The East Carolinian, January 13, 2000






www.tec.ecu.edu
GREAT MINDS ABOUND IN THE
20TH CENTURY, pg 6
ECU alumni join famous peers.
Volume 74, Issue 80

PIRATES LOSE IN MOBILE pg 10
Horned Toads topple ECU 28-14
THURSDAY, JANUARY 13. 2000
TODAY'S WEATHER
Sunny, high of 62
and a low of 35
59 days to go until Spring Break
NEWS BRIEFS
NO CLASSES
Classes will not be held Monday in ob-
servance of the Martin Luther King Jr. holi-
day.
BLOOD DRIVE
A blood drive will be held from 10 a.m
4 p.m. today in Room 2W-40 of the Brody
Medical Sciences Building.
SPORTS
Men's basketball visits William and
Mary for a game with the Lady Pirates at 7
p.m. on Friday, Jan. 14.
Women's basketball hosts University of
Richmond at 2 p.m. on Sunday, Jan. 16 in
Williams Arena at Minges Coliseum.
RELAY FOR LIFE
A kickoff meeting will be held at 5 p.m.
on Tuesday Jan. 18 at Beverly Healthcare
located at 527 Moye Blvd. Team captains
and those interested in organizing a relay
team are urged to attend. To register a
team, or for more information call The
American Cancer Society Pitt Unit at
(252J-321-2836.
PARKING PERMITS EXPIRED
Greenville Public Works Department
wants to remind citizens residing in Con-
trolled Residential Parking Areas A and B
that parking permits expired Dec. 31.
Residents have until Feb. 14 to renew
them at an annual cost of $5decal re-
quested. Permit decals may be purchased
at the Public Works Department located at
1500 Beatty St. If you have any questions
concerning parking issues you may call
(252) 329-4525.
PERFORMING ARTS
PEOPLE'S ACT
Saturday, Jan. 29 the BotsfordWitt
Residency Performance, in association
with ECU dance students, will be perform-
ing at the Rose High School Performing
Arts Center located at 600 West Arlington
Boulevard. The performance is free and
open to the public, but it suggested that a
$5 donation be given at the door to sup-
port the People's Act.
ONLINE SURVEY
Did you experience any
problems related tg Y2k?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Do you feel the proposed tuition
increase is fair?
32 YES 68 NO
Sundial to "honor
past, imagine future"
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The City of Greenville's Mil-
lennium Committee has pro-
posed the concept of a large sun-
dial with a time capsule to carry
out the national millennium
theme "Honor the Past. Imagine
the Future
According to Program Coor-
dinator Dr. John Meredith, the
capsule within the sundial will
represent cultural diversity and
will be up to mark the beginning
of the new millennium at mid-
night on Pec. 31, 2000.
Meredith said the capsule and
sundial will be placed in the
town commons just north of 1st
Street.
"Capsules are usually lost
Meredith said. "We decided that
the sundial would be the marker
of where our capsule is held. The
sundial will also represent time
of the past and future
According to City Manager
Ron Kimble, stories about
Greenville will be sketched into
the sundial. The time capsule
within the sundial will include
recorded oral histories, school es-
says, signature scrolls, photo-
graphs and drawings, current and
historical local newspapers and
magazines and other contjibu-
tions from Greenville citizens.
The entire project is esti-
community
mated to cost $100,000, and
fund-raisers will begin this
month to complete the construc-
tion by the official start of the
millennium.
"The Millennium Committee
is working hard to preserve
Greenville's history Kimble
said. "As a result of their efforts,
ourcapsule will be here fora long
time to come
"We are looking for ways to
reduce funds Meredith said.
"Citizens may make tax deduct-
ible contributions to Greater
Greenville and those which sup-
port our project will receive rec-
ognition
Meredith said he hopes that
the capsule is opened in 100
years.
"I hope to be dead and gone
by the time it is reopened
Meredith said. "I hope that a tra-
dition begins with the opening
of the capsule so lessons can be
learned and more knowledge
can be stored in it
The sundial is a way of mark-
ing the passage of time for
Greenville.
"Our sundial not only pre-
serves history Kimble said, "but
also demonstrates a natural
marking of time through na-
ture
Kimble and Meredith said
they are very excited about their
millennium plan.
"I-am very excited Kimble
said. "Our sundial will make sure
that we don't forget the past
while keeping an eye on the fu-
ture
I am ecstatic Meredith said.
"It will express our dynamic,
progressive community while
staying focused on the people
and their quality of life
Meredith said that the
Greenville Millennium Commit-
tee filled out an application with
the White House in efforts of be-
coming a millennium commu-
nity.
"Based on our creative idea of
a capsule within a sundial we
were chosen Meredith said.
"It is fantastic that we were
chosen Kimble said. "We
sought out our mission and
reached our goal of being a mil-
lennium community
The White House Millennium
Council recognizes national and
local projects that contribute in
educational, creative and produc-
See MILLENNIUM, page 3
Pirates fall in bowl game
Construction, parking
changes frustrate students
Science and Technology
Building underway
Terra Steinbeiser
NEWS EDITOR
Flanker LaMont Chappell looks for holes in the defensive line The Horned Frogs of
Texas Christian University topped the Pirates 28-14 in the inaugural Mobile Alabama
Bowl Dec. 22. For full coverage see page 10 (photo by Emily Richardson).
New traffic and parking patterns
around campus won't be going back to
normal anytime soon.
The newest and largest of these
projects is the pre-construction site prepa-
ration taking place east of Umstead Resi-
dence Hall for the new Science and Tech-
nology Building. The permanent closing
of Founder's Drive between Christenbury
Gym and the English Annex has cut off a
main artery through campus and made
new traffic patterns that affect a large
portion of the campus.
Residents of SlayUmstead Residence
Halls lost 42 parking spaces when the lot
east of the dorms was fenced off, but the
residents gained back 35 of those spaces
with the new arrangements. A total of 59
staff parking spots were lost to resident
and private parking for this project alone.
"It's the staff who have taken a major
hit on this said Johnnie Eastwood of
Parking and Traffic Services. "We're really
trying to look out for the residents in this
part of campus
This preliminary construction, known
as Phase I, began on Dec. 13 and should
last approximately 150 days.
"All we're doing now is site prepara-
tion said Bill Bagnell, assistant director
for Planning and Facilities. "This is the
time when we relocate utilities, grade the
area and create a pad for the building
Despite the fact that ECU will gain a
state-of-the-art facility after enduring
these months of construction, many stu-
dents have expressed their frustration
with the situation.
"You can't go a single place on cam-
pus where there isn't any construction
going on said freshman Jenny Frasier.
"It's so noisy, ugly and distracting
Construction traffic blocks roads on campus,
(photo by Emily Richardson)
"It just makes me mad that I've paid
all this money for a resident parking
sticker and they keep getting rid of park-
ing lots said junior Jason Daniels.
While it may look like construction
vehicles ate taking over parking lots by
leaps and bounds, Eastwood says that
measures are being taken to limit the num-
ber of actual vehicles on campus.
"We only allow construction vehicles
that are totally necessary to the comple-
tion of the project to park on the site
Eastwood said. "The rest of them have to
park in a lot on the corner of 4th and
Reade Streets
There has recently been an increase in
construction traffic on central campus at
thejarvis site.
"This is because as a job gets nearer to
completion you need more people on a
job site�people like plumbers, electricians
and so forth Eastwtxid said. "They all are
usually working there at the same time,
so it's a little busier there
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
DirectorofUnivemtyUniommovesontonewschool Three is good Company
Marshall encourages
student involvement
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
After almost 10 years, Jay
Marshall, assistant director of
University Unions, is leaving
ECU.
Marshall is leaving Greenville
at the end of this week to be
closer to his family and old home
in Montana and to further de-
velop his career. He has accepted
a position as associate director of
the Ullsvik Center and the Cen-
ter for the Arts at the University
of Wisconsin at Platteville, a
four-year institution specializing
in engineering and teaching de-
grees.
According to Marshall, he
spent two and a half years selec-
tively looking for a position that
would allow him to supervise
staff and "build" a student cen-
ter from tiie ground up.
At ECU, Marshall's main du-
ties included hosting the travel
adventure film series and advis-
ing the Student Union, specifi-
cajly the Barefoot on the Mall
Committee, the Marketing and
Popular Entertainment Commit-
tees, and the I lomecoming Com-
mittee. There will be no one fill-
ing his position, although Asso-
ciate Director for University
Unions, Stephen (iray will take
over his committee responsibili-
ties!
"I'm not leaving because I
don't like ECU�because I do
Marshall said. "I've always been
proud of the collaboration we've
made with the academic depart-
ments, particularly the School of
Music, School of Arts and the
Department of English.
The first major event that
Marshall was involved in was
bringing panels for the AIDS
quilt to ECU to commemorate
AIDS Awareness Month in 1992.
Since then, the quilt has been
displayed in many places
throughout the country.
Close to 5,000 people came
to see the quilt on display.
Other events that Marshall
helped organize included bring-
ing in Dr. Ruth Westheimer and
author Robert Fulgham to speak,
the Allman Brothers' concert and
1 lomecoming.
"I would like to say that with
the new millennium, the Depart-
ment of University Unions and
See MARSHALL page 3
� am �
Greenville reinstates
old ordinance
Angela Hame
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The saying "thi
iwd" does not stijnd true
for Greenville.
According to City Attor-
ney Dave Holec, the city has
certain rules for residency
where by law no mor.
three or mo
are unrelated w
gether what their
sex is.
"Unrelated refers to those
that are not blood ret
married andor adop
Holec said.
Harry Hamilton, chief city
planner, said that the city zon-
ing law for living arrange-
ments was instituted in the
early '80s.
These rules were recently
relaxed due to the flood, but
�ng to Hamilton they
reinstated.
regulating the city zoning
law Hamilton said. "If we got
complaints from neighboring
residents about violations or
then we took ac-
and the
bv the n
te(





The East Caroiinian
.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Jan. 13,2000
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Former director of
Ledonia Wright
Center takes on
new duties
Eakin praises
Clayton's insight, experience
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
Taffye Benson Clayton has recently been named
special assistant to the chancellor and director of equal
employment opportunity at ECU.
After her official appointment at the beginning of
September, Clayton stepped into the position prepared
to undertake her new duties.
"I interact with management and employees to in-
terpret and apply all Federal and State policies regard-
ing color, race, natural creed, sex, or disability Clayton
said.
Prior to this promotion, she served as the director
of the Lowdown Wright African American Cultural
Center at ECU.
Before arriving at ECU, Clayton attended and gradu-
ated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel
Hill with a bachelor's degree, and she later attended
American University in Washington, D.CfAfter: obtain-
ing her master's degree there, she served as the special
programs and populations coordinator for the Division
of Student Life at American University.
"In this role I worked with assisting the university's
responsiveness to minority student needs and con-
cerns Clayton said. "I believe these past experiences
will assist me greatly �
In addition, Clayton served as a Legislative Fellow
for Senator Edward Kennedy on the U.S. Senate Com-
mittee on Labor and Human Resources. -
Y2K happens
without much ado
CRIME
Problems few
and far between
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
Taffye Benson Clayton was recently named special assistant
to the chancellor, (photo courtesy of the Internet)
"I assisted in the drafting of legislation on a num-
ber of critical issues expfained Cfayton.
"I am delighted that Taffye Benson Clayton has ac-
iepted this new assignment as a member of my cabi-
net said Chancellor Richard Eakin. "She brings to this
position exceptional experience and insight, and I look
forward to working with her
Clayton succeeds Dr. Carrie Moore, who was ap-
pointed as vice chancellor of Student Life early last se
mester.
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
After massive research projects,
billions of dollars and unbelievable
preventative measures, Y2K has
proven to be nothing more than the
start of a new century. With the ex-
ception of a few businesses, residen-
tial computers and government
agencies disturbed by a few minor
glitches, problems were few.
Software giant Microsoft re-
ported they experienced two Y2K-
related problems. The first disrup-
tion that occurred affected the soft-
ware used in viewing some Web
pages. The second involved an in-
correct display of time within the
free e-mail server, Hotmail. Interest-
ingly, Microsoft Internet Explorer
displayed the date for a short period
of time as being 3099.
The Federal Emergency Manage-
ment Administration (FEMA), one
government agency familiar to east-
ern North Carolina, also experi-
enced some technical problems for
a bit. FEMA employees had diffi-
culty with a database of reservists
and regular staff used to deploy per-
sonnel when a disaster is declared.
Immediately after the rollover on
New Year's the system went down,
although things are expected to be
repaired by the end of this week.
Although the New Year is well
underway, government officials still
feel there may be possible glitches
in the future.
