The East Carolinian, January 25, 2000






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eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 83
LATIN BAND HEATS UP NIGHT pg. 6
Mandorico brings new flavor to G-villi

47 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
Correction
Last Thursday's issue stated Mark
Saieed was the owner of Pantana Bob's
when in fact he is the owner of The Cellar.
Bernett LaPrade is the owner of Pantana
Bob's. Mark Farrell is the general manager
of Pantana Bob's and was not able to be
contacted.
Trustees Retreat
The ECU Board of Trustees will meet in
a retreat at The Sanderling Inn near Duck,
NC Friday Jan. 28 to Sunday Jan. 30. They
are meeting to discuss facilities funding,
campus facilities master plan, trustee by-
laws and athletics.
Blood Drive
A blood drive will take
place at Mendenhall from
noon-6 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday.
Graduation
Today is the last day
to apply for May gradua-
tion.
Best-Selling Author
Connie Mason, a historical romance fic-
tion writer, will
visit
Greenville
Thursday and
Friday Feb. 3-
4 to discuss
her work and
to help build
awareness
and raise
money for Lit-
eracy Volun-
teers of America of Pitt County (LVA-PC).
The Jockey Club will have a fundraising
luncheon for LVA-PC at 11:30 a.m. on Feb.
3. A writer's forum will also be held at the
Willis Building at 7:30 p.m on Feb. 4. A
book signing will be held at Barnes & Noble
Booksellers at 7:30 p.m. on Feb. 4.
Christenbury Visits Campus
World famous artist and photographer
William Christenbury will be discussing his
works and accomplishments tonight at 7
p.m. in the Jenkins Art Building, in Room
1220.
Lecture
Dr. Raymond A. Dombroski, associate
professor of obstetrics and gynecology will
present a lecture entitled "Pre-natal Diagno-
sis of Cystic Fibrosis" from 1-2 pm on
Thursday in the Pitt County Memorial Hos-
pital auditorium.
Cancer Screening
Free colorectal educational session and
screening at 9 am in the Leo W. Jenkins
Cancer Center on Saturday.
ONLINE SURVEY
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
Do you think scurvy is just for
sailors?
The results of last week's question:
Is there reason to suspect the po-
lice of misreporting crimes?
78 YES 22 NO
PIRATES OUTLAST SEAHAWKS pg. 8
Men's basketball team snaps 3-game losing
streak
TUESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Partly cloudy, high of 38
and a low of 25
Master's in criminal justice now offered
New program an
option for graduates
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
The criminal justice field of
study will soon have a new
master's program.
The program will offer two
concentrations within the field:
one dealing with practice within
the criminal justice field and one
dealing with administration and
policy.
Students will have to com-
plete 39 semester hours, and the
program is open to anyone who
is interested.
The idea for the program
came about ten years ago, and
was a part of the strategic plan
for the university for the 1993-
199S and 1995-2000 years.
"Starting a program like this
is not done in isolation said Dr.
Linner Griffin, interim dean of
the School of Social Work and
Criminal Justice. "It was done in
cooperation with local agencies
like the police department,
sheriff's department and the pe-
nal system
For a university to start any
new degree program, there are a
series of steps that must be fol-
lowed. First, the need for such a
program must be assessed. Once
the initial assessment is com-
plete, an advisory committee is
formed to oversee the rest of the
project.
"The committee looks at the
curriculums at other schools and
then makes a formal request to
the Faculty Senate and the chan-
cellor. If it is approved by them
it goes to the UNC System Gen-
eral Assembly. If they approve
it, then the program becomes
official Griffin said.
In the past years, there has
been a lot of interest expressed
in a program of this sort. As part
of the decision making process,
an advisory group met made up
of people from the community
in the criminal justice field.
"This program was requested
by students, the community,
practitioners, faculty and others
in the field as a whole Griffin
said.
This writer can be contacted at
cherold@itudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Pirates sail over Seahawks I Hll SeaSOn ill fill! blOOlTl
New drugs offer relief for sufferers
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDfTOR
Senior Guard Garrett Blackwelder scores a quick two points for the
Pirates while forward Steven Branch looks on. For full story, see page
9, (photo by Emily Richardson)
While it appears that Pitt County is experienc-
ing a more active flu season than last year's, ECU
Student Health has reported only an average num-
ber of flu cases.
"We usually do clinical diagnoses based on the
symptoms of the patient instead of doing a full flu
culture that takes two to three weeks to get the
results said Dr. Beta Aneja of Student Health.
"We've had.five cases confirmed by a flu culture,
12-15 clinical diagnoses and about 100 other viral
infections that may be the flu or flu-related
Aneja said this number if cases is about aver-
age for this time of year.
However, doctors and nurses in other clinics
around the county are reporting an increase of in-
fluenza, said Tammy Quinn, the communicable
disease nursing supervisor at the Pitt County
Health Department.
"Adults over the age of 65 and children with
respiratory diseases are most at risk for contract-
ing the illness Quinn said.
There are two recently FDA-approved drugs on
the market that weaken the virus and reduce the
number of days of sickness. Relenza and Tamiflu
are inhibitor drugs that offer relief from the clas-
sic flu symptoms, including fatigue, body aches,
loss of appetite and fever.
"The new drugs don't take the flu away, but
they shorten the time that you feel sick by one or
two days Aneja said.
Both medicines are administered by way of an
inhaler, similar to those used to treat asthma suf-
ferers. According to a Tamiflu Web site, when the
patient inhales using the inhaler, the medicine,
which is in the form of a fine, dry powder goes
directly into the lungs, which is the primary site
of infection and where the virus replicates.
Both Tamiflu and Relenza must be prescribed
by a doctor within 48 hours of the first symptoms
for the treatment to be effective in shortening the
The Relenza Diskhaler deposits medteine into the lungs,
weakening the virus, (photo from World Wide'Web)
run of the illness.
Physicians at the Student Health Center are of-
fering the new drugs as an option for students suf-
fering from the illness.
"We are giving out prescriptions for Relenza and
Tamiflu, but they are not available in our phar-
macy and they are fairly expensive Aneja said.
The best way to avoid contracting the virus is
to avoid crowded areas and people you know are
sick. A flu vaccination is also a viable option for
preventing illness and is recommended for adults
over the age of 65 and children with respiratory
diseases, Quinn said. �
Although the vaccination is no longer available
at the Student Health Center, the Pitt County
Health Department is still offering them by ap-
pointment.
"If you do get sick, see your physician, get
plenty of rest and drink lots of fluids Quinn said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@s tudentmedia. ecu. ecu.
ECU Dining Services sponsors 'Scurvy Awareness Week'
Program targets
poor eating habits
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Sunkist and nutritional infor-
mation comes to university din-
ing halls just in time for Scurvy
Awareness Week.
From 11 a. ml :30 p.m. today
in Todd Dining Hall and Thurs-
day in Mendenhall Dining Hall,
Sunkist will be supplying fresh
oranges, health tips and informa-
tion on the need for vitamins in
the everyday diet.
Manning Selvage St Lee Com-
pany said Sunkist will be remind-
ing students that oranges pro-
vide a full day's worth of vitamin
C.
Campus Nutritionist Laura
Hartung will be there providing
additional information.
"We will be giving away free
T-shirts and orange peelers
Hartung said. "To be eligible for
the giveaways, students just need
to fill out a survey on vitamin C
knowledge. We hope to increase
students' knowledge of good
health techniques and how vi-
tamin C can help reduce the risk
of cancer while increasing their
immune system
John Eddings, manager of
Mendenhall, said promotion of
health tactics is a good idea.
1
"This is a great event
Eddings said. "Students need to
be know that the continuous in-
take of oranges and vitamins will
help them remain healthy
ECU is part of a network of
colleges across the country pro-
moting the importance of a bal-
anced diet and essential vitamin
intake through whole foods like
oranges.
On-campus dining halls and
cafes serve fresh fruits daily.
"Everyone needs three to five
servings of fresh fruit a day said
Amy Hartman, marketing man-
ager of Dining Services. "It's im-
portant for students to know that
fresh fruits are available in the
dining halls and at all five cafes
Sunkist will be educating stu-
dents and faculty on how to
avoid the debilitating disease,
scurvy.
According to Manning Sel-
vage fir Lee, scurvy is not just
something sailors used to get
when they ran out of fruit on
long voyages. In fact, last year
two college students in Arizona
contracted scurvy, a condition
characterized by general weak-
ness, gum disease or gingivitis
and skin hemorrhages resulting
from a lack of vitamin C in the
diet.
Manning Selvage fir Lee said
scurvy is debilitating but com-
pletely avoidable with proper a
diet.
A recent study revealed that
college-age
students
would con-
sume more or-
anges if they
were reminded
that they are
powerful anti-
oxidants, con-
taining 130
percent of the
daily value for
vitamin C as
well as fiber,
folic acid and
phytochemkals.
Based on
this statistic,
Sunkist created
the Scurvy Boy
campaign ex-
clusively for
college cam-
puses.
"We are
proud to bring
quality fruit
and vital
health infor-
mation to the
ECU campus,
Winands, Sunkist spokesperson.
"This year's crop is abundant and
the oranges are delicious. Eating
right has never tasted as good
Manning Selvage fit Lee said
free oranges, samples and Sunkist
Snackers, easy-to-use orange
peelers, will be distributed with
Scurvy Boy brochures and nutri-
tional sheets all week.
Junior Shauna McCann takes an orange from the fruit stand at Mendenhall Student Center
Oranges, a source of vitamin C, are one of the fruits that can be eaten to prevent scurvy (photo
by Emily Richardson)
said Gee
To add to the fun, Scurvy Boy
T-shirts and posters will be
raffled and students will be in-
troduced to the latest install-
ment of the imaginative
scurvyboy.com Web site.
Scurvyboy.com revolves
around Scurvy Boy, the green-
haired kid who does not eat his
oranges and ends up getting into
all sorts of jams as a result. The
4
site is designed in Flash anima-
tion as a virtual television set
with three cable channels: The
Scurvy Boy News Network, Name
That Spew, the "Orange-inal"
Game Show and" VJ Scurv" as the
host on the music television sta-
tion, SBTV.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Court reviews gun liability
SAN FRANCISCO (AP)�Setting
the stage for a major battle over gun
liability, the state Supreme Court
has agreed to review an appeal by
the maker of semiautomatic pistols
that were used to slaughter eight
people in a San Francisco highrise.
Six of the seven justices, all but
Stanley Mosk, voted Wednesday to
set aside the nation's first appellate
ruling that would have allowed a
gun manufacturer to be held re-
sponsible for a criminal shooting.
The high court will decide the issue
after a hearing, which has not yet
been scheduled.
Before this case, every state and
federal appellate court to consider
suits against gun manufacturers has
ruled that makers of legal, non-de-
fective guns cannot be sued for their
criminal misuse.
But the state's 1st District Court
of Appeal ruled last September that
families of the victims in the San
Francisco shooting were entitled to
a trial on their claims that the
Florida manufacturer of the TEC-
DC9 marketed it to appeal to crimi-
nals and should have foreseen that
it would be used in a massacre.
The manufacturer, Navegar Inc
"had substantial reason to foresee
that many of those to whom it
made the TEC-DC9 available would
criminally misuse it to kill and in-
jure others said Presiding Justice
J. Anthony Kline in the 2-1 ruling.
The case could affect suits
against gunmakers by Los Angeles,
San Francisco and 10 other Califor-
nia cities and counties, claiming
faulty design, manufacture and dis-
tribution of firearms. At least 16
similar suits have been filed by lo-
cal governments elsewhere.
The case dates from July 1993,
when Gian Luigi Ferri, a mentally
disturbed man with a grudge against
lawyers, entered the 101 California
St. skyscraper and opened fire in a
law office with two TEC-DC9s and
a revolver. He killed eight people
and wounded six before killing him-
self.
Copies of Soldier of Fortune and
similar magazines, in which
Navegar commonly advertised the
TEC-DC9, were found in Ferri's
apartment in the Los Angeles sub-
urb of Woodland Hills.
The TEC-tiC9, a high-capacity
pistol easily converted to fully au-
tomatic fire, was one of the guns
used by two students to kill 12 fel-
low students and a teacher in
Littleton, Colo last April. The ap-
peals court quoted Navegar's former
marketing director as saying in 1992
that sales went up when the gun was
used in a notorious crime.
A Superior Court judge dis-
missed the damage suit, saying there
was no evidence that Navegar's
marketing practices had influenced
Ferri or helped to cause the killings.
But the appeals court said a jury
should decide whether Navegar's
overall promotion of theTEC-DC9,
its sale of the pistol to the general
public and the gun's ready use for
spray fire caused deaths and inju-
ries that otherwise would not have
occurred.
Nature Bo
for Governor
Charlotte, NC (AP)�Wrestler Ric "Nature
Boy" Flair wants to follow the lead of Jesse "The
Body" Ventura, now Minnesota's governor, and
run for governor of North Carolina.
Flair, a 50-year-old platinum-maned pro
wrestler said last week on the Live with Regis
and Kathie Lee TV show that he might run as
an independent candidate.
"I'm putting together a team, and I'm going
to take a shot at it Flair said after the show.
The subject arose when host Regis Philbin
asked Flair whether he had ever thought about
the governor's job.
"Unofficially, I am going to run for gover-
nor myself Flair said. "This is the unofficial
official announcement
The last time a celebrity tried his hand in
North Carolina politics was in 1996, when
NASCAR driver Richard Petty lost his bid to be
elected secretary of state.
"Actually. I have been asked to run for office
a lot over the last ten years. Jesse's proved that
anything can happen Flair said. "He is a char-
ismatic guy. I think the political system is open
to a lot of opportunities right now
YAKIMA, Wash. (AP)�Fourteen years ago, a pair of
rare medals handed out to friendly Indians by
Meriwether Lewis and William Clark were stolen from
a museum in the Columbia River Gorge. Now, with
the bicentennial anniversary of the Corps of Discov-
ery expedition just a few years away, Maryhill Museum
is renewing its efforts to find the valuable pieces.
"They have a great deal of historical value said
Lee Musgrave, spokesman for the museum, which over-
looks a section of the river route the two explorers took
to the Pacific Ocean in 1804-1805.
The monetary value of the medals is less definite,
but insurance documents from the time of the theft
estimated the pair to be worth about17,000.
The two coins are the same: not quite two inches
in diameter, with a depiction of a man sowing grain
on one skte and the words "Second Presidency of Geo.
Washjngfbrf MDCCXCVI" on the other.
Lejwis and Clark carried 55 of these "Washington
season medals" with them on their expedition, along
with larger and more prestigious Jefferson peace med-
als, said the Rev. Francis Paul Prucha, an American his-
tory professor retired from Marquette University.
Historic Lewis, Glark medals missing
There were three "season" designs: a man sowing,
a woman spinning and a man with cattle and sheep.
Prucha, reading from his book, "Indian Peace Med-
als in American History said there were 700 season
medals ordered from England, 500 in silver and 200 in
copper. The medals arrived in the United States in June
1798, after Washington's second term of office had
ended and John Adams was president, Prucha said.
The practice of giving peace medals to tribal lead-
ers began in the Washington administration and con-
tinued into the 1880s, according to the National Park
Service.
The presidential peace medals showed an image of
the president on one side and, on the other side, two
hands clasped in friendship with a crossed peace pipe
and tomahawk above them.
The peace medals were presented to Indian leaders
with great ceremony.
"They were a sign of allegiance almost between the
Indians and the federalgovernment Prucha said.
The season medals probably would have been a
somewhat lesser offering than the presidential medals,
although "they're numismatically quite important.
People will pay a lot of money for them because there
aren't very many he said.
The two missing medals had been given to two fami-
lies of the Upper Chinook Band and were donated to
the museum in the 1940s by the Underwood family,
who were descendants of Chief Chenowuth of the Cas-
cade Tribe.
In 1986, the medals, suspended on a single leather
thong with glass trade and shell beads, were on display
as part of a special exhibit. They were shown on a sculp-
ture stand, under a plastic-glass cover.
. A thief removed the security screws in the cover,
and took the medals, which are said to be a bronze-like
color. A docent noticed their disappearance within 24
hours.
"1 would say that they seemed targeted Musgrave
said. "It would have been possible to steal other things
in that same display
The theft was reported to the Klickitat County
Sheriff's Office in nearby Goldendale and the FBI, but
the medals were never recovered. There was also no
clue as to who might have done it since the museum
averages 10,000 a visitors a month, Musgrave said.
Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
CRIME SCENE
Jan. 21
Damage to Property�A staff member reported, '
that two brick display walls, located southwest of
GCB, were damaged.
Suspicious Activity�A staff member reported that ,
there was a clicking noise at the front door of Suite '
9 in the Medical Pavilion. The staff member was
advised to fill out a maintenance report.
Damage to Property�A student reported that her
vehicle had a small dent in the hood. She was un-
sure If the damage happened on or off campus. Her.
car is usually parked between Aycock and Scott
Halls.
Larceny�A student reported that clothing Items
were stolen from a dryer in the second floor laun-
dry room at Tyler Hall.
Jan. 22
Provisional Driving While Impaired�A student
was issued a Campus Appearance Ticket (CAT) and
state citation for provisional DWI after he was
stopped for exceeding the speed limit. His vehicle
was secured at the scene and he left on foot.
Assault�A student reported that an unknown
male struck her in the face, bruising her eye, while
she was at an off-campus location. Assistance was
requested from the Dean's Office.
Provisional Driving While Impaired�A student
was issued a state citation for provisional DWI af- '
ter he was stopped for running a stop sign at the
intersection of Dowell and Faculty Way. His vehicle'
was secured at the scene and a friend picked him'
up.
Involuntary Commitment Order� An involuntary '
commitment order was served on a non-student' '
who was staying with his girlfriend in Jones Hall.
The subject was transported to Pitt County Memo-
rial Hospital (PCMH) and banned from all ECU
property.
Jan. 23
Suspicious Person�A student was issued a CAT '
after repeatedly knocking on a female's door in'
Aycock Hall.
Tuesday, Ja
www.tec.eci
ACRC
DukeUniv
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For a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252.328.6004
or bookmark our web site at: www.ecu.edustudent union
a7
denhall
Student
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Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina
University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353, or call
252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or
VTTY 252.328.4736, 8:30 a.m. - 6p.m Monday -
Friday. Individuals who require accommodations
under ADA should contact the Department for
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eight hours prior to the start of the program.
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Jan. 25, 2000
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Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
Duke University�If the early re-
sponse from many Duke students is
any indication, the power of the
NAACP's tourism boycott in South
Carolina will keep some Duke stu-
dents away from Myrtle Beach this
May.
Although students who support
the boycott are doing so with fer-
vor, others insist the issue will not
keep them away from Myrtle's surf
and sand after finals week.
Protesting the Confederate flag
flying above the state capitol, the
National Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People
(NAACP), led nationally by Kweisi
Mfume, has called for a boycott of
South Carolina until the state's leg-
islature agrees to remove the flag.
Although the source of the con-
troversy lies in a neighboring state,
many student groups and individu-
als have a vested interest in the is-
sue.
Duke NAACP President
Kameron Matthews, a Trinity senior,
said that the Duke chapter will do
its part to persuade university stu-
dents to support the boycott.
"We will be asking others to se-
riously consider canceling their
Myrtle Beach plans for May
Matthews said.
Although the president of Delta
Sigma Theta Sorority, Inc declined
to comment, other leaders of
Duke's black fraternities and sorori-
ties were eager to voice support for
the boycott. Delta Sigma Theta is
the only national Greek organiza-
tion currently listed on the NAACP
Web site as officially supporting the
boycott.
Trinity junior Carliss Chatman,
president of Sigma Gamma Rho
Sorority, Inc declared that her so-
rority would unequivocally follow
the boycott.
"If the boycott is still going
during Myrtle week, our chapter
won't go Chatman said.
The controversy has prompted
some to take an active role in the
protest. Stefan France, a Trinity se-
nior and president of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc said that his
fraternity would try to put pressure
on the South Carolina legislature by
doing more than just foregoing
Myrtle week.
"Our national organization, in
conjunction with the NAACP, has
organized groups 6f people to pro-
test and boycott in order to address
this issue France said.
However, some students felt that
the boycott would not dissuade
them from vacationing at Myrtle
Beach with other Duke students.
"Myrtle week is obviously a Duke
tradition, and 1 look forward to it
every year said Trinity sophomore
Carla Rothenberg. "It's too bad that
South Carolina still flies the Confed-
erate flag above the capitol, but I still
plan on going
Others took issue with the boy-
cott itself.
"It's unfair to make the whole
state suffer said Trinity junior
Dania Ermentrout, who likened the
boycott against South Carolina to
current United States economic
sanctions against Cuba. "South
Carolina is a poor state, and flying
the Confederate flag is the fault of
the legislators, not the small busi-
ness owners
The fact remains that many stu-
dents and organizations have yet to
deliberate over the controversy, and
how it pertains to Myrtle week.
Thousands gather in
Madrid, protest bombing
MADRID, Spain (AP)� Clamoring for an end to
political killings, about 100,000 people marched
through central Madrid on Sunday to express anger
at a car-bomb attack blamed on Basque separatists.
Prime Minister Jose Maria Aznar and former pre-
miers Felipe Gonzalez, Adolfo Suarez and Leopoldo
Calvo Sotelo led the demonstration, carrying a gi-
ant banner that read: 'For Peace and Liberty. Terror-
ism No
Crowds packed a nearly two-kilometer (one-mile)
stretch through the city to show that they oppose
what many fear could be a renewed campaign by
separatists
Many of the crowd the clapped rhythmically as
they walked while others carried banners with slo-
gans that read 'ETA No in reference to the armed
separatist group believed responsible for Friday's
morning rush-hour attack that killed an army colo-
nel.
In a speech at the rally, Basque actor Imanol Arias
said "the terrorists must be forced to lose any hope
of getting anywhere by killing innocent people.
"That's enough. No more killing he shouted to
the applause of thousands packing Puerta del Sol in
the heart of Madrid.
Initial police estimates put the crowd attendance
at 100,000.
All mainstream Spanish parties were represented
at the rally except for the Basque Nationalist Party,
which has been heavily criticized in recent months
for maintaining ties with Herri Batasuna, a party
linked to the separatist gunmen.
Similar, although smaller, rallies were held Fri-
day and Saturday in cities and towns across Spain.
Meanwhile, ETA supporters were blamed for a
Molotov cocktail attack on a Civil Guard building
in the northern Basque city of San Sebastian.
No one was injured in the violence. Molotov
cocktail attacks have become a regular feature of
weekend violence in the Basque region in recent
years.
ETA, whose name stands for Basque Homeland
and Freedom, has not claimed responsibility for
Friday's attack. However, many say the bomb attack
bore the group's hallmark.
ETA, which has killed nearly 800 people in a
three-decade campaign for independent Basque na-
tion, had warned Dec. 3 that the cease-fire it declared
in Sept. 1998 was over and attacks would resume.
Its last killing was in June 1998.
College student says he lost 245 pounds eating Subway subs
?,N?1�N: Jnd! (AP) - P� a commercial now be- that our low-fat sandwich ��h �. �� 'I . � J
Bl.OOMINGTON, Ind. (AP)
Jared Fogle stands at the counter of
a Subway shop near the campus of
Indiana University, watching an
employee assemble a foot-long veg-
etable sub that he has ordered.
The two exchange some small
talk and share a laugh. They have
gotten to know each other pretty
well, what with Fogle eating almost
nothing but low-calorie, low-fat
sandwiches from the shop for nearly
i year and shedding 245 pounds
rom his 6-foot-2 frame in the pro-
:ess.
Fogle went from a colossal 425
ounds to a much slimmer 180
ounds on his unusual diet. When
ubway executives got word of his
emarkable weight-loss story, they
put him in a commercial now be
ing aired around the country.
The 30-second spot was filmed
on a sunny December day in Pasa-
dena, Calif. It begins with a picture
of the old Jared Fogle, then cuts to
images of the new Jared Fogle
cheerfully ordering a Subway sand-
wich and eating it on a park bench.
"We're not saying that his diet
is right for you. You should talk to
your doctor first the announcer
says. "But it is food for thought
A year of veggie subs is not the
dream diet for everyone.
Michele Klotzer, a spokes-
woman for Milford, Connbased
Subway, concurs.
"We're very proud of Jared's ac-
complishment, and we're pleased
that our low-fat sandwiches could fit
into his meal plan, but it's not a diet
that we endorse by any means she
said.
Nelda Mercer, a registered dieti-
tian with Health Media Inc. in Ann
Arbor, Mich and a spokeswoman
for the American Dietetic Associa-
tion, said Fogle ate "relatively
healthy" during his diet because sev-
eral food groups are represented in
the sandwiches. She said he prob-
ably should have included skim milk
or yogurt to ensure he was getting
enough calcium.
She added that most people
probably would become bored
quickly by Fogle's repetitive meal-
time regimen and gone off the diet.
Instead of quick-fix diets, the ADA
recommends lifestyle changes: eat-
ing the right foods, consuming
fewer calories and exercising.
Fogle, 22; a senior in business
management at Indiana University,
started steadily gaining weight
when he was in the third or fourth
grade and continued to do so
throughout high school, despite fre-
quent warnings from his father, In-
dianapolis'physician Norman Fogle.
"I never listened, you know the
younger Fogle said in an interview.
"It went in one ear and out the
other. It didn't cause me to change
my ways. It had to be me who
wanted to do that
At IU, Fogle's weight skyrocketed
and he became dangerously obese.
He wore size XXXXXXL shirts, the
largest sold by big-and-tall men's
stores and pants with 60-inch
waists. He often fell asleep in class
and found himself short of breath
after walking one or two blocks.
Worried about his health and
unhappy about his appearance, he
found salvation at the Subway shop
next door to his off-campus apart-
ment. One evening in mid-March
1998, he suddenly decided to live
on a steady diet of the franchise's
low-fat subs.
From then until late February
1999, he followed virtually the same
mealtime routine every day. He
skipped breakfast. He had a 6-inch
turkey breast sub, small bag of baked
Lays potato chips and Diet Coke for
lunch. He downed a foot-long
veggie sub and a Diet Coke for din-
ner.
Total daily dietary intake: about
1,000 calories.
"The biggest question people
would ask me was, 'Did you ever get
sick of it?' and I never did Fogle
said. "Every time I would come in
here, I would sort of be excited
about it, knowing I was going to get
to eat this sandwich. I don't know
why
Only a few meals, usually dur-
ing holidays or other special occa-
sions, didn't include a Subway sand- �
wich. At those times, he always was
careful to eat small portions of low-
fat foods.

