting pulled for a block or two
Make sure to wear heavy boots and gloves and a;
catcher's mask doesn't hurt either. But make sure the'
car you choose can handle it. This is a true story � in'
Buffalo, NY where I skitched for years, my buddy and
grabbed the bumper of aYugo. The bumper actually
ripped off and we almost got killed by the car behind !
us. So choose a sturdy car like a Ford Festiva or a Ged!
Metro. ;
So enjoy the snow, drive to school fast, do donuts
wherever you can and make sure to have a good law-
yer. Dress warm and remember which bars stay open
in the foul weather. And if school does close, make sure
that whatever you do, don't catch up on work and study
It belittles the school's grand gesture of looking out for'
your safety. Go out and have some fun and make some
money
This writer can be contacted at
csachs@studentmedia.ecuxdu





I The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES BRIEFS
The many
meanings of color
RED has the lowest
vibration, being therefore the
coarsest and most physically
vitalizing. Astrologers tell us
that the "planetary
color " of Mars is
red and has
dynamic power
over iron, which is
responsible for our
red-blood. Without it we
would have transparent liquid
in our veins. Mars is consid-
ered the God of War, giving a
martial spirit to all born under
this sign, quick strength and
force, power and leadership.
Red is the color of Mars, whose
stone is the ruby and whose
metal is iron.
ORANGE is the second
color in the spectrum. This
I beautiful color is
associated with the
sun, and has a
I warming and
invigorating effect. But
whereas red is stimulating to
the body and the blood,
orange is stimulating to the
emotions. It is also considered
the color of the brave. It
should be avoided by ex-
tremely emotional types of
people, who acquire balance
through its complimentary
color, blue.
YELLOW is the third color
of the spectrum. This color
belongs to the planet Mercury.
Mercury instills a
quick intellect by
stimulating the
nervous system.
Wisdom is said to
be conferred by
Mercury and its color. This
color has stood for wisdom
and intellect throughout the
ages. Yellow lamps or glass
windows stimulate the nerves
of the brain and the body.
They should not be used by
highly nervous subjects.
GREEN is the fourth color
which stands in the center of
the scale of seven colors.
Green gives stability, endur-
ance and quietude. People
with the luminous .
I green of Saturn in
their aura are the
harmonizers and
pacifiers of the
world. They stand
for social stability. If
the green is dark and crude it
tells that its owner, so con-
cerned with the affairs of
others, has become "green
with envy
BLUE belongs to the planet
Venus, the giver of love,
devotion and harmony. Its
stone is the amethyst, the
super-sacred of the seven
jewels. Pale blue in the aura
represents devotion, while
dark blue shows fanaticism.
One can either be "true blue"
or have a fit of the "blues
according to one's outlook.
INDIGO is the sixth color
of the scale. It is, like green, a
meeting-ground for all the
colors. Its planet is said to be
Uranus and its stone is jet. In
the aura it shows dignity and
high aspirations.
VIOLET is the seventh and
last color of the spectrum. It
represents the seventh and
highest quality a
person attains �
noble spiritual
aspiration. There-
'1�t f�re it has always
been connected to
the priestly ceremo-
nies. It cools the nerves, is
magnetic and antiseptic.
Purple and violet speak of
honor, spirituality and self-
esteem.
FEATURES
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
Local bands hold unique appeal for Greenville fans
Smaller audiences
cause more interaction
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
nights, depending on the club that
you go to and the band that you
want to see. Local record stores,
such as CD Alley and East Coast
Music and Video, carry the CDs
The crowd is screaming, and
the band takes the stage. True, the
crowd Is only 250 people and they
are all packed into Peasant's Cafe,
but they are no less enthusiastic
than a larger crowd at Walnut
Creek Amphitheater. Local bands
have a different type of attraction
for fans.
In Greenville, the downtown
scene is a local legend. Everyone
knows that there are concerts on
Thursday, Friday and Saturday
jimmie's Chicken Shack performs
throughout the eastern seaboard region,
(photo by Bobby Russell)
and tapes that these bands
produce.
"We carry between 15 and 20
local groups, and that's a
conservative estimate said
Daniel Rowe, a clerk at CD Alley.
A local band sells CDs based
on the quality of its music as
well as the amount of self-
promotion that they do.
"The Mike Corrado Band sells
just as well as any national
band Rowe said. "They just
need to get out there and
promote themselves
Not all of the bands that play
in Greenville have cut an album
yet. Some are still performing on
a small local circuit, and these
bands draw crowds that are
looking for a good time and a
Mandorico performs for Greenville
residents semi-annually. (File photo)
quality show, not necessarily a
great musical experience.
"You figure, it's only $8-$10
for the show, so I'll go hang out
with my friends
and see the
band again
said Andre
Julliay, a clerk .
at East Coast.
"With a local ;
band, there is �
an opportunity, �
for more crowd !
interaction.
With a larger ;
audience, the �
performance is �
impersonal and they can't get to !
know the crowd
Smaller bands also tend to show �
their appreciation for their audi-
See BANDS, page 7
www.
BROWN is the color of the
earth and holds us to the earth
and materialistic thoughts.
GRAY is neutral and useful
as a background to other
colors.
WHITE absorbs
all the rays and is
therefore cooling
and restful.
Courtesy of SF Heart web site
Sliding through a winter wonderland
students broke out their skis,
snowboards and sleds to go down
the slope. Those who weren't
equipped with the snow gear
improvised by
borrowing sleds
or by creating a
makeshift sleigh
out of trash can lids.
"We went to the hill
over on 5th Street and
m
"It's interesting to have this
snow because it's not something
we have everyday said fresh-
man Fred Angoco.
Chris Cooper, a sociology
graduate student, is from the
mountains so he was used to
this weather and welcomed it
with open arms.
"It's about time it snowed
Cooper said.
lie did run into some issues
when he went to
local grocery
"I had to
line for 45 min-
The snow
has come and
gone, with
students enjoy-
mini-break.
has truly arrived in the South-
east.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia. ecu.edu.
"V�m -
Greenville residents
frolic in frozen city
Nina M. Dry
FEATURES ASSISTANT EDITOR
The Emerald City got a
taste of what it's like to be in
a a world of snowy white when
flakesfell on Tuesday.
Although meteorologists
reporting flurries for early
Tuesday morning, not many
people in this area were ready
for what we actually re-
ceived�northwest winds
gusting between 15-25 mph,
temperatures in the upper-
30s, not to mention the four
to six inches of snowfall.
According to WITN-7
Meteorologist Marvin
Daugherty, he has not seen
snow hit eastern North
Carolina like this for about
20-25 years. -
But since it did come
down and classes were
canceled, ECU students did
not waste one minute In
getting outside and playing in
the wintry weather.
One of the more popular
sites this Tuesday was the hill
located on 5th Street, where
it.
borrowed one of my friend's sled
and had a great time sledding
said senior Kiersten Hansen.