"We are likely to see glitches pop
up here and there in the coming
days and weeks, but I think that will
be localized and transitory and will
not pose a threat to the nation's
economy said John Koskinen,
White House point man on Y2K.
As for the economy, majiy ex-
perts believe Americans spent the
Y2K bug to death. Koskinen esti-
mates that U.S. businesses and gov-
ernment agencies spent at least
$100 billion in preventative mea-
sures.
A more comical story occurred
in New York state when a customer
was charged $91,250 for renting
"The General's Daughter The com-
puter in the store mistakenly
charged customers for returning
videos 100 years late.
"The clerk and I were shocked,
and then zeroed out the late charge
and gave the customer a free video
rental and wished him a Happy New
Year said Terry Field, owner of the
store.
"I think that the whole world is
taken aback by how smoothly this
whole thing went said Bob
Denham, vice president of public
relations for BB&T Corp. "But then,
when you spend three and a half
years�and $30 million�on a
project, expectations are high to get
it right
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
January 8
Criminal Damage to Prop-
erty�An officer reported that
theiear window of a vehicle
parked 'Hi the Reade Street Lot
1 was damaged.
Worthless Check�A crimi-
nal summons was served on a
student in Garrett Hall.
January 9
Larceny�A student in
White Hall reported that a gold
bracelet was taken from her
room.
January 10
Larceny�A staff rnember
reported that her purse was
stolen from the Medical Pavil-
ion.
Auto Accident�A student
backed into another student's
vehicle in the parking lot lo-
cated at Fifth and Harding
Streets.
Failure to Appear�A stu-
dent was arrested for failure to
appear.
CrimeScene is compiled from
ECU police reports. To report a
crime, contact the ECU police de-
partment at 328-6787.
FunFest funds Toys 'R Us gift certificates for flood victims
Students donate gifts to
campus housekeepers
Angela Harne
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
In an effort to reach out to flood
victims once again, students of the
!Recreational Leisure Studies pro-
gram gave the 47 campus house-
keepers who lost everything, $40
gift certificates to Toys R Us.
According to Director of Recre-
ational Leisure Studies, Dr. Jon
McChesriey, the housekeepers had
no idea they receiving the gifts.
Students Adam McComb, Allan
Nielson, Anna Dietrich, Kalvin
Yarrell and Harriet Turner, along
with McChesney, presented the gifts
to the ten housekeepers present at
the ceremony held early last month.
Those who were not present had
their gifts delivered later.
Kenn Chavis Director of House-
keeping, praised the actions of stu-
dents.
"This was a wonderful and hu-
manitarian gesture Chavis said.
"It's great that will be much hap-
pier thanks to these students ac-
tions
"From beginning to end this has
been a class effort McComb said.
"We heard about the significant ef-
fects the flood had on our house-
keepers and we thought who better
to help then those that take care of
us and the school first
"Letter grades don't matter
Dietrich said. "I just wanted to help
people and make their holidays
happy
"I am glad our class could help
the community Turner said. "I
think many have benefited from
our efforts and I am happy we could
lend a helping hand
Housekeepers expressed their
gratitude.
"Thank you so very much said
housekeeper Eddie Barnes. "This
was very generous and will go a long
way. I'll spend it on my grand kids
"I think it is great that these stu-
dents have gone to so much trouble
to help us out said housekeeper
Charles Rosekrams. "I will use this
gift to make sure my child enjoys
Christmas and our holidays are
filled with joy
"This will definitely be of great
V"
Furniture Fair
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� Part time - 29 hrs. a week
� Apply in person - ask for Dot.
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use for Christmas said house-
keeper Marilyn Forbes. "I have chil-
dren and grandchildren of my own
and this will help with shopping. I
thank ECU for all of their help and
.support
According to McChesney, his
students raised $34,000 through the
Greenville Arts in FunFest which
took place in November at Minges
Coliseum.
The mission of the FunFest was
to assist flood victims by way of a
special community event.
"As seen here tonight we were
very successful in bringing smiles
MUn.
and joy McChesney said. "The
money raised at FunFest was used
to purchase the gift certificates
given out to our housekeepers. We
got donations from the amuse-
ment rides and provided entertain-
ment. Money was raised through
soft drinks sales and parking fees
McChesney said that FunFest
usually takes about a year to plan,
McChesney said.
7775 writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.

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www.tec.ee
MILLE
educational,
America's coi
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ognition by tl
MARS
heading in th
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said. "To the s
my heart
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Ian. 13,2000
nedia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
nage to Prop-
reported that
of a vehicle
ade Street Lot
ieck�A crimi-
is served on a
tt Hall.
student in
ted that a gold
:en from her
itaff member
er purse was
Medical Pavil-
it�A student
her student's
irking lot lo-
ind Harding
pear�A stu-
for failure to
:ompiled from
i. To report a
ECU police de-
787.
ley said. "The
ll'est was used
ft certificates
isekeepers. We
n the amuse-
ided entertain-
aised through
parking fees
that I'unFest
a year to plan,
e contacted at
iecu.edu.
The East Carolinian S
news@studentmediaecu.edu
MILLENNIUM
from page 1
ORDINANCE
from page 7
educational, creative and productive ways to show
America's commemoration of the new millennium's
slogan, "Honor the Past. Imagine the Future
Only national nonprofit organizations, federal or
intergovernmental agencies or an association that sup-
ports positive health, social, cultural, educational, eco-
nomic or environmental objectives may qualify for rec-
ognition by the White House Millennium Council.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
MARSHALL
from page 1
heading in the right direction�a real positive direc-
tion�and that students should take the time to get
involved and help lead these organizations Marshall
said. "To the students: Thank you from the bottom of
my heart
This writer can be contacted
cherold@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
the amount of time residents violate the law Holec
said. "For instance, if residents are notified and the ex-
tra non-related persons do not vacate the premises in
the given time then fines will be issued one day equals
$50, two days equals $100 and three or more days
equals $250 each excessive day. These are viewed as
civil fines not as criminal ones. If for some reason resi-
dents ignore the warnings and issued fines the city has
the right to pursue a court order which may require all
residents to move out
The code of living law relates to zoning issues.
"The idea of zoning has been around forever
Hamilton said. "It is a police power given to the state
to separate the land into districts and set rules accord-
ingly. Different rules pertain to different areas and as-
pects like the issues of buffing, vegetation, sign usage
and living arrangements
Holec said zoning is a useful tool.
"Zoning is a legislative tool used to regulate the use
and development of land by districts Holec said. "It
is a planning method used to protect the investment
and promote health safety. For example, rules apply to
residents on the amount of objects displayed in their
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FOR MORE INFORMATION OR A RIDS, CALL
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Climbing the walls in a cramped
apartment?
Don't monkey around with the
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ts (252) 752-4225 fc
yards.
"Residents cannot just fill their yards with random
junk because the community and neighbors do not
want to see the mess everyday. The same concept per-
tains to the amount living in one household. Rules have
been set for the amount which can live in a dwelling
for the communities safety and neighborhood respect
Holec said Greenville follows the definition of fam-
ily for the code of living.
"Our code states that a family is one of the three;
an individual living alone, two or more persons blood
related living together or no more than three persons
unrelated living together
According to Holec, the law offers balance through-
out the community.
"It's useful because the law is designed for single
family purposes,v Holec said. "Therefore when you have
more residents in one area it unbalances the commu-
nity and surrounding neighbors. I believe a balance is
needed for the quality of life
There are exceptions to the zoning law.
Sorority and fraternity houses do not fall into the
"family" living codes.
"They are not limited to amount of persons Holec
said. "They are not considered a single family unit,
therefore they are allowed through permit only
Resident complexes�F;irates Cove and Players Club,
are also exceptions to the rule.
According to Hamilton, Pirates Cove and Players
Club were approved under dormitory standards
Hamilton said. "They were regulated by bedroom rather
than residency due to their suite style layout
This writer con be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
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PARKING
4
Parking is by permit only
To register your vehicle:
�� Go online at
www.student.ecu.edu
w Stop by the Parking and Transportation
Services Office at 305 E.Tenth Street.
Call 328-6294 for more information
Can't find a space? Try the Rapid Shuttle lot!
ECU POLICE
' days a week to
ECU Police are on duty 24 hours a day,
7 days a week to assist you.
911
Blue light
Emergency Phones
Call with ANY
questions or problems:
328-6787
MAIL
� Mail delivered Mon Sat.
to resident hall mailboxes
� Customer Service window
open Mon Fri.
w Purchase stamps
�' Mail packages and
overnight express
�� Pick up packages
Questions? Call 328-6091
ECU ONE CARD
The ECU One Card serves
several purposes:
� Identification
� Library
� Rec Center
� Dining
� Activities
�Vending !�,
� Copiers
Office located in the
Wright Building.
RAPID COPY
Self-service, card-operated copiers:
� Joyner Library
� Classroom buildings
� Community service desks
S Rapid Copy
���. emu . mm
Rapid Copy Centers:
� Joyner Basement: 328-0458
� 10th Street: 328-6171
� BrodyGE-101: 816-2261
PLUS, the
Library Copy Center
sells computer disks,
pencils, and more!
STUDENT STORES
� New & USED Textbooks
� Apparel
� Computers
� Software
� Supplies
Wright Building
Brady IS-04
VENDING
ECU Vending Services provides
snack and beverage machines all
over campus!
328-6731
816-3450
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
PCin KBZEE33B
Student Stores
Problems?
Call 328-62947
atc, f
fl
Have more questions? Visit
Business Services on the web:
www.ecu.eduservices





ECU Presbyterian Campus Ministry
Welcomes you to the year 2000!
Start the New Year off with good food and friendly faces
When? Tuesday nights, 6 until 8 p.m.
Where? First Presbyterian Church (see map)
What? A FREE home-cooked meat followed by a program
Who? All ECU students are invited
For further information, contact:
Ellen Crawford True Presbyterian Campus Minister
ellencrawfordtrue@yahoo.com or 758-1985
Hope to see you there!
RR tracks
lllllllllllllllllllllll
14 Street
First Presbyterian Church X
10,h Street
Cftadiur
llllllllllllllllllllll
m

MAP
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NOWHIRING
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Orientation & the First-Year Experience - 214Whichard - 328-4173
For more information,
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and the First-Year Experience
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Deadline for completed applications is February 4,2000 at 5:00 p.m.
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www.tec.ecu
Terra Steinbe
Susan Wright
Emily Richan
Dan Cox, We
It almost seem
arbitrary and foil
when you tool'
Player's Club a
These apartrt
under dormitory
of their suite st
they really
countless other
LETTEI
Dear Kditor,
On Oct. 12,
"Permanent qly.
TEC newspaper,
that I enjoyed tt
time hearing at
ally caught my,
As for myself
become an optii
way of just cont
The reason 1 say
takes pain very v
LETTEF
Availal
Dear Kditor,
I was readin
infamous "fresh
ing the Freshm;
students about t
attempt to avoii
However, th
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praised salad ani
even open?
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LETTEF
Fe
Dear Editor,
Today, Dec. I
through TEC tha
is being proposei
athletic progran
ever, given the a
football progran
pear that reveni
self-supporting,
fair treatment ani
in their futures.
Therefore, it
fair to expect the
money to suppoi
is heavily weigh
ries and revenue





Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
OPINION
The East Carolinian
features@studentrnedia.ecu.edu
ttf
c Carolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Erin C. Mudge, Managing Editor
Terra Steinbeiser, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Joey Ellis, Staff Illustrator
Dan Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studenlmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Edtorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
(or decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters lor publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent by e-mail to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building.
Greenville, NC 278584353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366.
It almost seems the zoning laws are
arbitrary and follow no real guidelines
when you look at Pirate's Cove and
Player's Club apartment complexes.
These apartments were approved
under dormitory regulations because
of their suite style floor plan, but are
they really any different from the
countless other apartments in town'
OURVIEW
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Permanent cosmetics painful choice
Dear Kditor,
On Oct. 12, 1999 1 received and read your article
"Permanent cosmetics growing in popularity from
TEC newspaper, issue 67.1 would like for you to know
that 1 enjoyed this article very much. This Was my first
time hearing about permanent cosmetics, so you re
ally caught my attention.
As for myself, permanent cosmetics would not even
become an option. I think I'd rather stick with the old
way of just continually buying makeup from the store.
The reason 1 say this is because I am not a person that
takes pain very well. Sitting still while somebody pokes
around my eyes or lips with a needle just would not
happen unless it was an emergency.
Have you heard of any problems or side effects that
have appeared after a patient has gone through this
process? If so, what are they?
Even though 1 won't use permanent cosmetics, it
still is good to have greater insight about different tech-
nologies around the world. I believe that your article
might influence other people who don't have the time
or patience to apply makeup every day.
