The East Carolinian, January 20, 2000






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Volume 74, Issue 82
ECU TO HOST NC SYMPHONY
pg.6
Group blows their horns for children
TRACK PREPARES FOR NEW
CHALLENGES pg 8
Teams aim to continue success
THURSDAY, JANUARY 20. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Partly cloudy, high of 45
and a low of 25
52 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
- Racial discrimination reported downtown
LUNAR ECLIPSE
A lunar eclipse will take place tonight.
The eclipse will be starting its partial
phase at 10:01 p.m. EST. The total phase
will begin at 11:05 p.m. and end at 12:22
a.m.
CELEBRATE 2000
You can ring in the new millennium for
a second time at the Millennium Bash
sponsored by ABLE in Todd Dining Hall
from 10 p.m 2 a.m. tomorrow night. Cost
is $3 with a student ID and $5 for non-stu-
dents. Enjoy music by a professional DJ
along with free food and drinks.
RECEPTION
An opening reception for "The Line of
Movement and Shadow will be held from
6 p.m8 p.m. tomorrow in the Mendenhall
Student Center art gallery. Artist Keith
Moncus will be exhibiting wall reliefs and
three-dimensional pieces in the show con-
tinuing through January.
SYMPHONY
The North Carolina Symphony will per-
form at 4 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 23, in
Wright Auditorium. For ticket information
call (252) 328-1244.
SERVING DISABLED STUDENTS
A one-day training seminar sponsored
by Training Challenge-North Carolina
Project will be held from 9 a.m3 p.m. on
Saturday, Feb. 5 in Room 129 of the
Speight Building.
The training is open to all students,
teachers, parents, professionals and other
interested parties. Fees are not required,
but please call (252) 328-4247 to make a
reservation.
Individuals requiring accommodations
under the Americans with Disabilities Act
(ADA) should notify the university at least
two weeks prior to the event. Write the
Department for Disability Support Services
in A-117 Brewster Building or call (252)
328-6799 for more information.
CANCER AWARENESS
January is Colon Cancer Awareness
Month. The American Cancer Society rec-
ommends people should start getting
screened at the age of 50.
People with no family history of colon
cancer should have either a yearly fecal
occult blood test and a flexible sigmoidos-
copy and digital rectal exam every five
years, or a colonoscopy and digital rectal
exam every 5-10 years
To reduce your risk of colon cancer,
eat foods high in fiber and low in fat (fruits,
vegetables and whole grains) and exer-
cise regularly.
BANQUET
State Health Director Dr. Dennis
McBride will address attendees of the an-
nual Martin Luther King Jr. Recognition
Banquet. This event is an awards program
for students of The Brody School of Medi-
cine and will take place at 7 p.m. on Satur-
day, Jan. 22 at the Greenville Hilton.
ONLINE SURVEY
is there reason to suspect the
police ofmis reporting crimes?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Did you experience any problems related to
Y2K?
WYES 98NO
Allegations made
against popular dubs
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Alleged discrimination
against black students in down-
town clubs has finally been ad-
dressed by officials.
Dr. Garrie Moore, vice chan-
cellor of Student Life; City Man-
ager Ron Kimble; Charles
Hinman, chief of police; Earl
Phipps, head of Downtown Po-
lice Patrol; Les Robinson, attor-
ney for the Bar Association and
Mark Saieed, the owner Pantana
Bob's (PB's) met earlier this
month to discuss accusations of
discrimination
in some down-
town clubs
made by stu-
dents. Moore
continues to
keep an eye on
the situation.
Moore has
received 12 re-
ports from mi-
nority students
stating they
had not re-
ceived equal
treatment
from club
owners. Information courtesy of Dr. Garrie Moore, vice chancellor, Student Life
"I received the reports from dents, were not being treated as Hinman said he felt discrimina-
students and became very con- fairly as white students tlon was not the necessary word
cerned Moore said. "Students Moore said due to the exces- to use.
claimed that they, as black stu- sive amount of reports providing "I do not agree with the dis-
Reports of Racism in Downtown Clubs
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Pantana Bob's The Sports Pad
Clubs
The Cellar Unspecified
similar ac- crimination allegations
counts of stu- Hinman said. "I was toid students
dents being were turned away due to their at-
denled en- tire, not their race. I felt the meet-
trance into ing went well and everyone left
clubs, he on a positive note
called Kimble Moore also said the meeting
to update him went well, but he thought that
on the events discrimination was the reason for
going on the meeting,
downtown. "All present at the meeting
Moore said were very respective and con-
Kimble helped cerned with the accusations of
him set up a discriminating against minori-
meeting with ties Moore said,
downtown According to Moore,
club owners. Robinson said actions would be
Chief taken to put the alleged discrimi-
nation to an end.
"1 felt Robinson was con-
See RACISM, page 2
Let it snow!
Facelift in future
for ECU home page
Web committee seeks
input on new site
I
After Tuesday's class cancellations, freshman Kate Neal (front, right) and her friend
Becky Jordan took time to create a full-size snowman at the bottom of College Hill,
(photo by Emily Richardson)
Terra Steinbeiser
. NEWS EDITOR
The university Web site is in
the process of being redesigned
for easier use by students, faculty
and staff.
The University Web Commit-
tee (UWC), the group respon-
sible for this project, was estab-
lished last fall to begin the long
and involved process of upgrad-
ing such a large web site. The
committee is made up of faculty
and staff members from the dif-
ferent academic departments
and experts from Computing
and Information Systems (CIS).
In order to make the project
more manageable, the UWC is
divided into five subcommittees
who meet on a regular basis. The
subcommittees are Design and
Navigation, Performance and Us-
ability Metrics, Content and Pro-
gram Mechanisms, Publicity and
Policies and Guidelines and Le-
gal Authentication. Each of these
subcommittees work separately,
but meet together every month
to report progress to the UWC
as a whole.
Although making the site
easier to navigate is the UWC's
main goal, they do have other
things on their agenda.
"There is great interest in giv-
ing the whole site a consistent
look and feel throughout all of
the pages said Ernie
Marshburn, director of CIS.
"Right now most of the pages
have their own look. We'd like
to get to the point where we have
one voice, one university, one
web page
Another big goal for the site
is using it to market the
university's legions of educa-
tional opportunities but keeping
it functional at the same time,
according to Leslie Craigle, chair
of the publicity subcommittee.
Marshburn said that getting
user feedback is one of the most
important processes in the rede-
sign of the web site.
"We'll be sending out e-maiJs
very soon giving students and
faculty the opportunity to give
us feedback and input on the ini-
tial draft designs Marshburn
said. "The users have to like it or
they won't use it, and that won't
do us any good
The UWC does not have a
definite date when the rede-
signed site will be ready for full
time use yet.
"We are making headway,
considering it's such a long and
involved process Marshburn
said. "I encourage everyone to
help us out by giving us feed-
back
Updates on the project can be
accessed on-line at www.ecu.edu
uwc.
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Pharmacy school new possibility for university
Pharmacists needed
in eastern NC
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
A school of pharmacy may
become part of the ECU family
due to the increased need for
pharmacists in our region.
According to Dr. Ann Jobe,
senior associate dean of Aca-
demic Affairs, the idea of ECU
getting this new academic addi-
tion is still in the preliminary
stages.
The Board of Trustees said
Jobe gave the concept of a phar-
maceutical school their endorse-
ment based on Dr. Jack Cole's
consultant report stating trie
need for pharmacists in eastern
North Carolina.
Jobe said a group of eight pro-
fessionals from the School of
Medicine, allied health and the
university have developed docu-
ments that request permission to
plan the foun-
dation of a
pharmaceuti-
cal school.
"It will be a
long and
drawn out pro-
cess Jobe
said. "Recently
we got permis-
sion from the
Board of Trust-
ees to put
documents to-
gether discuss-
ing plans for a
pharmacy
school. In my
opinion it's too
soon to tell
whether this
will be a reality
or not. 1 believe it is feasible, but
right now we are in the explor-
ing mode, meaning we are dis-
cussing the region and cost of
possible faculty, buildings and
space
Jobe said that once the pre-
liminary plans go through the
Due to the dire need for pharmacists in this region, the BOT approved the
plan for a pharmacy school at ECU. (photo from World Wide Web)
Board of Trustees it will then
have to be passed by the UNC
system Board of Governors.
Fred Parham, professor of
chemistry and a pre-pharmacy
adviser, said he supports the con-
cept of a pharmaceutical school.
"I believe the chances of ECU
getting of
pharmacy
school are very
feasible he
said. "It is defi-
nitely a dream
which can be-
come reality
because we are
in dire need of
pharmacists.
Not only in
eastern North
Carolina, but
throughout
the United
States. We
need the cor-
rect facilities
to properly
train students
so they can go
out and fill the available posi-
tions
Professors in various depart-
ments recognize the lack of phar-
macists in our area.
"At the moment, many stu-
dents graduate from ECU as
chemistry majors and become
pharmacists said Chia-Yu Li
professor and chair of the chem-
istry department. "Currently
there is a shortage of pharmacists
and I believe our institution ii
ready for a pharmacy school
Currently, the only pharma-
ceutical schools in North Caro-
lina are at the University of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill and
Campbell University.
Jobe said the pharmacy
schobl will be aimed at serving
those in eastern North Carolina.
"Though we have not gotten
the full go ahead from the uni-
versity, if and when ECU gets a
pharmaceutical school its gradu-
ates will be aimed at serving our
region, just like the School of
Medicine aims at doingJobe
said.