Whether it be through making
snowmen or pelting passers-by
with snow balls, campus became
a giant playground as students
put their creativity and mischief
to work.
"My friends and 1 participated
in a massive snowball fight, did
some recreational driving trdund
the area and tried to avoid any
drive-by slusliings said
Mckenzie Thompson, a speech
and pathology graduate student.
"People were trying to do
drive-by snowball throwings
said senior Lissa Griffin. "Unfor-
tunately it backfired because as
the guy threw the snowball, he
fell out of the back of the truck
"My friends and I have been
trying to build a really big
snowman said freshman Leo
Nieves. "We have been rolling
this ball of snow for about an
hour
Many people were happy to
see the snow fall and have it
stick.
ly Zimmerman, freshman, slides through the snow! (photo by Emiily Richardson)
Above: Graduate students Jason Pickard. Doug Jones and Brantley Rive stand next to their homemade
igloo, (photo by Emily Richardson)
Walk I
Vlon.
i
7
(
114
Greei
758
OPNION COLUMN
Stop, snow lies ahead
Students are slipping
still on the ice
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Tuesday was definitely one for
the record books. It was nice to
see students come together for
snowball fights, creating
snowmen and skiing down the
5th Street slope on sleds, garbage
can lids and Mendenhall cafeteria
trays.
But, it wasn't nice to find out that
my Adidas Vindicators were not a
suitable source of footwear. It may have
been better to wear a sturdy pair of ice
skates for the hike to class on Wednes-
day morning. Don't get me wrong�I
appreciate the administrative higher-ups
for canceling morning classes for those
who had to drive on the slick roads, but
how about us poor pedestrians?
If s a fact that eastern North
Carolina isn't used to getting this
amount of snow, but let's get on the
ball, people. Most of the main walk-
ways on this campus were covered by a
complete sheet of ice. What used
to be a five-mmute walk to the
General Classroom Building took
an extra five just to make it to class
without slipping and falling.
The fact that many students'
classes were canceled after endur-
ing the physically challenging hike
to their classroom building just
added to the frustrations of the
day. It's times like these that I want
class to be held�especially if I
went through all the trouble to risk
my life (and my humility) to get
there. I mean, really, what's worse:
falling on the ice and injuring
yourself or falling on the ice and
injuring your ego as people look
down at you, suppressing their
laughter.
Yesterday would have been the
prime moment for ECU maintenance to
clear some of these paths, you know,
before the snow turned into ice. Now I
should give credit wherecredit's due
since I did see some people clearing
some of the areas. But some of the main
walkways looked untouched. And, no,
throwing sand and dirt on top of the ice
will not make it all better.
Last time I checked, when it snows,
thecity puts down salt rocks to melt the
ice and prevent slippage. The dirt
and sand stuff only makes what
was left of the snow slushy dirt
covered the ice, and really did
nothing to help pedestrians. It
stuck to our shoes, leaving
attractive dirt prints wherever we
went. Let's learn a lesson from
the Northeastern states�I don't
recall ever seeing them use sand!
Oh yeah, I do want to thank those
who cleared the road for those driving
around campus. You guys did a
fantastic job in removing the ice and
snow, but did you have to place it
directly in the gutter areas? I have a
theory as to what you were thinking:
pushing the snow into the far comers
of the road will clear the area for
drivers and when it finally melts, it will
go right into thedrains.
Well, that's great, but it was only
supposed to get up to40degreeson
Wednesday. That's only a mere eight
degrees above freezing. So it took
leaps and bounds to make it from the
street to the sidewalks, again endanger-
ing ourselves to make a wrong step,
slip and fall at the expense of being the
joke of all of those who are within
viewing distance.
Although it was an eventful snow
day, we aredefinitelynot as prepared
as we could be for the consequences
once the fun is over.
This writer can he contacted at
ndry@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Dear Majorie,
My roommate hangs his
underwear on the door every
night. He says that he hangs
them up so that they can air
out. He then wears them the
next day. Is this sanitary?
�Grossed out in Garrett
Dear Grossed out,
This has got to be one of the
more disgusting dorm tales that
I have heard. First of all, what if
you get a late-night visitor, do
you really want him or her to
see the funky drawers? No, I
didn't think so. Secondly, we
should all worry about our
roommates, and it is in his best
interests to wear clean drawers
at all times. What if he was to
go home with a hotUe, and they
started getting hot and heavy.
Rest assured, he wouldn't get
any if she saw nasty skids. For
everyone concerned, clean
drawers are a must. Jeans last for
three days, shirts indefinitely if
you wear something under
them, but drawers are a one-day
thing.
Dear Majorie,
My freshman roommate gets
up at 5:30 a.m. every morning
to get ready for her 8 a.m.
college algebra class. Her
4
makeup case is the size of a 10-
gallon aquarium, and she has
more shoes than I have cans of
Spaghetti-O's. Is this a freshman
female phenomenon, or is it just
her?
�Concerned in Clement
Dear Concerned,
This is a phenomenon that we
have seen in many freshman
females on campus. Possibly
because there is a 3-1 ratio of girls
to guys on campus or because this
is their first chance to snag a real
college guy, we're not sure. Ladies,
at 8 a.m. the men aren't Hungry
for love, they are thinking about
the fact that the sun shouldn't rise
so early or about how many
aspirins are medically safe to take
at one time for the hangover
that's pounding their brain.
With the money that your
roommate spends on make-up in
a month, the rest of us could
probably feed a small country.
Natural beauty is a blessing, but
plaster is disgusting. If you must
wear make-up and you must be
beautiful at 8 a.m know that you
will be one of a select few and that
everyone will identify you as an
overly eager freshman.
If you are having issues send your
gripe or queries to
features@studenttneiiia.eai.edu.
Come do





an. 27, 2000
Ilth my friends
ind see the
3and again
;aid Andre
ulliay, a clerk .
it East Coast. ;
'With a local ;
and, there is �
in opportunity '�
or more crowd !
nteraction. )
Vith a larger ;
ludience, the ;
)erformance is �
can't get to !
d tend to show ;
their audi-
i
page 7 ;
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Thursday, Jan. 27,2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Roaming chicken charges dropped
A:
he South-
contacted at
iecu.edu.
&pnfWillRojjf5Gpfil
Toro
Eastgate Shopping Ctr.
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sen
BARRE, Vt. (AP)�A judge has dismissed criminal
charges against a Montpelier man who was accused of
violating a city ordinance by letting his chickens roam.
Judge Mark Keller recently dismissed a misdemeanor
case against Gary Schy without a hearing in Vermont
District Court after notifying both sides that he in-
tended to so unless they objected.
Schy, a 41-year-old day care operator, was charged
in August under a city ordinance that makes it a crime
to have chickens escape from their enclosure.
Court documents said a neighbor, Bernard Folta,
57, complained to police about Schy's chickens escap-
ing in July and even provided Montpelier police with
photos that depicted the chickens off Schy's property.