Tpnya Daniels
Freshman, Education
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Availability of healthy food on campus inadequate
Dear Fditor,
I was reading an article in a recent TEC about the
infamous "freshman fifteen This article, called "Fight-
ing the Freshman Fifteen" was informative in telling
students about the weight gain issue and some ways to
attempt to avoid the situation.
However, the one issue the writer failed to discuss
was the inconvenience of the hours of the dining halls.
The two main dining halls, Todd and Mendenhall, do
not seem to accommodate much of the student body.
With the exception of dinner, the hours are short and
inconvenient. The time for breakfast, 7:30 a.m. to 9:30
a.m essentially destroys any chance to eat for students
who do not have eight o'clock classes. The lunch pe-
riod, 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m gives students no chance
to eat if they can only make a late lunch. How are stu-
dents going to take advantage of the healthy and highly
praised salad and pasta bars if the dining halls are not
even open?
The administration in charge of the dining halls
needs to reevaluate the situation and make the time?
more convenient for the students who do not have a
schedule that allows them to follow the strict eating
hours. When this happens the students who could eat
before can still eat and at the same time the students
who could not eat will have the opportunity to do so.
The smaller eating spots such as The Wright Place,
Croatan and The Spot are open all day and do have
healthy alternatives, which is good. The overwhelm-
ing number of unhealthy foods such as Steak and cheese
and chicken fingers on the menu compared to the small
variety of healthy foods makes it hard for a student to
turn down the greasy food for a small salad. People are
essentially forced to eat junk food to fill up because the
salads and sandwiches just are not doing the job. Can a
salad or sandwich be considered healthy hunger that it
was originally supposed to fill? That is the true ques:
tion behind the great epidemic people call the "fresh-
man fifteen
Hayes Framme
Freshman, Undecided
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Fee increase puts unfair strain on students
Dear Editor,
Today, Dec. 8, 1999, it has come to my attention
through TEC that a tuition increase of $15 per student
is being proposed by the university to support revenue
athletic programs of the Athletic Department. How-
ever, given the amount of money that is raised by the
football program in the fall of every year, it would ap-
pear that revenue sports should be capable of being
self-supporting. Also, student-athletes need to be given
fair treatment and better chances to achieve career goals
in their futures.
Therefore, it does not seem economically just or
fair to expect the student body to kick in extra tuition
money to support a system, or an athletic program that
is heavily weighted in favor of bringing in high sala-
ries and revenue for the ones who control it from the
top.
The athletic department does an excellent job here
at ECU, building morale, raising money and providing
a great relationship with alumni. We need to call upon
some of these wealthy folks who have a lot more cash
than students do, to put up the money for revenue
sports.
We here at ECU are a winning team, working to-
gether to build a better future for ourselves and for East-
ern North Carolina. I hope that we never lose sight of
these goals. There is no reason to push the student body
further down into debt and poverty to support those
individuals who are already extremely well off.
Richard F. Becker
Senior, Political Science
In an effort to help deal with the large number of citizens displaced by
last year's flood, the city of Greenville lifted the ordinance that bans more
than three unrelated persons living together in the same house. It seemed
Greenville was finally going to do away with at least one of its archaic
laws. As of the first of this year, however, that ordinance is back in effect
and residents who disobey the ordinance are subject to heavy fines that
increase by the day. This is a law that may have served some purpose
when it was first implemented, but does it really have any place in a col-
lege town where students are the biggest spenders?
City officials cite zoning as the reasoning behind the ordinance, mean-
ing that a residential zone is designed specifically for single family pur-
poses, not for college students trying to save money on rent. Jhe code
even goes so far as to define a family. A city attorney said he believed the
law brought a "balance needed for the quality of life Now it seems that
most college students live together in communities with other college
students.
It is unlikely that we are going to feel our quality of life is declining if
the apartment next door has three or five people living there. It almost
seems the zoning laws are arbitrary and follow no real guidelines when
you look at Pirate's Cove and Player's Club apartment complexes. These
apartments were approved under'dormitory regulations because of their
suite style floor plan, but are they really any different from the countless
other apartments in town? The fact that the Greenville City Council was
so quick to get rid of this ordinance when we were in a state of emer-
gency speaks volumes about the real intent behind this law.
ari
OPINION COLUMN
The straight-A student's shopping list
Chris Sachs
OPINION WRITER
Welcome back fellow students to a new and excit-
ing semester of qualityhigher learning here at good
'ol ECU. 1 know that you are looking forward to ex-
panding your minds and discovering the rich future
that this term has to offer.
After a month-king break, how can anyone be ready
to go back to school? Even after a two-week visit with
the family I am not ready to begin studying again; af-
ter that visit I'm ready to begin my dream of becom-
ing a wise old drunk. I'm definitely not ready for school.
But for those few die hard students, who are intent on
actually getting a degree, I have compiled a list of things
you need to have for a successful semester.
The first and foremost item is a large supply of No-
Doze sleep inhibiting pills. This is mandatory for the
incredibly interesting lectures that your professor loves
to ramble on with at eight o'clock in the morning. You
know you don't want to miss a second of the sphinc-
ter-constricting narrative about 17th century accounts
of troglodyte dyspepsia.
The next items for your shopping baskets are Pepto
Bismol and aspirin. These are mandatory hangover
medication that you must have in great supply, espe-
cially since here the parties start on Thursday and don't
end until the nest Wednesday. Plus, they will keep you
from eating too many No-Doze and listening to a long-
winded crackpot yawn about 17th century troglodyte
dyspepsia.
The next items to steal are alarm clocks. Make sure
that you have more than one at all times. This allows
you to still be woken up even after you throw the first
one at the wall in a hung-over rage at 7:58 a.m. The
alarm clocks with a built-in tape player are the best
kind: they allow you to wake up to a recording of the
lecture you had the day before.
The next item is to get a job. That's right, (God fOf-
bid) a job. This job is not for paying tuition and biHi,
that's what parents and student loans are for. This job
is to raise the much-needed funds to provide a truly
memorable spring break. One where you can get tanked
and forget about loved ones" classes and your rottfrn
job. And remember: The most important part abenit
the job, is that when you get back from spring break,
make sure to quit.
The next to last item on the shopping list is an ample
supply of excuses; you can never have too many. These
valuable nuggets are needed for late term papers and
missed tests. Try to be original, having the same excuse
as someone else in the class makes you look suspicious.
And for the ladies, get lots of tissues, that way when
you cry in your professor's office about your inability
to get a passing grade because your cat had an emo-
tional trauma from a hairball incident, you won't
smudge your eyeliner. Guys, make sure to get faked
sports injury excuses from a buddy that works at tte
health center.
And the last item to procure is a note-taker. Prefer-
ably someone who is unpopular and looking for accep-
tance, does not drink and has really neat handwriting.
This allows you to miss massive amounts of class-time
and still receive a "C" on the tests. And if the note-
taker gets curious about why you miss weeks of classes,
refer to the previous paragraph.
There you go people�you're now all set for another
productive and meaningful college semester. And t?y
-the way, you will soon be able to purchase all these
items on the Web site I'm working on, so stayed tuned.
This writer can be contacted at
csochs@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
ECU fans lack enthusiasm during Bowl game
Dear Editor,
Watching from the stands as my fellow students
tore down the goalposts at the NC State game, I thought
to myself, we really are spirited, despite what others
may say. And of course 1 was excited to hear about our
invitation to the Mobile Alabama Bowl. I was excited
not only for the team but for the whole school.
My mother, my boyfriend and I headed to Ala-
bama, preparing for the best game of the season. We
hadn't noticed too many students but we figured they
would pop up sooner or later. The stadium was small
but it was packed with ECU fans, while the TCU side
was sparsely populated. The game began with an ECU
touchdown in the first few minutes. The crowd went
crazy. This was a good sign.
the game turned and TCU took the lead. Slowly,
the supposed ECU fans all started to sit down. I real-
ized that there were hardly any students and tons of
alumni. Not only that but these fans weren't even fans
they were people from Alabama who just wanted to
see a Bowl game. The guy in front of me even asked
me where ECU was. Still cheering, we hoped the Pi-
rates would regain the lead.
The last lew minutes of the game came and the
Pirates could still win if they tried but they needed fan
support. I was so frustrated. Everyone was sitting down
staring at the field like they were in a trance. Me and a
lone man in front of me screamed at the crowd to stand
up and cheer for their team. They just ignored us. When
their team is winning they scream and cheer, but when
they start to lose they blow them off. Literally, me and
my family were the only four people cheering, and we
cheered until the very end. How well is a team going
to play if they have lukewarm fans?
The most discouraging point of the game was when
one of our own players stood in the middle of the field
and motioned for the crowd to stand up and cheer. Not
one person stood up. Even the cheerleaders gave up,
and that's sad. I felt so sorry for our team. These so-
called "spirited" alumni paid all this money to come
and see their team play and then just sat there. � -
1 personally believe that a lot of how well a team
plays depends on fan support. And we have very little
of it, or at least that's what I got from the Bowl game. I
hope that next season our team will know that they
have true fans and we will win a Bowl game.
Cara Cousins !
eastcarolinian
is looking for a full-time student to fill an immediate opening as
Managing Editor
Applicants must have at least a 2.0 G.P.A. and some experience in
desktop publishing. The person hired must be a self-motivated,
organized individual who is looking to get some useful experience out
of working at the paper while overseeing its twice-weekly production.
Applications are available in The East Carolinian office on the second
floor of the Student Publications Building (across from Joyner and
Mendenhall). The position will be filled as quickly as possible.
� �






S The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
BRIEFS
Get rich while
getting hitched
� A chance at marrying a mul-
timillionaire drew dozens of
women to a Kenosha tavern,
even though they were given no
"other details about the man
looking for a bride.
"It would change my
jifestyle said Nicole Milem, 23,
a cosmetologist from Fox Lake,
III. "It would be fun to share mil-
Jions with someone. I want my
future kids to have everything
they want
The event at the Brat Stop
Friday was one of several held
around the country. Plans call
for narrowing the field to at least
50 finalists who will compete in
b beauty pageant on a Fox net-
work for a show called "Who
Wants to Marry a Multimillion-
aire
The unidentified millionaire
then will make his choice, and
the wedding will be shown be-
fore a live television audience.
Genny Marquez, 39, a com-
mercial bank worker from
Waukesha, was among those
trying to make the field of final-
ists.
"I'm just tired of working
three jobs, and I have nothing
to lose Marquez said. "If the
man is repulsive, you could
close your eyes. I mean, with
that much money, you could al-
ways say, Tm going on a trip
Fonda finds
religious relief
ATLANTA (AP)�A minister
acquaintance of Jane Fonda
says she has expressed a de-
sire to become more spiritual
but would not say whether that
was the reason for her separa-
tipn from husband and CNN
founder Ted Turner.
The conservative World
Wide Web site
WorldNetDaily.com reported
last week that the separation
between the 62-year-old ac-
tress and Turner, 61, was par-
tially caused by Fonda's "em-
brace of 'born-again' evangeli-
cal Christianity It also reported
that Fonda was attending Bible
study in Atlanta.
The Rev. Gerald Duriey said
. he doubted that Fonda was
regularly attending Bible study
; but that Fonda has "found a
; certain sense of peace among
: people who've found peace with
Christianity
; "I think as she approached
; her 60th birthday, she began to
; search for more meaning
� Durley said in Saturday's edi-
; tions of The Atlanta Journal-
j Constitution. "I am extremely
; impressed with the genuine-
j ness and sincerity in her search
i for spirituality and wholeness
� Durley is a board member of
;fonda's Georgia Campaign for,
Arfolesceftl Pregnancy Preven-
tion. The pastor of Providence
Missionary Baptist Church and
the former president of Con-
cerned Black Clergy said he is
around Fonda "quite a bit
Durley did not return several
telephone call from The Associ-
ated Press on Saturday
But the newspaper said
Durley would not comment on
the couple's eight-year mar-
riage, Turner or the cause of the
separation�announced earlier
this month.
Turner Broadcasting System
officials would not comment on
the Web site report.
The newspaper reported
that the Jan. 17 edition of
People magazine quoted Turner
assaying "Jane wants me to
toefcome a saint But I'm not
at an awaYds dinner in Califor-
nia.
FEATURES
Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000
Creativity, sciences fostered in twentieth century
laiATKANP OfSTROTERI
PICASSO
Key international
figures leave mark
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Many people of the 20th cen-
tury left behind a legacy of creative
innovations, inspired music or
unique literary achievements that
have forever changed the world. As
the next century begins, mankind
is continuing to build on the suc-
cesses and triumphs of its forefa-
thers. These dreamers and doers will
not be soon forgotten.