This writer can be contacted at
ahame@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
attaati





Z The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
www.attic-niqhtclub.com
Thursday, Jan. 20, 20001
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
RACISM
from page 1
cerned about the issues discussed
anjd was very serious about taking
action Moore said. "Robinson
agreed to talk to all club owners. He
claimed to set standards for all clubs
where all will be treated fairly. Sup-
posedly all students with their stu-
dent ID and proper attire will be ad-
mitted
Proper attire is a subjective term,
however.
"I was told attire varies from club
to club Moore said. "Though it was
anonymous that sunglasses and
baggy pants were not permitted
Representatives of The Cellar,
which had one report filed against
it; denied discriminating against
anyone.
; A worker at The Cellar who
wished to remain anonymous said
proper attire is at the bouncer's dis-
cretion, though he said it does not
vary from night to night or person
to. person. He said hats needed to
be worn correctly, and pants could
not be baggy due to the possible
concealment of weapons or booze.
A student whose name was with-
held claimed she once went to The
Cellar with her friends, and a male
student with them was wearing his
hat backward and was asked to leave
because it referred to a gang sym-
bol. She also said that she person-
ally has seen The Cellar deny ma-
rines entrance into the club.
One student said marines
needed to be banned from clubs due
to their improper actions.
"Marines seem to be the ones to
the start the bar fights and cause
chaos throughout the clubs said
freshman Brooke Harrison. "They
overstep the lines of flirting and it
is truly unnecessary
According to staff at The Cellar,
they had been informed by
Robinson about the new standards
now in play and the accusations
against them.
The Cellar would not further dis-
cuss the issue.
PB's has received eight reports of
alleged discrimination acts, but the
owner, Saieed, was unable to be con-
tacted.
According to Moore, Saieed
seemed concerned with the accusa-
tions at the meeting and said he
would make a special effort to talk
to all of his employees.
Moore said Saieed promised he
would take immediate action and
discuss the issue with other club
owners.
How much has actually been ac-
complished remains to be seen.
"I feel the new year will bring
change Moore said. " But one can't
be too sure until time passes by, for
only time will tell
Moore said that if the discrimi-
nation continues he needs to be in-
formed immediately by students so
actions can be taken to the next
level.
"I informed students to make
me aware of any continued dis-
crimination Moore said. "If I re-
ceive any more reports I will be con-
tacting Robinson the minute it's in
my hand. Students need to be sure
reports are very informative with
the club's name, the date, the time,
the situation and, if possible, the
bouncer's name
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
CRIME SCENE
January 14
Assist Rescue�A student was
transported to Univ. Medical Cen-
ter after being found unconscious
on the Tenth Street and Founder's
Drive sidewalk. Once EMS and of-
ficers arrived student became com-
bative and had to be restrained.
Larceny�A staff member re-
ported that 10 fans, as well as parts
to a shelving system were stolen
from a room in the Life Sciences
Bldg. at Brody.
Second Degree Trespassing�A
non-student was arrested for second
degree trespassing after a staff mem-
ber observed him attempting to
steal food items at the Outpatient
Center.
January 15
Intoxicated Student�A student
reported that he found another stu-
dent adjacent to College Hill Drive
in an intoxicated state. The student
was transported to PCMH.
January 16
Auto Larceny�A student re-
ported that his vehicle was stolen
from the north side of Slay Hall.
Possession of Marijuana�Resi-
dents of a room in Belk Hall were
issued Campus Appearance Tickets
(CAT) after officers responded to a
fire alarm. It was found during a
consent search that marijuana
smoke set off the alarm.
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It's Your Place
.To Be Scared
JAN. 20-22 AT 7:30 P.M. AND JAN. 23 AT 3 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Stigmata A supernatural thriller that will scare the hell into you. You and a guest
get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
.To Catch a Free Flick
JAN. 20 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Buena Vista Social Club This ground-breaking documentary, inspired by the Grammy-
winning album, The Buena Vista Social Club, chronicles the lives of these famous
Cuban jazz musicians. You and a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU
One Card.
To Strut Your Stuff
JAN. 22 AT 10 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Written a new song or poem lately? If you've got some-
thing to say and need a place to say it - Open Mic Night
is the place. To sign-up for the limelight, call 328-4715. If
you're more into watching than performing, there's free
dessert, coffee, and billiards for all. Your valid ECU One
Card gets you and a guest in free.
To Win Phat CASH
JAN. 23 AT 6 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
You know the lingo, well now its time to BINGO. Bingo Night is fun for everyone,
especially when there is cash involved. But no need to bring cash to play - Bingo
Night is FREE to all ECU students with a valid ECU One Card.
.To Explore Exotic Places
JAN. 25 AT 4 P.M. AND 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Join John Wilson as he explores the mystical islands of Galapagos in his film,
Galapagos - Islands Lost in Time. You can add an optional tantalizer to this excur-
sion by purchasing a ticket for the theme dinner. Get your film tickets for free at the
Central Ticket Office by showing your valid ECU One Card. Dinner tickets may be
purchased for $12 using either your meal plan, declining balance, or cash and must
be reserved by Jan. 20.
.To laugh Out loud
JAN. 26 AT 7:30 P.M. AND JAN. 27 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Opposite of Sex A sneakily romantic road comedy featuring an in-your-face-white-
trash vixen, who at sixteen has already generated enough scandal for an entire
trailer park. You and a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Rock With Britain's Best
JAN. 28 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Get ready to experience one of the hottest bands on Britain's
live circuit today. Although sponsored by the S Rudolph
Alexander Performing Arts Series, this is not your average per-
forming arts concert. This gig will rock with a mix of traditional
Irish tunes and contemporary beats. This show will sell out so
get your advance discounted tickets now by showing your valid
ECU One Card at the Central Ticket Office. All tickets at the
door tickets will be full price.
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NEWS
The East Carolinian 3
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
Eastgate Shopping Ctr.
Walk In or Appt.
JVIon.�Fri. 9�6
Washington State U.�The
ski slopes he knew and loved
proved fatal for another WSU
student over Winter Break.
Brandon "Bean" Barton died
Dec. 27, five days after hitting a
tree on Slalom, an intermediate
level run at Ski Bluewood ski
area near Dayton, Wash. He was
the second WSU student to die
on a ski slope in the last few
weeks.
"He had worked at Ski
Bluewood in high school and
while going to community col-
lege said Kayla Kirk, Barton's
mother. "He grew up skiing
there; he knew that mountain
top to bottom
Barton, 23, was going about
SO miles per hour when he
struck a tree, according to Casey
Casseday, who was skiing with
Barton.
"He had gone over a jump and
caught an edge which threw him
into the snow; then he bounced
into a tree Kirk said.
"He was in a coma from the sec-
ond he hit the tree Kirk said. "He
never regained consciousness
Barton was taken to St. Mary
Medical Center in Walla Walla,
Wash where he died.
"He died doing what he loved
said Jason Emery, a friend of Barton.
Shawn Frisbee, another friend,
agreed.
"I'm sure if you asked Bean,
there'd be no other way he'd want
to go Frisbee said.
Barton, a senior in Natural Re-
source Management, loved the out-
doors.
"He started fishing when he was
a little, tiny thing; he liked all the
outdoors and that's how he spent
all his time Kirk said. "He was ei-
ther at the river fishing or at the
mountain four wheeling or skiing
According to Kirk, Barton spent
a semester in 1998 with the Oregon
State Department of Fisheries at
Hermiston, Ore and La Grande,
Ore working on a genetic fish
project.
"The main thing about Bean was
he loved the outdoors and he was
always happy Emery said. "He al-
ways had that big grin on his face
Barton's friends had a joke about
his trademark smile.
"We used to say that if you
punched him in the face he'd still
smile Frisbee said.
"It seemed like God needed a
smiling face and Bean was the one
to do it said Jason Cooper, a friend
of Barton.
Barton's ashes will be scat-
tered on Blue Mountain on
March 21, Barton's birthday in
honor of his love for the out-
doors.
"He is just a guy who loved
the outdoors, loved people and
loved life Cooper said.
Barton's memorial service
was held Dec. 30 at first Chris-
tian Church in Dayton, Wash
where he grew up.
The service was standing
room only, Frisbee and Cooper
said.
"He touched the lives of ev-
eryone he came in contact
with Cooper said. "He was
amazing
I N'
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0;
Terra Steinbei
Susan Wright,
Emily Richard:
Dan Cox, Web
downtov
we are aw
It is no li
the rum
expecte
and we're
OPINIOI
Possib
I saw on the i
tists have success
ground-breaking
given a very stupi
through as far as 1
concerned, since
about a two perc
less if the human
see the first cloni
tickets now kiddie
a steel cage matcl
I am for clonir
immediate future
as the long term,
lical proportions,
bothered by this'
up production lir
kid's dead goldfisl
Questions do
someone, who sh
the first copied? SI
a senator? Or a fan
ing be sponsored
with all the religk
other religious ilk
sleep about all thi
take God's ability
form the same mi
more and we wor
turn out the way
opiNior
it
Maybe it is jusl
not escape my bod
probably point ou
causes me the mc
Well, I trust peopl
lief that everyone
I believe that v
choose the right t
decision to make,
understanding, ca
God, how that noi
Call me the eti
or just downright:
the holidays, the n
would help anyon
Some rough an
the street and aske
get a meal (aka Col
a few bucks and d
prehension in givii
in the fact that he
would if in his shoe
did he do? Walk ri
and get himself soi
that others would;
What literally
the span of 24 hoi





Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian 8
opinion@studentmedia.ecB.edu
easI Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Dan Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILIec@studenlmediaecu.edj
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Editorial Board members The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
for decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent by e-mail to editor@studentrnedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366.