roclTx
3 ;
i Ticket
ma
Start the semester
off on the right
foot!
When you wish upon a star
You could wind up a winner in
the 2000-2001 REACH FOR THE STARS
Campus Living Sweepstakes! �
mi
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IR)
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lock
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Join other ECU student leaders for this entertaining and
motivational presentation by a nationally known speaker.
Humorist and motivational speaker Michael Broome has addressed more
, than 2,700 audiences from Fortune 500 companies to student leaders.
He states his presentations are like "baths: the effects don't last forever,
but everyone needs one
January 26 - 5:00 p.m.
Hcndrix Theater, Mendenhall Student Center
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This is just the first phase of the 2000-2001 reach
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UNIVERSITY HOUSING AND CAMPUS DINING SERVICES � TELEPHONE: ECU-HOME; ECU-FOOD





, Jan. 25, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian 4
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Battle of th
Ha:
s
FOR MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS PROGRAM AND OTHERS
SPONSORED BY RHA, CALL THE RHA OFFICE AT 328-1679.
y
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www.tec.e
�51
Terra Steir
Susan Wri
Emily Rich
Daniel E. C
We have
proper char
and begged t
Chancellor E:
work hard.
don't take
university. All wi
LETTEI
Safety
Dear Editor,
I am writing
Our View, Jan. 2i
town.
To begin wit
referred to that c
in should be rec
allowing certain
to ask for that f
when going dow
out respect, ther
act that way.
For a matter
the ladies than i
certain rule to bt
racial. Women ai
against for the wa
of you have seen
and immediately
men � the "ba
weapon.
Secondly, for
worked in a bar b
opiNior
Ryan-D
Well here we i
dab on the welcor
people come up to
not to mention fri
is going to do to
even though techi
will truly affect me
is going to happer
cause I know you'l
discussing it My i
I've thought at
minutes, and I thii
you and yours�-wl
1. March 23,20
Jimmy Hoffa will i
gether on an icebei
research. They will I
left it: eating 12 fr
ting, planning gen
Hoffa did before th
tion.
2. March 23, 20
�evil ones) of Helsin
to cover the hole in
the Hubble telesco
re-entry.
3. March 23, 2C
Five and Tom Gre(