Walt Disney, the man who built
an empire on the shoulders of a
mouse, was born Dec. 5, 1901 in
Chicago, II Disney did not grow up
wealthy; his family relocated several
times to find a home where they
could prosper. Walt Disney began
his career in animation as an ap-
prentice commercial artist in Kan-
sas City in 1919. The agency's busi-
ness declined, and Disney was laid
off. Undeterred, he continued to
pursue a career in cartooning, only
now, he was the owner of the ad-
vertising agepcy.
Throughout his career, Disney
looked for new innovations and
variations on his work as a cartoon-
ist. He created cartoon ads called
"Laugh-O-Grams" and a series
called "Alice in Cartgonland" in
which live actors were combined
on-screen with animation before he
created the mouse that would make
him famous. Initially, the mouse
was named Mortimer, which was
later changed to Mickey after his
wife told him she thought that the
name was depressing. Steamboat
Willie, the first sound cartoon, won
the Academy Award.
Disney experimented success-
fully in liye action films, "The Van-
ishing Prairie" and "The Living
Desert full-length animated mov-
ies, "Snow White" and "Fantasia
and television series, such as the
"Disneyland" TV series and the
"Mickey Mouse Club" series. Before
Walt Disney died on Dec. 15, 1966,
he had turned Mickey Mouse and
his empire into a billion-dollar cor-
poration. His legacy of fantastic
and innovative animation as well
as his drive to experiment with all
possible mediums for his art has
often been imitated, but never rep-
licated.
Henry Ford created "a motor car
for the great multitudes Born July
30, 1863, Ford lived on his family's
farm until he was 17. He then
worked at the Westinghouse En-
gine Company, where he first tink-
ered with his won inventions In his
own machine shop. In 1896, Ford
completed the "Quadricycle the
first horseless carriage mounted on
bicycle wheels. After selling his first
car to finance his next vehicle, his
profits continually fueled new
changes. In 1903, Ford began pro-
ducing his automobile for the pub-
lic through the Ford Motor Corpo-
ration.
The Model T, created in Octo-
ber 1908, was manufactured over
as period of 19 years. In Great Brit-
ain, 250,000. cars were sold, while
1,000,000 models were sold in
Canada and 15,500,00 were sold in
the United States. Ford's produc-
tion accounted for half the total
automobile output in the world,
lord increased productivity from
728 minutes per car to 24 minutes
per car in 1927. He also paid a
higher minimum wage than his
competitors, introduced the three-
shift system and vertically inte-
grated his empire.
Although Ford was known for
his strange behavior, such as char-
Yosemite National
of John Muir and
photo)
tering an ocean
liner with his
friends to Eu-
rope to end the
war in 1915 by
"continuous
meditation"
and blaming the
"International
Jew" for financ-
ing the war in,
his own news-
paper in 1918,
Ford changed
the world to a
more mobile so-
ciety with his in-
vention of the
automobile.
John Muir
preserved America's beauty be-
cause of a passionate love for and
avid appreciation of the wilderness
and all that exists. Muir was born
in 1838 in Scotland, and emigrated
to the United States in 1849 with
his family. In his spare time, he
would take walks in the lands
around his home or carve wooden
mechanisms. One of these tipped
him out of bed before dawn every
morning.
Muir attended college for three
years, but withdrew to see the
northern United States and
Canada. Muir walked 1000 miles
across the United States as well as
sailing to Cuba and Panama. By
1871, he found the living glaciers
of the Sierras. His writings about
this area of the country started his
successful career as a writer. Muir
composed 300 articles and 10
books about his travels an'd his
naturalist philosophies.
Muir's book "Our National
Parks" captured the attention of
the nation. !ln 1903, President
Roosevelt and Muir visited
Yosemite. Here, they discussed the
Park was perserved because of the efforts
other conservationists. (World Wide Web
dreams that were to become
Roosevelt's many conservation pro-
grams. Because of Muir and his in-
terest in nature and the preservation
of the beauty that exists naturally, the
National Parks System in the United
States is internationally recognized
for its conservation efforts.
Albert Einstein worked toward
peace his entire life, but he was also
the man who made it possible for sci-
entists to invent a nuclear bomb.
Einstein was born in T879 in Ger-
many. F.arly in life, he showed poten-
tial in his ability to play the violin
and his mathematics skill. As he grew
older, Einstein did not have much
success in the German school system.
He was denied entrance to an engi-
neering school in 1894 and 1900. He
began working in a patent office in
Bern while exploring theoretical
physics, and in 1905, was rewarded
with his doctorate from the Univer-
sity of Zurich for a thesis on a new
determination of molecular dimen-
sions.
This writer can be contacted at
teatures@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
University once home to
performers, professionals
Pirate pride stretches a century wide
Nina Dry
FEATURES EDITOR
ECU is an institution that
springs many individuals who
go on to become quite success-
ful in their careers. With this
new year upon us, let us look
back at just a few people who
have made a name for them-
selves after graduating.
Mark Kemp (Class of 1983)
This Asheboro, NC native
lives out his dream of becoming
an editor of a well-known maga-
zine and major contributor to
music television.
Kemp attended ECU in the
late '70s majoring in English and
minoring in Philosophy. Upon
graduating in 1983, Kemp began
his successful climb in the jour-
nalism field as a reporter for the
Burlington Daily News Times in
Burlington, NC.
In 1987, while attending a
book publishing seminar at New
York University, Kemp chose to
make the Big Apple his new
home where-many doors of op-
portunity opened for him as he
wrote articles for Discover Maga-
zine, The Village Voice and Op-
From there, in 1996 Kemp is of-
fered a position as senior editor Roll-
ing Stone Magazine moving up to
music editor.
Kemp's stint at Rolling Stone was
short lived when the president of
MTV offered him the position in
1997. He is currently the Vice Presi-
dent of music development at MTV
and is part of a team in charge of cre-
ating new music and video-based
programs. He and a team of writers
are responsible of creating such
shows as "The Mourning After how
stars deal with the loss of loved ones
and some Ultrasound segments.
Although his plate seems quite
full at the moment, Kemp find the
time to write articles for the New
York Times on the side.
Dr. Annette Wysocki (Class of
1976)
While attending ECU, Wysocki
received her bachelor of science de-
gree in nursing in 1978, her master's
in 1980 and then went on to the Uni-
versity of Texas at Austin to obtain
her doctoral degree.
She is the Scientific Director of
the National Institute of Nursing
Research (NINR) and completed a
NIH post-doctoral fellowship, study-
ing in 1989 in the department of cell
biology and anatomy at the Univer-
sity of Texas-Southwestern Medical
Center and later in the 1991 depart-
ment of surgery at Cornell Univer-
sity Medical College.
Annette currently directs all as-
pects of the Division of Intramural
Research at NINR and is develop-
ing a mult'idisciplinary -laboratory
and clinical research program.
Before joining NIH, Annette
was the Director of Nursing Re-
search at New York University
Medical Center. Since 1986, she has
investigated the pathophysiology
of chronic wounds and has been
nationally acclaimed and recog-
nized for her publications and re-
search. She seeks ways to improve
clinical management and care of
chronic and acute surgical wounds.
John Christopher Farren
(Class of 1979)
Farren was blessed with the skill
to play the piano since he was a
child. As most college students ex-
perience, he made some pocket
money playing in clubs in down-
town Greenville. All his perform-
ing at the Tree House (today known
as Boli's) paid off because he is now
a country music producer,
songwriter and vocalist. One of the
many awards Farren has won in-
cludes being named the third top
producer in country music for the
1997 issue of Billboard Magazine.
Dr. Donna Thigpen (Class of
1964)
Thigpen went down in ECU his-
tory when, in 1964she graduated
with the first School of Nursing
class.
Thigpen has traded her
nurse's capfor a president's role.
Originally from Beaulaville, NC,
she now heads Bismarck College
in North Dakota.
Donna previously served as a
"iaurse in Pitt County and in Rich-
mond, Va and as a professor at
Virginia Commonwealth Uni-
versity and James Sprunt Com-
munity College. She obtained
her doctorate from North Caro-
lina State University. She feels
her background as a nurse has
helped her in problem-solving,
and one that serves as a model
in every day role as president of
a college.
John E. Sexton (Class of
1977)
Owner of John E. Sexton &
Associates of Greensboro, Jonny '
has contributed significantly to
helping the children of North
Carolina as a professional audi-
ologist.
He has held numerous posi-
tions in state and national orga-
nizations, such as President of
the North Carolina Speech, Hear-
ing and Language Organization,
whereby he has offered his ex-
pertise and experience in help-
ing the young children in North
Carolina who suffer from hear-
ing disorders.
Sexton has also been extremely
supportive of the students in the
. ECU School of Allied Health Sci-
ences and has graciously offered
the John E. Sexton Audiology
Scholarship to graduate students
studying audiology at ECU, which
Sexton offers in appreciation for
the support and encouragement
given to him as a student and a
professional audiologist.
Babs Winn (Class of 1973)
�Although Winn received her
degree in physical education in
1973, her passions resided in danc-
ing. While attending ECU, Winn
taught at the Ramona School of
Dance. After many trips to New
York for recitals, Winn knew that
the "city that never sleeps" would
be her new home.
Winn has been in. many off-
Broadway productions, such as
"Take This Show and Shove It"
which she finished in July. Cur-
rently Winn heads the music
group, Winn and the Kickin'
Boogie Band recently released the
CD "Good Home Cookin over
the summer.
Kevin Williamson (Class of
1965)
Williamson was born in New
Bern, NC in 1965. Throughout his
See ALUMNI, page 9
Waiting on the new millennium Green Mile constantly involves audience
Clock watchers agonize
over another year
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Cries to rally massive crowds to
"celebrate the new millennium"
rang throughout the world in 1999.
If only they had paid attention to
their history books, they would
have realized that there is still a year
to go before the next millennium
truly begins.
The Gregorian calendar, the cal-
endar that is currently used, sup-
posedly began with Christ's birth.
The Gregorian monk who designed
this calendar made two minor mis-
takes when he invented his calen-
dar in 524 A.D. The first was that
Christ was born about four years
before the Romans believed him to
be. His second mistake was that he
did not begin with the year 0. Instead
he began with the year 1.
"There was no year zero as there
should have been said Don Collins,
associate history professor. "Since
the calendar began with one, the
millennium will begin in the year
2001. The last millennium began in
the year 1001
The acceptance and use of the
Gregorian calendar has had many
glitches along the way, so the mil-
lennium confusion is not unex-
pected. In 1752, the United States
and Britain finally accepted the
Gregorian calendar instead of the
less accurate Julian calendar that
they had been using previously. The
acceptance came so slowly because
the calendar was initiated by a
Catholic pope. Originally, the calen-
See MILLENIUM, page 7
Pnsioner and
guard are moved
by the same
phenomenom in
The Green Mile.
Death row drama creates
emotional roller coaster
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
In five minutes, a man is burnt to a charred corpse.
It begins with heart-wrenching screams, smoke and
tears, and the scene is so vivid that one can almost
smell his skin. This was just one of the most moving
drama that I have seen this year.
The Green Mile, written by Stephen King, is set in a
Southern penitentiary. The action all happens on the
green mile, or death row. "The prison guards and the
paltry prisoners are the main characters, and for three
and a half hours, the viewer is pulled into their lives.
Death row becomes more than the black and white
place for the men who were condemned to die by an
impartial jury of their peers. On the green mile, lives
are changed, not only terminated.
Every character is acted brilliantly, and you are swept
along with them as they discover who John Coffey
("like the drink only spelled different") truly is and what
he can do. Until the first half of the movie is over, none
of the typical Stephen King touches are apparent. There
are no overtly psychotic characters and no supernatu-
ral happenings.
When the author does make his role in the film
apparent however, the audience is pulled in and can-
not let go. For many of the scenes, the audience is right
there in the room or walking through the woods. The
real world ceases to be separated from the effects and
believable characters. The aspects that will separate it
from the other phenomenal movies that were made in
See GREEN MILE, page 9
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FEATURES
The East Carolinian
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
MILLENNIUM
from page 6
Jewish Mother serves up tantilizing entrees
dar was established in 1582 by Pope
Gregory XII. Between 12 and 20
days were lost in the first year of ac-
ceptance in the United States and
Great Britain because of minor in-
accuracies that
had piled on top
of one another
over centuries.
Although the
calendar is an
integral part of
life now, some
still are wary.