Whatever the reason,
downtown should know that
we are aware of this problem.
HeV Eaw Can YooRelieve it
EARLl THooCtNT VoO QOiTSrtOttAlfc.
OURVIEW
It is no longer just a shot off
the rumor mill, ignored and
expected We are onto you,
and we're coming to get you.
It's one of the first stories heard off the rumor mill when you were a
freshman: Downtown clubs exclude minorities. Some will tell you that it's
just a myth, but many people see it happening each week. Everyone be-
comes a believer sooner or later.
Most clubs use the dress code as an excuse. Ten scantily-clad Cauca-
sian girls can pass under a sign that says, "No tank tops but the first
African-American male to show up wearing a jersey is turned around and
sent elsewhere.
Sometimes they use the membership ruse. "You can't get in if you're
not a member But does anyone actually know a member of any club
downtown?
The point is, it happens. Of course the clubs won't say it's racial bias,
and they get away with claiming other reasons for turning out minorities,
but we know what's going on. You can see it when you look around
inside clubs and notice how few dark-skinned faces you see.
Perhaps the owners are afraid of developing a reputation for being a
"black club Maybe they fear gang violence down here in tiny Greenville.
It could be they just don't like African-Americans.
Whatever the reason, downtown should know that we are aware of
this problem. It is no longer just a shot off the rumor mill, ignored and
expected. We are onto y8u, and we're coming to get you.
OPINION COLUMN
Hey AOL, $21.95 for a busy signal?
OPINION COLUMN
Possibility of human cloning excites one weirdo
Chris Sachs
OPINION WRITER
I saw on the news last week that American scien-
tists have successfully cloned a monkey and like all
ground-breaking biological science the subject was
given a very stupid name: Tetra. This is a major break-
through as far as the ability to create a human being is
concerned, since a monkey and a human are only
about a two percent difference in DNA. (Sometimes
less if the human has been drinking.) I think we will
see the first cloning of a human very soon. Get your
tickets now kiddies. Darwin and God are about to have
a steel cage match.
I am for cloning. I don't see massive dangers in the
immediate future from cloning so I say go for it. As far
as the long term, well that will be a nightmare of Bib-
lical proportions. But by then I will be dead and not
bothered by this whole mess. So copy away folks! Set
up production lines and clone everything from your
kid's dead goldfish all the way to porn stars.
Questions do arise, however: If we are to clone
someone, who should it be? Who will be chosen to be
the first copied? Should we clone a movie star? Or clone
a senator? Or a famous artist? And should the first clon-
ing be sponsored by Kinko's? And how will this play
with all the religious folk? I am sure the pope and the
other religious ilk are pulling their hair out and losing
sleep about all this cloning business. We are about to
take God's ability to create in his own image and per-
form the same miracle. (Except our process costs a lot
more and we won't drown our subjects if they don't
turn out the way we want them to).
Now I know president Whatshisname has banned
government funding for human cloning research, but
when has this ever stopped anything of Importance?
Popular scientists are everywhere and they will scrounge
oTjfAhe capital from private investors and get the job
done anyway.
As in every good science fiction story, which clon-
ing has emerged from, there are bad guys out there
who will want to use the ability for their own dastardly
deeds. What about the dumb people � the rich? Mil-
lionaire old ladies will want to dig up their old dead
cats and have "Muffin" brought back to a boring old
life. Old fading Wall Street barons will want to clone
themselves so their idiot step-sons won't inherit their
illegal stock portfolios. What about the tree huggers?
Will they want to clone John Denver and Jerry Garcia
and have thousand of peace freaks sitting on the roof
of the capital smoking avocado peels and wondering
whether trees dream? Will the Mormons in Utah want
to clone themselves so they have a bigger voice to chant
"our Jesus is better than your Jesus?
This whole cloning business is a gas to watch. This
will lead to major ethical and sociological problems in
the future that will make Roe vs. Wade look like an
episode of "Judge Judy I am gonna enjoy watching
all this unravel in the next couple of decades and I
think it will become one of the most important issues
this species will ever have to deal with. But until all
hell breaks loose, I will continue the cloning that has
given meaning to my life and to those around me: clon-
ing cash with my laser printer.
This writer can be contacted at
csachs@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Mark Larado
OPINION WRITER
If you're like me, you're tired of America Online
because you're unable to sign on to it at a decent hour.
For me, I can usually only sign on around 11 p.m.
Recently, AOL and Time Warner merged creating
a company worth over $300 billion. With all of this
new capital, can't they spare a little to create a new
access number?
Greenville alone holds over 50,000 people within
its boarders, then adding the outlying towns of Ayden,
Winterville and Kinston to the Greenville number cre-
ates more congestion than one can deal with. So the
competition at night to get online is a lot like clowns
attempting to fill a midget car, sometimes it happens,
sometimes it doesn't.
So what can we do? Some people I have talked to
have left AOL for the small local Internet service pro-
viders popping up all over town, who promise instant
connection. But after switching most of these same
people complain about the more difficult interfaces
that some of these ISPs have and they are still receiv-
ing busy signals at dial-up.
I have heard from a lot of you that you have e-
mailed AOL about this problem. Personally, when I
tried it I received a lame, generically generated e-mail
containing a "Thank you for your concern yet I
haven't seen any results.
AOL claims that last October it reached the 20 mil-
lion member mark, but I fear that with this great ex-
pansion they are losing touch with the small commu-
nities they helped wire years ago. To them, Greenville
and our problems are just a minor blip on their screens.
For now we have to sit patiently and wait, unless
by some miracle, they listen up and respond to our
plight. Maybe with this new merger the Greenville area
will receive cable modems, which are faster, much like
the ones already used in Charlotte and parts of north-
ern Virginia. But until that time, we are just slaves to
the new Big Brother.
This writer can be contacted at
mlarado@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Taking on the elements to get to class
Leigh Murphy
OPINION WRITER
OPINION COLUMN
It's hard to know who to trust anymore
What does it take to cancel classes at ECU? Obvi-
ously last semester we Suffered a horrible encounter
with Mother Nature and were forced to stay home.
However, when places start to close in and around
Greenville due to weather, it makes you wonder if we,
ECU students and employees, need to be out driving
around either.
I realize that it is early in the new semester and it's
a problem to cancel classes, but unfortunately we do
have to look out for our fellow pirates and consider
the severity of the driving conditions.
Tuesday morning I was on my way from to school
after work and had trouble sliding all over the roads. I
hated the fact that I had to call my teacher and tell
him that I was not coming to class, but what else was I
supposed to do?
I am sure he must have thought that it was just a
way to get out of class. But, the roads were bad enough
to cancel Pitt County schools, yet we were expected to
take them on to get to morning classes.
Why is it that the county will close the public
schools but the university will uphold expectations for
attendance? I understand that there is an allotted num-
ber of hours and class meetings that have to be held
and that puts pressure on everyone to fulfill that policy,
but what about safety?
I think that if the roads and the weather condi-
tions are too dangerous for travel, then the many
people that live off campus commuting to school ev-
ery day should be taken into consideration. There are
days when it is simply too hazardous to attend.
I know this might not be the most popular way to
look at it, but when I get up for school and see that the
public schools and other facilities are not opening, I
really think about whether or not I should try to com-
bat the elements.
According to the Office of Planning and Institu-
tional Research, there were a total of 18,223 students
enrolled at ECU, of those, 13,270 were commuters.
These numbers reflect the fact that during inclement
weather, a large portion of our students have to deal
with driving and might not attempt to go to class if
the rest of the county isn't trying either.
I am not saying that once Pitt County shuts djiwn.
ECU should also, I just feel as though more consider-
ation should be paid since two-thirds of the popula-
tion commutes to class.
. None of us want to miss class, but none of us should
be asked to take any unnecessary risks to attend either.
This writer can be contacted at
lmurphy@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Patrick McMahon
OPINION WRITER
Maybe it is just me, but I have a flaw that just will
not escape my body. I know, I know, you people could
probably point out dozens of flaws in me but this one
causes me the most trouble. The problem, you ask?
Well, I trust people too much and have a strange be-
lief that everyone on the planet is basically good.
I believe that when push comes to shove, people
choose the right thing to do even if it is the hardest
decision to make. 1 expect people to be generous and
understanding, caring and compassionate. Oh dear
God, how that notion is flawed.
Call me the eternal optimist, a goodie-two-shoes
or just downright stupid, but up until a little trip over
the holidays, the notion of goodness guided my day. I
would help anyone out of a jam. ?
Some rough and tumbled hobo came up to me on
the street and asked for a couple of dollars so he could
get a meal (aka Colt 45) and what did 1 do? Hand him
a few bucks and direct him to Wendy's. I felt no ap-
prehension in giving him the money because I trusted
in the fact that he would do the right thing, just as 1
would if in his shoes. I watched him carefully and what
did he do? Walk right across the street into Wendy's
and get himself some grub. It made me feel confident
that others would act the way he did. Until Mobile
What literally changed my outlook on people in
the span of 24 hours happened in Mobile, Ala. while
some friends and I were down there for the bowl game
(a.k.a. "ghetto stadium) We were all downtown on
Dauphin Street waiting for our cab when a well-dressed
man came up to my friend Goo and asked him for a
couple of dollars so he could get a cab ride home.
As I walked up, he went into this long story about
how this and that prevented him from doing that and
this. Naturally, I felt sorry for the man and gave him
2o bucks. I know that may sound stupid but this guy
looked right out of a J. Crew catalog and those Long
Island I drank.