Folta told police he had been complaining to Schy
about the chickens escaping since the summer of 1998,
and had filed a complaint previously.
Schy was charged in August 1998 with "failure to
contain chicken according to court records. He said
the charges were dropped after he agreed to make a
donation to the city.
When the latest charges were filed, Schy could have
faced a $250 fine and up to 30 days in prison if con-
victed. City attorney Glenn Howland had said he was
only seeking the fine.
In September, Keller put the case on hold for 90
days to give the two sides a chance to work out a solu-
tion through the Corrections Department's Court and
Reparatiye Service program.
Schy sajd Monday Howland had filed a motion ask-
ing the charges be reinstated. Howland did not return
calls seeking comment.
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their appreciation for their audience. They incorpo-
rate elements into their show like "call and re-
sponse which is when a group sings one line and
the audience sings the next line. Local bands also
tend to more willingly interview with local newspa-
pers than larger bands. They also recognize members
of the audience who have been, to past shows and try
to get to know the-people who follow their music.
"I went to a Jimmie's Chicken Shack concert, and
they are the nicest group of guys that I have ever
met said Danielle Custis, an ECU alumnus. "Before
the show, they mingled with the crowd and met the
audience on a more personal level. They are not even
phased by the fact that they are "famous When
they're on stage and they recognize you from
previous shows, they recognize you. It's really cool
A local band's show is typically more than just
the music and making money selling CDs. The
audience is incorporated into the show, and the band
follows the audience and feels the mood of the night.
"For someone performing for 500 people, there is
more intimacy said Tom Ives, owner of Skully's.
"You get a better sense of what the band is really
about. The band tends to react more to the crowd
and the feeling of the night
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
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MMMMM
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Track teams start season on right foot
Pirates qualify for
ECAC, IC4A in seven events
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Thomas has surgery
Chiefs linebacker had surgery Tuesday to treat
the serious back injury he suffered in a car accident
Sunday. The 4 12 hour surgery was performed in
Thomas' home town of Miami by the renowned back
specialists at the Miami Project. Thomas regained
some feeling in his feet but, is still paralyzed below
the waist. Doctors are undecided as to whether or not
Thomas will walk again.
"Anybody who knows Derrick Thomas knows not
bet against him said Dr. Barth Green of Jackson
Medical Center. "But it's too early to tell right now
Tyson explains statement
Mike Tyson made headlines this week by saying
he would "kill" opponent Julius Frazier.
"I hope gets knocked out, but this is just the moti-
vation I have Tyson.
Tyson will fight Frazier Saturday in Manchester,
England.
After weeks of running on grass and wondering
when their new track would be complete, ECU men's
and women's track teams finally got to run for real
this weekend, at the Pepsi One Invitational.
The meet on the campus of Virginia Tech in
Blacksburg, V.A featured stiff competition for the Pi-
rates. "It was a pretty big meet said Head Women's
Track Coach Matt Munson. "We chose to open a little
later because of what we had been through with the
track. But this was a big meet. We were up against teams
like Penn State, Carolina and Florida State
The meet was bigger than most season openers for
past ECU teams.
"I prefer a smaller meet said thrower Crystal Frye.
"But you don't want to be babied
Both teams rose to the occasion. The men posted
the third fastest collegiate time this year in the 4x400
meter relay. Three runners qualified for the IC4A's in
the 400m. The women had three athletes qualify for
the prestigious ECAC Indoor Championships.
Junior Rasheca Barrow posted two ECAC qualify-
ing times. On Friday Barrow qualified with a time of
7.61 in the preliminaries of the 60 meters. The Win-
ston-Salem native then notched another ECAC quali-
fying time in the 200 meters on Saturday. Barrow placed
sixth with a time of 24.94.
In addition to Barrow, thrower Crystal Frye earned
a bid to the ECAC in the shot put with a personal best
throw of 44' 6 34
"The competition in this meet is always fierce Frye
said. "There are of course the collegiate competitors and
also competitors that are no longer in college
Also qualifying for the ECAC meet was freshman,
Becky Post. Post tied for seventh in the pole vault. She
is the first pole vaulter in ECU history, thus her first
vault of 10' 6 was a school record in addition to a
personal best.
Her vault qualified her for the ECAC and brought
the total number of qualifiers to four in only the first
meet of the season.
"1 did really put that on the kids Munson said I
told them to go for it this week. For the kids who quali-
fied, it's out of the way and they don't have to worry
about it
For the ECU men's team the 4x400 meter relay team
picked up where they left off last season. In their first
meet they qualified for the IC4A Championships, and
turned in the third fastest time run by a college team
this year, behind Florida State and Georgia Tech.
"If we'd have run smart, we would have beaten
Georgia Tech said Head Men's Track Coach Bill
Carson.
The team ran with a reorganized lineup.
"I just wanted to try different people out at differ-
ent spots Carson said.
Three of the 400 meter runners qualified for the
IC4A's. Senior Damon Davis finished fifth in the 400
meters with a time of 47.97. Freshman Lawrence Ward
finished eighth at 48.40 while Darrick Ingram placed
ninth in 48.42.
ECU placed two people in the top 30 in the 800
meters. Freshman I'rankie Green placed 20th with a
time of 1:56.80, and teammate Brian Beil came in 28th
at 1:57.45.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studeritmedia.ecu.edu.
Dilfer becomes a free agent
Trent Dilfer became a free agent Tuesday, after
the Tampa Bay Buccaneers declined to pick up his
4:6 million dollar option on the 27 year-old quarter-
back.
Dilfer started 76 games for the Buccaneers. He
lost his starting spot to rookie, Shaun King following a
season-ending injury. King led he Bucs to the NC
Championship game before losing to the Rams last
weekend.
"Given the situation that exists here in Tampa, I
agree with the Bucs that it is best for everyone that I
be permitted to move on to another team Dilfer said
I
Hingis, Martinez
advance to semifinals
No. 1 seed, Martina Hingis advanced to the semi-
finals of the Australian Open, Tuesday. Hingis will
face former Wimbledon Champion, Conchita
Martinez. Hingis needed only 45 minutes to dispose
of Spain's Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario, 6-1,6-1.
In the other semifinal matchup No.2 seed Lindsay
Davenport will face fellow American and surprise
semifinalist, Jennifer Capriati.
Results from Pepsi One Invitational
Men
4x400 meter relay3:11.533rd
4X400 meter relay'B" team3:19.7110th
400 metersDamon Davis47.495th
400 metersLawrence Ward48.408th
400 metersDarrick Ingram48.429th
400 metersJames Alexander50.66did not place
400 meters1 rankie Green51.17did not place
800 metersAntonio Grey1:56.()820th
800 metersBrian Boil1:57.4528th
3,000 meter runStuart Will9:01.17
Women
60 meters
Pole vault
Weight throw
Weight throw
Rasheca Barrow
Becky Post
Margaret Clayton
Crystal Frye
60m hurdles Ayana Coleman
Distance medley relay
400m runner Darrick Ingram placed ninth at the Pepsi One Invitational in
Blacksburg, Va. Saturday (file photo)
200 meters
Shot put
Long jump
Long Ump
High jump
4x800 meter relay
2(K) meters
400 meters
400 meters.