"The calen-
dars are very in-
accurate said
Joe Poran, jun-
ior. "We don't
NEW
New Year's wear
new millennium
Richardson.) .
even know if next year is going to
be the millennium, but it will be
closer than this year
Several television networks, such
as ABC, apparently ignored their
history in promoting January 1,
2000 as the beginning of the mil-
lennium. . �
"The media just went along with
the crowd said Bobbv Burns, city
editor at The Daily Reflector. "They
did not bother to separate fact from
fiction. We, as a newspaper, tried
not to give false information
Although much of the media did
present the beginning of the new
millennium, Burns said that many
would have believed without the aid
of additional propaganda.
"If I was just a regular Joe, I
would just see the numbers change
from 1999 to 2000, and that's a sig-
n I f i c a n t
change Burns
said.
Others
though, are not
so tolerant of
the media's bla-
tant rejection of
facts in favor of
the more popu-
lar, and more
easily sold, fic-
tion.
Entertainment, food
make meals enjoyable
falsely advertises a
(photo by Emily
"I think the Y2K bug and the
new millennium was all govern-
ment propaganda Poran said.
"There are a lot of misinformed
people out there �
"I hate the media, sans college
newspapers said George Knott,
second-year senior
This writer can be contacted at
leaturei@itudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Ryan Kennemur
SENIOR WRITER
Why do people
choose to go to certain
restaurants? Sometimes
they go because the res-
taurant has a massive
reputation, such as
Outback Steakhouse,
Lone Star Saloon and
even McDonald's. Other
times people go based on
the word-of-mouth that
the foodatmosphere is
good, such as Staccatto's
Cafe and Finnelli's Cafe.
An interesting name can
also draw a crowd.
� Such is the case for
the newest restaurant to
spring up in Greenville,
The Jewish Mother, lo-
cated inside the Plaza
Mall in the place Annabelle's used
to occupy.
As you are seated, you can't help
but second-guess the fact that you
are technically still inside the mall.
The dining area is much larger than
David Klop, leftcriminal justice major, works as a
part-time cook. The Helga burger, above, is served
with two slices of bacon and smothered in cheddar
cheese" on a kaiser bun. (photo by Emily
Richardson).
CONGRATULATIONS TO THE
1999-2000 PINNACLE HONORARY INDUCTEES
The Pinnacle is a non-traditional student honorary which recognizes seniors over 25 years
old who have earned over a 3.000 grade point average. Honorees must also be actively
involved in at least three extracurricular activities outside of the classroom including
volunteer service or involvement with a student, community or church organization. The
1999-2000 ECU Chapter Inductees were:
Na'im K. Akbar
Diane Croom Anderson
Tamara L. Andrews
Rosa Marie Baker
Nigel Agustus Brookes
Denise Joyner Carmack
Leonilde Mary Clay
John Anthony Doughtie
Steven G. Drouin
Christie Pearce Ellis
Charlene Mary Francis
Kathy Jo Fulcher
Cassandra Rae Gant
Robert W.Gautier, III
Scarlette Hope Hoyle
Patrick Jenkins
Jennifer Renee Mayo
Joanne Morace
Kimberly Northcraft
Lynne Palmer
Patricia R. Respess
JoAnne Riemer
Laura Rosenstein
Albert K. Sanguillen
Joy Locke Shepard
Kimberlee Dawn Sipe
Tammy Smith
Sharon Standing Bear
Joyce Stevenson
Sandra Toler Stocks
Nathan M. Szejnuik
Julee R. Tarkowski
Tanya Vanderweel
Lisa M. Wicks
Phillip Ziady
you'd expect, boasting a capacity for
250 customers. When you are
seated, you are given a menu that
looks and feels much like the news-
paper you're reading. The difference
is that the menu showcases a pic-
ture of an old (presumably) Jewish
woman standing in front of a bag
of groceries and holding something
that looks like a cross breed of a
chicken and a gecko lizard.
The food at The Jewish Mother
is nothing short of stupendous. You
can start with an appetizer such as:
nachos .of
cheese sticks, all
of them around
$5. Then you
can move on to
soups and
"noshes which
is Yiddish for
"snacks
The sand-
wich menu is
phenomenal,
featuring every-
thing you'd ex-
pect from a New
York delicates-
sen, including' a
a kosher (of
course) pickle:
It's the entrees,
however, that
make the meal special. I had the
"Mom's Meatloaf" which was the.
best I have ever tasted. It was accom-
panied by along with the mashed
potatoes and gravy that can't be
topped.
There's something for everyone
at The Jewish Mother. From
"Mother's Great Grandchildren"
(kids 12 and under), to the older
crowds. The restaurateurs really had
ECU in mind when they built the
See MOTHER, page 9
photographers wanted
apply in person at the
east Carolinian,
ask for emily.
free lollipops to the first ten applicants.
�the lollipop offer U only o ploy to get your attention, the east
caroliman dots not really dittribute candy to strangers
Its TOURNAMENT TIME!
You could represent ECU at Regional Competitions in
BILLIARDS BOWLING CHESS
TABLE TENNIS frflDCS RACQUETBALL
Tournament winners will be awarded trophies and the opportunity to represent
ECU at regional competitions to be held at University of Tennessee, Knoxville,
TN, the weekend of Feb. 18-20,2000. All expenses paid by Mendenhall Student
Center.
ARE YOU THE BEST?
If you think you could be, we want to give you the opportunity to find out!
Mark A. Ward
A T TO RNEY AT LAW
� DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
Criminal Law
� 24 hour message service
www.GreenvilleNCLawyer.com
752-7529
Spades
Mon Jan. 24 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Student Center
Social Room

Nine-Ball
Mon Jan. 31 6:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Billiards Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Bowling
Wed Jan. 26. 6:00 p.m.
The Outer Limitz
Mendenhall Bowling Center
(Men's and Women's Divisions)
Table TenniTtf
Sat Jan, 29 9:00 a,m, - 5:00 p.m. Jm 2? &00 W
Mendenhall Student Center Mendenhall Social Room
OCial Room (Men's'& Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
Chess
Racquetball
Sat. - Sun Feb. 5-6
Registration Deadline - Feb. 1, 6:00 p.m.
Student Recreation Center
(Mixed Doubles and Men's & Women's SinglesTeam Divisions)
There is a $2.00 registration fee for each tournament. Registration forms are available at the
Mendenhall Information Desk, the Billiards Center, and THE OUTER LIMITZ Bowling Center
located on the ground floor of Mendenhall Student Center, as well as at the Main Desk of the
v Student Recreation Center. Call the Recreation Programs Office, 328-4738 for more information.
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The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NORRISTOWN, Pa. (AP)�An
old Gothic Revival style building
that has sat vacant since 1996 would
be perfect for an art museum that
could anchor a cultural corridor that
may revive this economically de-
pressed county seat, an architect
and some local officials maintain.
The unusual thing about this
building is what it used to be: the
Montgomery County Prison.
I When Doug Seiler moved his
architectural office from Blue Bell to
Norristown last March, he became
interested in the downtown build-
ing, which is nearly 150 years old.
"It's a good-looking building
Seiler said. "It's striking. It's hand-
FEATURES
Architect chooses Pennsylvania prison site for art museum
some, well built. It's in incredible
shape for its age and it being vacant
for so long
It took him until June to get in
touch with someone from the
county who could let him inside to
look around.
"It was at that point it dawned
on us there was potential he said.
"It's almost a prototypical museum.
If you were o lay out a generic
museum, it would be laid out the
way this building is
The inmates who inhabited the
building until the county opened its
current prison in Eagleville might
not agree with Seiler's enthusiasm.
They had been crammed in three at
a time into 8-by-10-foot cells. The
basement of the original part of the
prison has cells that resemble a
medieval dungeon, with doorways
that are only 5 feet tall and no
source of outside light.
Pigeon droppings are several
inches thick in some places upstairs.
Hot-rod and pornographic pictures
remain hanging in some cells.
The plaster is crumbling and
paint is peeling'in huge sheets from
most walls. But the brick and tile
work underneath is still as solid as
the day it was built.
Seiler has been awarded $4,700
in local government money to come
up with architectural ideas and
drawings for reusing the building.
The money came from a $100,000
grant the county awarded
Norristown for revitalization.
Consultants hired to devise a
revitalization action plan for the
borough expanded on Seiler's idea,
saying the old prison could also be
used as a cultural arts center or a
combination of the two, said Steve
Nelson, the county's deputy chief
officer for policy and planning.
Built in 1851, the prison and
county courthouse were designed
by Napoleon LeBrun, a noted Phila-
delphia architect of the time who
also designed two well-known
buildings in Philadelphia: the Ca-
thedral Basilica of Saints Peter and
Paul and the Academy of Music.
"I think it's get tremendous po-
tential Nelson said. "It creates a
visitor attraction in downtown
Norristown, and that helps the bor-
ough out. It works from a historic
preservation point of view, and it
reuses a county building so the
county doesn't have to worry about
the building falling down
After Seiler does his work, the
county needs to find out how much
Seiler's plan would cost and how
many people could be expected to
visit the museum, Nelson said.
"Then we start shopping it
around to museum boards and the
Thursday, Jan. 13,2000
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
cultural arts people he said. "The
most likely scenario is for an exist-
ing museum to open up a branch
or a satellite
Nelson explained most muse-
ums have more holdings than can
be displayed, keeping items in stor-
age where the public cannot see
them, so opening a branch museum
could be an attractive idea. And an
existing museum has expertise that
would have to be duplicated if a new
museum were opened, he said.
If an art museum does open in
the old prison, it won't be the
region's first. The James A. Michener
Art Museum In Doylestown was
converted from the old prison.
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an. 13,2000
iedia.ecu.edu
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a is for an exist-
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js expertise that
plicated if a new
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ALUMNI
from page 6
youth, he showed great interest in
acting and writing. Williamson de-
cided to makehis dream a reality as
he studied theater and film at ECU,
graduating with a bachelor of fine
arts degree in 1987. From there he
moved to New York to pursue a ca-
reer in acting, but after only a few
bit parts on TV and the stage, he
decided to try his hand at writing
and directing.
In 1996, Williamson was put on
the map of horror movies when he
released "Scream From there, he
created films such as "I Know
What You Did Last Summer
"Scream 2 "The Faculty" and "Kill-
ing Mrs. Tingle
Williamson is also responsible
for the popular teen drama
"Dawson's Creek which airs
Wednesday nights on the WB net-
work.
Williamson's contacts have in-
formed the university of his most
recent project, "Wasteland a
drama about the issues of a group
of recent college graduates who
move to New York. Word has it that
these characters will be based on
ECU alumni.
Stuart Ward (Class of 1986)
Ward came to ECU on a football
scholarship in hopes of majoring in
acting. With such a hectic football
schedule, he had to switch his ma-
jor from theater to broadcasting
communications. Along with his
courses, Ward gained more experi-
ence by working at the campus ra-
dio station, WZMB.
In 1986 Ward graduated with
the first communications class in
the history of ECU.
Soon after graduating, Ward
moved to New York to pursue a ca-
reer in his first love�acting. He
landed many roles in both TV and
theatrical projects such as "Streecar
Named Desire" and "The Beast on
East 77th Street
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
GREEN MILE
from page 6
1999, like "The Matrix" and
"American Pie"are the raw emo-
tion that is in the movie. Every-
thing is intense because the men
ccnd'jmned to die have a limited
life .span, the guards have to be on
edge to be effective in a high stress
environment and it continually
seems as if every character is on the
brink of pain or pleasure. Nothing
is watered down or muted for the
audience; it is all real and in- full �
color.
If you are looking for a way to
pass a couple of hours after the
stress of a long day at work or at
school, you should seek something
else. "The Green Mile" will take'
you on an emotional journey you
won't soon forget.
This writer can be contacted at
1eatures@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
MOTHER
from page 7
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H The East Carolinian
Www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Thursday, Jan. 13, 2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Horned Frogs top Pirates in Bowl game
Tomlinson, Printers option
rushing attack too much for Bucs
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Phills killed in car accident
Charlotte Hornets guard, Bobby Phills was
killed in a car accident around 11 a.m. Wednes-
day morning. Phils was driving home from the
team's morning practice when he crashed his
black porsche. Phills was killed instantly and pro
nounced dead on the scene. ,
The 30-year-old Phills was in his seventh year
in the NBA. He attended Southern University and
is survived by his wife Kendall and their two chil-
dren.
The Hornets game against the Chicago Bulls
scheduled for tonight has been postponed.
Fisk, Perez elected
to the Hall of Fame
Carlton Fisk and Tony Perez were elected to
the Baseball Hall of Fame, Tuesday. The Base-
ball Writers Association of America eleoted
Fisk, who played catcher for 24 seasons with
both the Boston Red Sox and Chicago White
Sox, to the Hall with 397 votes. Perez, who
played first base on the powerful Cincinnati
Reds teams of the 70s, received 375 votes.