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Jan. 25, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian �
opinion@studentmedia.ecu.edu
o;i Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Daniel E. Cox, M�0 rffeft ?pcoa janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
lM252-328-6558
E-MAILIec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
pnnts 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Editorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
for decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent by e-mail to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building
Greenville. NC 27858-4353. For additional information call
252-328-6366.
to
o
We have pestered through all the
proper channels. We have pleaded
and begged and whimpered Please,
Chancellor Eakin, give us a sign! We
work hard We obey the rules We
don't take much money from the
university. All we want is a stupid sign.
Is thai so much to ask?
OURVIEW
PARiolor, srdDEfJrs are Forced
To
to
o
50
' ��
00
Have you ever tried to tell anyone how to get to TEC's office?
The directions always come out something like, "It's in the Stu-
dent Publications Building, somewhere between Joyner Library's old
entrance and Mendenhall, in the same building as the post office but
on the other side of the building, but not the same side as Financial
Aid
So not only is it the hardest building on campus to locate but now
it doesn't have a sign. It looks like the back door to some unimportant
administration office.
There used to be a sign outside that said, "Student Pubs a particu-
larly mtsleading title for optimistic freshmen. And while Expressions
I he Rebel, TEC and the Media Board don't quite serve fish and chips'
at least the building had a name. People could find us.
Then came the aesthetic renovation of campus, and we lost our
sign. Everybody else got a new one, and they all looked really pretty
When the Cashier's Office moved in downstairs, even they got their
own sign. But when our turn came around, we were told we should be
satisfied with a slot on the directory inside-the building. Including
your student publications on any proper type of sign is apparently too
much clutter. One of the most important student functions on cam-
pus has been reduced to what university officials call "sign pollution "
We give you this as another example of bureaucracy in action
People run around all day at Expressions and the Rebel, and especially
at the Media Board Office; they're doing their jobs, keeping the ECU
public in the know, all the while forlorn at their loss of place in the
world. We've seen them. They looked dazed. But not half as dazed as
the people who try to bring their Letters to the Editor to the Financial
Aid Office.
The voice of ECU has been stuffed upstairs in an unnamed build-
ing like the redheaded stepchild the school wishes it never had Maybe
they think "if you can't see us, we can't see you
Why does the university hate us? Why take away our wonderful
"Student Pubs" sign and not replace it? Why deny us our identity'
Why, why, why?
We have pestered through all the proper channels. We have pleaded
and begged and whimpered. Please, Chancellor Eakin, give us a sign'
We work hard. We obey the rules. We don't take much money from
the university. AH we want is a stupid sign. Is that so much to ask?
It is our one great dream that one day we may say: "Oh yeah, TEC?
That's over by Mendenhall. There's a sign outside the building. You
can't miss it
OPINION COLUMN
No Espanol spoken here
Patrick McMahon
OPINION WRITER
LETTERT0 THE EDITOR
Safety measures misinterpreted as discrimination
Dear Editor,
I am writing in response to the article written in
Our View, Jan. 20, 2000 discussing racial bias in down-
town.
To begin with, the so-called "excuses" that were
referred to that do not allow some people from getting
in should be recognized as legitimate reasons for not
allowing certain people in. I do not think it is too much
to ask for that people dress in a respectable manner
when going downtown. If you want to be treated with-
out respect, then by all means � please � dress and
act that way.
For a matter of fact, this rule is upheld more for r
the ladies than it is for the men. 1 would believe this
certain rule to be more as gender discrimination than
racial. Women are far more likely to be discriminated
against for the way they dress than the men. How many
of you have seen a girl in a skimpy skirt and tank top
and immediately thought she was easy? And for the
men � the "baggy pants" could easily conceal a
weapon.
Secondly, for those of you who have obviously not
worked in a bar before � the rules are not only looked
to for customers but also for staff. I'm sure that I'antana
Bob's has cracked down on letting some people in, but
that is for safety � not for discrimination. I had friends
injured in the fight there last May when a young man
brought in a knife and decided to start cutting people
after his friend had been kicked out. You've got to be
naive or stupid to think they would allow anyone in
that they even remotely believed could cause trouble.
If I owned a downtown business I would be the same
way.
Thirdly � the membership policy is not to keep
out minorities, it is enforced to keep ECU students �
all who frequent downtown � safe. That is the sole
reason any of these rules is enforced.
Remember that it is a privilege to be allowed into
any of these establishments and that privilege can be
revoked at any time. If you do want to be let in, then
dress and act in an appropriate manner because if you
don't respect yourself it's a safe bet you will not re-
ceive any respect or special treatment from the door-
men.
Leigh Richards
own humble opinion, I think if people come here to
work then they should know the language. If I went
off to France to study and work, then I would make
Why, oh great dean of college education must I have damn sure that I could speak the language well enZh
ZTT �f,Pani u l� grad?,e WUh a" Eng,iSh t0 ensure mv "velihood wasn't beinfcheatbythose
Education degree? Isn't that a paradox? Answer me this, damn Frenchmen
oh great swami, why is it that all the while I'm study- The Spanish requirement is ludicrous. If a student
ing famous writers like Thoreauand Wright must I learn comes to the U.S. from Mexico or anywhere else for
what bailamos and "living la vida loca" mean? that matter, give them ESL (English as a Second Lan-
Some degree programs here at ECU require four se-guage) before putting them into situations where
mesters of Spanish to graduate. English Education, one knowledge of the English language becomes a neces-
of the most popular majors, has the Spanish require- sity. The problem with that, however, is that many of
ment. While I understand the necessity for Spanish to the students can speak some English while the parents
be spoken by someone majoring in public relations, I cannot. My father is a principal and tries to instill in
can see no need for myself as an English major to have my head the need for Spanish. He tries to tell the kid
four units of it. something to tell the parent, but being a typical kid, it
I want to learn about great writers and literary tra- gets twisted around to fit the kid's own interests. For
dition not how to conjugate the verb "ser I plan on that I understand but the parents should know English
using this knowledge in a classroom setting by teach- before they enter our work force
ing English to high school students. How am I sup- Maybe I'm just pissed because I'm so ignorant when
posed to spend time reading and absorbing important it comes to knowing and studying Spanish that I'm sub-
works of l.terature so I can get into upper division when consciously trying to tear down the requirements I
I m busy studying for a Spanish I test (which I failed know I may need it for ten minutes out of every months
miserably last semester.) Dut for mC the On (fifteen now since I failed Span-
The main argument for the studying of the Span- ish I) semester hours 1 use and pay for to take the classes
ish language is that with North Carolina's growing His- is more valuable than that. That is full-time tuition to
panic community, the need is there for teachers (the take something that most likeiv I'll just end up passing
boat I m in) to be able to communicate with students and not learning. Maybe that is what it all boils down
and parents as to their progress in the classroom set- to. Money,
ting. But the reality is that if they cannot speak En-
glish how are the.y to learn how English works? In my Thfs writer con be contacted at
pmcmahon@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Ryan-Dogg makes predictions for new millennium
OPINION COLUMN
Millennium hype was way overrated
� i
t ,i.
Ryan Kennemur
OPINION WRITER
Well here we are, just the two of us, right smack
dab on the welcome mat of a new millennium. Many
people come up to me and say, "Ryan-Dogg, I'm scared,
not to mention frightened of what the next 100 years
is going to do to affect me and my way of life. And
even though technically only the next 50 or so years
will truly affect me, I'd still like to know what you think
is going to happen for the whole amount of time be-
cause I know you'll want to use a lot of column space
discussing it My reply to this is, "Hey, thanks, dude
I've thought about this really hard for the last few
minutes, and I think I may have some predictions for
you and yours�-whoever yours is:
1. March 23,2021�Elvis Presley, Adolph Hitler and
Jimmy Hoffa will all be spotted at the same time to-
gether on an iceberg, thereby ruining a half-century of
research. They will then re-enter civilization just as they
left it: eating 12 fried banana sandwiches at one sit-
ting, planning genocide and doing whatever it is that
Hoffa did before they went on their ice-fishing expedi-
tion.
2. March 23, 2013�The good scientists (not those
evil ones) of Helsinki, Finland will devise a Teflon tarp
to cover the hole in the ozone. This attempt will fail as
the Hubble telescope tears through it during a forced
re-entry.
3. March 23, 2005�The Backstreet Boys, N-Sync,
Five and Tom Green are sling-shot directly into the
sun (which back in the 1900s was thought to be a star)
in order to prevent future generations from making
such ghastly mistakes. No one seems to notice their
absence.
4. March 23, 2096�The immortal David Crosby
will surpass the Wayans Brothers' dad's record by fa-
thering his 1000th child. He celebrates with a good
stiff shot of moonshine from his own still.
5. March 23, 2037�Pauly Shore comes back with
a vengeance, wreaking havoc on the Home Shopping
Network, right smack dab in the middle of the "Big
Scary Knife" show. He wounds two camera lenses and
one key grip laughs himself into a coma as he witnesses
that Pauly can't look menacing eveh with a 2-foot long
blade in his hand. Pleading insanity because of his old
age, he's sent to WCW and becomes Ric Flair's whip-
ping boy.
6. March 23, 2069�Earth Is saved in the zero hour
by appeasing the alien invaders by giving up the now
"geriatric but still looks like he's fifteen" Leonardo
DiCrapio as a sacrifice. Good deal, Earth!
7. March 23, 2010�"Ryan Dogg's Morning Show"
(now on WZMB from 8 a.m. to 10 a.m. every Tuesday
and Thursday) finally goes off the airwaves after 10
fabulous years. Ryan Dogg cuts his losses and comes
back to graduate school at ECU where many of his old
friends are finally graduating. He resumes his original
; work at The East Carolinian and actually writes an ar-
ticle worth reading.
Well, that's about it for this week. Just call me
Ndstradamus. Until next week, Ryan-Dogg-Aholics!
Demosthenes
OPINION WRITER
1 remember when the hype was just beginning, and
everyone was advising me to make plans early for the
celebration of the approaching millennium, century
and year as the Western World's calendar turned from
1999 to the spectacular 2000. Apparently, hotels in most
major global cities had already been booked solid and
available airline tickets for the hot date were becoming
an extinct commodity.
The humorous part of all of this is, not only was
there no excess of celebration by individuals, but many
were discouraged by the hype and by travel agencies
jacking up rates two to three times the norm.
What were people doing if they weren't standing
shoulder-to-shoulder at Times Square you might ask?
They were spending the turn of the millennium with
their families.
A majority of people chose to be near loved ones
rather than on some all out vacation or cruise, and this
says an important thing to me: Family comes first. Af-
ter all, when it comes to the bottom line, who should
you really be able to rely on?
The general feeling regarding this event was one of
uncertainty and concern as is the case with every new
year's introduction; only magnified by the factor of a
thousand.
Probably the greatest contributing element to this
year's hysteria was the much talked about Y2K com-
puter bug. When something like this occurs, it makes
you wonder what could happen if machines had wider
control of human functions.
Even though this event was coordinated by a cal-
endar which is not observed by the entire world, it
seemed as though there was a general feeling of peace
among nations. The spectacle around the Great Pyra-
mid at Giza was especially impressive since it had al-
ready seen six millennia in its time.
Another glitch in all the hype is the ongoing con-
troversy of which year constitutes the new millennium.
Nowhere in the bible do you see the phrase, "In the
year 0 of our Lord " This makes me laugh at the
silliness of it all.
I am glad to see that as a majority, people were not
caught up in the hysteria, which forced the travel agents
and airlines to slash prices due to low booking. This
was the pay-back for their greed.
Myself, I had a wild New Year's Eve, and I spent it
with my family. I hope yours was as satisfying, and I
wish you the best in the coming year. I also feel sorry
for the poor saps with Y2K shelters in their backyards.
So be safe and keep collecting those canned goods for
the next millennium, until we meet again.
' This writer can be contacted
demosthenes@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
at