The man took down our hotel and promised to get
back to me the next day to pay me back a whopping
$100. The guy never followed through on his word. I
trusted him and where did it get me? Twenty dollars
in the hole, that's where. My friends have yet to let
me live this down (just ask me about "Moron Money)
I find it truly sad that this man's actions have so
changed my outlook on people. I don't trust many
people anymore and for that alone, I hope that man
ODs on the crack he bought with my money.
Some obviously needy guy came up to me down-
town the other week and I damn near hit the man. It
just made me furious. How sad is it that you cannot
trust anyone anymore? What ever happened to hon-
esty? Maybe it's just a sign of the times but for my
sanity's sake, I hope not.
This writer can be contacted at
omcmahon@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
D. Miccah Smith
OPINION WRITER
OPINION COLUMN
How Miccah feels about everything
really necessary to keep three wildly expensive con-
struction projects going on simultaneously? Am I just
being idealistic when I dream of a time when every-
body will be happy with the way things are?
1 wonder how many T-shirts the average college
student collects over a four-year period. I've noticed
how easily we students are manipulated by offers of
free T-shirts from banks and credit card companies.
Heck, our own school even uses our insatiable lust
for free T-shirts to aid its own ends. I mean, who would
go to those wacky pool parties if not for the shirts? I
sure wouldn't! But just to bolster my argument, I'll
admit that I not only hurled my body into icy waters
at the SRC Polar Bear jump for a T-shirt, I also did it
again for a second one!
I'm convinced that we're all subjects in some
twisted Pavlovian experiment designed to condition
us to perform for T-shirts, as a way of strengthening
our cotten-based economy. But when I think really hard
about it, my brain starts to hurt! I rest my case.
My name is Miccah Smith. Some of you may know
me as "hey, you I am readily ident'fiable by my hair,
which is an astonishing shade of mermaid blue.
That said, I'd like you all to know how 1 feel about
things. This is my one chance, so I'm making it count.
I'll start with the '80s, which happens to be my
favorite decade. I can only insist that, contrary to state-
ments made to the press by the Misfits, Jem was, in
fact, truly outrageous. Truly, truly, truly outrageous.
Now on to more modern issues, like campus con-
struction. Gosh knows, I'd love a brand-spankin' new
"Science and Technology Building" as much as the
next girl, but when held up next to both the Jarvis
renovations and the Student Health Building overhaul,
it's just too much to handle, aesthetically speaking
that is.
I've already resigned myself to death by strangula-
tion with orange plastic safety fencing, but now I can't
evendrive through a whole section of campus. Is it
This writer can be contacted at
msmitbpstudentmedia.ecujdu.





I The East Carolinian
wyvw.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Yoi
Barbie collection
worth a fortune
Lila Idso said goodbye to
Barbie, but hello to more than
�25,000.
Saturday Idso auctioned off
hundreds of Barbie dolls and
doll accessories she'd collected
over the last 20 years with her
daughter, proceeds from the
seven-hour auction will help
Idso buy a. new car, pay living
expenses and set up a trust for
her grandson.
The auction had no diffi-
culty attracting customers. Bids
came in from as far away as Cali-
fornia and Florida, e-mailed in
from Switzerland, phoned in
from Japan and more than 100
people showed up to bid in per-
son.
Idso and her daughter,
Bonnie, had searched garage
sales, estate sales and dolt shows
to build their collection.
Sometimes they scored big.
At a West St. Paul estate sate,
. they paid $15 for a new Barbie
; Midnight Color Magic, still in
; its box with tiny bags of hair
; dye. It brought in 51,900 at the
i auction.
Despite the profits, Idso said
; it was tough to part with her col-
' lection.
"We still like Barbie and hate
; to sell her, bur if s time to move
i on she said,
i Fire station closed
I safety violations
; A new $1 million fire station
i in West Virginia cannot open
because it is in violation of the
city's own fire code.
"It's kind of ironic said
Capt. Johnny Brotherton
Charleston fire prevention
chief.
Brotherton said that metal
studs go through the 6,600-
square-foot wood framed
, structure's fire wall, and the
aloor isn't adequately fire-
proofed.
f- Located in a newly devel-
oped business district, the prob-
;Jem must be fixed before the sta-
jjon can open for fire and am-
bulance service.
No cost estimate for the
Jwork was available, but the ex-
cuses are expected to be mlni-
jmal.
� "We're going to make it
�ight Brotherton said last
week. "We're going to treat our-
selves Just like we treat everyone
�lse
Brotherton attributed the
?oversight to the publicly funded
?project's exemption from city
ifees. A payment of the building
'permit fee normally would trig-
ger a review of the plans.
Wooden sculptures
get the boot
PALO ALTO, Calif. (AP)�
termites were the final critics of
J controversial wooden sculp-
ture that had been the target of
lyandals.
The sculpture of a man and
Jvoman walking their dog on a
$nch was a gift to Palo Alto
Jfrom its sister city in Llnkoping,
�weden. The statue survived
pore than a decade of humilia-
Jions including beheadings and
jpaintsplatterings.
The larger-than-life pastel-
colored work called "Foreign
friends" became infested with
(termites and was buried in the
iPalo Alto dump Thursday.
The wood sculpture set off
Controversy soon after its 1989
�debut with some people deem-
ing it ugly.
? in 1991, someone tried to set
Jheworkonfireandin 1993 the
jieads of both figures were
Shopped off and left in their
laps.
? The city replaced the heads,
Jnoved the sculpture to a new
location and pledged to consult
jieighbors on future art projects.
Internships bring real world knockin'
Co-op experience ups
chances of employment
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
Getting a job after college is al-
ways a trying and frustrating pro-
cess. But the Cooperative Education
Program is a good way to get a head
start in finding a job in your area of
specialty.
"Cooperative education is an
academic program that assists stu-
dents in finding career related
work said Lafry Donley, a coop-
erative education coordinator and
education specialist.
Kate Tomlmson works as a copy editor
for The East Carolinian, (photo by Emily
Richardson)
There are numerous internships
available out there for all different
fields of study.
Donley says that it is definitely
an advantage to have an internship
on your resume.
"The number one question em-
ployers ask prospective employees
is do you have work experience?"
Donley said. "Cooperative educa-
tion allows students to get that work
experience
For Tiffany Norton and Paul
Tucker, the Cooperative Education
Program was exactly what they
needed.
"My adviser recommended that
I complete at least one internship
and 1 ended up doing two Norton
said.
While she completed both of
her internships as a graduate stu-
dent, she recommends that most
students complete them during
undergraduate study.
"Doing an internship around
junior or senior year would be the
most beneficial because it will help
with your core classes in your ma-
jor
Tucker, a decision sciences
major, got involved by going to
the weekly cooperative education
meetings and talking with Mr.
Donley. He has been working in
technical support for the City of
Greenville.
"I would recommend this to
anyone who is looking for work
in their field of study. It's a great
opportunity Tucker said.
James Westmoreland works on a
different side of cooperative educa-
tion. He is involved with the Office
of Career Services.
"We want students to do intern-
ships as soon as possible
Westmoreland said. "We believe it is
helpful for students to have found
some kind of work experience in their
field
Although career services is prima-
rily for after students graduate,
Westmoreland said that they work
very closely with cooperative educa-
tion.
Students interested in cooperative
See Co-op, page 7
North Carolina Symphony fiddles around for kids
Orchestral group participates
in educating children
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
In 1932, the North Carolina Sym-
phony was founded by Pulitzer Prize-win-
ning composer Lamar Stringfield. In 2000,
the internationally renowned perfor-
mance group is known for its mastery of
music as well as its active participation in
the musical education of the children of
North Carolina.
The North Carolina Symphony will
perform five pieces from its classical se-
lections on Sunday, Jan. 23.
"We perform really great music from
the 'A' list said associate conductor Wil-
liam Henry Curry. "Because we only come
to Greenville onceor twice a year, we don't
have time for experimental or music on
the fringe of the repertoire
The program begins with Beethoven's
Overture to Coriolan, Op. 62. The over-
ture was inspired by a play that bears the
same title. �
"Beethoven is featured often because
his work is considered to be an integral
part of the classical repertoire Curry said.
"Everything is dramatic and turbulent
Mozart's Symphony No. 41 in C ma-
jor, K. 551, is a more serious piece by
Mozart, and according to Curry, it is the
most epic and greatest symphony he ever
wrote. Mozart was 32 when he wrote it,
and died less than three years later.
The third selection, Claude Debussy's
"Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun is a
contrast musically to the first two.
"This was the moment when modern
music was born Curry said. "Debussy
opens a door and suddenly there is a dif-
ferent mood and scene. Debussy's mu-
sic is similar in style to the French Impres-
The orchestra warms up prior to every performance, (photo courtesy of the North Carolina
Symphony)
sionists. It has a transparent, ethereal, dream-
like feel. It is a lazy afternoon type of feel-
ing
Also included will be selections from
Prince Igor and "Night in Mexico
This program is eagerly anticipated by
Greenville's music lovers, and also by Pitt
County's educators. In conjunction with the
Pitt County Chapter of the North Carolina
Symphony, the musicians have the opportu-
nity to involve children in the music.
"We actually raise the money to bring
them here said Louise Toppin, president of
the Pitt County Chapter of the North Caro-
lina Symphony.
"Three years ago, the symphony was ready
to pull out of Greenville
It costs between $30,000 and $50,000 to
bring the symphony and its educational pro-
gram to Greenville. The educational program
has been active since 1943 when a bill, known
as the 'horn tooting bill was passed. The
North Carolina Legislature funded a small por-
tion of the total costs for the educational pro-
grams in North Carolina. The communities
were expected to do the rest.