Among those who missed the cut were Red
Sox power hitter, Jim Rice; Mets catcher Gary
Carter and relievers Bruce Sutter and Rich
"Goose" Goosage.
Cowboys fire coach
'
The Dallas Cowboys have had four head
i ;coaches in their history. All four have been fired
;by current owner Jerry Jones. Jones fired his
� fourth coach Tuesday, pulling the plug on Chan
'� ;Gailey's tenure in Dallas.
Gailey went 18-14 in his two seasons, guid-
ing the Cowboys to the playoffs in each season.
Both times the Cowboys have been ousted in
the first round. Sunday they lost to the Minne-
sota Vikings 27-10, at the Metrodome.
; The 48-year-old Gailey replaced Barry
Switzer following the 1997-98 season. Gailey is
the only Dallas Cowboy head coach not to lead
the team to a victory in the Super Bowl.
Williams withdraws
from Australian Open
Venus Williams announced Wednesday that
she will not compete in this month's Australian
Open due to tendonitis in her left wrist. Williams
is the second American to withdraw from the
open in two days. Fellow American, Monica
Seles withdrew Tuesday citing a foot injury that
she suffered in October.
"I am really sad to to miss the first Grand
Slam, because I've been working realty hard
and I was looking forward to playing Williams
said.
Williams will be replaced as the No3 seed
by her younger sister and 1999 U.S. Open
Champion Serena Williams.
In the Mobile Alabama Bowl, Texas Christian
showed why speed kills. The Horned Frogs option at-
tack and speedy defense paced TCU to a 28-14 win over
the Pirates.
Led by the nation's leading rusher, LaDainian
Tomlinson and true freshman quarterback Casey Print-
ers, the Horned Frogs racked up 186 rushing yards.
Tomlinson rushed for 124 yards on 36 carries and two
touchdowns as the TCU option offense moved the ball
easily on the Pirate defense.
"We knew they would be weak in that area Print-
ers said. "We worked on that day in, day out in prac-
tice. My coach told me that they might make me run
the football
Printers rushed for 27 yardj passed for 174 and
picked up the GMAC player of the game award.
In contrast, the Pirates were unable to get anything
going on the ground. ECU finished the game with -16
yards rushing.
"We went out with the mind set to run the ball, but
they shut that down from the beginning said Jamie
Wilson. "So we had to throw the ball and they shut
that down. So we had to run the ball. We just played all
of our game and we just couldn't get anything going
today
The Pirates wen? able to find some success in the
air, passing for 239 yards.
"That's the way it's been all year, up and down and
in between, " said head coach Steve Logan . "We had
our opportunities tonight for about 24 points and let
about ten of 12 of those points slip away
In the first quarter it looked as if it would be TCU
who would let the game slip away. The Horned Frogs
first possession ended when ECU safety John
Williamson, drilled TCU receiver LaTarence Dunbar,
jarring the ball loose. ECU'S Anthony Adams recovered
the fumble and the Pirates took over. On the Pirates'
second play from scrimmage, David Garrard hit a wide
open Arnie Powell with a short pass. Powell scurried 58
yards down the right side for the game's first score.
Down 7-0, TCU responded with an eight play, 65
yard drive ending in a two yard touchdown run by
Tomlinson to knot the score at seven.
Later in the first quarter, the Horned Frogs drove to
the ECU 20. An unsportsmanlike conduct penalty
pushed TCU back 15 yards and they were forced to punt.
In the second quarter the Horned frogs went on top
with a 21 yard touchdown pass from Printers to Mike
Scarborough.
"When I came off of the play fake, the corners squat-
ted. They just stood there Printers said. "Scarborough
just pointed to the corner of the end zone, telling me
to throw it. So I threw it, and he was wide open
With 51 seconds remaining in the second quarter,
Tomlinson got his second touchdown of the night, scor-
ing on a three yard run. The Horned Frogs had opened
up a 21-7 lead heading into halftime.
"We were lucky we weren't behind by more than
what we were at halftime Logan said. "We just wanted
to go out and reestablish ourselves early in the third
See BOWL LOSS, page 11
Jeff Kerr goes up against the TCU
offensive line which allowed the Horned
Frogs to amass 186 yards on the
ground (photo by Ray Williams).
The Pirates' Jamie Wilson rushed for 16 yards on nine carrnes against the sticky
TCU defense (photo by Ray Williams).
Corey Floyd fights the tough TCU
defense (photo by Ray Williams).
Loss sours tremendous season
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
When Jeff Kerr walked off the
turf of Mobile's Ladd-Peebles Sta-
dium following ECU'S 28-14 loss
to TCU in the Mobile Alabama
Bowl, it marked the end of his Pi-
rate football career.
"It's been a great five years
Kerr said. "It's a terrible way to end
it. It's sad to end it this way, when
you know you played your hard-
est
That sentiment was echoed by
many Pirate players. For the team
it was the end of a long, strange
ride that went from a win in
Ericsson Stadium, to a week in a
hotel in South Carolina, to na-
tional prominence and back to a
devastated Greenville. This team
was the first to knock off a top 10
team and the first to beat North
Carolina State in Greenville.
"It was a great season said se-
nior flanker LaMont Chappell. "I
had fun playing with these guys. We
did some amazing things and came
through a lot of adversity
For the seniors, the game was the
end to a career that for some began
five years ago.
"I have a lot of things to be
happy about, but at the same time,
losing this game, going out as a se-
nior, there is something to be sad
about Chappell said. "We had a
great season but the last thing I'm
going to remember is the TCU
game
The Pirates finish the season at
9-3. The teams nine wins are the
most since 1995.
"To come up short is excep-
tionally disappointing for us, es-
pecially for me as a senior Kerr
said.
The loss somewhat darkened
what had been a tremendous sea-
son. However, looking ahead the
team likes what it sees. The Pirates
will lose only 15 seniors and the
team should contend for the C-
USA title in 2000.
"We're 9-3 so, I guess its just
one of those crappy ol' 9-3 sea-
sons said Head Coach Steve Lo-
gan.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Men's basketball team continues five game winning-streak
Pirates thrive during break,
improve overall record to 7-7
Susanne Milenkevich
SENIOR WRITER
ECU'S men's basketball team did not have time to
relax over the semester break, as the team faced seven
opponents building their record to 7-7. The Pirates be-
gan by hosting Jacksonville State University on Dec.
18. The Pirates shot 34 percent from the floor in their
69-53 loss against the Gamecocks, bringing ECU to a 2-
6 record while JSU improved to 6-2.
"I think this was a game that was decided in the
first few minutes said first-year Head Coach Bill
Herrion. "We changed the lineup around some tonight,
but I am not blaming one individual. Early in the game
I am looking to get more production out of our veter-
ans. We try to get more guys involved, but it is not
happening for us right now
The Gamecocks jumped to a 9-0 lead in the first 3:46 of
the game before senior forward Neil Punt sank a free
throw to give the Pirates their first point of the game.
'ECU ended the half with a five-point run to come within
12 points of JSU. The score was 34-22 in JSU's favor.
JSU opened the second half with a 7-0 run that in-
creased the Gamecock lead to 19 points. The Pirates
cut this lead to 11 with 3:51 left in the game when
senior guard Garrett Blackwelder hit back-to-back 3-
pointers to bring the score to 57-46.
ECU-h.it only three more shots down the stretch to
give JSU a 69-53 victory.
"Offensively, the ball will not go in the basket
Herrion said. "However, that excuse only goes so far.
We need more answers to our problems than that. We
are now entering a very fragile part of the season
ECU was handed their second loss during the break
when they hosted West Virginia on Dec. 20. The Pi-
rates' record fell to 2-7 in the 87-76 defeat; their fifth
consecutive loss.
Blackwelder walked away from the loss with a ca-
reer high of 25 points and tied a school record with
eight completed 3-pointers, a mark that was set in 1990
by Steve Richardson.
The Mountaineers opened a 18-8 lead during the
first half after a 10-0 run before ECU sophomore guard
Brandon Hawkins and Blackwelder each hit a 3-point
shot to pull within seven.
a 14-6 run in which Blackwelder hit another of his
eight 3-pointers against the Mountaineers to pull
within five. At the close of the half West Virginia lead
' 41-36.
"I thought we came out ready to play, that's the
toughest part Herrion said. "Make no mistake about
it, I thought we had the effort to play with that team.
But it's hard when you lose (five straight) like this
West Virginia took control in the second half with
a 9-1 run. ECU remained close throughout the half
and with 4:29 left in the game Blackwelder sank a 3-
pointer to bring the Pirates within five.
In the final two minutes of play the Mountaineers
hit 9 of 12 free throws to cap their win over the Pi-
rates.
"It's hard to feel good when we can't seem to win
Hawkins said. "We really needed to win to regain our
confidence
After a week off, the Pirates returned to the floor
by hosting Presbyterian College on Dec. 28. The Pi-
rates snapped their five game losing streak as they beat
the Blue Hose 86-52 in their first win since Dec. 1.
"Right now, our guys needed a win Herrion said.
"We weren't concerned with the name on their jer-
seys. What was important for us, was to go out there
tonight and execute and play well. Our performance
was far from perfect, but I think we did see some en-
couraging things
The Pirates entered the game averaging a mere 37.4
shpothig percentage but came out with a season high .
game average of 60.4 percent.
Punt and Blackwelder teamed up to score half of ECU'S
first half points as the Pirates entered the locker room
with a 44-17 lead at the half.
"In a sense, it is hard to play hard in the second
half when you have a big halftime lead, but the kids
did a really good job Herrion said. "Give Presbyte-
rian a lot of credit; they continued to play hard all
game
Presbyterian College opened the second half with
a 6-0 run but was stopped when ECU regained control
midway through the half when junior guard Larry
Morrisey scored eight points in just 1:10.
ECU finished the game with 11 of 19 3-pointers
and a rebound advantage of 36 to 25. This was ECU'S
ninth game out of 10 this season in which they lead in
rebounds.
The Pirates then spent New Year's Eve on the road
as they faced Fairfield University Dec. 31. ECU im-
proved their record to 4-7 in an overtime victory against
Fairfield opened with a quick 10 point lead with
the score at 20-10 with 10:10 remaining in the first
half. ECU then rebounded with a 19-8 run to gain the
lead at 29-28. The Pirates went on to score nine more
points, entering the second half with a 38-36 lead.
ECU came out of the locker room ready to score as
the Pirates built a 52-44 lead with 13:14 left in the sec-
ond half. Fairfield then took control and mounted a
14-3 run that helped the Stags overcome ECU with a
73-69 advantage.
With only :09 remaining in regulation time,
Blackwelder sank a crucial 3-pointer that tied the game
at 79, sending the game into overtime.
The Pirates lead throughout overtime to defeat the Stags
92-89 in their first road victory this season. ECU out
rebounded its opponent for the 10th time in 11 games
this season and shot 51.7 percent from the floor.
With two consecutive wins on their backs, the Pirates
continued the streak as they defeated Mount Saint
Mary's team on the Mountaineer's home court. The
72-49 victory put ECU at 5-7 on the season.
The Pirates took a 24-13 lead midway through the
first half when they sparked a 10-2 run. ECU added to
the lead to end the half with a 37-21 score over the
Mountaineers.
ECU kept the. lead during the second half despite
the Mountaineers' 15-7 run that brought them within
9.
"I thought we played a good game Herrion said.
"The first half was a strong all-around effort. I think
the biggest thing is that we were.getting some contri-
butions from our bench. If we continue like this, we
can have a good nine- or 10-man rotation going for
us
ECU then extended their winning streak to four in
a row after defeating Belmont College 66-54 in Nash-
ville, Tenn improving their record to 6-7. "We knew
coming in that Belmont was a well-coached team
Herrion said. "We knew they would have a tough style
of play with four or five guys capable of shooting 3s
The Bruins entered the game ranked third in the
nation for 3-point shooting but ECU held Belmont at
just 25 percent with 6 of 24 3-pointers completed.
Belmont took a six point lead early in the game
that ECU overcame at the end of the half to bring the
score to 32-30.
The Pirates opened the second half with a 13-6 run
and never looked back as ECU kept the lead for the
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Thursday, Jan. 13,2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
Pirates to stay in
CAA next year
Teams will not be eligible for
conference championships
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
ECU'S imminent move from the Colonial Athletic
Association to Conference USA did not give many
people in the CAA a warm feeling, Now it may be ECU
that is left out in the cold.
On Dec. 8, 1999 the CAA Council of Presidents ac-
cepted ECU's resignation from the conference effective
June 30, 2001.
The Pirates will be able to keep their regular season
schedule that includes games against the CAA teams,
for the entire 2000-01 season. However the Pirates will
be barred from competing for any conference champi-
onship. ECU will join C-USA in the 2001-02 school
year.