I
6 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES BRIEFS
Finding the shoe
that fits your fancy
OUTDOOR
Women's New Balance
WO680OL
This is a light-weight com-
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trail and off-trail activities. The
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added protection and improved
mid-sole performance while the
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Men's New Balance
MO680GR
This multipurpose outdoor
shoe is perfect for hiking or ev-
eryday use. The rugged upper
leather provides great support,
while maintaining a comfort-
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those who are hard on their
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TRAINER
Women's Adidas Blur
This shoe specializes in sup-
port. The elastic material con-
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foot to offer more stability and
flexibility. The.body itself con-
tains lightweight cushioning,
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TENNIS �
Adidas Thruster
For those on the tennis
court, Adidas offers this light-
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tures a progressive design
formed for comfort, cushion
and breathability. Its herring
bone construction is perfect for
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RUNNER'
Women's Puma Superfly
A shoe designed with the
performance runner in mind.
This comfortable, high mileage
running shoe offers a light-
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Men's Puma Pryde
A high mileage training shoe
built to satisfy the performance
runner looking for a good blend
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These benefits are the result of
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WALKING
Women's Reebok's Leader
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DMX 2X is comfort technol-
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and visibility, there is a 3M
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Reebok Men's Leader DMX
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The Men's Leader offers ex-
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ride. A removable sockliner also
allows you to insert orthotics.
FEATURES
Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000 !
Pets provide companionship, warmth
Animals have
therapeutic effects
Ryan Kennemur
SENIOR WRITER
Pets are truly members of the
American family.
Today, approximately 60 percent
of all households have at least one
dog, cat, bird or other companion
animal. Pets are popular with all
ages because they provide compan-
ionship, unconditional love and a
sense of safety for their owners. The
biggest question prospective pet
owners face remains: What kind of
pet is best suited for me?
Karen Honeycutt, a veterinarian
- from Raleigh, sheds some light on
the subject.
"You have to realize that the pet
will become your daily responsibil-
ity Honeycutt said. "People like to
go out and get the first puppy that
catches their eye or the latest status-
symbol pet that they can show off
at backyard barbecues. Then when
they bring their new pet home, (hey
find out that they have bitten off
more than they can chew
Different people have different
tastes regarding pets, and vice versa.
According to Petopia.com, dogs are
very interactive, trainable and need
an owner who can play with them
often. Cats, however, take up little
space and are able to entertain them-
selves. They can also be left alone
Before buying a pet, consider this:
1. Do you have room for a pet?
2. What activities do you en joy and can your pet en joy them with you?
3. How do you spend your day and what can you do with your pet
during long absences?
4. Is there a "No-Pet" clause in your lease?
5. How much will your pet cost?
6. Are there vets or animal hospitals nearby?
longer than most dogs.
There are 59 million cats and 52.91'
million dogs in the United States
.Even though cats have the,higher
population, dogs can be found in 4.2'
million more households. Even-
though both cats and dogs are unri
valed in popularity, a recent survey!
done over the past seven years by The;
American Veterinary Medical Associa-
tion (AVMA) shows a dramatic in-
crease in the sales of birds, fish, small,
mammals and rabbits.
"People buy pets for one main
reason: to make themselves .feel bet-
ter said Dr. Paul Classman, a psy-
chology professor from the Univ'er
See PETS, page-7
SOCCER
The Nike Air Zoom Match Fit
meets all of your off-field and
on-field training needs. The soft,
ultra-light KNG-100G offers ul-
timate ball touch. Cooler mesh
in the quarter vents lets your
feet breathe while resisting wa-
ter. The lining in the vamp and
quarters is made of moisture-
managing Dri-FIT. With Zoom
Air speed cushioning in the fore-
foot, this boot helps you train
in superior comfort with un-
matched versatility.
Altruistic alumni enlist in Peace Corps
ECU ranks among top
producers of volunteers
. The Peace Corps sends workers to
exotic locations. (World Wide Web
photo)
Nina M.Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
A sense of pride engulfs Mr. and
Mrs. Cornwell as they think of their
daughter, Kendra.
"We are so proud of what she's
vdoing said Karin Cornwell. "Al-
though the eight-week training was
difficult, Kendra never gave up and
remained focused
Kendra is one of the manyECU
alumni who have volunteered their
services in the Peace Corps.
According to Paige Kisser, Peace
Corps' public affairs specialist, there
have been a total of 102 volunteers
from ECU since the Peace Corps'
establishment in 1961; currently
there are 10 ECU graduates serving
overseas. r
So, why oin the Peace Corps?
According to campus recruiter Tara
Komano, there are many reasons
why people choose to volunteer.
"Some of the main reasons are
Jfor people to use their creativity
and resourcefulness in real life ex-
periences and to gain the interna-
tional experience while traveling
komano said.
� ipor students leaving college,
Romano sees it as chance to take
what was learned in the classroom
and apply it to a more hands-on
situation, thus gaining more expe-
rience.
Peace corps volunteers are lo-
cated in approximately 80 coun-
tries.
There are six assignments in
which volunteers can be placed:
agriculture, education, environ-
ment, community development,
business development and health
and nutrition.
"A person placed in health and
nutrition may work with pregnant
women on prenatal care and teach
them.the importance of vaccina-
tions Romano said. "Or they could
become involved with public health
issues or having a safe drinking wa-
ter supply
The Peace Corps looks at the
whole person when screening po-
tential volunteers. To be eligible,
one must be at least 18 years old, a
U.S. citizen, have some prior vol-
unteering experience and have bal-
anced motivation:
"The person must want to do
something positive, but we also
want them to see it as an experi-
ence Romano said.
"Also, one must have cross-cul-
tural skills. Traveling to another
part of the world requires some ad-
aptations. This was the perfect way
for her to follow her dream
Kendra currently lives in
Gambia, a small country on the
western coast of Africa, where she
is a teacher-trainer.
"She helps teachers create les-
son plans and shows them how to
follow a pattern of teaching stu-
dents Cornwell said.
Kendra is the first teacher-
trainer to ever visit this area, al-
though other Peace Corps volun-
teers have assisted in Gambia in
other capacities.
For those interested in joining
the Peace Corps, Romano suggests
Peace Corps workers teach students
more than just reading, writing and
arithmetic (World Wide Web photo)
that one.should go on the Web site,
www.peacecorps.gov and fill out an
application. Information is also avail-
able at Career Services on 5th street.
For more information, contact tara
Romano at (919) 515-5340.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Mandorico spices up Greenville nightlife with Latin flavor
Jesse Launcella. lead vocalist for Mandorico.stands in Peasant's where he and his band performed Friday night (photo by
OUoull VvHUHl)
Exclusive with Jesse
iauricella, lead vocalist
for Mandorico
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Initially, Mandorico was a small
name in Greenville that had little
crowd response. After performing
around town a couple of times over
the past year, the size of their fol-
lowers has steadily grown.
With fans screaming out song
lyrics like "cada vez que te veo el
hermano, cada vez que te veo asi
it was apparent Friday night that
Mandorico's popularity in
Greenville has definitely increased.
The lead singer, Jesse I.auricella, is in
it for love of the music. I.auricella sat
down with us and shared his experi-
ences as well as his thoughts on
music, success and the fans that fol-
low Mandorico.
TEC: How did you get started
with the Latinska music that you
play?
JI I lived in Mexico. I used to
have a ska band in Atlanta, and I
moved to Mexico for six months and
I got turned on to a lot of the Latin
music down there. My band at home
kind of disintegrated, and I got with
the guitar player Mark, and we sat
down and talked about Latin bands.
We realized that we didn't know any-
thing about Latin music so basically
we started off more ska-oriented
and then we began mixing in more
of the Latin, rock, hip-hop and stuff
like that, and it got to where it is
today.
TEC: Who is one of your fa-
vorite Latin American artists?
JL: Los Fabulosos Cadillacs.
TEC: What kind of music do
they play?
JL: Basically, a real across the
board mix, like really folkloric Latin
to punk, ska, samba. They do a
bunch of everything, but the thing
that I liked about them was that
they did some of everything, and
they did it all really well. That's
probably my favorite band.
TEC: How do you dance to
your music?
JL: However you want really.
I've seen people come out and
dance salsa, and I've seen people
come out and just jump around.
A lot of Latin music has a distinct
step, but music like reggae doesn't.
Once you get familiar with the
rhythm, you can just go back and
forth.
TEC: Where did you get your
name from?
JL: It came from a short story
from Puerto Rico. I was studying
Spanish literature at Georgia State,
and one of the stories that we read
was called "Pico Rico Mandorico
and it's from a Puerto Rican writer.
Mark and I were talking about
names for the band, and I threw
that out half kidding, and he
thought that was cool, and it just
kind of stuck from there.
TEC: Are you fluent in Span-
ish?
JL: Yes. I studied Spanish litera-
ture in college, and I lived in
Mexico. That made it happen; I
had no choice. It was either learn
the language or don't eat.
TEC: How long have you
been playing?
JL: With this band, three years.
TEC: Do you all want to keep
getting bigger, or do you want
to stay more of a local band?
JL: It's funny because we talk
about that all the time, and I think
that one of the things that I don't
know if people realize is that when
you are operating on a certain
business level, you know it might
be comfortable for the fans to
come see you at certain venues
with 200 other people. But, finan-
cially, when you have as big a band
as we do, with eight members, it
gets to a point where you can only
play so much for the amount of
money that you're making.
I'd like to see the band get
more successful, and get better
venues; possibly go overseas. Not
only for the reasons that I'd like
to get it out to more fans and stuff,
but it would make doing this as a liv-
ing, you know, making music, a lot
easier, a lot less stressful. It's fun to
play at the small shows at the clubs
and stuff, but there is a reality factor.
TEC: What's your favorite city
to play in?
JL: We really dig Greenville a lot.
It's a really supportive city. We've
been through here like two or three
times over the past two years. It has
been a really weird city for us because
for our first year, we got absolutely
no reaction at all. When that happens
three or four times, you tend not to
go back. You have other cities that
you have been working on.
Last year, like every time we came
through, we got a real nice crowd,
and people started buying our
records. That really makes all the dif-
ference for the band because people
know that they're enjoying your
music, and they appreciate what thev
are bringing you.
It's not terribly easy to do. Even
before we walk in the door, we have
put $500-600 in even before we play.
That's not including paying ourselves
or anything.
TEC: How much time do you
spend practicing?
JL: None. This is the least practic-
ing band that we've ever been in. A'
lot of that is due to the fact that we've i
been traveling so much lately. I don't
think that people understand. They
see that Mandorico is coming, and
they say that they'll catch the band
next time. For all the people that
don't show up for a concert, that
translates into financially a bad show
or moral-wise. People don't realize
the impact of even one person com-
ing out. If you're really digging some-
thing, it's important to get out there
and support it.
TEC: How much do you make
per show?
JL: Like each of us? Anywhere
from nothing to nothing. If you look
See MANDORICO page 7
cu
SPR
(Subjt
You mi
date ir
these o
tion D
info
employ!
Nortel
IBM Recer.
DSCJ Car
Fair
Ind. & Te
Career Fs
Education C
Day
Penn Marks
BB&T
BB&T
First Citize
Bank
Pizzagall
Constructs
Ferguson
Enterprise
Northweste
Mutual Lil
Price Pflsti
BB&T
BB&T
Edward Joni
Sherwin
Williams
Crescent Elec
Co
Arthur Anders
Bureau of
Census .
Precision Fabr
Apex System
Jefferson Pile
Financial
Fuji Silysia
Chemical
Wachovia
Wachovia
Wachovia
Wachovia
Penske Truck
Rental &
Leasing
Grainger
John Hancock
Financial
Maxim
Healthcare
Oyster Point
Construction
State Farm
Insurance
Collins &
Aikman
Sprint-Mid
Atlantic Telecor
Burlington
Industries
Underwriters
Laboratories
IBM
IBM
IBM
Circuit City
Stores
Olde Discount
Stockbrokers
Consolidated
Elec.
Distributors
Hackney & Sons
Enterprise Rent
A Car
Greater Carolina
Group
Western
Southern Life