"Generous contributions, both business
and private, in addition to the ticket sales,
fund the symphony Toppin said. "People
don't realize the important connection be-
tween the symphony and the music educa-
tion program
In August, the pieces are announced to the
music education teachers.
"Kids are prepared over the course of the
year to get the most out of the experience
when the symphony performs live said
Maria Lundberg, director of public relations
for the North Carolina Symphony. "No other
orchestra in the country has an educational
program comparable to ours
The $10 ticket price will help to fund an
orchestra that performs in over 50 countries,
travels over the state extensively and works
with the music education program in North
Carolina to introduce children to live classi-
cal music. There are not many opportunities
to spend money so efficiently.
Experience the "grace of the moment"
with the North Carolina Symphony at 4 p.m
Jan. 23.
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
tyaformi by the North Carolina Symphony Orchestra Jan. 23, 2000
Overture to Coriolan, Op. 62�Ludwig Vori Beethoven
Symphony No. 41 in C major, K. 551, "Jupiter"�Wolfgang Mozarl
"Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun"�Claude Debussy
Polovetslan dance from Prince Igor�Alexander Borodin
"Ni;ht in Mexico"�Paul Creston
Any Given Sunday has surprise ending
Intensity of life off the
field illustrated well
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Lions roar, their voices heard
across the football field and light-
ning flares across the black sky. It's
"Any Given Sunday when lives are
changed both on and off the field.
Although the concept of an en-
tire movie based on a football team
may appeal to a select audience,
there are moral dilemmas, iove, ego-
ism and corrupt money woven in
to add texture to the plot. Whether
there is a tackle on the football field
or a sawing Of someone's vehicle in
Al Pacino, Jamie Foxx and Cameron Diaz are the backbone of the cast in Any Given Sunday, (photos from the World Wide Web)
half at a party, the action is fast- cu i � � � a � . �.
r " " Sharks, is injured early in the sea-
son, and the third string quarter-
back Willie Beaman (Jamie Foxx)
is called in to play. For one sea-
paced.
"Cap" Rooney (Randy Quaid),
the starting quarterback for4the
son, he leads the Sharks to victory.
"Bad Boy" Beaman relishes each
victory and the fame he has tem-
porarily earnefc but he resists
Coach D'Amanto's (Al Pacino) in-
structions in favor of his own.
Vi
They
college exi
How:
If you
with over 6
We'll
is usually c
Training. E
ing, you'll t
So, if;
school-the
lnter
Call 3:
All performers I
N
BUEI
SOCI
directed
"A SPEI
IN TIME,
WANT
ONE WE'I
TO EX
-Kenneth Ttira
Peter Stark SA
See SUNDAY, page 7






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FEATURES
The East Carolinian I
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SUNDAY
Want $25,000
for college?
The Army Reserve can help you take a big bite out of
college expenses.
How?
If you qualify, the Montgomery GI Bill could provide you
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from page 6
Beaman, with the full support of
owner Christina Pagniacci
(Cameron Diaz), threatens to tear
up the fiber that holds the team to-
gether. The team is in crisis during
Its best season in years, and every
member of the all-star cast has to
deal with their own problems.
Emotions run high in this
movie, both on and off the field.
Football is an intense game from the
stands, but from the field, it is in-
describable Although there is no
place for fear or hesitation in foot-
ball, Beaman becomes so intimi-
dated by the size of the opposition
that he vomits before taking the ball
every game. Toward the end of the
season, this becomeshis trademark.
CO-OP
from page 6
From a novice's perspective, I
thought the players and their inter-
actions were presented superbly,
and I felt as if I was watching a true
professional football team go
through one season.
The movie is three hours long,
and I sincerely doubt that it mer-
ited that much time. During the fi-
nal game, I was ready to leave be-
cause I knew what was going to hap-
pen, or so I thought. The end of
"Any Given Sunday" holds a sur-
prising twist, and because of the in-
tensity and tastefully added special
effects, it was worth staying the full
three hours.
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
education can come to the weekly
department meetings. They are held
ilternating between 1 p.m. and 4
p.m. Mondays and Thursdays in
Suite 2300 of the General Classroom
Building.
A complete schedule of meetings.
is posted on their Web site at
www.ecu.educoop. There is also a
job database available on the site to
help locate jobs in your area.
This could be just the opportu-
nity you need to secure work expe-
rience in your field on study.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Check our
classifieds for all
the hot spots
w
the east
Carolinian
LoveLines FORM
Messages will appear in the Feb. 10 issue of The East Carolinian
Name
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ID.
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fewer
IOC each for
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Tor a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252-328-600
or bookmark our web site at: www.ecu.edustudent union
OPENMI
Interested in performing?!
Call 328.4715 for more info!
All performers must register their intent at least 24 hrs. before performance! I
WELCOME
BACK
from
the
East Cam ma
University
Oiling
Services
99
to ECU Students
valid ONECARD
with
onlv
January 23, 6pm @ the Pirate Underground
MERCURY (TMIA III 0 Kill Ml It
Wed. @ 7:30 p.m. & Thur. at 10:00 p.m. Thur-Sat @ 7:30 p.m. & Sun. @ 3:00 p.m.
For additional information contact the: Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina
University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353, or call
252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or
VTTY252.328.4736, 8:30 a.m. - 6p.m Monday -
Friday. Individuals who require accommodations
under ADA should contact the Department for
Disability Support Services at 252.328.4802 forty-
eight hours prior to the start of the program.
BUENA VISTA
SOCIAL CLUB
directed by wim wenders
"A SPECIAL MOMENT
IN TIME, ONE WE DON'T
WANT TO END AND
ONE WE'RE PRIVILEGED
TO EXPERIENCE"
�Kenneth Tuna. L0SAN01US IMS
Peieisum san fRAsrjsco cmomac
r-m � � ���! ���!��
ffjl�. ffftff? SONY Wl!
11" WILL SCARE THE HE
iL INTO YOU
TONIGHT!
mr-
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PRAY YOU'Re'nOT NEXT
Thirsty Thursday
Blockbuster Film: Stigmata
7:30pm Hendrix
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D�S
JAN 20, 21,22 & 23
Fabulous Friday
Blockbuster Film: Stigmata
7:30pm Hendrix
Sensational Saturday
Blockbuster Film: Stigmata
7:30pm Hendrix
Pirate Underground: Open Mic Night
70pm MSC Pirate Underground
Super Sunday
Blockbuster Film: Stigmata
3pm Hendrix
Pirate Underground: Bingo Night
6pmMSC Pirate Underground





Ji inr rti"�
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Jordan joins Wizards
NBA great Michael Jordan will join the NBA's
Washington Wizards as the President of Basketball
operations. Jordan will have an option to buy the
team. He should take over before the trading dead-
line on February 24th.
Last year, Jordan tried to become part owner of
the Charlotte Hornets. The deal was nixed after cur-
rent owner George Shinn wouldn't relinquish control
of the team.
Jeter close to
signing record contract
New York Yankees shortstop, Derek Jeter is close
to signing the richest deal in baseball history. The
Yankees will offer Jeter a 118 million dollar contract
that will keep Jeter a Yankee for seven years.
"Eventually I'll get a long term deal Jeter said.
"Hopefully it will be sooner rather than later. It's out of
my hands. We'll see what happens. It's just a matter
of time Jeter said.
Police release
report on Phills Accident
. Charlotte Police say that Bobby Phills and team-
mate David Wesley were traveling at over 100 mph
before the crash that killed Phills. By analyzing skid
marks and the amount of damage to the cars, police
estimate that Phills' car was traveling at 107 mph,
while Wesleys was traveling at 110 mph in a 45 mph
zone.
In the report police describe the driving as "er-
ratic, reckless, careless, negligent or aggressive in
manner
The reports states that the men were involved jn
"aspeed competition
They also say that Wesley was driving with a sus-
pended license. There is no word on whether or not
the police would file charges.
SPORTS
Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Men's basketball falls to American, George Mason
Pirates lose three
conference games in a row
Susanne Milenkevich
SENIOR WRITER
ECU dropped two games in Colonial Athletic
Association play over the weekend to make it three
loses in a row after a five game winning streak.
"We are more up beat now (after three loses) than
when we had the other losing streak senior forward
Neil Punt said. "We know we can be successful
The Pirates traveled to American Saturday to face
the Eagles who had hot beaten ECU since the 1997-
98 season.
American opened the game with a bucket that
gave the Eagles a lead they would maintain until the
second half.
ECU went scoreless in the first 7:35 of the game
when Punt sank a deuce that pulled the Pirates within
five with the score at 7-2.
The Pirates ended the first half shooting just 36
percent but entered the locker room down by five
with the score at 28-23 in favor of the Eagles.
"We were fortunate to be down just five points at
the half said Bill Herrion, first year head coach. "We
should have been down by 25 at the half. We had 10
turnovers in each half, which we can't do and still
put ourselves in a position to win. Today we were
challenged and we didn't have anybody step up
ECU opened the second half with a 16-8 run that
gave the Pirates its first lead of the game at 41-40.
The Eagles followed the Pirate run with an 11-0 run
of their own to fake a 12-point lead with 5:19 left in
the game.
ECU pulled within five but the Eagles sealed their
72-�4 victory with free throws down the stretch.
American outshot the Pirates completing 46 percent
to ECU'S 42 percent while ECU out rebounded their
opponent for'the 15th time this season out of 16
games.
"I thought we had played well the previous two
weeks but the last two games it seems as though we
have fallen back to where we were before Christmas
Herrion said. "We have to try to get it straightened
out
The loss was the second straight for the Pirates
(7-9, 2-3 CAA) after coming off of a five game win-
ning streak.