"We continue to wish East Carolina success in the
future, but the Council determined it was inappropri-
ate for a resigned member to potentially represent the
conference in NCAA competition said CAA Commis-
sioner Thomas Yeager in a statement from the confer-
ence.
"Conference transitions are never easy, but we feel
the totality of these agreements represent a fair com-
promise both for the university and the conference
Yeager said.
The decision severs a relationship between ECU and
the CAA that dates back to the conferences inception
in 1981.
"I am pleased by the actions taken today by the
CAA Council of Presidents said ECU Chancellor Dr.
Richard Eakin. "It is clear to me that the presidents
have placed the interests of our student-athletes first
and foremost. Our membership in the CAA continues
to be a most enjoyable experience. Today's action will
allow our departure to amicable as well
ECU athletes will be eligible for conference titles in
individual sports such as track and field, swimming and
diving and cross country. ECU'S baseball, men's and
women's basketball, golf, tennis, volleyball and soccer
teams will not be able to compete for conference cham-
pionships.
"We are a little disappointed but we are happy to
have our CAA schedule intact and keep the quality com-
petition said men's soccer Coach Devin O'Neill. "Now
we have to shift our emphasis and try to make our team
worthy of an at-large bid to the NCAA tournament
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia. ecu. edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian tl
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
BOWL LOSS
from page 10
Larry Williams, an exercise and sports science graduate student, enjoys lifting weights at the SRC every week (Photo by
Emily Richardson)
quarter and win It late. We had a couple of opportuni-
ties to do that but we just couldn't get it done
One of the Pirates' opportunities came with four
and a half minutes left in the third quarter when Wil-
son scored on a 13 yard touchdown run. Down by
seveji, Logan gambled. The Pirates tried a surprise in-
side and Forest Foster recovered. The Pirates' drive
stalled and they were forced to punt.
The Pirates got the ball back'but less than a minute
into the fourth quarter, TCU safety Russell Gary effec-
tively turned out the lights on the Pirates' season, pick-
ing off a Garrard pass and returning it 32 yards to put
TCU back up by 14.
"I didn't see the guy coming underneath Garrard
said. "Coach said he came in kind of late. He just made
a good play coming underneath the ball, because if he
wasn't there, it's a touchdown all the way
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Cowboys fire Chan Gailey
IRVING, Texas (AP)�Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry
Jones considered asking coach Chan Gailey to make
some changes to his offense.
Then Jones decided it would be better if he just
changed coaches.
Jones fired Gailey on Tuesday, two days after his
second season ended just like the first: with a blowout
loss in the first round of the playoffs.
Gailey's undoing was an offensive philosophy that
didn't get the most out of Troy Aikman, Emmitt Smith
and other holdovers from teams that won Super Bowls
following the 1992, '93 and '95 seasons.
"We had some success, but we didn't have the kind
of success I thought we'd have Jones said. "I thought
a fresh approach, a change, doing something different
for the Erik Williamses, the Emmitt Smiths, the Troy
Aikmans, the Michael Irvins, just might be the ticket.
"They tried their hearts out to try to make it pro-
ductive. We just aren't as productive offensively as we
need to be, and we haven't been for the last two years
Jones is likely to hire someone with ties to the sys-
tem that did work in Dallas, the one installed by Norv
Turner and continued by Ernie Zampese.
But Turner, the Washington coach, probably won't
be available, and Zampese wasn't popular when he left.
A possible front-runner, then, is Mike Martz, who
worked for Turner with the Redskins, then used his
knowledge to build a record-setting offense as St. Louis'
offensive coordinator this season. He'll be a candidate
for several of the other four NFL job openings, although
no one can talk to him until the Rams' season ends;
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� 3 hour event with lighting � in-town only
� one per event � coupon expires Feb. 29, 2000
Brasswood
� Quiet Neighborhood
� 1 Bedroom $300
� 2 Bedroom $360
� WasherDryer Hookups
1 Ceiling Fan
�Free WaterSewer
� Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & restaurants
� furnished unit for
corporate leasing available
� Office on site
3216 Brasswood Court �l
Phone 252-355-4499 � Fax 252-355-1554
bfasswood@greenvillenc.com
ECU Academic Planner Sale $2.00
300 Ct. Bonus Pak Filler Paper� Sale $2.65
Staedtler 3-in-1 Pen (Mack & red ink plus pendii) Sale $7.95
Ronald E. Dowdy
m
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support
Scholars!
Don't forget your coupon for $5 OFF $75 or more purchase included In your tuition statement!
PRICE BREAK SALE RUNS JANUARY 10-29, 9000
df Ifc
Stor
Wright Building � 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
fioURS
Monday - Friday
7:30 a.m. to 7:00 p.m.
Saturday
9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m.
Jones, Saunders & Crews
Attorneys at Law
Traffic & Minor Criminal, Family Law
Real Estate, Social Security & Workers'
Compensation, Wills, Trusts & Estates,
Personal Injury, Business Law
3493-E South Evans St.
Bedford Commons
Greenville, NC 27858
(252) 353-1012
'Steven R. Jones James R. Saunders Harold R. Crews





H The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Thursday, Jan. 13,2000
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
BASKETBALL
from page 10
Fisk, Perez in Baseball Hall of Fame
remainder of the game.
' In the final 11:44 pf the game
ECU allowed Belmont just four bas-
kets.
"We got off to a slow start but
then settled in on defense Herrion
said. "I thought our defense in the
second half was outstanding. We
still have some things to work on,
but 1 thought we have been doing
some good things as a basketball
team lately
The victory gave ECU its fourth
straight win.
"I think that winning four
straight has really given the kids
some confidence and it is showing
in their play, especially on defense
Herrion said after the Belmont
game. "We are starting to get a great
nine or 10-man rotation with out-
standing contributions from the
bench
"When you're on such a win-
ning streak everyone feels good
about themselves and come into
practice feeling positive and ready
"Yea, Buffy. I totally can't
believe they really printed
my letter to the editor
to win Punt said.
ECU returned home last Satur-
day to play their last game of the
break against CAA opponent Will-
iam and Mary.
The Pirates brought their record
to .500 with a 83-62 victory over the
Tribe.
"Right now I think we are get-
ting better as a team each time we
step on the floor Herrion said. "Be-
ing ready for games has been a big
goal of ours this season and we were
prepared for it tonight
ECU began the game with an 11-
0 run to take a lead that the Pirates
never lost. At the end of the first half
ECU lead 47-26 as Brandon Hawkins
nailed a 3-pointer at the buzeef.
The second half brought more
of the same action from ECU as
their lead never fell to less than 17
points. The Pirates finished the
game completing 56 percent from
the floor, 43 percent behind the arc,
and out rebounding William and
Mary 39-23.
"Another nice thing that we
have going for us right now is that
we have a lot of guys contributing,
especially the guys coming off the
bench Herrion said. "It makes my
job tougher to find minutes for ev-
eryone but it is a positive thing with
our team's balanced play
Punt agreed that coach Herrion
gives the players fair time.
"Herrion has given us oppor-
tunities that other coaches haven't
Punt said. "He started as a walk-on
against West Virginia and has given
guys time to play
With a five game winning streak,
ECU took to the court last night at
Minges Coliseum in a late game
against CAA opponent Richmond.
"About the winning streak, we
weren't in school, we were about the
only people here Punt said, "just 13
individuals spending time and starting
to gel with the coach
This writer can be contacted at
smilenkevich&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
NEW YORK (AP)�A quarter-
century ago, the lives of Carlton
Fisk and Tony Perez intersected on
an October night at Fenway Park.
Now they meet again, entering
the Hall of Fame together.
The pair, linked by home runs
in perhaps the greatest World Se-
ries ever, were elected to the Hall
on Tuesday, wiping away the times
they fell just short.
"I'll be happy and proud to be
standing up there in July at the
same podium as he is Fisk said.
Fisk is best remembered for
waving his 12th-inning homer fair
in Game 6 of the 1975 World Se-
ries. Perez's two-run shot off Bill
Lee the following night, which
helped rally Cincinnati from a
three-run deficit to the title, is
largely overlooked.
"It's sweet now, when I'm in. It
doesn't matter how long I had to
wait Perez said, who made it on
his ninth try. "The first thing I
thought of was calling my mother
in Cuba. The family was there, too.
They started jumping around. My
mother was crying
Fisk, who caught the most
games in major league history
(2,226) and hit a record 351 of 376
career home runs while playing the
position, received 397 votes among
the record 499 ballots cast by 10-
year members of the Baseball Writ-
ers' Association of America. Perez
received 385 votes.
To be elected, a player had to be
listed on 375 ballots (75 percent).
Fisk, who fell short by 43 votes last
year in his first time on the ballot,
received 79.6 percent and made it
with 22 votes to spare.
Perez, 71 votes shy last year
when Nolan Ryan, George Brett and
Robin Yount were chosen, got 77.2
percent and was elected with 10
votes to spare, becoming the first
Cuban chosen by the BBWAA.
And it could be an even bigger
'75 reunion when induction cer-
emonies are held.
Fisk, who played from 1969-93,
and Perez, active from 1964-86, will
be inducted into the Hall at
Cooperstown, N.Y on July 23.
Sparky Anderson, who managed the
Reds to Series titles in 1975 and '76,
is a leading contender for election
by the Veterans' Committee, which
meets Feb. 29 at Tampa, Fla.
"That would be something spe-
cial, if I went in with Sparky at the
same time Perez said.
Fisk, who spent 11 seasons with
the Boston Red Sox and 13 with the
Chicago White Sox, acknowledged
his Game 6 homer off Pat Darcy was
his defining moment, especially for
director Harry Coyle's reaction shot
of his using every bit of body En-
glish to wave the ball fair as it trav-
eled down the left-field line. When
it finally hit the foul pole for a home
run, he jumped with his arms thrust
in the air.
"A lot of people who viewed that
game realized we're all people and
we run the full gamut of emotions,
maybe even more intensely than
the fans Fisk said.
Cincinnati trailed 3-0 in the
sixth inning the following night
when Perez hit a two-run homer on
Lee's blooper pitch.
"Like, I heard they want to
publish yours too
All letters to the ETriitor must be
typed. 250 words or less. Must
include your name, major, year, an
phone � Send to:
2nd Floor Student Pub. Building
Greenville. NC 27852
www.geeksnct.com
seeksnet
Faster, more reliable Internet service.
ADVERTISE in The East Carolinian
classifieds for only s2 an issue
ask about our
"Student Special"
$17.95 per month
From the people
who know computers.
COMPUTER
GEEKS�vvw-
etower W. Greenville 355-3339 Centura Village Shopping Ctr, Wilson 293-0600
If s Your Place
To Laugh EXTREMEly Hard
JAN. 13-15 AT 7:30 P.M. AND JAN. 16 AT 3 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Big Daddy Adam Sandlers latest comedy. EXTREMEly funny. You and a guest
get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Be EXTREMEly Scared
JAN. 13 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
The Blair Witch Project You will be EXTREMEly scared. You
and a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU
One Card.
To Meet An EXTREME Artist
JAN. 14 FROM 6-8 P.M. IN THE GALLERY
Meet the artist, Keith Moncus, and check out The Line of Movement and Shadow
To Be An EXTREME Pool Shark
JAN. 14 FROM 9-11 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
Rack em and shoot em for FREE tonight.
To Be Rodin' to the EXTREME
JAN. 14 FROM 9-11 P.M. IN OUTER LIMITZ
BOWLING ALLEY
Glow-Bowling It's the latest craze in lanes across the
country! Bowl under black lights with glow-in-the-dark
balls and pins. Newly outfitted with electronic scoring
and refurbished lanes. Outer Limitz is the place to roll.
FREE tonight.
To Win EXTREME Prizes
JAN. 14 AT 9 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
You know the lingo, well now its time to BINGO. EXTREME Bingo is fun for
everyone, especially when there are EXTREME prizes involved. FREE tonight.
To Explore EXTREME Places
JAN. 25 AT 4 P.M. AND 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Join John Wilson as he explores the mystical islands of Galapagos in his film
Galapagos � Islands Lost in Time. You can add an optional tantalizer to this
excursion by purchasing a ticket for the theme dinner. Get your film tickets for
free at the Central Ticket Office by showing your valid ECU One Card Dinner
tickets may be purchased for $12 using either your meal plan, declining balance.
or cash and must be reserved by January 20.
To Witness An EXTREMEly Great Concert
JAN. 28 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Get ready to experience one of the hottest bands on Britain's live circuit today
Although sponsored by the S. Rudolph Alexander Performing Arts Series this
concerns not your average performing arts gig. This gig will rock with a mix of
traditional Irish tunes and contemporary beats. This show will sell out, so get your
advanced discounted tickets now by showing your valid ECU One Card at the
Central Ticket Office. All tickets at the door tickets will be full price
Located in the
K-Mart Center
95; Draft
Everyday!