wmmmm
PVJHUHIfl
, Jan. 25, 2000
dogs.
llion cats and 52.9J
he United States
have the, higher;
an be found in 4.2'
juseholds. Even-
ind dogs are unri
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seven years by The;
y Medical Associa-
vs a dramatic in-
if birds, fish, small,
jits.
ets for one main
emselves.feel bet-
Glassman, a psy-
from the Univ'er
, page- 7
I teach students
ng, writing and
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n the Web site,
� and fill out an
tion isalsoavail-
eson 5th street.
n, contact tara
i-5340.
e contacted at
dia.ecu.edu.
avor
fans and stuff,
ingthisasa liv-
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sful. It's fun to
vvs at the clubs
a reality factor.
r favorite city
ireenville a lot.
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got absolutely
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buying our
ikes all thedil-
ecause people
ijoying your
late what they
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zing ourselves
time do you
least practic-
er been in. A
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page 7
www.ecu.edui
CAREER SERVICES
SPRING ACTIVITIES SCHEDULE
AS OF 12100
(Subject to change - other organizations and programs
will be added throughout the semester)
You must be connected with Career Services by the
date in the 3rd column to be able to interview with
these organizations. You must click "Submit Registra-
tion Data To Career Services" any time you change
information in your demographics or resume.
FEATURES
R- rated movies banned
in state training schools
The East Carolinian
features@studentmedia.ecu.pdu
BAND
from page 6
EMPLOYERS
Nortel
IBM Reception
POSITION TO BE
FILLED
Various positions
- See CO-OP
DSCI Career
Fair
Ind. & Tech.
Career Fair
Education Career
Day
Penn Marketing
BB&T
Info. Session
A variety of
positions
A variety of
positions
"SUBMIT
REGISTRATION
DATARESUME
TO CAREER
SERVICES"
THROUGH
WEBSITE BY:
Have resume
for event
6-8pmMSC
Have resume
for event
A variety of
positions
Marketing
Representative
BU&T
Management,
CommercialRetai
Have resume
for event
Have resume
for event
LAST DAY TO
SUBMIT
RESUME TO
EMPLOYER
THROUGH
WEBSITE BY:
EVENT:
Feb 2, 2000
EVENT:
Feb 10,2000
EVENT:
Feb II, 2000
Jan. 24, 2000
First Citizens
Bank
Pizzagalli
Construction
Ferguson
Enterprises
Northwestern
Mutual Life
Price Pfister
BB&T
Management,
Trust and Ins.
Serv
Banker Dev.
Program
Entry Level
Project Manager
Sales
Management
Training Program
Jan 25,2000
Jan 25,2000
Jan 25,2000
EVENT
Feb 24, 2000
EVENT
Feb 25,2000
Jan. 26, 2000
Jan 27,2000
Jan 27, 2000
DETROIT (AP)�The state Fam-
ily Independence Agency has de-
cided to ban the showing of R-rated
movies with sexual and violent con-
tent to juvenile offenders in
Michigan's training schools.
Plymouth attorney Evelyn But-
ler complained last week that mov-
ies Tike "Basic Instinct" and "9 12
Weeks" had been show to juvenile
offenders at the W.J. Maxey Train-
ing School near Whitmore Lake for
years. She asked state Attorney Gen-
eral Jennifer Granholm to stop the
practice.
Friday, FIA treatment centers
were given word by phone of the
new policy, said the agency's deputy
director, Mark Jasonowicz. A com-
plete written policy is being devel-
oped.
"We made a small dent in a big
problem Ms. Butler told the De-
troit Free Press for a story Saturday.
"The R-rated movies only exemplify
the hostile atmosphere" at the train-
ing school, she said.
Jasonowicz said R-rated movfes
have been used at the training
schools as a way to spark discussions
about violence and sexuality. In a
staff meeting this week, Jasonowicz
said James Beougher, the FIA's head
of child and family services, lobbied
to keep the movies.
Beougher said some R-rated
movies, such as Steven Spielberg's
heralded Holocaust movie
"Schlndler's List are useful in
teaching values to youths who have
victimized other people.
"I'm not a social worker, but to
the lay person, I have a hard time
agreeing with that philosophy
Jasonowicz said. "We don't really
think there are enough (R-rated)
movies out there that have redeem-
ing value as part of treatment
Ms. Butler said she had discov-
ered Maxey records from the early
1990s that indicated R-rated mov-
ies were regularly shown to youths
age 13 to 20. She said she found logs
that documented the movies shown
at Maxey while working on a law-
suit on behalf of Kurt Synnestvedt.
His wife, Barbara, was murdered at
Maxey's Green Oak Center in 1993.
Butler said she was prompted to
go public about the movies after
Oakland County Probate Judge Eu-
gene A. Moore sentenced 14-year-
old Nathaniel Abraham to Maxey
on Jan. 13.
at what I've put into it and what I've
got out of it, I'm probably $10,000
upside down. We don't do it for the
money. I'm not talking about put-
ting money into my pocket or their
pocket, but we do it for the music.
TEC: Do you do it because you
love the music?
JL: You have to love it. If you
don't, you'll quit in two months. Af-
ter playing 20 shows with five
people, unless you like what you're
doing and you believe in what
you're doing, you're not going to
last at all. What you lack in your
pocket book is made up by what you
have in your heart and in the band.
TEC: What do you love most
about your job?
JL: The freedom. Knowing that
from whatever day to whatever day,
I'm doing what I love. Knowing that
I don't have to answer to people and
be somewhere at a certain time.
You're running your own business,
and you are pretty much in charge
Launcella gives his heart and soul to the
' audience through his music, (photo
from World Wide Web)
at that point. More than that, I like
the response from people. Some-
times, you'll just be having the
worst week in the world, and some
people will come up to you and say,
we bought your record and we loved
it. I know it sounds really cheesy,
but it makes you feel like you're not
an idiot, and you're doing the right
thing.
This writer can be contacted at
feotures@studentmedia. ecu, edu.
PETS
Jan 27, 2000
Feb 5,2000
Jan 27,2000
Life Insurance
A Kent
Bli&l
Edward Jones
Sherwin
Williams
Direct Sales
Representative
Management,
Trust and Ins.
Serv
Management,
CommercialRetai
I
Crescent Electric
Co
Arthur Anderson
Bureau of
Census .
Precision Fabrics
Apex Systems
Jefferson Pilot
Financial
Fuji Silysia
Chemical
Investment
Representative
Manager Trainee
Technical Sales
Jan 27,2000
Feb 10,2000
Feb. 10, 2000
Feb. 1,2000
Feb. 1,2000
Jan 30,2000
Jan 30,2000
Jan 30,2000
Jan 30, 2000
Management
Trainee
Audit & Tax
Accountants
Math, Comp.
Spce. &
Economist
Jan 30, 2000
Feb 1,2000
Feb. 14,2000
frdm'page 6
Feb. 2, 2000
Feb. 2, 2000
Feb. 2, 2000
Feb. 3, 2000
Feb. 3, 2000
Feb 1,2000
Manufacturing
Mgt. Trainee
Feb. 4, 2000
sity of Southern California. "Pets are
very therapeutic. Many people suf-
fering from loneliness and depres-
sion are given dogs to look after and
take care of.
People like cats and rabbits be-
cause they're cute and fuzzy, and
that feeling of warmth brings about
a calming peace. Also, studies have
shown that watching fish, either
fresh or saltwater, can help lower
one's blood pressure
But with all the good things that
WWW
come with owning a pet, there are
also down sides. Owners must take
on the responsibility of feeding the
pet regularly, which includes buy-
ing food on a weekly basis, keeping
a clean living environment and
cleaning up after the pet.
"My rabbit has a tendency of
gnawing on absolutely everything
in the house, be it a table leg or a
human one said sophomore Randi
Clark.
Owning a pet can be a highly re-
warding experience to everyone, re-
gardless of age, sex or race. In ex-
change for a place to sleep and regu-
lar feedings, pets can provide safety,
entertainment and a sense of impor-
tance to their owner. In some'cases,
they can even help one's love life.
"All you have to do is take a
puppy to the park with you and all
the girKcome running said gradu-
ate student Jack Meadows.
This writer canbe contacted at
rkennemur@studentmedia. ecu. edu
U.S. Hot Rod Monster Jam
rocks Raleigh's Sports Arena
RALEIGH (AP)�It's too loud to It's pure testosterone said
scream above, then it gets louder. A
rumble in your chest vibrates to the
ends of your fingers and toes. It
sounds like fireworks far a few sec-
onds, then diesel exhaust fills the
nose.
The volume�that must be the
appeal of monster trucks. That's
why thousands of fans flocked to
Raleigh's Entertainment and Sports
Arena recently for the U.S. Hot Rod
Monster Jam, nearly filling the
place.
"I want noise yelled Brian
Smith, 25, a computer salesman
from Holly Springs, at the start of
the show.
But the thirst for noise does not
explain the popularity of Monster
Jam shows on TV, or Crash Madness
videos, Web sites, mini remote-con-
trolled trucks, T-shirts. Or why ear
plugs and headphones protected
many of the ears in the audience.
Male hormones offer a better
explanation.
Kevin Zakrzewski, 24, also a com-
puter salesman, who lives in
Durham. "This is men getting their
aggression out on a bunch of mud
Four monster trucks showed up
Saturday night�5-ton beasts with
1,600-horsepower engines atop gi-
ant wheels that leap over four
junker cars at once. Zakrzewski's
group hollered their approval in
monosyllables, between gulps of
beer in plastic cups, waving fists
high.
"Oh, yeah screamed Pat Bar-
ber, 26, from Hope Mills.
'Boo yelled Smith.
'Boo this man Zakrzewski
hollered. "Boo
The Grim Reaper, a "street war-
rior" truck that was smaller than the
monsters, was not man enough for
them.
"He slowed down at the jumps
Zakrzewski said. "He didn't have
enough acceleration; he was not
See HOT ROD, page 8
Feb. 4, 2000
Feb I, 2000
Sales Associate
Recruiter
Feb 3,2000
Sales Rep.
Mgt. Trainee
Wachovia
Wachovia
Sales &
Marketing
Representative
Retail Banking
Feb 4,2000
Feb 4, 2000
Feb 6, 2000
Wachovia
Wachovia
Penske Truck
Rental &
Leasing
Grainger
John Hancock
Financial
Information
Services
Feb 6, 2000
Feb. 4, 2000
Feb. 7, 2000
Feb. 8, 2000
Feb. 8, 2000
Feb. 9, 2000
Banking
Operations
Systems
Operations
Management
Trainee
Field
Development
Program
Feb 6,2000
Feb 6,2000
Feb 20,2000
Feb 11,2000
Feb. 9, 2000
Feb. 9, 2000
Furniture Fair
is Hiring!
� Furniture Sales
� Electronic Appliance Sales
� Warehouse Technician
� Part time - 29 hrs. a week
� Apply in person - ask for Dot.
131 South West � Greenville Boulevard � 756-9050
Alfredo's; Home of t,
Alfredo's Daily I
Bomb Special j
2 large 1 topping pizzas
$8.99 i
Good 5-10 p.m. daily
i Large New fork Slices
ECU'S Favorite
Lunch Special
j 2 slices with 1 topping and a drink
$3.30
Good 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. daily
Location: Downtown East 5th Street 752-3880
Feb. 9,2000
t Above Tanning Salon
Feb. 23, 2000
Feb. 15,2000
NOW OPEN
Mon-Sat 8-9
Sun 1-6
Maxim
Healthcare
Oyster Point
Construction
State Farm
Insurance
Marketing
Representative
Sales Recruiter
Mgt. Trainee
Project Mgt. &
Estimating
Feb 11,2000
Feb 13,2000
Collins &
Aikman
Sprint-Mid
Atlantic Telecom
Burlington
Industries
Underwriters
Laboratories
IBM
IBM
Claims Rep.
Underwriting or
Stockbroker
Trainees
Management
Trainee
First Level
Engineer
Manufacturing
Trainee
Engineer
Personal Systems
Feb. 25,2000
Feb. 13,2000
Feb. 27,2000
Feb. 15,2000
Feb. 16,2000
Feb. 29, 2000
Feb. 16,2000
Mar 1,2000
Feb. 13,2000
Feb. 13, 2000
Feb. 15,2000
IBM
Networking
Program
Circuit City
Stores
Olde Discount
Stockbrokers
Consolidated
Elec.
Distributors
Hackney & Sons
Enterprise Rent
A Car
Greater Carolina
Group
Corporate
Accounting
Feb. 15,2000
Feb. 15,2000
Feb. 15,2000
Store Managers
Stockbroker
Trainee
Feb. 21,2000
Feb. 21,2000
Management
Trainee
Product Line
Manager
Management
Trainee
Sales Associate
Western
Southern Life
Sales
Representative
Feb 27,2000
Mar 22, 200(1
Mar 22,2000
Mar 17,2000
Mar 22,2000
Carolinian
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The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
86-year-old man becomes tree sculptor
SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) � For
60 years, its willow branches shel-
tered their lakeside domain, offer-
ing shade and a sense of perma-
rience with each turning of the sea-
Sons.
i(- But then a fierce wind blew
across Lake Madison three or four
ears back, snapping the gentle old
giant in Art and Erma Arshem's back
yard.
The big willow had grown to 50
or (50 feet tall since they first planted
it in 1937. And now it was reduced
to 18 feet of stripped, shattered
wood.
"What to do?
After three years of pondering
the question, Art Arshem came up
with two possibilities. He could cut
the rest down and haul it away. Or
he could find a new purpose for an
old friend.
'He chose the latter. And this is
where the story really gets interest-
ing.
, At age 86, Arshem decided to
pursue a new hobby. Something he
never had time for in all those years
he was running the Arshem Broth-
ers filling station on First Avenue in
downtown Sioux Falls, across from
the Shriver Building. Something he '
just couldn't fit in, either, during 20
,years of operating Sioux Cab in
Sioux Falls.
" He decided to become a chain-
saw sculptor.
That's right, a Michelangelo of
the whirring, ripping blades. He
looked at that old willow and de-
cided there was a Viking inside it.
And in the course of about three
months, that's exactly what has
taken shape on the southeast side
of Lake Madison.
Using two different saws - with
8- and 16-inch blades - Arshem
hacked and cut and trimmed. He
lopped off the top 10 feet of the tree
to get it down to a workable height.
And halfway through the project, he
managed to lop off one of the
Viking's hands, too.
"I was trying to extend his saber
down to the base, and 1 accidentally
hit the hand he says. The memory
brings a hearty laugh. "So I'm work-
ing around it
Good artists do that, you know.
And as it turns out, Arshem is a
pretty good artist, especially for a
guy whose background in wood-
working amounts to making end
tables, kitchen cabinets and one
fairly respectable boat.
From the willow has emerged a
7-foot Norseman he calls Lars.
"That was my dad's name
Arshem explains, "Dad loved the
lake. So I named him after my dad
I.ars has horns and a helmet. He
has a long saber at his left side. And
when the artist finishes his work
this spring and summer, he will
have a mail suit hanging from his
shoulders.
"I've got about 15, 20 hours left
of work on him Arshem says as he
sits in the kitchen of his Sioux Falls
home on South Grange Avenue. "I
have to finish his eyes, and 1 haven't
finished around his chin or the top
of his boots. But I'm getting there
As you might imagine, old Lars
has become quite a conversation
piece around the lake. People have
parked along the private access road
and stared at the emerging figure.
Some have walked into the yard to
check him out.
"I never dreamed it would be
anything like this Arshem says.
"What would be all the attraction
on it in this part of the country? I
don't know. But people sure seem
interested in it
So interested, it turns out, that
the snow in the backyard of their
lake cabin has revealed footprints
coming right up next to Lars this
winter.
Arshem says he chose a Viking
because of his own Norwegian heri-
tage.
"I'm Scandinavian, so I'm a Vi-
king he says. "My friends send me
cards about being Norwegian, and
some get kind of hostile. But I don't
mind it. We Norwegians are pretty
easygoing people
Pretty talented, too, it turns out.
Thanks to the warm days of the ex-
tended autumn, Arshem was able to .
prove that as he whacked away with
his chain saw and carved away on
the finer details with his chisel.
He figures he put in about 1MJ
hours on the sculpture, much of
that on a ladder so he could reach
the top of Lars. The work ended for
the season around Thanksgiving. It
will continue again when spring
comes around.
IaUk
kM A
Rush
Alpha Phi Omega
National Co-Ed Service Fraternity
Invites you to attend
Informational Meetings
When: Tuesday & Wednesday,
January 25th & 26th at 5:00 - 6:30
Where: Mendenhall Student Center
Pirate Underground
For More Information please contact
Erin Ryan @ 758-8283
HO I nOU from page
aggressive
Still, testosterone does not ex-
plain why toddlers sat, barely
squirming, through the entire show.
Or why two 8-year-old girls squealed
over their15 stuffed monster truck
toys. It must be the circus atmo-
sphere, the bright paint jobs and the
announcer's staccato voice�all
mesmerizing to short attention
spans.
"Thev can do all kinds of tricks
7 said Zelle Creech, whose bangs were
caught in dainty ponytails off her
forehead.
"They got neat colors on them
and stuff said Madison Hairr, wear-
ing a bright pink vest.
If it's not just a guy thing, mon-
ster trucks may simply offer vicari-
ous fun. Permission for road rage.
When trucks were.not gunning
engines or catching air, the crowd
grew bored. During one such lull, a
woman applied lipstick. A boy up
front half-heartedly waved a check-
ered flag. Dads' eyes glazed over as
if they were watching the Home
Shopping Network.
They all livened up again when
a quad racer on the Tar Heel team
smashed the winning trophy over
the Wolfpack racer's head.
"Hit 'em with your helmet said
Jamie Lunsford, 16, a junior at Riv-
erside High School in Durham.
NOWHIRING
Orientation Assistants for 2000-2001
Orientation & the First-Year Experience 214 Whichard - 328-4173
For more information, �
contact the Office of Orientation
and the First-Year Experience
Applications are now available in 214
Whichard Building!
Deadline forcompleted applications is February 4,2000 at 5:00 p.m.
RUSH

0
&
V
Jfc
JAN. 24-27; 8-11
'At
Anwi retreat to spy Rock
Tor Rides or information, Call:
shannon @ 754-2433
or
Ryan @ 329-8731
schedule
of Events
Dates:
janua
jersey Mikes
Annual 70's social with AAYl
Monday, January 24, 2000
ifJau

Tuesday, January 25, 2000
shrimy & Oyster Roast
Wednesday, January 26, 2000
Chick-Fil-A
Thursday, January 27, 2000
Pia Pickin'
� Friday, January 28, 2000
Band Parly
Saturday, January 29, 2000
Bid Night w AZ
" -a X cpKT ZTA :
Downtown5th St.
;Downtown
Campus