ECU then matched up with defending CAA tour-
nament champion George Mason, Monday, in more
CAA action where the Pirates gave up their third game
in a row, 75-66.
The Pirates held tight throughout the game as
neither team had more than a five point lead until
the final minutes of the game.
ECU'S senior guard Garrett Blackwelder gave the
Pirates a 56-54 lead with 6:21 left in the game when
Travis Holcomb-Faye looks to pass against Richmond, (photo by Garrett McMillan)
center Alphons van Ireland was called for a foul on
George Mason's following possession and Herrion was
called for a technical foul.
The Patriots capitalized on the call that lead to a
6-0 run by George Mason.
"The first thing I did in the locker room was apolo-
gize to our basketball team for the technical foul
Herrion said. "It hurt our team. Our guys played hard
tonight. They did everything we asked them to do and
we were in a position to win the basketball game
Punt felt otherwise about the call.
"I don't think the technical had any affect on our
loss Punt said. "We were in the game the whole time,
even after the technical
Blackwelder stepped up with a three that helped
the Pirates cut the Patriot lead to one before George
Mason went on a nine point run to take a 10- point
lead before finishing the Pirates.
ECU came out of the game with 13 three-point
buckets (28 attempts) that tied the school record for
three-pointers in a game.
Blackwelder also set a personal mark with a career
high 30 points which were the most points a Pirate
has scored in a game since Lester Lyons scored 33
points against Old Dominion in the 1991-92 season.
ECU, now 7-10,2-4 CAA, will take to the court this
Saturday at 2 p.m. when they play host to UNC-
Wilmington.
"We're up for Saturday's game because it is
Wilmington Punt said. "We just hope there will be a
big crowd there
This writer can be contacted
smilenkevich@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
at
ECU's track teams face many changes
Pirates hope to reap
benefits of new track
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Damon Davis looks to continue ECU'S sprint dominance, (file
photo)
This year's ECU men's and women's track teams will
be the first to use the school's new track. The new track
that surrounds Bunting field replaced the worn and
hard old one that many felt hindered both the athletes
and the program.
"When we used to recruit with the old track, every-
thing would be going fine until we took the kid out to
see the track; it would be like a time bomb said Bill
Carson, head coach for the men's team. "Now we can
go out and show the kids the track and they can leave
here with a positive feeling
The new track should keep the athletes in better
shape.
"It is much needed. We haven't had a new track in
a while and it should cut down on injuries said jun-
ior Rasheca Barrow.
"It's much softer, so we should be less prone to in-
jury said senior Lynn Stewart.
However, the new track did not come without a
price. The track was laid down during the fall semester.
Construction on the project was not completed until
December. Thus, the teams were unable to practice on
a track. They spent much of the fall working on their
strength and running on grass. The lack of traditional
Mauresmo upset at Aussie Open
1999 Australian Open finalist Amelie Mauresmo
lost to Patty Schnyder in Monday's action at the
Open in Melbourne. American Jennifer Capriati beat
14th seed Dominique van Roost. Lindsey Davenport,
4th seed Mary Pierce, 8th seed Amanda Coetier, 9th
seed Julie Halard Decougis all advanced, while 5th
seed Nathalie Tauziat lost in what she said would be
her final Australian Open.
Misty Home lends experience to WZMB
Injured guard to
do color for WZMB
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Misty Home's senior season was
lot turning out exactly as she had
loped. Following reconstructive
cnee surgery over the summer, and
i nasty bout with tonsillitis that
aused her to miss the first week of
:lasses, Home decided not to play
ler final season for the ECU
vomen's basketball team.
"I made the decision not to play
efore practice Home said. "I
lidn't want to risk my health
"We missed her, she is an im-
jortant part of the team said Head
-oach Dee Gibson.
Misty Home averaged 7.2 points per
game in her Pirate career (file photo)
Faced with a season spent on
the bench, Home has found an-
other way to participate. She has
decided to lend her three years of
experience in ECU'S basketball pro-
gram and her knowledge of the
game to WZMB and their coverage
of Lady Pirate basketball.
"We figured, it was her senior
year and she wasn't really doing
anything but sitting on the bench,
preparing the team and pumping
up the players said Bob Smith,
WZMB general manager and play-
by-play announcer. "We thought it
was kind of a good way to give back
for her career at ECU and it's been
a great fit for us
"I asked Coach Gibson and she
thought it would be fun Home
said.
See Home, page 9
Toni Kilgore hopes to improve the Lady Pirate jumps
photo)
training worries the coaches.
"It was a tough fall for us Carson said. "The new
track was a long time coming. It was a little late. For
me, I'm behind. 1 couldn't practice the way I wanted
to, spiking up every day. But I think we're in pretty
good shape. I don't think we have the sprint speed
yet and I don't think we will run fast for a period
Some of the runners think the training methods
will benefit them in the long run.
"Actually, I think it was good said senior Lynn
Stewart. "We had to focus on strength and not just
speed. I think it will keep us from peaking too early
The new track wasn't the only major change in
the track program. This summer, long-time women's
track and cross-country coach, Charles "Choo" Jus-
tice, stepped down. Replacing him is former Assistant
Coach Matt Munson.
"Well it's going to be different, it's going to be a
change said junior Marshari Williams.
Munson coached under Justice last season, after a
stint as an assistant at Columbia. Munson worked
mostly with the throwers and sprinters last season.
"He pretty much has the same role as last year,
only now he has more administrative duties Barrow
said.
Wlth
64
Harris
Orana
8-K
Swiss
Coc
24 ct. roll
12 double
Cotton
Bath
Tissu
This writer can
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
be contacted
at
Prfc
Prices In
InCK
1





, Jan. 20, 2000
tmedia.ecu.edu
ason
13 three-point
hool record for
rk with a career
points a Pirate
'ons scored 33
591-92 season,
o the court this
host to UNC-
because it is
; there will be a
mtacted
at
M�ftM
ate jumps, (file
id. "The new
ittle late. For
iay I wanted
re in pretty
sprint speed
a period
ng methods
senior Lynn
ind not just
g too early
tchange in
ne women's
"Choo" Jus-
ler Assistant
sing to be a
ason, after a
son worked
ist season.
as last year,
ies Barrow
icted at
EE3
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhcjod Food Market
www.harristeeter.com
The Best Is What We're All About!
Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
vww.tec.ecu.edu
E vie
10.75 oz.
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SP0BIS
The East Carolinian 9
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Assistant
Sports Editor
Needed!
Ov
e�
ity
Hi
USi
x Must have excellent grammar & editing
skills and knowledge of sports.
Also an interest in writing.
Apply at the second floor of the Student Publications Building
or call 328-6366
HORNE
from page 8
BUFFALO WILD WINGS
- � GRILL & BAR
While Home is injured she is still
on the team. She goes to practice
arid team meetings, and she still
joins the team for pregame and
postgame meetings. Her intimate
knowledge of the ECU program
serves to prbvide insightful com-
mentary on WZMB broadcasts.
"The only other way we could
get this information is if we placed
a bug on somebody Smith said.
WZMB is in its first season of
broadcasting Lady Pirate basketball.
Home's presence on the play-by-
play team gives the WZMB broad-
cast an advantage.
"Jeff Charles has Si Seymor, but
I he's not playing now Smith said.
" "I think we are better in that cat
egory
However, Home does not see '
herself pursuing a career in broad-
casting. �
"No, its not for me Home said. J
This writer can be contacted at V$
I sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu. � W
Tailgate Special
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apply at www.versity.com and eArn to leaRn
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Where to go when you need to know.





W The East Carolinian.
www.tec.ecu.edu
THE JOEYSHOW
COMICS
Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
miics@studentmeclin.ecu.edu
by Joey ellis
Wt, VUdTvi's 15 S��o
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ft. �4ft l'e.
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BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR FALL CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
eastcarolinian
in the Student Publications Building
IFC Spring 2000 Fraternity Rush
Jan. 24-27, 2000 8-1 lpm
bids extended after midnight Thursday, Jan. 27
AZ& Alpha Sigma Phi
Delta Sigma Phi- 510 E. 10th St.
Delta Chi- AAn House
Theta Chi- 312 E. 11th St.
Kappa Alpha- 500 E. 11th St.
Kappa Sigma- 700 E. 10th St.
AXA Lambda Chi Alpha- 500 Elizabeth St.
riKA Pi Kappa Alpha- Sigma Sigma Sigma House
I"IK! Pi Kappa Phi- 803 Hooker Rd.
nAO Pi Lambda Phi- AOn tenative
XAE Sigma Alpha Epsilon- AHA
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Sigma Pi- 506 E. 10th St.
Tau Kappa Epsilon- 951 E. 10th St.
Phi Beta Sigma- 800 W. 5th St.
Phi Kappa Tau- 409 Elizabeth St.
ZN
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Friendships are
common,
but Brotherhood
lasts a lifetime.
Go Greek
The ECU Sports Marketing Department Is looking
for a few good students. A group of marketing
volunteers Is needed to assist in running
promotions and game operations during Pirate
home baseball games. If you are interested, please
attend the informational meeting January 27th
or call the Sports Marketing Department.
INFORMATIONAL MEETING
THURSDAY, JANUARY 27TH
5:30PM
LOCATION: MENDENHALL, GREAT ROOM 3B
(2ND FLOOR)
ECU SPORTS MARKETING DEPARTMENT 328-4530
Thursday
www.tec.