800 meters
Rasheca Barrow
Crystal Frye
Toni Kilgore
Leana Anding
Kelli Post
Carmen Weldon
Kiona Kirkpatrick
Martina Freeman
Kay Livick
7.61
10'6"
S0'2"
44'6 14"
9.03
13:48.41
24.94
44' 6 34"
18' 12"
17'8"
5'2 14"
9:33.59
25.72
57.82
58.75
2:20.84
7th
7th(tie)
7th
17th
14th
15th
6th
6th
12th
16th
11th
5 th
16th
13th
19th
16th
Titans, Rams cut through Super Bowl hype
ATLANTA (AP)�Roland Williams had a tinge of
disbelief in his voice.
"Everything seems different the St. Louis Rams
tight end said Tuesday. "My hotel room seems differ-
ent. The sheets on my bed seem different. Even the
water tastes different
So, this is what it's like to play in your first Super
Bowl.
"I can't believe it Titans receiver Chris Sanders
said, video camera in hand as hundreds of reporters
milled about at that annual phenomenon known as
media day. "Look at me. I can't stop smiling
The Rams aren't really playing in their first Super
Bowl, but they might as well be. Their only previous
appearance came in 1980, when they were still in Los
Angeles and St. Louis belonged to the football Cardi-
nals.
The Titans are neophytes, playing in their first Su-
per Bowl as Tennessee's team or their previous incar-
nation as the Houston Oilers.
"I've never seen this much media Sanders said.
"I'm taping every-
thing
But, with memo-
ries of the Atlanta Fal-
cons still fresh on their
minds, both the Rams
and Titans declared a
moratorium on any-
thing that might be
construed as contro-
versial.
No dog collars. No
insults. No guaranteed victories.
"We want to be careful in what we say and what we
do Tennessee receiver Derrick Mason said. "We don't
want to say anything about the Rams that might get
them motivated
Not even an appearance by Mr. Dog Collar himself,
Falcons cornerhack Ray Buchanan, could produce the
slightest of trash talk at the Georgia Dome.
A year ago, Buchanan first guaranteed a victory over
the Denver Broncos, then arrived for interviews wear'
ing silver-studded neckwear as a way of dramatizing
his team's underdog role.
Instead of being motivated, the Falcons suffered a
major meltdown, losing 34-19.
"We're not going to do stuff like that Williams
said. "We're going first class to get the job done. We
respect our fine opponent, the Tennessee Titans?'
Not the kind of talk you'd get from Deion Sanders
or Jim McMahon. Then again, this game just doesn'(
have the star power of past Super Bowls.
Many reporters kept glancing at the one-page ros-
ters that were handed out at the Georgia Dome, trying
to figure out who they were talking to.
No. 77. Who's that?
Long before each team exhausted its one-hour ses
sion, the crowd in front of most podiums went from
thick to thin. Soon, reporters were interviewing .each'
other, pointing microphones toward players-tuaied
commentators like Joe Theismann, Jim Kelly and Ror(
See SUPER BOWL page 9
Cowboys promote Campo
. The Dallas Cowboys announced yesterday that
Offensive Coordinator, Dave Campo would be pro-
moted to Head Coach. Campo, 42, came to the Cow-
boys in 1989 with former coach Jimmy Johnson, after
current owner Jerry Jones bought the team. Like all
other Cowboy head coaches, Campo has no previ-
ous NFL head coaching experience.
The Cowboys won their last Super Bowl in 1996.
In the past three seasons, they are 24-24. Campo re
places former coach Chan Gailey, who was fired two
weeks ago.
OPINION COLUMN
The true meaning of Super Bowl Sunday
Chris Sachs
OPINION COLUMNIST
Get ready everyone, Sunday is almost upon us. Stock
up on chips, meat, booze and large television sets. Call
your bookies now and take all the cash out of your
girlfriend's purse. That's right everyone, it's Super bowl
time! That time of the year where there really is some-
thing worth watching on TV. Pure carnage at it's best,
and that is just the Super bowl party; the game is pretty
good, too.
As men we all reach a climax in the end of January.
We build up pressure of watching mediocre teams play
mediocre games and watch as our favorite teams lose
the AFC championship. We suffer with our girlfriends
nagging us on Sundays and getting dragged to Lane
Bryant sales at the mall when we should have been
home watching the final 30 seconds. We answer the
phone when Mom calls right when the game gets in-
teresting. We have designated drivers when the local
pub shows a Monday night game and draft beers are
only a Peso each.
But when it comes to the Super bowl, all the gloves
come off. The girlfriends get locked in the closet, the
phone gets a drop kick into the street, the car keys get
thrown in the woods, and the pyramid of kegs in the
living room gets dry, one per hour. We have slabs of
meat on the grill so large that they would make Fred
Flintsone commit suicide.
We have enough chips and dip to build edible mud
huts all over the city. We have the 215 inch TV plugged
into a stereo system with enough decibels to make your
nose bleed. This is what it's all about men. The best of
the best fighting it out, and the best party of the year.
It's in our nature fellas, grab your clubs and give a grunt.
The pigskin is gonna fly!
Personally, I don't care who wins this year, the Rams
or the Titans, but I do care about the game itself. I just,
want to watch the best. I want to watch the commer-
cials that cost two billion dollars per half second. But i
usually root for the team that lives closet to my home
state. So I will have to go for the Titans, but I have an
uncle in St. Louis, so maybe I should go with them
Which team is better?
I have no idea and I don't care. I just want to see
broken arms and ambulances on the field. I jqjjt want�
good excuse to have furniture thrown about ittyapart
ment in a drunken rage and wake up with 40 snoozing!
men on my couch. Then I know the night was worth it;
and a good party was thrown. Because that is what the'
Super bowl is all about. !
So fellas, skip classes for the rest of the week and go!
out and get supplies. Classes will be here next week
and you can fail them later, but the Super bowl only"
comes once a year. !
This writer can be contacted at
csachs@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Thursday, J
www.tec.ee
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Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian 9
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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college expenses.
How?
If you qualify, the Montgomery GI Bill could provide you
with over $7,000 for college or approved votech training.
We'll also pay you over $107 a weekend to start. Training
is usually one weekend a month plus two weeks' Annual
Training. By adding the pay for Basic Training and skill train-
ing, you'll earn over $18,000 during a standard enlistment.
So, if you could use a little financial help getting through
school-the kind that won't interfere with school-stop by or call:
756-9695
KZ Kappa Sigma KZ
Presents: j
1st Annual Greek
Shag Contest
Tuesday, Feb. 1st.
at Cabana's
10:30 p.m.