www.tec.e
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Jan. 25, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Super Bowl is set
The St. Louis Rams and the Tennessee Titans
yvill square off in Super Bowl XXXIV. The Titans
earned their spot by beating the Jacksonville Jag-
gars In the AFC Championship game, 33-14 in
Alltel Stadium, Sunday. The Titans overcame a 14-
10 second quarter deficit to defeat the Jaguars for
the third time this season.
The Rams won their first NFC Championship
since 1979, by beating the Tampa Bay Bucca-
neers 11-6. The Rams won with a 30 yard touch-
down strike from Kurt Warner to Ricky Proehl with
4:44 remaining.
Chiefs' Thomas injured in crash
Kansas City Chiefs' linebacker Derrick Thomas
was injured in a one car accident early last Sunday.
Thomas lost control of his car when he hit an ice
patch. The car collided with the median and wit-
nesses say it flipped multiple times. The crash
killed one of Thomas' companions and injured an-
other.
Thomas is said to have suffered serious back
injuries. Specifics on his injuries have not been re-
leased.
"It's devastating to me said Gunther
Cunningham, Chiefs head coach. "Forget about the
football aspect of it�he has given a lot to this city
and this organization. It's a tough thing to deal
with
Thomas was drafted by the Chiefs in 1989. He
has played for Kansas City for all of his 11 years in
the NFL.
Williams bounced
from Australian Open
No. 3 seed, Serena Williams was ousted from
the Australian Open by No. 16 seed Elena
Likhovtseva, 6-3, 6-3. Williams, the 1999 U.S.
Open Champion, had 32 unforced errors.
"There's no excuse for me to lose this said
Williams. "I just couldn't find any rhythm throughout
the match
Notes'Janikowski arrested
Florida State place-kicker, Sebastian
Janikowski, was arrested Saturday night after al-
legedly trying to bribe a police officer. Janikowski
and some companions were trying to enter a Talla-
hassee nightclub. When Janikowski's companions
were refused entry, a conflict occurred. After
Janikowski's companions were taken into custody,
the two-time All-American attempted to give $300
to a Tallahassee police officer.
Bribing a police officer is a third-degree felony.
Janikowski was released Sunday morning on
$1,000 bail.
Janikowski is forgoing his senior year and opt-
ing for the NFL draft.
Yankees resign Pettite
The New York Yankees announced Monday
they would resign lefthander Andy Pettite. Pettite,
who went 14-11 with a 4.70 era in 31 starts last
season, will ink a four-year deal that could be
worth as much as $35 million.
Pettite was rumored to be trade bait for much
of last season as he struggled with his mechanics.
The deadline came and went and Pettite was still
in pinstripes. He proved his worth as a big game
pitcher, leading the Yankees to two wins in their
postseason run to the World Championship.
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Pirates weather comeback, top UNCW
Men's basketball
team snaps losing streak
Susanne Milenkevich
SENIOR WRITER
The Pirates ended a three game losing streak Sat-
urday after defeating UNC-Wilmington 65-57 before
a crowd of 6,712 at Williams Arena at Minges Coli-
seum.
ECU opened the game with a 13-2 run against the
Seahawks. Senior forward Neil Punt posted six of his
15 points in the opening minutes.
The Pirate defense held the Seahawks to just 27
percent shooting from the field in the first half while
ECU'S offense took a 17 point lead on two occasions
before entering the locker room with a 35-20 lead.
"Our defense played great for 40 minutes and we
came out in the second half with a chance to go up
25 or 30 points first year head coach Bill Herrion
said. "But we missed three front ends of 1-and-l situ-
ations that could have put us up 28 points. We didn't
make them or some other free throws and they hit
some 3-pointers to get back in it. But give the kids
credit because they stuck with it
ECU continued to score in the second half as the
Pirates opened with a 13-4 run to put the Seahawks
down by 24 points.
In the final eight minutes of the game, UNC-W
sparked a 25-4 run that brought the Seahawks within
3 points. The run was led by UNC-W freshman guard
Brett Blizzard who posted 12 of his 24 points as he
hit four 3-pointers in 2:05 to bring the Seahawks back
into the game.
"We knew coming in UNC Wilmington was not
going to give up and that itj was going to be tough
to put away Herrion said. "They showed that today.
UNC Wilmington Is a talented club
and we just held them off. Now we
need to learn to put people away
ECU held onto the win by com-
pleting 7-8 free throws with 42.4 re-
maining in the game to give the Pi-
rates an eight point advantage.
"Good teams know how to put
people away Herrion said. "We
would have liked to have won by
20 points, but we put ourselves in a
position late in the game that
maybe we can learn from
The 25 point run by the
Seahawks had people on edge while
the team was confident they could
hold on.
"I knew we had it the whole
time said senior forward Neil Punt.
"I knew we were going to step up
and hit shots
ECU finished the game with a
35-33 rebound advantage, the
Pirate's seventeenth game out of 18
with the rebound advantage. ECU
shot 49 percent (20 of 41) from the
floor and 61 percent (20 of 33) from
the free throw line.
The Pirates will return to action
on January 26 when they travel to
Richmond to face CAA foe Virginia
Commonwealth.
This writer can be contacted at
smilenkevich@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
David Taylor scores his only bucket in ECU's 66-57 win over UNCW (photo by
Bobby Russell)
OPINION COLUMN
Tarheels' hard times
are no surprise
Tar Heels not included on AP
Top 25 for the first time in a decade
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Alphons van Ireland scored five points and grabbed two rebounds in Saturday's game (photo by Bobby Russell)
Ok, I know this is the ECU student paper, but 1
can't help myself. The most talked about sports story
in the state is wi thout a doubt, the collapse of the Caro-
lina Blue hoops dynasty.
Yesterday, for the first time since 1990, an AP Top
25 came out that did not include the Tarheels. As a j
person who has spent 18 of his 21 years living iril
Chapel Hill, I can say this, Carolina fans are not ac-TJ
customed to losing and for them, the sky is indeed
falling.
Now to many, this comes as a surprise. The Heels
were picked No. 2 in the nation by Sports Illustrated,
and were in the preseason top ten in most national
polls. Carolina was also picked to finish atop the ACC.
All this for a team who was bounced from last years'
NCAA tournament in the first round by Weber State?
I don't get it. North Carolina finished the 1999 sea- -
son with a whimper. They were plagued by inconsis-
tency. They won the preseason NIT, and limped
through the ACC schedule. They got to the final of
the ACC tournament and then stunk up Seattle in their
opening round loss to Weber State.
For a team coming off of such a disappointing sea-
son, they got an awful lot of credit coming into this
year. The amount of praise heaped upon these Heels is �
made more puzzling by the fact that they lost last
season's floor leader, Ademola Okulaja, to graduation.
the lack of leadership is evident to even the most
casual observers. This year's squad often looks rudder-
less and they play with out fire. It seems that in every
game, the Heels' opponent looks as if they just want it
more.
In the eyes of many Carolina fans, slumps like this
happen everywhere, except Chapel Hill.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia. ecu. edu
Women's team looks at undefeated conference record
Men learn from
their mistakes, fall to American
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
The Lady Pirates picked up two more wins over the
weekend, improving to 9-1, 6-0 in the CAA, while the
men's team fell short in a tough meet Saturday.
Friday the ladies had a road win against the Rich-
mond Spiders, 175-125. "We are pleased to get a con-
ference victory over a top CAA team said Head Coach
Rick Kobe.
The meet featured five first place finishes, one such
finish by Dana Fuller in the 1000 free style. The meet
provided some momentum for their home meet Sat-
urday against American, which was a resounding 149-
92 blowout.
The women are not just on a roll, they have been
consistent winners all season. The American meet fea-
tured 7 first place finishes for the ladies.
"It was fantastic said team captain Hollie Butler.
"We won a meet yesterday and then won our meet
today. What mote can you ask for?"
The team has been working extremely hard since
their Christmas training and has not let up on prac-
tice since they got back to campus.
"Tired is the only word Butler said. "Everybody
is so tired. Some people shaved and tapered for this
meet, and the team supported them. They did real well
for us
The men's team was dealt a loss (135-102) in its
Saturday meet against American. The loss knocked the
men to 6-3, :i-2.
"This is one of the top teams in the conference
said captain Matt Jabs. "They have a lot of national
caliber talent on their team. It was the kind of meet
where everybody had to he at the top of their game.
Today some of us were and some of us weren't
While a loss is not a positive happening, Matt Jabs
explains that it is not the end of the world.
"The initial loss always hurts because of the expec-
tations Jabs said. "But after that you have a win some,
lose some attitude while still striving lor excellence
This is turning out to be a great season for both the
men's and women's teams. The women are on the verge
of an undefeated conference record.
"As a senior, I can say that there is nothing that
makes me happier than to see everyone be as success-
ful as they have been Butler said.
Coach Kobe put the meet in perspective.
"We were pleased with how everyone swam, Ameri-
can is probably the toughest team in the conference
Kobe said. "We took them down to the last two events,
any time you score 100 points you have to be happy.
We are working and preparing for the championship
meet
ECU vs. Richmond
Women
1000 freestyle first place Dana Fuller
4000 relay first place Lady Pirates
200 freestyle first place Hollie Butler
50 freestyle second place Mary Bennett
200 backstroke first place Amy Hendrick
400 freestyle relay second place team finish
ECU vs. American
Men
400 medley relay second place
200 freestyle first place Casey Charles
50 freestyle second place Matt Jabs
100 backstroke second place Matt Jabs
200 backstroke second place Claes Lindgren
77i$ writer can be
rdowaey@studentmedia.ecu. edu.
contacted
at





I
The East Carolinian
wwM.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
"Hurricanes trade Primeau to Flyers Jets set to name Al Groh as coach
Jan. 25, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
KALEIGH, N.C. (AP)�The Carolina Hurricanes got
a player with impeccable playoff credentials. The Phila-
delphia Flyers received some insurance for corxeussion-
prone star Eric Lindros.
,J(n the biggest NHL trade this season, Carolina fi-
najjby unloaded disgruntled former captain Keith
Prjjmeau on Sunday for Rod Brind'Amour.
.Xhe two veteran centers have comparable career
numbers, except in the postseason, where
Brind'Amour has 33 goals in 87 games. Primeau has
ojlly six in 64.
� ZAny time that Eric (Lindros) had an injury when
ym look at who the guy was that stepped up and made
that team go Brind'Amour was always that guy Caro-
lina coach Paul Maurice said of one of Philadelphia's
mast popular players. "He'll have an opportunity to
cfcihat here on a nightly basis because he is going to
recounted on that strongly
1 "Primeau, 28, had been in a contract dispute with
(Slolina since he became a restricted free agent July 1
afiS vowed never to play for the Hurricanes again.
2 "Carolina general manager Jim Rutherford said the
t$n resisted trading Primeau until recently, when sev-
eRJ teams began inquiring about the rugged 6-foot-5,
2J-pounder.
JlfThe deal with the Flyers was apparently off Satur-
dSS night, but things fell into place early Sunday.
J IJPrimeau, who missed Carolina's first 48 games af-
tftjleading them with 30 goals a season ago, said he
sjjped a five-year, $22.75 million contract with the
Fftf rs and should be in uniform Thursday night. He
vfljj receive $5 million a year the last three years of
t deal.
SSTheoniy regret that 1 would have is that it didn't
vfctTR out in the first place Primeau said. "As far as
how it has unfolded and how it has developed, I don't
have any regrets
Primeau's relationship with team owner Peter
Karmanos deteriorated during the five-month dispute.
"It's best left unsaid Primeau said when asked if
he had anything to say to Karmanos, who at one point
in the negotiations called Primeau a 'prima donna
Karmanos released a statement through the team's
public relations office.
"When you break it all down, Keith basically got
the same contract we originally offered him in Au-
gust Karmanos said.
That's true.
Carolina's first contract offer to Primeau in July
was five years for $20 million. He then turned down
various other offers for fewer years and less money
over the past few months.
"We don't think this is a contract that embarrasses
what we did Rutherford said. "Once he passed on
arbitration for the month of August, we had $20 mil-
lion on the table for him. So, he still ended up getting
a five-year deal. As an organization, we felt it was im-
portant to keep his contract in line
Brind'Amour, an 11 -year NHL veteran, had played
in 484 straight games before missing the first 34 games
this season with a broken left foot. Since returning to
the lineup, the 6-foot-l, 200-pound center has eight
points in 12 games. '
Rod Brind'Amour is the newest member of the Carolina
Hurricanes (AP photo)'
"He is one of the top two-way centers in the Na-
tional Hockey League Rutherford said.
Maurice said Brind'Amour, 29, would center a line
with wings Gary Roberts and Jeff O'Neill against
Montreal on Monday night.
Maurice made the phone call to Brind'Amour to
inform him of the trade. He was in Pittsburgh get-
ting ready to play the Penguins.
"I think he knew the call was coming Maurice
said. "While there may have been a shock to it when
he finally heard it, he is still that great pro and he
snapped right into the arrangements of when he was
coming.
"He got very focused at the job at hand. There
wasn't any, 'I'll have to call you back or I have to talk
to my agent It was hockey
Rutherford said Brind'Amour has two years re-
maining on his contract, which will pay him $3.5 mil-
lion next season and then $4.2 million.
Carolina also gets 21-year-old goalie Jean-Marc
Pelletier and a second-round pick at the NHL entry
draft in June. The Flyers will get Carolina's fifth pick.
Primeau has 179 goals, 227 assists and 1,127 pen-
alty minutes in 597 games in an 11-year career with
Detroit and Carolina.
Brind'Amour has spent his last eight seasons with
Philadelphia. He has 273 goals and 430 assists in 778
games with Philadelphia and St. Louis. He was third
in Flyers scoring last season with 74 points.
Carolina came into Sunday's games four points
out of a playoff spot in the tight Eastern Conference.
HEMPSTEAD, N.Y. (AP)�The
New York Jets finally appear to have
found someone who wants to coach
their team.
Three weeks after Bill Parcells re-
signed and Bill Belichick turned
down the job, the Jets- were set to
hire Al Groh, one of the more non-
descript assistant coaches in the NFL,
as their new head coach.
Although he will replace Parcells,
one of the coaching icons of pro
football, Groh doesn't seem con-
cerned.
"I feel very ready for this, if it
were to happen he said. "I don't
minimize the size of the job. I'm not
trying to make it sound as if I would
be taking over at some small high
School, but I don't see this as that
big a deal
The decision to hire Groh will
bring to an end three weeks of un-
certainty for the franchise.
Since the season ended on Jan.
3, the Jets have seen:
� Parcells step down as coach,
saying that while he could still do
the job, the total commitment to it
was lacking.
� Belichick, the defensive coor-
dinator and coach-in-waiting, el-
evated to the position upon Parcells'
announcement.
� Belichick stun the team and
everyone else by quitting the next
day, citing the unsure ownership
situation.
� Representatives of Belichick
filing a grievance with the NFL,
claiming the team was not allow-
ing him to seek employment else-
where.
� The estate of the late Leon
Hess agree to sell the team to Rob-
ert Wood (Woody) Johnson IV for
$635 million.
� Parcells tell Johnson he did
not want to return to the sidelines.
� The league rule in the Jets' fa-
vor in Belichick's grievance. Com-
missioner Paul Tagliabue said the
contract bound Belichick to the Jets
for 2000 and urged Belichick, the
Jets and any outside team (New En-
gland) seeking to hire Belichick to
work out an agreement before Feb.
1.
And now comes the expected el-
evation of Groh, recommended by
Parcells.
Groh, the team's linebackers
coach, is a former defensive coordi-
nator under Parcells, and wouldn't
deviate much from the approach his
boss took.
"It's confirmed by the results
Groh said. "The system of putting a
team together, running a team, the
whole thing as it's been spearheaded
by BiH, is one of the most success-
ful operations in the history of the
league.
"To be in three different Super
Bowls, to resurrect two programs,
with New England and the Jets, ob-
viously it works. And all of us that
have been in it feel very confident
in implementing it if given our own
opportunity
Groh is an expert In the Parcells I
system, which features an aggressive,
defense with multiple designs, usu-
ally run out of a 3-4. He worked unr �
der Parcells In 1989 and 1990 with!
the Giants, winning a Super Bowl
He reunited with Parcells in New En
gland in 1993 as defensive coordi-
nator, but then stepped down to-
linebackers coach again when!
Belichick, who spent five years as �
head coach in Cleveland, joined the;
Patriots.
When both Parcells and.
Belichick left for the Jets in 1997
Groh came, too. Three years later
he is about to get his first head;
coaching position since leading'
Wake Forest from 1981-86.
Would Groh feel overshadowed I
because Parcells will remain the;
organization's football chief?
"Some players might say Al is a-
puppet for Bill' said the Daily"
News.
But another disagreed.
"Bill will do everything he can'
to launch Al on a successful cruise
the source said. "If the cruise goes-
as anticipated, Bill can backoff and!
let it be Al's ship
The Jets also are concerned with-
continuity, and promoting Groh-
might keep much of the staff intact
The Jets already have lost an
other coach. Romeo Crennel, defen
sive line coach the past three sea
sons, accepted an offer Sunday to!
become the defensive Coordinator
for the Cleveland Browns.
While Yankees win, Orioles pay
(AP)-While the New York Yankees got the trophies,
the Baltimore Orioles ran up the biggest taxes.
Baltimore's total bill for the three years of baseball's
luxury tax was $10,643,897, according to management
records obtained by The Associated Press.
The Yankees, who won the World Series twice in
the three years of the tax, were second at $9,919,651,
followed by Los Angeles at $2,712,672, Boston at
$2,205,960 and Cleveland at $2,065,496.
Only three others teams wound up with bills dur-
ing the three years of the tax: the Atlanta Braves
($1,795,582), the New York Mets ($1,137,992) and the
Florida Marlins ($139,607).
Teams received their bills for the last year of the tax
Jan. 10, and they are payable Jan. 31.
For 1999, the Yankees had the highest tax bill for
the second time in three seasons: $4,804,081. They-
were followed by the Orioles ($3,475,048), the Dodg-1
ers ($2,663,079), the Mets ($1,137,992) and the Red!
Sox ($21,226).
While the Yankees finished with the best record in �
the American League and went 11-1 in the postseason
the Orioles were fourth in the AL East at 78-84 and the !
Dodgers were third in the NL West at 77-85.
The luxury tax is based on the average annual val
ues of contracts of players on teams' 40-man rosters as �
See ORIOLE, page 11 ,
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Caffeine Free Diet Cone. Sprite
Diet Coke or
Coca cola Classic
2 liter
6 Pack 20 oi btls
loc IS oo with can .mtknt
" mm V
we throw all kinds of
obstacles at 70u,
tuition isn't one of them.
Doritos
t'Sot.
vegetable, with Heat or s Cheese
Stouffer's
Lasagna
$J99
StvttS.00
M varieties
Nabisco
Snack Crackers
5)6 5 07
Kroger
Potato Chips
Sure, we'll have you climbing walls. But if you qualify for
a 2- or 3-year scholarship, tuition's one obstacle you won't
have to worry about. Talk to an Army R0TC rep. And get a
leg up on your future.
ARMY ROIC Unlike any other college course you can take.
For more information, .
call the Army ROTC Program at ECU,
M varieties
Pop Secret
Popcorn
Soak
&uy Our - gtt On
OB!
Made with 2�
SUPCRBOWt
Party t�MQQ
Platters
19
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Jan. 25, 2000
itmedia.ecu.edu.
ach
Jan. 25, 2000
I www.tec.ecu.edu
pert in theParcellsI
itures an aggressive,
Itiple designs, usu
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pent five years as
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1981-86.
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offer Sunday to-
isive Coordinator
Browns.
f
;hest tax bill for
1,804,081. They-
048), the Dodg
�2) and the Red !
lebest record In �
the postseason, �
it 78-84 and the !
77-85.
age annual val
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I
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Brown & Brown
ATTORNKYS AT
ftuftEquaBfrJUrtfcc Speeding Tickets
3493C South Evans Street
Bedford Commons, Greenville
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
SPORTS
fyriiii? flfeak 2000 Panama Gfy Beach, llorida!
BE A CO H J
BEACH RESORT V
- liw ltv Khrr Hklf. Mki (it. llngtMBid. �
and Wtfir Stir . 2 lira- OiiMmir Swain�W
lxt. So .M & & I ��. Knit
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The East Carolinian
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edtf
ORIOLE
from page 10
adjusted each day of the regular
season, and was assessed on the
five biggest spenders at a rate of 34
percent on the amount of salary
above the midpoint of the teams
with fifth- and sixth-hjghest pay-
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By shedding payroll late in the
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cut their tax bills significantly.
Based on opening-day rosters,
liquid IjnxwaK- Smin-
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS & CELLULAR
e�ervaf ions: 1800-188 8828
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the Dodgers were projected to
wind up with the top bill at
$5,150,347, followed by the Yan-
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($4,067,305), Braves ($772,506:
and Mets ($525,156).
The tax went out of existence
following the season. Owners, un-
able to get a salary cap, agreed W"
the tax in the settlement of the
1994-95 strike, hoping it would"
slow the rate of payroll growth.
Pagers - $49.95
Includes Activation and 1 Month Service
316 - D East 10th St.
(Across from Kinko's) -r US, Cellular
931-0009
Tailgate Special
75 wings - $24.99
(Choice of up to 3 sauces)
Expires 21400
114 E. 5th St.
Greenville, NC
758-9191
Assistant
Sports Editor
Needed!
,