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ings for appoi
! -WESLEY
1 or 2 bed
refrigerator,
jwasherdrye
facilities, 5 I
ECU bus set
NOW I
FOR
-All Property
mainlen
1
not
RINGGC
Now Tal
1 bedrooi
Efficienc
CALL
ROOMMATE I
Wilson Acres
month. Spring
ROOMMATES
bedroom housi
pus. Rent 160
ties. Call Amar
ROOMMATE V
ly renovated 3
rything is new. I
es, 4 car port,
for only $275
329-0709(n).
GRADUATE 1
needed to sha
with 2 females
pus. Rent 260
friendly, studiou:
ASAP.
ROOMMATE ft
bedroom towrjf
and 12 utilrtie;
FEMALE ROO
share apartmen
Two bedrooms,
ny. $242.50 mo
Call Stephanie;
ROOMMATE V
bedroom house
from art building
erdryer include
8354. Comforta
ATTENTION Ml
Dental students
prices on all yoi
plies at www.dis
TOYOTA COROI
miles. Good cc
8521.
SPRING BREAI
Party Cruise! 5 r
meals! Awesom
Departs from F
room with kitche
ties & free drinks
with kitchen $14
open until 5 a.m
(near Disney) $
el.com 1-800-671





I
1It. W Ml
e
�wti
Thursday, Jan. 20, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
COZY ONE bedroom house on 407
South Holly. New appliances, low util-
ities and cable. Across from art school.
$335momh. Available March 1st or
sooner. Call Charlotte 329-0558.
WALK TO ECU. 1 bedroom apt.
$300month. available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street.
Call 758-6596.
BEECH STREET three bedroom two
bath $650.00 a month available Janu-
ary 5th call Wainright Property Man-
agement LLC 756-6209.
2 BR duplex available immediately. 2
story (BR's upstairs)- 804-A Johnston
Street. $575month-Call Rick 9 551-
9040.
ECU AREA, BIG three bedroom
house. Large backyard, screened
porch, washer and dryer included. Pets
OKI Six month lease available. $600
a month. Call 830-9502.
DOCKSIDE 3 bedroom. 2 bath duplex
available now. Everything newly remo-
deled. New appliances, carpet. Some
pets allowed. Please call 321-6423 day-
time, 756-6823 evenings, leave mes-
sage.
DOCK SIDE - 2 bedroom. 2 bath, new-
ly renovated duplex townhome with
multi-car covered parking. Includes
washerdryer. $625month. 919-834-
7702.
2 BR Apts Available Immediately,
above Catalog Connections. $500-
550month - Call rick 9 551-9040.
3 BR house available immediately,
newly renovated, painted, carpet, liv-
ing and dining room - 310 E 13th
Street. $650month - Call Rick � 551-
9040.
SPRING BREAK. pjjMMi CITY
BEACH -SUMMIT- LUXURY CONDOS
NEXT TO SPINNAKER OWNER DIS-
COUNT RATES. (404) 355-9637.
CLASSIFIEDS
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
OTHER
NO CREDIT check. Cellular Phones
Pagers. ABC Phones 931-0009. 316-0
East 10th St. (next to Papa Oliver's Piz-
za)
1991 MITSUBISHI Mirage blue. 4-
speed. AC, AMFMCASS. Runs and
looks great. $2.00OBO. Call (262)
527-6237.
1 PANAMA City Vacations! Party
Beachfront 9 The Boardwalk. Summit
Condo's & Mark II. Free drink parties!
Walk to best bars! Absolute best price!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www.endleSssummer-
tours.com
SERVICES
SIZE DOES Matter! Biggest break
package. Best price from $29.
WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM. 1-
800-224-GULF
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMMUusiYsmm
(919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
DOCKSIDE 3 bedroom. 2 bath duplex
available. Newly renovated with new
appliances, carpet and cabinets. Call
321-6446 daytime or 329-0709 even-
ings for appointment, leave message.
! -WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: !
1 or 2 bed rooms, 1 bath, range
) refrigerator, free watersewer,
jwasherdryer hookups, laundry;
facilities, 5 blocks from campus
i ECU bus services.
! NOW PRELEASING
FOR JANUARY
I -All Properties have 24 hr. emergency I
! maintenance- Call 758-192f !
M
. SKr.Jiori
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom 8t
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED three bdrm at
Wilson Acres 13 utilities. $240 per
month. Spring semester call 329-0196.
ROOMMATES NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house one block from cam-
pus. Rent 160 a month plus 13 utili-
ties. Call Amanda 413-6953.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share new-
ly renovated 3 bedroom duplex. Eve-
rything is new. Includes new applianc-
es. 4 car port, washer and dryer, all
for only $275mo. Call 321-6446(d)
329-0709(n).
GRADUATE STUDENT or senior
needed to share 3 bedroom house
with 2 females. Located near cam-
pus. Rent 260mo. Must be neat,
friendly, studious. Please call 329-8582
ASAP.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share two
bedroom towijhouse.175, free ws
and 12 utilities. 756-7755.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share apartment at Eastgate Village.
Two bedrooms, one bath, wd, balco-
ny. $242.50 month plus 12 utilities.
Call Stephanie at 830-0903.
ROOMMATE WANTED! Urge four
bedroom house located directly across
from art building. Malefemale, wash-
erdryer included. $189month. 329-
8354. Comfortable and laid back!
For Sale
ATTENTION MEDICAL, Nursing, and
Dental students: you'll finJ the best
prices on all your textbooks and sup-
plies at www.discountmedbooks.com
TOYOTA COROLLA SR5 "87 138.000
miles. Good condition $2,000 758-
8521.
SPRING BREAK Specials! Bahamas
Party Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
Departs from Florida! Panama City
room with kitchen next to clubs, 7 par-
ties & free drinks129! Daytona room
with kitchen149! South Beach (bars
open until 5 a.m)159! Cocoa Beach
(near Disney) $179! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
S$$ TUTORS NEEDED$$$ Looking
for some extra money (best pay on
campus) and a way to improve aca-
demically? Do you have a 3.0 or bet-
ter GPA? Become a tutor for the Of-
fice of Student Development-Athletics.
We need individuals capable of tutor-
ing classes from Accounting to Zoolo-
gy. Undergraduate students are paid
six dollars ($6) an hour and graduate
students are paid seven dollars ($7)
an hour. Does this sound like the job
for you? If so, join us for one of our
orientation meetings in 236B Ward
Sports Medicine Building (behind
Minges Coliseum) on either 119, 1
20. 125 or 126 at 5pm. questions?
Need more information? Contact Isha
Williams at 328-4691 for further infor-
mation.
FUN ft free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pictures
to give to your family or boyfriend? I
enjoy shooting pictures of young wom-
en for my portfolio. If you model for
me. I will give you free pictures. Repu-
table amateur photographer. Referenc-
es available (I've photographed dozens
of ECU girls). Please send a note,
phone number and a picture (if avail-
able - it will be returned) to Paul Hron-
jak. 4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC
27893 or call 252-237-8218 or e-mail
me at hronjak�simflex.com. You can
also check my website at www.sim-
flex.comusershronjak
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is recruiting part-
time youth In-Line Hockey coaches.
Applicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have the
ability and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18, in hockey fun-
damentals. This program will run from
late February to mid-May. Salary rates
start at $5.15 per hour. Applications
will be taken until the positions are
filled. For more information please call
Judd Crumpler, Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2pm.
AFTERNOON SITTER needed for
two boys, ages 6 and 8, from 2:15pm
to 5:00pm. four days per week. Will
pick up children from school on 5th
Street and take home for care. Re-
quire mature, highly dependable stud-
ent with cleansafe driving record.
References required. Good pay. Please
call 756-8262 after 5:00pm.
4-5 tennis instructorattendants need-
ed at Greenville Recreation & parks
dept. For winter and spring. $5.15-
5.75 per hour. Tennis teaching experi-
ence needed. Call 329-4559.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED for small
law firm of 4 attorneys: full-time or
part-time. If interested, please call 758-
4257 or fax resume to 758-9282.
$200 MILLION is spent on advertis-
ing tactics aimed at YOU! Want a
piece! Log onto www.TeamMag-
ma.com for information on how to
earn money now.
HELP WANTED Resident Crisis Coun-
selor position. Free rent, utilities.
etcplus monthly stipend in exchange
for employment. Training available at
REAL. For more information call 758-
HELP. 600 East 11th Street. Greenville
NC 27858.
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing info 800-
662-2122.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation & Parks
Department is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for the
Spring Youth Soccer Program. Applic-
ants must possess some knowledge
of the soccer skills and have the abili-
ty and patience to work with youth.
Applicants must be able to coach
young people ages 5-18. in soccer fun-
damentals. Hours are form 3:00pm
until 7:00pm with some night and
weekend coaching. Flexible with
hours according to class schedules.
This program will run from early March
to early May. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. For more information
please call Ben James. Michael Daly
or Judd Crumpler at 329-4550 after 2
pm.
FARMVILLE DAYCARE has 2 part-
time positions available: toddler teach-
er 6 afterschool teacher (approx. 1-
6p.m.). Must have experience or be in
CDFR, early childhood or related field.
Call 753-4866 between 10a.m. 6
6p.m.
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring students to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
� nual Fund. $5.50 hour plus bonuses.
Make your own schedule. If interest-
ed, call 328-4212. M-TH between the
hours of 3-6pm.
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemaT-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
SUMMER TRIP to Spain and Moroc-
co. Two weeks. First session 3-6 hours
credit. Scholarships, loans available.