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS & CELLULAR
SUPER BOWL
Jaworskl.
"They don't know how to get
wild down here said Falcons offen-
sive tackle Bob Whitfield, taking a
break from his day job to play
pseudo-journalist. "As soon as they
remembered Ray in that dumb col-
lar, they said, 'We're not going to
sell out like that
Indeed, both teams seemed to
learn from the Falcons' self-destruc-
tion.
Atlanta's players were bickering
when they got off the plane. Terance
Mathis decided it was the proper
time to discuss a heretofore un-
known alcohol problem. Buchanan
said Denver tight end Shannon
Sharpe looked like a Kentucky
Derby entry. Worst of all, Eugene
Robinson was arrested the night
before the game on a charge of so-
liciting sex from an undercover po-
lice officer.
Titans coach Jeff Fisher asked his
players to please refrain from those
type of antics.
"He told us to enjoy the mo-
ment cornerback Samari RoIIe
said, "but don't get silly about it
from page 8
Buchanan, who also wound up
with a journalist's pass around his
neck instead of something studded,
did his best to dress down the for-
mal atmosphere.
"These guys look a little tense, a
little intense he said. "They need
to loosen up, have some fun
So Buchanan waded into a group
of reporters surrounding Titans
safety Blaine Bishop, armeel with a
microphone from the Black Enter-
tainment Television network.
"You should be loose
Buchanan said grinning mischie-
vously. "There should be a smile on
your face
"I'm pretty loose Bishop said,
managing a weak smile.
"Just don't guarantee a victory
Buchanan said.
"Oh, no Bishop said. "I would
never do that. Not with all the
weapons they have
With those kind of answers, it
was not surprising that yet another
guest journalist, Dallas Cowboys
lineman Nate Newton, seemed
bored by the whole affair.
"This media stuff is not all it's
cracked up to be he said.
Pagers - $49.95
Includes Activation and 1 Month Service
316 - D East 10th St.
(Across from Kinko's) -tqs. Cellular
931-0009
AUTHORIZED AGENT
If s Your Place
To Laugh Out loud
JAN. 27 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
MERCURY CINEMA presents: The Opposite of Sex (Rated R) A sneakily romantic
road comedy featuring an in-your-face-white-trash vixen, who at sixteen has already
generated enough scandal for an entire trailer park. You and a guest get in free
when you present your valid ECU One Card.
Assistant
Sports Editor
Needed!
Must have knowledge of Photoshop,
Illustrator, and Pagemaker.
� Must have excellent grammar & editing
skills and knowledge of sports.
Also an interest in writing.
Apply at the second floor of the Student Publications Building
or call 328-6366
.To Get KOed
JAN. 27-29 AT 7:30 P.M JAN. 30 AT 3:00 P.M. IN
HENDRIX THEATRE
BLOCKBUSTER FILMS presents: Fight Club (Rated R) A rage-
filled sociopath (Brad Pitt) organizes an underground organiza-
tion of fight clubs. But he's got more than fisticuffs in mind.You
and a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU One
Card.
To Rock With Britain's Best
JAN. 28 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Get ready to experience one of the hottest bands on Britain's live circuit today.
Although sponsored by the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series, this is not
your average performing arts concert. This gig will rock with a mix of traditional
Irish tunes and contemporary beats. This show will sell out, so get your advance
discounted tickets now by showing your valid ECU One Card at the Central Ticket
Office. All tickets at the door tickets will be full price.
When you wish upon a star
You could wind up a winner in
the 2000-2001 REACH FOR THE STARS
Campus Living Sweepstakes!
tt� Sy
.To Hear Some Joyful Noise
JAN. 29 AT 10 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
HEART FOR JESUS plays Christian Rock. Your valid ECU One Card gets you and a
guest in free.
.To Knock on Wood
NOW-FEB. 2, 2000 THE GALLERY
Just kidding. No knocking allowed. But looking and enjoying are strongly encour-
aged. The wood and clay sculpture of Greenville artist, Keith Moncus is currently on
display in an exhibit entitled The Line of Movement and Shadow. "I want the viewer
to see and appreciate the beauty of the wood's own grain and patterns he says of
his show which features sculpted indigenous poplar, sweet gum, pecan and black
walnut.
WEDt
To Start Saving Your Stash
AY, FEB. 2, 4:00 P.M MENDENHALL UNDERGROUND
Are you living paycheck to paycheck? Overdrawn in your
checking account or have large debt? Susan Mead,
Assistant Director of Housing Services can tell you how
to get back on track. Few things in life are free, but this
is, so join us.
To Roll Some Discount Frames
OUTER LIMITZ BOWLING ALLEY
Bowl for $1.00 per game from 1-6 p.m. on Fridays. Shoe rental included.Show your
valid ECU One Card.
M�C Hours: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - MidnightSat. Noon-Midnight Sun. Noon -11 p.m.
7
ifi
-I
c
O
o
o -
o
o
o
o
(II
This is just the first phase of the 2000-2001 reach
for the stars Campus Living Sweepstakes. Mark your
calendar now for Return to Campus Living Sign-Up
February 21-25. A" sign-up participants become eli-
gible to win one of eight great sweepstakes prizes.
Don't miss out on a campus living package that's
o out of this world!
- y
If you receive a winning Wish Upon a Star game card, be
4 s6 sure to claim your prize. Stop by any Neighborhood
C Service Office, the University Housing Services office
C �f on the ground floor of Jones Residence Hall, or the
y 4j. Campus Dining Services office in Todd Dining
J- 1 Hall to claim your prize.
N .
Up
UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES
U P 00-091 '
TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD





10 The East Carolinian
�Ifyvw.tec ec u.cdu
THE JOEYSHOW
W
COMICS
Thursday, Jan. 27, 2000
omics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
by joey ellis
ALEXANDER
PERFORMING ARTS SERIES
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Teu&i?ams Risked HeWe
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SUPER HERO UNIVERSITY
by noah freeze
��SSMVS Of TXI S�M�5 7E.V.
riyipio YOU
j Supet Boul? Special
8�o p.m .Wright Audit
( .ist Carolina Universit
One of Britain's most popular Anglo-Irish quartets debuts with a mix
of traditional Irish rhythms and contemporary beats and ideas.
Advance tickets18 public, J15 facultystaff, 19 tCU studentyouth
All tickets S18 at the door Group rates available.
ECU Central Ticket Office, Monday-fnday, 8:30 a m -6:00 p.m ; 252-328-4788 or
1-800-ECU-AIVrS VTTY 252-328-4736 or 1-800-tCU ARTS
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MELON
SUNDAY 30 TH
Superftmi Party
�pen 24 Was.
300 �. lOfiSt.