US!
Must have excellent grammar & editing
skills and knowledge of sports.
M Also an interest in writing.
Apply at the second floor of the Student Publications Building
or call 328-6366
�r
ASS
ATTENTION
MISA
Wants you
Co mejoin the best student
organization on campus.
Open to all majors
Meeting: Jan 25
6:30 pm
Place: GCB 1028
(Refreshment
Served)
TEL 252-328- 6893
6
MISA
Managamant Information
Syatams association
COLLEGE RUSH
Get great seats at a great price. Purchase
Upper Level $33 seats for $15 and Lower
Level $44 seats for $20. Tickets may be
purchased up to 48 hours prior to any
game at the Arena box office based
on availability. Valid . 10U'U
college ID required. 0ou
60
Philadelphia FlyersJan. 117:30PM
New York RangersJan. 207:00PM
Buffalo SabresJan. 221:30PM
Montreal CanadiensJan. 247:30PM
Phoenix CoyotesJan. 257:30PM
New Jersey DevilsJan. 287:30PM
Florida PanthersFeb.i7:30PM
Montreal CanadiensFeb.177:30PM
Tarnpa Bay LightningFeb. 197:30PM
Washington CapitalsFeb. 211:30PM
Florida PanthersFeb. 247:30PM
Chicago BlackhawksMar. 87:30PM
Boston BruinsMar. 107:30PM
Atlanta ThrashersMar. 121:30PM
Edmonton OilersMar. 157:30PM
St. Louis BluesMar. 227:00PM
New York IslandersMar. 261:30PM
Buffalo SabresMar. 277:30PM ;
Nashville PredatorsMar. 297:30PM :
Philadelphia FlyersApr. 21:30PM
Atlanta ThrashersApr. 91:30PM
9
TICKETS AVAILABLE THROUGH THEtBKKtMBOX OFFICE
at919-681-2323 or www.caneshockey.com