For more information, leave name,
number at 328-4310 or mer-
cercOmail.ecu.edu
SPRING BREAK - Grad Week. $75 &
up per person, www. retreatmyrtle-
beach.com 1-800-645-3618.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WANTED: PAYING $6.50hr. plus
bonuses for qualified tele'marketers.
No Friday or Saturday workHours
4:30-9 p.m. Monday-Wednesday;
3:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Call Energy Sav-
ers Windows & Doors, Inc. at 758-
8700 for appointment.
WAIT, HOST and bus staff needed
for friendly and fun work environment.
Must have some morning week day
availability. Experience helpful but not
necessary. Pick up application 9 Ba-
sil's Restaurant on Firetower Rd.
BROWSE ICPT.COM WIN a FREE trip
for Springbreak "2000 ALL destina-
tions offered. -Trip Participants. Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or Rep registration call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL HAS
full-time and part-time teacher posi-
tions. Great experience for ELEM and
CDFR majors. Call 355-2404 for more
information.
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO come into
my home all day on Thursdays to care
for my 3 year old. Call 355-7875. No
morning classes, please.
LIFEGUARDS AND beach vendors
needed in North Myrtle Beach for the
summer season. Will train, no experi-
ence necessary! Fill out the applica-
tion at www.nsbslifeguards.com-
Email-dudes0nsbslifeguards.com or
call (843) 272-3259.
HAWKSNEST WEEKEND FEBRU-
ARY 5-6. this is the trip for those that
need a ski fix but can't afford those
normal resort prices, we will leave Sat.
morning and our first session will be
night skiing 6pm-2am and then back
again Sun. morning at 9am. Cost is
$110mem-$130non-mem. Registra-
tion deadline is Jan.26, 5pm. Call 328-
6387 for more information.
WALLYBALL TOURNAMENT regiv
tration meeting Jan. 25. 5:30pm at
Mendenhall Student Center Multi-Pur-
pose room for those interested in par-
ticipating. Everyone is welcome! For
more information please call 328-6387.
STRESS MANAGEMENT: This one-
session workshop helps you explore
the causes of stress and the effect that
stress has on you. For more informa-
tion call 328-6661.
NOTE TAKING: The Center for Coun-
seling and Student Development is of-
fering the following workshop on Janu-
ary 27. 1:30. If you are interested in
this workshop please call 328-6661.
CHOOSING A major and a career:
This workshop is designed to help you
explore your interests, values, and abil-
ities to find out possible career and
major choices. You will learn effec-
tive tools in the greatest hunt of you
life. Contact the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development at 328-
6661 for more details. This workshop
meets every Thursday from 3:30-5.
TRY YOGA! Treat yourself to the re-
laxation you deserve. Cost is $16
mem-$25non-mem. Yoga beginner
Jan.26-March 2. Wed. 4pm-5:15 or
Thurs. 5:30prrv6:45. Reg. Jan.10-26.
Yoga intermediate Jan. 25-Feb. 29.
Tues. 5:30-6:45. Reg. Jan. 10-24. Yoga
Advanced Jan. 24- Feb. 28. Mon. 4-
5:15, Reg. Jan. 10-21. Power Yoga Jan.
25-Feb. 10. Tues 8 Thurs. 4-5:15, Reg.
Jan. 10-24. For more information call
328-6387.
LIFEGUARDWATER SAFETY assis-
tant needed to work at therapy pool
TuesdayThursday 8am-3pm at PCMH
please call 321-1214.
BABYSITTERS NEEDED for Com-
munity Bible study. Tuesdays andor
Thursdays 9-11:30 AM, starting Spring
semester. Call 756-9394.
GREEK PERSONALS
WELCOME SIGMA class! Love your
Pi Delta sisters.
RHO CLASS keep up the good work.
We love you all very much! Love your
Pi Delta sisters.
GAMMA SiGMA Sigma announces
its Spring rush 2000. 'Come see what
service and sisterhood is about
When: January 20 at 8pm and Janu-
ary 21 at 7pm. Where: The Multipur-
pose room. Choose only one of these
days. Dress is semi-formal. For ques-
tions call Karen 439-0999.
CONGRATULATIONS TORI Johnson
on your internship in Florida! Have a
great time and get a tan! Love your Pi
Delta sisters.
OTHER
1 SPRING Break Vacations! Cancun,
Jamaica. Bahamas & Florida. Best pric-
es guaranteed! Free parties it cover
charges! Space is limited! Book it now!
All major credit cards accepted! 1-800-
234-7007 www endlesssummer-
tours.com
THE DEPARTMENT of Communica-
tion Sciences and Disorders will be
providing the speech, language and
hearing screening for students who are
fulfilling requirements for admission to
Upper Division the following dates:
College of Arts and Sciences. General
College and School of Art. Health and
Human Performance. Human Environ-
mental Sciences, and Music will be
held Monday, January 24, 2000 or
Tuesday January 25. 2000. School of
Education screenings will be Wednes-
day. January 26. 2000 or Tuesday. Fe-
bruary 1. 2000 from 5:15 - 6:15 pm.
These are the only screening dates for
the Spring semester. The screening
will be conducted in the ECU Speech
and Hearing Clinic. Belk Annex 1.
School of Allied Hearth Sciences. Sign
in begins at 5:00pm. Please call 328-
4405 for more information.
TAI CHI Jan. 25-March 9. Tues.
Thurs. 12:05pm-12:50pm. Experience
the art of maintaining the body and
mind, relaxation and self-defense. Reg.
is Jan. 10-28. For more information call
328-6387.
BOWLING REGISTRATION meeting
Jan. 25. 5pm at Mendenhall Student
Center Multi-Purpose room. Anyone
interested in Intramural Bowling needs
to attend this meeting. For more in-
formation call 328-6387.
TEST ANXIETY. Learn ways NOT to
stress over tests, including ways to
help you gain the grade you want. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on January 26, 11:00. If you
are interested in this program, contact
the center at 328-6661.
MARRIAGE RETREAT 2000. Pastor
James & Delores Corbett of Commun-
ity Christian Church invites you to join
them Thursday. February 10-Saturday.
February 12. For more information and
cost write or call Community Christian
Church. James D. Corbett. Pastor;
1104 North Memorial Dr Greenville.
NC 27834. (252) 752-LOVE(5683).
HELP WANTED
Cook or Assistant Cook
Luptons Seafood Restaurant
14th & Greenville Blvd.
752-4174
Spring Break 2000
CANCUN�JAMAICA�NASSAU
Space is limited
CALL TODAY
800-293-1443
www.StudentCity.com
Spring BrMfc Tcwd �m 1 of 6 small hisrSMS in e US in 1998 � be
recognued to outsttnrWtg ethics by Council of Better Business Bureaus'
Bahamas Patty
Cruise $279
b diys � Host Mean I Fm fartfes � include Taws
Panama $139
City- Bosrtwf, HoMty bin Sumprw Mart
Florida $149
J WgMt Dtytoni. Smnfi Beach, Cocoa Beach
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7 WOJM " AbHOW � ftW Food � 30 Hrt Of Or!
springbreaklravet.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
ANNOUNCEMENTS
BOOST YOUR Self-Esteem: this one
session workshop will help you under-
stand how self esteem is developed
and how you can create a more posi-
tive sense of self. This workshop will
meet on Tuesday. Jan. 26 3:30. For
more information call 328-6661.
The East Carolinian
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
ANOUNCEMENTS
KAYAK ROLL January 31. 7:30pm-
9:30pm in the SRC pool. Trying out
kayaking has never been easier, get
into a boat and practice the Eskimo
roll, if s a great way to break into the
sport and a must for any future pad-
dlers. CostS10mem-$15non-mem.
Registration deadline is Jan.24, 5pm.
For more information call 328-6387.
Where can you hear the Lady
Pirates vs. American basketball
game Friday night
at 7 p.m.?
Just one place.
91.3 FM
Why wait tables?
You can't lern much besides how cheap
and unappreciative people tend to be.
We're looking for production workers
who can learn real-life computer and
graphics skills that translate into real ex-
perience that employers are hooking for in
their employees.
Join us for the experience of a lifetime.
Come by our office or call 328-6366.
NEED A DATE?
try our campus calendar at
clubhouse.ecu.edu.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5C each .
.$2.00
STUDENT LINE AD RATE
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5C each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
-All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
ll





Are you interested in becoming involved with!
YOUNG LIFE
schWyfi&'Rrk?
If you are interested
and would like to find
out more
Call the Pitt
County
Young Life
Office at
(T

STUDENT UNION
PRESIDENT WANTED
East Carolina University's Student Union Board of
Directors is taking application's for STUDENT UNION
. PRESIDENT for the 2000-2001 term.
; ANY full-time student with a minimum G.P.A. of 2.5 can apply.
Applications are available at the Student Union
office in Room 236 Mendenhall Student Center.
It's TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS SPADC5 RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at University Of Tennessee, Knoxville,
TN, the weekend of Feb. 18-20,2000. AH expenses paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Spades
Mon Jan. 24 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room
vio.E.iyr
Deadline to apply is January 20,2000.
This is a paid position.
Nine-Ball
Mon Jan. 31 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center"
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
?hefS � rt �� Table Tennis
Sat Jan. 29 9:00 a,m, - 5:00 p.m. � . , , -
a j u ii c j A Thur Jan. 27 6:00 p.m
Mendenhall Student Center
Bowling
Wed Jan. 26. 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Mendenhall Social Room
(Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
ocial Room
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline - Feb. 1, 6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
Student Recreation Center. Call the Recreation Programs Office, 328-4738 for more information
a textbook e
of why the
pie
met is so ha
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71


Title
The East Carolinian, January 20, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 20, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1383
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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