830-1525
www.IJvewJreonline.com




Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "AlouchOj Class"
756-6278
SILVER � fl
BULLET D0U5
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m
TUESOAV
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur N ight and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRI & SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
i,
. Ucued S Miles West of GmnrilM oo !M Ml. (Behind Aladdin Senices k Limo 1
gunners Celebrate the
fF Super Bowl Safely!
K
Call 756-5527
Do not risk a DUI on a Beer Run.
Let us bring it to you
We deliver these fine restaurants:
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Ming Dynasty IHOP Perkins
Andy's Cheesesteaks & Chick-fil-A
So make sure that you have a fun & safe
Super Bowl Party Order from us & let
Us do all the work for you.
PS
We also now deliver cigarettes
Call for more info, about alcoholic beverages delivery.
Your Spring Break. Viscount Vacation
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It's warmer here and we love spring breakers!
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We have been in business over 8
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?
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
the east
Carolinian
LoveLines FORM j
Messages will appear in the Feb. 10 issue of The East Carolinian
I
Phone
ID
$2 far 25
words or
fewer
IOC each for
each word
over 25
All ads must
be prepaid
Drop off the
form at
Mendenhall
& our office
0 N t YF1R STNAME S0 R 1NTA L !W 1t IBE USED
1.241 i 17G i2 1! 2'1
78'J10
lIn16
IS20212223
25262029JB
I
Messages may be rejectededited on the basis of decency. Only first
names or initials will be used in an ad. The paper reserves the right to
reject any ad deemed objectionable, obscene or misleading. .
DEADLINE !
FEB. 7 @ 5 P.M.
if
utV&
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BUILD STRENGTH AND
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BE PREPARED TO SWEAT WHILE
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$8 STUDENT RATE
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AROMATHERAPY INCLUDED
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Thursday
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ONEBEDRC
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own bathrooi
1677 or(919
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South Holly,
ities and cabl
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sooner. Call I
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BEECH STREI
bath $650.00 i
ary 5th call W
agement LLC "i
WALK TO El
$300month,
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Call 758-6596.
2 BR Apts Ai
above Catalog
month � Call ri
2 BR duplex av
story (BR's ups'
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9040.
IF YOU have h
gar Wall at 321-
nights. I have 1
mo includes uti
i ESLEY C
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NOWPf
. FOR.
I
i -All Properties I
maintenarii
RINGGOI
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1 bedroom
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lilWTi
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bedroom house
pus. Rent 160 a
ties. Call Amand
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ly renovated 3 bi
rything is new. In
es, 4 car port, v
for only $275n
329-0709(n).
FEMALE ROOr
share a 2 bdr. ai
has a balcony po
ed on premise. I
electric. Ginger 3
ADMI1
Large Resec
time Admi






Jan. 27, 2000
;media.ecu.edu
Thursday, Jan 27, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian If
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
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COZY ONE bedroom house on 407
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ities and cable. Across from art school.
$335month. Available March 1st or
sooner. Call Charlotte 329-0558.
NEAR ECU 3 bedroom 2 baths fire-
place. Fenced in backyard. $850
month 756-3947.
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom. 1
bath, all appliances, free cable, small
pets. $410 per month Wainright Prop-
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HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
AVAILABLE JAN. 25- 2 bedroom
house, close to ECU campus. Pets with
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3 BR house available immediately,
newly renovated, painted, carpet, liv-
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9040.
BEECH STREET three bedroom two
bath $650.00 a month available Janu-
ary 5th call Wainright Property Man-
agement LLC 756-6209.
WALK TO ECU, 1 bedroom apt,
$300month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
Call 758-6596.
2 BR Apts Available Immediately,
above Catalog Connections. $550
month - Call rick @ 551-9040.
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IF YOU have high utility bills call Ed-
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, ESLEY COMMON SOUTH: !
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RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
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CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
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Two bedrooms, one bath, wd, balco-
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Call Stephanie at 830-0903.
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electric. Ginger 329-8051.
HELP WANTED
ARAMARK, AN international lead-
er in managed services, is hiring a part-
time graphicsmarketing asst. for ECU
dining services. Must have experience
with Illustrator. Macintosh, Pagemak-
er. Freehand. Word and Excel. Duties
include assisting marketing director
with research, special events and creat-
ing promotional materials, hours are
flexible 15-20 per week. Please apply
at Mendenhall Student CenteTor send
resume to Human Resources, PO Box
3295. Greenville, NC 27836.
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund $5.50 hour plus bonuses.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212, M-TH between the
hours of 3-6pm.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for the
summer season. Will train, no experi-
ence necessary! Fill out the applica-
tion at www.nsbslifeguards.com-
Email-dudes@nsbslifeguards.com or
call (843) 272-3259.
4-5 tennis instructorattendants need-
ed at Greenville Recreation & parks
dept. For winter and spring. $5.15-
5.75 per hour. Tennis teaching experi-
ence needed. Call 329-4559
PHOTOGRAPHERS WANTED. Fun,
high-energy late night and evening
work. Part-time hours. Must be outgo-
ing and dependable with reliable trans-
portation. No experience necessary,
we train. Pay based on performance,
minimum $8.00 per hour. Call Tosha
at (800) 722-7033.
COURTYARD TAVERN is hiring
cooks, waitstaff and bartenders. Ap-
ply M-F 2-4 must be available for 2
weekday lunches.
ADMIN. ASSISTANTRECRUITER
$9.00 per hour
Great Opportunity
Large Research Company in Greenville is seeking a full-
time AdminRecruiter to recruit, interview, and staff
telephone surveyors
Qualified candidate will possess
the following skills:
1 � MSWord and MSExcel (spreadsheets)
� Excellent oral and written
communication abilities
� Strong work ethic and
flexible work schedule
� Great organization skills
Fax vour resume todavll
Headway Corporate Staffing Services
Fax: (252) 641-4898
Attention: Greenville Recruiter
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting part-
time youth In-Line Hockey coaches.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have the
ability and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18, in hockey fun-
damentals. This program will run from
late February to mid-May. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. Applications
will be taken until the positions are
filled. For more information please call
Judd Crumpler. Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2pm.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the
Spring Youth Soccer Program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the abili-
ty and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18. in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are form 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from early March
to early May. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more information
please call Ben James, Michael Daly
or Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after 2
pm.
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for stude or ca-
reer marketers. Healiii insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
NOTETAKER. GET smarter by getting
paid to take notes in class. Versity.com
is now hiring notetakers for more than
fifty of next semester's classes. Earn
$8-$14class. Apply online @
www.versity.com
COACH NEEDED for JVV Girl's Field
Hockey program for Fall 2000 in area
private school. Paid position. If inter-
ested, call Lydia Rotondo at (252) 329-
8080.
PERSONALS
YOU'RE PARENTS! CONGRATULA-
TIONS BRIDGETTE AND JERE-
MIAH ON YOUR NEW BABY)
JACKSON IS SO ADORABLE. AND
HAPPY BELATED 21 ST BIRTHDAY
BRIDGETTE! LOVE ALWAYS STA-
CEY.