Tuesday, Jan. 25, 2000
wftyw.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
The East Carolinian 12 j
comics@studentmedia.ecu.pdu
www.tec.
hths jo&yshow
by joey ellis
THE GRASS IS ALWAYS (KEENER
jeremy falls
'lUhouoJi El.ftO H.Hiue��aiA not cu3t e ofrtr 4s �.n MS, Terrenei
innouyn -i 5 fte (eAe h,5 -furry fail ttt"t. the.
brinT of their rMcKer
CAA PUNKS
by bruce satterfield
&rwonists
arwomts
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR FALL CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
eastcarolinian
in the Student Publications Building
For Rides Call: 752-4181 or 830-5554
IF YOU hav
gar Wall at;
nights. I hav
mo includes
2 BR duple
story (BR's i
Street. $57f.
9040.
3 BR housi
newly renov
ing and dir
Street. $650
9040.
SPRING BF
BEACH Sm
NEXT TO SI
COUNT RATI
DOCK SIDE
ly renovated
multi-car co
washerdrye
7702.
dockside:
available now
deled. New a
pets allowed,
time, 756-68
sage.
2 BR Apts
above Catalc
month � Call
WALK TO-
$300montl
Avery Street
Call 758-6591
BEECH STRI
bath S650.0C
ary 5th call V
agement LLC
DOCKSIDE 3
available. Nev
appliances, c;
321-6446 day
ings for appoi
COZYONBt
South Holly. N
ities and cable
$335month.
sooner. Call Ci
JASMINE G
bath, all applij
pets. $410 per
erty Managerr
ONEBEDROC
Cove $375. Ir
own bathroom.
1677 or(919)5
Len.
! -WESLEY C
1 or 2 bed r
jrefrigerator,
washerdryer
�facilities, 5 b
i ECU bus serv
NOWP
FOR
-All Properties
maintenai
l.
RINGGO
Now Tak
1 bedroor
Efficienc
CALL
ROOMM
ROOMMATES
bedroom house
pus. Rent 160 �
ties. Call Amaru
ROOMMATE V
ly renovated 3 t
rything is new. Ii
es. 4 car port,
for only $275r
329-0709(n).
SUBLEASER v
ary to July in Pir
furnished, all uti
er and dryer, cat
Bedroom and I
9425.
FEMALE ROOI
share apartment
Two bedrooms, i
ny. $242.50 moi
Call Stephanie a
ROOMMATE N
bedroom townh
and 12 utilities
ADMI
Large Reset
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MWH!K5pflW!PBP!
rolinian 12
media.ecu.pdu
iy falls
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR RENT
IF YOU have high utility bills call Ed-
gar Wall at 321-2700 days or 551-0971
nights. I have 1 Br apts for rent $320
mo includes utilities, near campus.
2 BR duplex available immediately. 2
story (BR's upstairs- 804-A Johnston
Street. $575month-Call Rick � 551-
9040.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share a 2 bdr. apt. on 11th Street. It
has a balcony pool and laundry locat-
ed on premise. Rent 237.5 plus half
electric. Ginger 329-8051.
HELP WANTED
3 BR house available immediately,
newly renovated, painted, carpet, liv-
ing and dining room - 310 E 13th
Street. $650momh - Call Rick � 551-
9040.
SPRINGBRlEAirciTY
BEACH "SUMMIT" LUXURY CONDOS
NEXT TO SPINNAKER OWNER DIS-
COUNT RATES. (404) 355-9637.
DOCK SIDE - 2 bedroom. 2 bath, new-
ly renovated duplex townhome with
multi-car covered parking. Includes
washerdryer. $625month. 919-834-
7702.
FOR SALE
DOCKSIDE 3 bedroom. 2 bath duplex
available now. Everything newly remo-
deled. New appliances, carpet. Some
pets allowed. Please call 321-6423 day-
time, 756-6823 evenings, leave mes-
sage.
2 BR Apts Available Immediately,
above Catalog Connections. $550
month - Call rick @ 551-9040.
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-D
East 10th St. (next to Papa Oliver's Piz-
za).
1 PANAMA City Vacations! Party
Beachfront @ The Boardwalk. Summit
Condo's & Mark II. Free drink parties!
Walk to best bars! Absolute best price!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
TOYOTA COROLLA SRslBTliaOOO
miles. Good condition $2,000 758-
8521.
ATTENTION MEDICAL, Nursing, and
Dental students: you'll find the best
prices on all your textbooks and sup-
plies at www.discountmedbooks.com
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$300month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street.
Call 758-6596.
BEECH STREET three bedroom two
bath $650.00 a month available Janu-
ary 5th call Wainright Property Man-
agement LLC 756-6209.
DOCKSIDE 3 bedroom. 2 bath duplex
available. Newly renovated with new
appliances, carpet and cabinets. Call
321-6446 daytime or 329-0709 even-
ings for appointment, leave message.
COZY ONE bedroom house on 407
South Holly. New appliances, low util-
ities and cable. Across from art school.
$335month. Available March 1st or
sooner. Call Charlotte 329-0558.
SPRING BREAK Specials! Bahamas
Party Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
Departs from Florida! Panama City
room with kitchen next to clubs, 7 par-
ties & free drinks129! Daytona room
with kitchen149! South Beach (bars
open until 5 a.m)159! Cocoa Beach
(near Disney) $179! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
LIVING ROOM furniture in good con-
dition. Neutral colors. Includes sofa
bed. loveseat, chair, and ottoman.
$400. 754-2553.
AKC MIN. Schnauzer. 13 weeks old.
female, black and silver. $300. Call
355-3183.
SERVICES
JASMINE GARDENS 2 bedroom. 1
bath, all appliances, free cable, small
pets. $410 per month Wainright Prop-
erty Management 756-6209.
SIZE DOES Matter! Biggest break
package Best price from $29.
WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM. 1-
800-224-GULF
ONE BEDROOM for sublease Pirate's
Cove $375. Includes cable, utilities,
own bathroom. Will neg. call (919) 851-
1677 or (919)549-2278 ask for Paul or
Len.
! -WESLEY COMMON SOUTH:
1 or 2 bed rooms, 1 bath, range,
refrigerator, free watersewer.
washerdryer hookups, laundry;
facilities, 5 blocks from campus.i
ECU bus services.
NOW PRELEASING
FOR JANUARY
-All Properties have 24 hr emergency i
maintenance- Call 758-1921 i
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CAROLINA SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5.50 hour plus bonuses.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212. M-TH between the
hours of 3-6pm.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED for small
law firm of 4 attorneys: full-time or
part-time. If interested, please call 758-
4257 or fax resume to 758-9282.
LIFEGUARDWATER SAFETY
tant needed to work at therapy pool
TuesdayThursday 8am-3pm at PCMH
please call 321-1214.
BROWSE ICPT.COMWIN aTREE trip
for Springbreak "2000 ALL destina-
tions offered. Trip Participants, Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or Rep registration call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
HELP WANTED: Resident Crisis Coun-
selor position. Free rent, utilities,
etcplus monthly stipend in exchange
for employment. Training available at
REAL. For more information call 758-
HELP. 600 East 11th Street. Greenville
NC 27858.
$200 MILLION is spent on advertis-
ing tactics aimed at YOU! Want a
piece! Log onto www.TeamMag-
ma.com for information on how to
earn money now.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting part-
time youth In-Lme Hockey coaches.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have the
ability and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18, in hockey fun-
damentals. This program will run from
late February to mid-May. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. Applications
will be taken until the positions are
filled. For more information please call
Judd Crumpler. Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2pm.
WAIT, HOST and bus staff needed
for friendly and fun work environment.
Must have some morning week day
availability. Experience helpful but not
necessary. Pick up application @ Ba-
sil's Restaurant on Firetower Rd.
WANTED: PAYING $6.50hr. plus
bonuses for qualified telemarketers.
No Friday or Saturday work. Hours
4:30-9 p.m. Monday-Wednesday:
3:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Call Energy Sav-
ers Windows & Doors. Inc. at 758-
8700 for appointment.
HELP WANTED
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the
Spring Youth Soccer Program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the abili-
ty and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18. in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are form 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from early March
to early May. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more information
please call Ben James. Michael Daly
or Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after 2
�pm.
OTHER
The East Carolinian
ads@studentmedia.ecu.0du
OTHER
PACTOLUS RESCUE Squad needs
volunteer EMTs. Any hours will be
helpful day or night. Building has
sleeping quarters, kitchen facilities, sit-
ting area with TV and meeting room
ideal for college students to study.
Please contact Jerry Mizell at 946-
0672 or Carolyn Lee at 762-0837.
SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $76 &
up per person, www. retreatmyrtle-
beach.com 1-800-645-3618.
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
Jamaica, Bahamas & Florida. Best pric-
es guaranteed! Free parties & cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endlesssummer-
tours.com
COURTYARD TAVERN is hiring
cooks, waitstaff and bartenders. Ap-
ply M-F 2-4 must be available for 2
weekday lunches.
GREENVILLE UTILITIES Commission
Employment Opportunity. Temporary
PT Engineering Technician. Temporary
position available for person to work
twenty hours per week, Monday
through Friday, in the Water Resourc-
es Engineering Section. This position
will involve reading and interpreting
maps and preparing databases and
spreadsheets. Qualified candidate
should have completed one year of col-
lege level course work in engineering,
geography, or computer related field.
Ability to read and interpret maps re-
quired. Possession of a valid North Car-
olina driver's license is also required.
Applications accepted through Janu-
ary 28. 2000. Salary $8.00hour. Em-
ployment is contingent upon passing
a physical examination including a
drug screening urinalysis. To ensure
consideration, a completed Greenville
Utilities' application must be received
in the Human Resources Office. Con-
tact the Human Resources Office, PO
Box 1847, Greenville, NC 27835 (200
Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive) or call
(252) 551-1513.
PERSONALS
WWW.THECOMMENTATOR.COM
GREEK PERSONALS
i.
1 opemj
B
orrtQermv,
�jj
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
HELP WANTED
NOTETAKER. GET smarter by getting
paid to take notes in class. Versity.com
is now hiring notetakers for more than
fifty of next semester's classes. Earn
$8-$14class. Apply online �
www.versity.com
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house one block from cam-
pus. Rent 160 a month plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Amanda 413-6953.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share new-
ly renovated 3 bedroom duplex. Eve-
rything is new. Includes new applianc-
es. 4 car port, washer and dryer, all
for only $275mo. Call 321-6446(d)
329-0709(n).
SUBLEASER WANTED from Febru-
ary to July in Pirates Cove apts. Fully
furnished, all utilities included, wash-
er and dryer, cable TV, $375 a month.
Bedroom and bathroom. Call 931-
9425.
$$� TUTORS NEEDEDSSS Looking
for some extra money (best pay on
campus) and a way to improve aca-
demically? Do you have a 3.0 or bet-
ter GPA? Become a tutor for the Of-
fice of Student Development-Athletics.
We need individuals capable of tutor-
ing classes from Accounting to Zoolo-
gy. Undergraduate students are paid
six dollars ($6) an hour and graduate
students are paid seven dollars ($7)
an hour. Does this sound like the job
for you? If so. join us for one of our
orientation meetings in 236B Ward
Sports Medicine Building (behind
Minges Coliseum) on either 119. 1
20. 125 or 126 at 5pm. questions?
Need more information? Contact Isha
Williams at 328-4691 for further infor-
mation.
FUN & free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pictures
to give to your family or boyfriend? I
enjoy shooting pictures of young wom-
en for my portfolio. If you model for
me, I will give you free pictures. Repu-
table amateur photographer. Referenc-
es available (I've photographed dozens
of ECU girls). Please send a note,
phone number and a picture (if avail-
able - it will be returned) to Paul Hron-
jak, 4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson, NC
27893 or call 252-237-8218 or e-mail
me at hronjak@simflex.com. You can
also check my website at www.sim-
flex.comusershronjak
4-5 tennis instructorattendants need-
ed at Greenville Recreation & parks
dept. For winter and spring. $5.15-
5.75 per hour. Tennis teaching experi-
ence needed. Call 329-4559.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for the
summer season. Will train, no experi-
ence necessary! Fill out the applica-
tion at www.nsbslifeguards.com-
Email-dudes@nsbslifeguards.com or
call (843) 272-3259.
THE SISTERS of Alpha Phi would like
to congratulate Jennifer Johnson.
Becky Gunn. and Kim Lewis on their
engagements. We wish you all the
best of luck.
PHI PSI would like to congratulate
their newly elected officers: Rob Smith-
President. Bob Smith- Vice President.
Matt Ensley- Corresponding Secretary.
John Batchelor- Recording Secretary.
Aaron Harris- Messenger. David Buc-
ci- sargent-at-arms. and GW Barker-
chaplain. Good luck guys, we know
you'll do a great job.
BRIOITTe, CABANAS ve.ry cool-
once you put your mind to it you can
do anything! Now lets work on that
GPA. I am so proud of you. love your
Big Sis.
KAPPA ALPHA Lambda Chi Alpha.
Alpha Qmicron Pi, the quad was a
blast! We'll have to do it again soon.
Love Alpha Phi.
ZETA, THANKS for helping us spend
our money at the social last Thursday!
We can't wait to do it again! Love, the
Brothers of Phi Psi.
FEDEX GROUND Packaae Handlers
A.M. sort positions starting at $7.50hr
Guarenteed Periodic Advances. Apply
at 2410 United De. Greenville, NC
27834 (Off Staton Rd.)
ZETA TAU Alpha is having open rush
parties for all ladies interested 126
and 127 at 5:30pm. Call 757-1811 for
info and rides.
A SPECIAL congratulations to Marie
Davis of Zeta Tau Alpha and Daniel
Knight of Delta Chi on their engage-
ment. We love you both, sisters of Zeta
Tau Alpha
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apartment at Eastgate Village.
Two bedrooms, one bath. wd. balco-
ny. $242.50 month plus 12 utilities.
Call Stephanie at 830-0903.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share two
bedroom townhouse. $175, free ws
and 12 utilities. 756-7755.
RELIABLE DRIVER someone to drive
son to school Mon. Wed. Fri. pick him
up at their home at 8:00am. Also need
someone to help son with homework
Tues. & Weds. 4-6. Call 328-0007 or
355-4855.
HELP WANTED
Cook or Assistant Cook
Luptons Seafood Restaurant
14th & Greenville Blvd.
�752-4174
ARAMARK, AN international lead-
er in managed services, is hiring a part-
time graphicsmarketing asst. for ECU
dining services. Must have experience
with Illustrator. Macintosh. Pagemak-
er. Freehand. Word and Excel. Duties
include assisting marketing director
with research, special events and creat-
ing promotional materials, hours are
flexible 15-20 per week. Please apply
at Mendenhall Student Center or send
resume to Human Resources, PO Box
3295, Greenville, NC 27836.
WELCOME SIGMA class Love, your
Pi Delta sisters
ADMIN. ASSISTANTRECRUITER
$9.00 per hour
Great Opportunity
Large Research Company in Greenville is seeking a full-
time AdminRecruiter to recruit, interview, and staff
telephone surveyors.
Qualified candidate will possess
the following skills:
� MSWord and MSExcel (spreadsheets)
� Excellent oral and written
communication abilities
� Strong work ethic and
flexible work schedule
� Great organization skills
Fax vour resume todavll
Headway Corporate Staffing Service
Fax: (252) 641-4898
Attention: Greenville Recruiter
Spring Break 2000
CANCUN'JAMAICA'NASSAU
Space is limited
CALL TODAY
800-293-1443
www.StudentCity.com
canCOwdamaicaSahatnas
Soring Break trim wat 1 of G small busmtsttt tn the US m 19M to be
recojmred for outstarrtno. m by Council of Better Boane� Burwui'
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
5 dirt. Most Metis � F;w fartet � Includes Tues
Panama $139
City- Boardwalk, Holiday Inn Sunspree & More
Florida $149
1 Nights � Daytona. South Beach. Cocoa Bexh
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7 rights � Air Hotel � fret Food i 3C Hrs of Drinks
5pringbrcaktravcl.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
canCOh-Jamaica-Baiiattias
$n in $s?
ENDLESS
ACT NOW! LAST CHANCE TO RE-
SERVE YOUR SPOT FOR SPRING
BREAK) DISCOUNTS FOR 6 OR
MORE! SOUTH PADRE, CANCUN,
JAMAICA, BAHAMAS, ACAPUL-
CO, FLORIDA Er MARDI GRAS.
REPS NEEDEDTRAVEL FREE. 800-
838-8203WWW.LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
CALL NOW OR RESERVE ONLINE!
18002347007
www.endlesssummertours.com
SUMMER TRIP to Spain and Moroc-
co. Two weeks. First session 3-6 hours
credit. Scholarships, loans available.
For more information, leave name,
number at 328-4310 or mer-
cerc@mail.ecu.edu
ANNOUNCEMENTS
NOTE TAKING: The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on Janu-
ary 27. 1 30. If you are interested in
this workshop please call 328-6661.
BOOST YOUR Sell-Esteem: this one
session workshop will help you under-
stand how self esteem is developed
and how you can create a more posi-
tive sense of self. This workshop will
meet on Tuesday. Jan. 25 3:30. For
more information call 328-6661.
B-GLAD, bisexuals, gays, lesbians,
and allies for diversity, will hold their
first meeting of the semester Wed.
Jan. 26 at 7:30 in Mendenhall 248.
CHOOSING A major and a career:
This workshop is designed to help you
explore your interests, values, and abil-
ities to find out possible career and
major choices. You will learn effec-
tive tools in the greatest hunt of you
life. Contact the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development at 328-
6661 for more details. This workshop
meets every Thursday from 3:30-5.
GAMMA BETA Phi Society will meef
Thursday, January 27 at 5:30pm in
Mendenhall Great Rooms 1 & 2. For
more info: www.ecu.eduorggbp
GOLDEN KEY will meet today. Tues.
Jan 25 at 5:30 in GC 2019. Well dis-
cuss inductions, officer elections, and
semester activities. E-mail any ques-
tions to ecugkGhotmail.com
GREEKCYPRIOT-AMERICANS, if
you are an ECU student of Hellenic or
Cypriot descent that is interested in
meeting, socializing, and participaitng
in cultural activities with others, please
call or e-mail Eleftheria at 752-8004.
(elemantzo@yahoo.com) or Katerina at
353-5083. (katerinaOgreenvil-
lenc.com)
ADULT SWIM lessons. Beginner and
Intermediate. Beginner is designecLfpr
the non-swimmer to receive instruct
tion on basic stroke skills in a suppor-
tive, fun environment. Intermediate is
for the average swimmer to receive
instruction on intermediate stroke
skills, turns, and workouts. Cosj" is
$20mem-$30non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Feb.4. for more infor.
mation call 328-6387. "V.
TEST ANXIETY. Learn ways NOT to
stress over tests, including ways to
help you gain the grade you want. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on January 26. 11:00. If you
are interested in this program, contact
the center at 328-6661.
HAWKSNEST WEEKEND FEBRU-
ARY 5-6. this is the trip for those that
need a ski fix but can't afford those
normal resort prices, we will leave Sat.
morning and our first session wlffbe
night skiing 6pm-2am and then Jback
again Sun. morning at 9am. Cost is
$110mem-$130non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Jan.26, 5pm. Call 328-
6387 for more information.
STRESS MANAGEMENT: This one-
session workshop helps you explore
the causes of stress and the effect that
stress has on you. For more informa-
tion call 328-6661.
AREA CHURCH DIRECTORY
WELCOME COLLEGE
STUDENTS - FOR A RIDE
CALL 830-1186
CHRIST PRESBYTE-
RIAN CHURCH
4889 Old Tar Road
Winterville
355-9632
Services: 9:30 a.m. Sun.
JOIN US FOR A GOOD
BIBLE PREACHING.
FRIENDLY ATMOSPHERE. A
CHURCH THAT CARES
IMMANUEL FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
317 Vernon White Road
Winterville
756-2670
Services: 10, 11 a.m 6
p.m. Sun 7:30 p.m.
Wed.
DYNAMIC WORSHIP -
JOHN 4:24 DYNAMIC
MESSAGE - ACTS 2:38
FIRST UNITEB
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH
114 E. 11th Street
Greenville
757-3033
Services: 10 a.m 7:30
pm. Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.
WHERE GOD IS PRAISED.
LIVES ARE CHANGED &
FRIENDS ARE MADE!
CHURCH OF CHRIST
1700 SE Greenville Blvd.
Greenville
752-6376
Services: 9 & 10:15 a.m.
Sun 7 8- 8:30 p.m. Wed.
WE INVITE YOU TO OUR
SERVICES
SAINT JAMES UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
2000 E. 6th Street
Greenville
752-6154
Services: 8:30 & 11 a.m
Sun College Sunday
School class 9:45 a.m.
A MULTI-CULTURAL
CHURCH-CUTTING-EDGE
MUSIC-ACTIVE CAMPUS
MINISTRY
FAITH AND VICTOR
CHURCH
3950 Victory Lane
Greenville
355-6621
Services: 9 & 10:45 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
REACHING OUT WITH THE
CLAIMS OF CHRIST
FIRST FREE Will
BAPTIST CHURCH
2426 S. Charles Blvd.
Greenville
756-6600
Services: 9:45 a.m.
Sunday School, 11 a.m 7
p.m. Sun 10 a.m. & 7
p.m. Wed. Bible Study
COME AND SEE WHAT
GOD INTENDED CHURCH
TO BE
KOINONIA CHRISTIAN
CENTER CHURCH
408 Hudson Street
Greenville
752-1848
Services: 8 & 11 a.m.
Sun 7 p.m. Wed.
PIRATES WORSHIPPING
WITH PIRATES
UNITY FREE WILL
BAPTIST CHURCH
2725 E. 14th Street
Greenville
756-6485
Services: 8:30, 9:45, 11
a.m 6 p.m. Sun 6:30
p.m. Wed.
A WARM WELCOME
AWAITS YOU AT THE
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOD
GREENVILLE CHURCH
OF GOO
3105 S. Memorial Drive
Greenville
355-6595
Services: 9:45 a.m 6p.m.
Sun 7:30 p.m. Wed.





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I
SWASHBUCKLER
CARWASH
NOW
RE-OPEN!
Due to Hurricane Floyd
We have all NEW
car washing equipment!
(ON 14lh St. between Belk Dorm and Harris Teeter)
Gamma Chi Ensiton
ECU'S newest sorority invites
YOU to join us for RUSH 2000!
General Classroom building 1019
TUESPAY, JANUARY Z5: mm THAN SEX NI&HT!
WEPNKPAY, JANUARYS: IUAU NIGHT!
THURSDAY. JANUARY 17: RETRO NIGHT!
FRJPAY, JANUARY U: CLOSER RUSH. IwHatioM Only.
ore?.
,oo
C?b
For mor: info call Elizabeth @ 695-0520 or visit
http:www.arigelfire.conincZgammarudihtniJ
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at University of Tennessee, Knoxville,
TN, the weekend of Feb. 18-20,2000. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Bowling
Wed Jan. 26. 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)


Nine-Ball
Mon Jan. 31 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Chess
Sat Jan. 29 9:00 a,m,
Mendenhall Student Ce
Social Room

Table Tennis
5:00 p.m. Jan 2? &0Q p
Mendenhall Social Room
.m.
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline - Feb. 1, 6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
tournament. Registration forms are available at the Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards
Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center located on the ground floor of Mendenhall
Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the Student Recreation Center. Call the Recreation
Programs Office, 328-4738 for more information.
We're a textbook
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LET IT SI
Winter w
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 25, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 25, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1384
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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