GREEK PERSONALS
OTHER
OTHER
FUN b free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pictures
to give to your family or boyfriend? I
enjoy shooting pictures of young wom-
en for my portfolio. If you model for
me, I will give you free pictures. Repu-
table amateur photographer. Referenc-
es available (I've photographed dozens
of ECU girls). Please send a note,
phone number and a picture (if avail-
able - it will be returned) to Paul Hron-
jak. 4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson, NC
27893 or call 252-237-8218 or e-mail
me at hronjak@simflex.com. You can
also check my website at www.sim-
flex.comusershronjak
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha Hey Sisters
hope you have a wonderful week. See
you Sunday.
ZETA TAU Alpha is having an open
rush party tonight, 127 at 5:30pm
for all ladies interested. Call 757-1811
for info and rides.
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma would like
to congratulate DeAnn Ingram on be-
ing Delta Chi of the month.
CONGRATULATIONS TO all the Pan-
hellenic award winners. We had a
great time at the Banquet. Love the
sisters of Sigma Sigma Sigma.
THE SISTERS of Sigma Sigma Sig-
ma would like to wish lots of luck with
spring rush to ail fraternities.
ALPHA PHI would like to congratu
late Angelica Orta on her presidency.
We would also like to congratulate all
other new officers Ashley Hickman,
Ginney Stanley, Michelle Ross, Taylor
Leonarnd, Emily Mickelson, Kathy
Pacella. Jennifer Johnson, Mary Con-
way, Emily Smith, Nikki Ringgold, Jane
Polifrone, Yonya Collier, Julie Lowe, Ar-
rihgton Baysden, Kristina Davis. Amy
Moore. Lauren White. Martie Bruner.
Jamie McKeon. Jessica Crawley, Lau-
rie Cooke, Macaria Wheeler, Libby Jen-
kins, Jessica Wearne, Melanie Warren,
and Kendra Latham. We know you'll
all do a great job! Love your Alpha Phi
sisters.
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to thank
the sisters of Alpha Zi Delta for com-
ing to our social last Thursday. We had
a great time, from what we remem-
ber!
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma welcomes
the following members into the Omi-
cron pledge class: Melanie Check, Ja-
mie Cope. Darcy Ellerson, Ashleigh
Hooks, April Husenita. Emily Kope-
miak. Leigh Scher, Marissa Ouimette,
Emily Richardson, Jen Swanson,
Amanda Tedder, Shari Thompson, Ja-
mie Tier, Karen Troldahl, Kelly Yount.
Stephanie Wattenbarger.
DELTA SIGMA Phi thanks to you guys
and Tom Collins for showing us such
a good time Friday night. Lets do it
again soori Love Alpha Phi.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED for small
law firm of 4 attorneys: full-time br
part-time. If interested, please call 758-
4257 or fax resume to 758-9282.
GREENVILLE UTILITIES Commission
Employment Opportunity. Temporary
PT Engineering Technician. Temporary
position available for person to work
twenty hours per week, Monday
through Friday, in the Water Resourc-
es Engineering Section. This position
will involve reading and interpreting
maps and preparing databases and
spreadsheets Qualified candidate
should have completed one year of col-
lege level course work in engineering,
geography, or computer related field.
Ability to read and interpret maps re-
quired Possession of a valid North Car-
olina driver's license is also required.
Applications accepted through Janu-
ary 28. 2000. Salary $8.00hour. Em-
ployment is contingent upon passing
a physical examination including a
drug screening urinalysis. To ensure
consideration, a completed Greenville
Utilities' application must be received
in the Human Resources Office. Con-
tact the Human Resources Office, PO
Box 1847, Greenville. NC 27835 (200
Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive) or call
(252) 551-1513.
BROWSE ICPT.COM WIN a FREE trip
for Springbreak "2000 ALL destina-
tions offered. Trip Participants, Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or Rep registration call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
OTHER
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
PACTOLUS RESCUE Squad needs
volunteer EMT's. Any hours wilt be
helpful day or night. Building has
sleeping quarters, kitchen facilities, sit-
ting area with TV and meeting room
ideal for college students to study.
Please contact Jerry Mizell at 946-
0572 or Carolyn Lee at 752-0837
SUMMER TRIP to Spain and Moroc-
co. Two weeks. First session 3-6 hours
credit. Scholarships, loans available.
For more information, leave name,
number at 328-4310 or mer-
cerc@mail.ecu.edu
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida. Best pric-
es guaranteed! Free parties Et cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $75 &
up per person, www. retreatmyrtle-
beach.com 1-800-645-3618.
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO RE-
SERVE YOUR SPOT FOR SPRING
BREAK! DISCOUNTS FOR 6 OR
MORE! SOUTH PADRE, CANCUN,
JAMAICA, BAHAMAS, ACAPUL-
CO, FLORIDA b MARDI GRAS.
REPS NEEDEDTRAVEL FREE. 800-
83 8-8203 WWW. LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
ANNOUNCEMENTS
'THE WORD on the Streets' Wednes-
day. February 9, 4:00pm Mendenhall
Underground. Presenter: Todd King,
Assistant Director for Marketing. Stud-
ent Recreational Services. Learn the
best ways to get the word out around
campus to promote your events and
programs. Find out what works and
discuss techniques to bring in a crowd
with a campus pro.
Spg Brtik I'ffrH WMI of 6 small busintsus in me US in 1998 lo t�
�:oq-i �; lor wtsta 'rt ng fitu :s by CotfKrt of Belief Buimess BiyMin'
Bahamas Party
Cruise
$279
i days � Most Meals � Free fifties � Includei Tarn
Panama $139
City Board walk Holiday inn Sunsprw More
Florida $149
7 Nights � Daytona. Souit, Beach. Cocoa Bech
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7 Mgtrts � Au Hotel � Free Food & 3C Mrs at Punks
springbrcaktravel.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
Spring Break 2000
CANCUN�JAMAICA�NASSAU
Space is limited
CALL TODAY
800-293-1443
wmv.StudentCity.com
MOTE TAKING: The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on Janu-
ary 27. 1:30. if you are interested in
this workshop on January 27. 1:30. If
you are interested in this workshop
please contact the Center at 328-6661
GREEKCYPRIOT-AMERICANS, if
you are an ECU student of Hellenic or
Cypriot descent that is interested in
meeting, socializing, and participaitng
in cultural activities with others, please
call or e-mail Eleftheria at 752-8004,
(elemantzo@yahoo.com) or Katerina at
353-5083. (katerina�greenvil-
lenc.com)
HEY STUDENTS, the Greenville Re
creation and Parks Special Population
Department is currently recruiting vol-
unteers for their 2000 Spring pro-
grams in: Track & Field, Bowling.
Swimming. Recreation Camp, Roller
Skating and the 2000 Special Olymp-
ics Spring Games. For more informa-
tion contact Kelvin Yarrell or Dean Foy
at 329-4844 or 329-4541.
THE REAL Crisis Center is recruiting
community people to become volun-
teer crisis counselors. We need com-
munity people for daytime and night-
time shifts. We need your experienc-
es! Your achievements in everyday sit-
uations can be useful to others we will
be offering a training course beginning
January 31, 2000. For more informa-
tion call 758-HELP.
ADULT SWIM lessons. Beginner and
Intermediate. Beginner is designed for
the non-swimmer to receive instruc-
tion on basic stroke skills in a suppor-
tive, fun environment. Intermediate is
for the average swimmer to receive
instruction on intermediate stroke
skills, turns, and workouts. Cost is
$20mem-$30non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb.4. for more infor-
mation call 328-6387.
GAMMA BETA Phi Society will meet
Thursday. January 27 at 5:30pm in
Mendenhall Great Rooms 1 6 2. For
more information: www.ecu.eduorg
gbp
YOU'RE LOOKING
IN THE RIGHT PLACE.
Where can you hear the
Lady Pirates vs. Wilmington
basketball game
Friday night
at 7 p.m.?
Just one place.
91.3 FM
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632 .
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING,
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE, A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEL FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vernon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10. 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP -
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UNITED
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED,
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 & 8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 Et 11 a.m
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTTING-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AND VICTORY
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-6621
Services: 9 �r 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE Will
DAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600
Services: 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed. Bible Study
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 Et 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
m
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE Will
BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30. 9:45, 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.





Our photographers are out on campus capturing shots of you at your best. If you see yourself in one of our ads, go to MSC 109 and identify yourself. We'll reward you for paying attention
Student Life
www.tec.
BEHIND 1
"MACBE1
A biweekly glance at what's happening In the DMslon of Student Life
on the JOB BOARD
JOB TITLEComputer Assistant II
POSITIONS AVAILABLE2
APPLICATION DEADLINE ASAP
JOB DESCRIPTIONNeeds experience with Microsoft Suite of products. General
understanding of computers and how they are used in an
office environment. Some hardware experience. Self-di-
rected and the ability to work in a team environment.
COMPENSATION$5.50hour (Must qualify for Federal Work-Study)
HOURS PER WEEK12
CONTACT NAMECharles Peele
252-328-2140
peelec@mail.ecu.edu
JOB TITLEComputer Programmer V
POSITIONS AVAILABLE1
APPLICATION DEADLINE ASAP
JOB DESCRIPTIONNeeds experirnce with Microsoft Suite of Products with an
emphasis on Access and VBA code generation. Knowledge of
HTML language desired. Perfor, hardware, software, and
related task as assigned. Self-directed and the ability to work
in a team environment.
COMPENSATION$6.25hour (Must qualify for Federal Work-Study)
HOURS PER WEEK12
CONTACT NAMECharles Peele
252-328-2140
peelec@mail.ecu.edu
JOB TITLEOffice Assistant 2
POSITION AVAILABLE1
APPLICATION DEADLINE ASAP
JOB DESCRIPTIONNeeds good communication, written, and oral skills. Word
processing experience required. Self-directed and the ability
to work in a team environment.
COMPENSATION$6.00hour (Must qualify for Federal Work-Study)
HOURS PER WEEK12
CONTACT NAMECharles Peele
252-328-2140
peelec@mail.ecu.edu
POSITIONResident Advisors
PAYRoom, Board, and400 academic year.
DESCRIPTIONResident Advisors live in residence halls and are respon-
sible for promoting the overall growth and development of
students within their residence hall. Each RA is assigned to
a residence hall floor of approximately 40 students. Addi-
tionally, an RA articulates for students the philosophy and
policies of UHS and the University. As a university official
and campus leader, an RA's duties include but are not
limited to:
Community Facilitator
Referral Agent
Team Member
Administrator
Programmer
University Representative
Applications are available at University Housing Services in Suite 100 Jones Hall from
January 14 - February 25,2000. Applications and references due on February 25,2000.
For-more information please contact: Carolus Brown
Assistant Director, University Housing Services
Suite 100 Jones Hall
252-328-4924
on the
BULLETIN
BOARD
The Office of Orientation & the First-Year Experience is
now hiring Orientation Assistants for 2000-2001.
An Orientation Assistant (OA) conveys information to new
students and their families about ECU programs and
services. The OA assists with all orientation events and
plays a vital role in facilitating the adjustment of new
students to ECU. The OA position provides an outstand-
ing opportunity for any student interested in gaining
leadership skills and enhancing hisher marketability.
Application deadline is February 18,2000. Benefits in-
clude a significant leadership experience, $1400 stipend
and free room and board during orientation and June
training. For more information please contact our office
at 328-4173 or email us at cdhll08@mail.ecu.edu.
on the
JUDICIAL
BOARD
The Judicial Boards invite
you to apply for the posi-
tion of Student Attorney
General or Advocate for
the Accused Student.
These positions, funded
by Student Government
Association, provide the
leadership for the Judicial
Boards. Priority is given to
students with prior judi-
cial board experience.
The AG and AAS provide leadership and training for the boards,
in conjunction with the Associate Dean of Students Judicial
Coordinator. The AG presents the University's case at hearings
when a student has been charged with violations of the student
Code of Conduct.
The AAS works with the accused student to ensure that she
receives all of his or her due process rights and has a fair oppor-
tunity to present information to the panel. Application informa-
tion and deadlines will be posted in the East Carolinian.
Students who wish to gain experience to be eligible for these
leadership experiences in future years, may volunteer to serve as
members of the 2000 - 2001 Judicial Board. Application informa-
tion may be found in The East Carolinian in February. For more
information please call 328-6824.
What's Up
Division of Student Life: Collectively Serving Students for Individual Success!
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held Jan. 26
9. The Jan.
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have been pi
gious Arts Fe
celed.
Feb. 2 at
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tion entitled "I
ity: Living Toe
This is a stud
open to the p
contact: Na'in
Yolanda Thigi
The Ledor
Cultural Centf
Explosion anc
by ECU art sti
turer Galen At
The History ol
from 2-3 p.m.
performance e
mic will take p
House. Light r
display your ai
call 328-1680.
At 6:30 p.n
ries will feature
World" in Men
film will be sho
sentation is pa
Alter
A lecture or
presented by C
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p.m. on Thurso
the Brody Medi
At 8 p.m. Tl
Hallof the Fleh
ulty members c
present a recite
instruments are
Nathan William
Michel Schub o
and open to the
M
This Friday
Sweetheart's in
of Nursing will c
TEC apologi
Cultural Center
13 story about I
Virtual ECU
www.virtual.ecu
know of any oth
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ONLINE
Vote on
Do you i
students
ma


Title
The East Carolinian, January 27, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 27, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1385
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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