Sunday
Specials-
Bloody
Marys,
Screwdrivers,
& Mimosas
Only $2.00
No Classes Monday-
So Come To Courtyard Tavern
THIS SUNDAY FOR LIVE MUSIC-
by "The Treehuggers" at 7pm!
The Only Place To Be On Sundays!

321-02
Hey, ECU Students
You made it through New Year's,
You had a real ball!
r3ut it's back to school now,
Where ya' living this Fall?
Think
Eaetbrook & Village Green,
We're ready for next yearl
Visit us today,
We've got it all here!
Free cable, swimming pools, the ECU bus
Your worries are over if you live with us!
1, 2, & 3 bedrooms are waiting for you!
Comfort, convenience�you know what to do
DW LEASING
FOR FALL 2000!
MSC Hours: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - MidnightSat. Noon-Midnight Sun. Noon -11 p.m.
Eaetbrook & Village Green
Apartments
204 Eaetbrook Drive
Greenville, NC 2705ft
752-5100
(Off Greenville Blvd. behind
Pizza Inn & Bank of America)






VWWVWW9V
'Jan. 13,2000
itmedia.ecu.edu
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, who managed the
es in 1975 and 76,
tender for election
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Tampa, Fla.
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z said.
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ox, acknowledged
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're all people and
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ailed 3-0 in the
following night
wo-run homer on
h.
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TONIGHT
DON'T MISS
POLAHIM3
sue
THE MILLENNIUM JUMP
FREEF
T-SHIRTS
HnlfcCO
TV
JANUARY 13, 2000
7:00 PM STUDENT RECREATION CENTER
uu
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
UNIVERSITY
HOUSING
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
DINING
SERVICES





"14 The East Carolinian
Www.tec.ecu.edu
x THIJOIYSHOW
COMICS
by joey ellls
4 SEATS UFT
Thursday, Jan. 13,2000
comics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
by Jason latour
XF HAWSOLO CAN UNDrejTftVlC WOOttE UN�UA?E,
T�B4 UttHCAXT HE Crave, it? OR DC�S HE
�SUT T�1M H& UNPf gSTPS CHEW�f
'lWn�U
Ok 0�t C�a4y
to a,o � Yo� VrM-
Got something to say? Need somewhere to
say it? Bring your letter to the easCarolinian
located on the 2!nd floor of The Student
Publications Building
artoonisfs
artoonisfs
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBUSHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
onstcarolinian
in the Student Publications Building
It's a new year. A new millenium. A new schedule!
Spring
8. a.m. to 10 a.m.
MORNING SHOW
BLUE NOTE
WEEKEND
10 a.m. to 12 p.m.
12 p.m. to 2 p.m.
BLUE NOTE CAFE
2 p.m. to 4 p.m.
4 p.m. to 6 p.m.
hmm ii-j
6 p.m. to 8 p.m.
I
Insights Pirate Talk Comedian organize This Women's
Interview Basketball
8 p.m. to 10 p.m
TWANG
SHOW
lOOTS
Rock
PUNK
SHOW
METAL
Locals
Only
Ska
Show
Rockabilly
PUNK
SHOW
METAL r RPM
Grateful
Dead
Show
METAL
BLUE NOTECAFE
Lunch hour jazz test
LOCALS ONLY
Independent 8 regions music
HIP HOP SHOW
Old school Hip Hop 8 R&B music
PUNK
Agressive 8 intense music
BLUE NOTE WEEKEND
Weekend mix of jazz 8 blues
SKA
Roots of reggae 8 UB 40
ROOTS ROCK
Performance-oriented music
TWANG SHOW
Traditional bluegrass 8 country
RPM
House, techno, drum 8 bass music
RETRO SHOW
Big hair 80's music
PHISHSHOW
Music from the Grateful Dead heirs
GRATEFUL DEAD SHOW
Music from the 30-year reign
GLOBAL RHYTHMS
Eastern and Western ambient music
DRIVE @ FIVE
Popular music, call-in requests 8 band interviews
MORNING SHOW
Wake up with our popular alternative mix
SURFROCKABILLY SHOW
Guitar groups from the coasts
METAL SHOW
Music to annoy the narrow-minded
H
R
Hill March
Turn to WZMB 91.3 FM for Robert
Smith's play-by-play along with side-
lined Lady Pirate guard Misty Home's
color commentary for all of the ECU
women's basketball action this Spring.
328
Want to hear
lady Pirate
basketball?
one place.
DATE
Jan. 21
Jan. 23
Jan. 28
Jan. 30
Feb. 6
Feb. 11
Feb. 13
Feb. 18
Feb. 20
Feb. 25
Feb. 27
Mar. 1
Mar. 8-11
OPPONENT
@ American
@ George Mason
UNC Wilmington
even
American
James Madison
@ William 6 Mary
@ Richmond
@ Old Dominion
VCU
George Mason
� UNC Wilmington
CAA Tournament
air e
6:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
2:15 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
1:45 p.m.
6:45 p.m.
TBA
Guest D.
of the week
Register on our website at
wzmb.ecu.edu. We'll select
one student each week to
be our guest d.j. and join
J. Powell Wednesdays dur-
ing the Drive @ Five show.
ftCMB
91.3
FM
MONDAY-INSIGHTS
Call-in talk show featuring student-related issues 8 concerns
TUESDAY-PIRATE TALK
Call-in talk show focusing on Pirate athletes and teams
imc
Weekdays at 7 p�nt.
on WZMB 91.3 FM
WEDNESDAY-COMEDIAN INTERVIEWS
Interviews with comedians before going onstage downtown
THURSDAY-ORGANIZE THIS
New talk show showcasing ECU's student organizations
FRIDAY-WOMEN'S BASKETBALL
Till early March - New talk show will follow the season
Plus our usual contests and giveaways!
Thursday
www.tec
OOCKSIDE
available. Ne
appliances.
321-6446 dt
ings for app
DOCK SIDE
ly renovated
multi-car co
washerdrye
7702.
ONE BEDRC
one block fr
bedroom wi
block from ci
0723.
2 BR Apts
above Catalc
550month -
PINEBROOI
rooms Free c
leases. ECU t
dromat pets
nace. mariag
DOCKSIDE3
available now
deled. New a
pets allowed,
time. 756-68:
sage.
3 BR house
newly renova
ing and dinii
Street. $575
9040.
ECU AREA.
house. Largi
porch, washer
OK! Six montl
a month. Call
BEECH STRE
bath $650.00
ary 5th call W
agement LLC
SPRING BRE
BEACH "SUMf
NEXT TO SPII
COUNT RATES
, -WESLEY C
1 or 2 bed n
refrigerator,
washerdryer
�facilities, 5 b
jECU bus ser
NOWP
FOR
-All Properties
maintena
ria
B
RINGGG
Now Tak
1 bedroor
Efficienc
CALL
HiM'ilul
FEMALE NEEI
room apartmen
be neat, studic
reliable income
utilities. Call Gil
MALE ROOM
2 Bdrm 2 Bath r
with indoor do
non-drinkers nei
ly 15 min from c
Deposit $175, re
excluding long c
6998 ask for Ps
ROOMMATE
bedroom house I
from art building
erdryer include
8354. Comfortal
ROOMMATE N
bedroom towntv
and 12 utilities
ROOMMATE N
room house. $2
10 min walk fro
0772.
ROOMMATE Nl
house at 409 E.T
mo. Call 561-78�
MALE ROOMM
to split three be
to campus. $22E
ROOMMATE Nl
Wilson Acres 1
month. Spring sei
ROOMMATE W
house- male prefi
painted, washer,
yard. Call after 8
2575.�
ROOMMATE N
bedroom apt Cyr.
12 utilities. Call
This positioi
receptionist,
records, and
candidates n
Excel) experi
time (16-24
payCasual c





� �' �"�;� "i pipppH
Ian. 13,2000
media.ecu.edu
Thursday, Dec. 13, 2000
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian 18
ads@studentmedia.ecu.edu
lafour
�DC�S HE
mists
mists
e!
'SIC
tusk
c
ID
es
try
wsic
)eirs
i
wsic
interviews
tive mix
ow
to
ded
13
1.3
M
FOR RENT
FOR SALE
HELP WANTED
i
ems
EWS
MI
?ys
DOCKSIOE 3 bedroom. 2 bath duplex
available. Newly renovated with new
appliances, carpet and cabinets. Call
321-6446 daytime or 329-0709 even-
ings for appointment, leave message.
DOCK SIDE - 2 bedroom. 2 bath, new-
ly renovated duplex townhome with
multi-car covered parking. Includes
washerdryer. $675month. 919-834-
7702.
ONE BEDROOM apartment available
one block from campus. Also, a two
bedroom with plenty of room one
block from campus. Call Mike 9 321-
0723.
2 BR Apts Available Immediately,
above Catalog Connections. $500-
550month - Call rick � 551-9040.
PINEBROOK APTS one two bed-
rooms Free cable, water 9-12 month
leases. ECU bus line pool private laun-
dromat pets allowed on-site mainte-
nace, management 758-4015.
DOCKSIDE 3 bedroom, 2 bath duplex
available now. Everything newly remo-
deled. New appliances, carpet. Some
pets allowed. Please call 321-6423 day-
time, 756-6823 evenings, leave mes-
sage.
3 BR house available immediately,
newly renovated, painted, carpet, liv-
ing and dining room - 310 E 13th
Street. $575month - Call Rick @ 551-
9040.
ECU AREA, BIG three bedroom
house. Large backyard, screened
porch, washer and dryer included. Pets
OK! Six month lease available. $600
a month. Call 830-9502.
BEECH STREET three bedroom two
bath $650.00 a month available Janu-
ary 5th call Wainright Property Man-
agement LLC 756-6209.
SPRING BREAK. PANAM� CITY
BEACH "SUMMIT" LUXURY CONDOS
NEXT TO SPINNAKER OWNER DIS-
COUNT RATES. (404) 355-9637.
ATTENTION MEDICAL. Nursing, and
Dental students: you'll find the best
prices on all your textbooks and sup-
plies at www.discourrtmedbooks.com
FEMALE CLIMBING shoes size 9 1
2 or 10 and harness, worn twice only.
Call 752-0281 for more information.
SPRING BREAK Specials! Bahamas
Party Cruise! 5 nights $279! Includes
meals! Awesome beaches, nightlife!
Departs from Florida! Panama City
room with kitchen next to clubs. 7 par-
ties & free drinks $129! Daytona room
with kitchen149! South Beach (bars
open until 5 a.m) $159! Cocoa Beach
(near Disney) $179! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
COMPLETE BEDROOM suite- cher-
ry finish. Nightstand and dresser with
mirror included. Double bed converts
to queen. Mattress and boxsprings in-
cluded. Moving, must sell. Call any-
time 355-1969. $900.
SERVICES
SIZE DOES Matter! Biggest break
package. Best price from $29.
WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM. 1-
800-224-GULF
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMOllrM SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
! -WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: !
1 or 2 bed rooms, 1 bath, range,
refrigerator, free watersewer,j
washerdryer hookups, laundry)
�facilities, 5 blocks from campus,
i ECU bus services.
i i
i
i
i
i
i
i
NOW PRELEASING
FOR JANUARY
-All Properties have 24 hr. emergency
maintenance- Call 756-1921
r rppoiTLj I
Qnopemont
!t" SssAfittfav � � -J
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
par
UL4
fflM
FEMALE NEEDED to share 2 bed-
room apartment on 11th Street. Must
be neat, studious, non-smoker, with
reliable income source. $237.50 plus
utilities. Call Ginger 329-8051.
MALE ROOMMATE wanted to share
2 Bdrm 2 Bath newly remodeled home
with indoor dog. Only non-smokers,
non-drinkers need apply Approximate-
ly 15 min from campus. Available now.
Deposit $175, rent $315 for everything
excluding long distance calls. Call 746-
6998 ask for Paul.
ROOMMATE WANTED! Large four
bedroom house located directly across
from art building. Malefemale, wash-
erdryer included. $189month. 329-
8354. Comfortable and laid back!
FUN 8- free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?.
Would you like to have special pictures
to give to your family or boyfriend? I
enjoy shooting pictures of young wom-
en for my portfolio. If you model for
me, I will give you free pictures. Repu-
table amateur photographer. Referenc-
es available (I've photographed dozens
of ECU girls). Please send a note,
phone number and a picture (if avail-
able - it will be returned) to Paul Hron-
jak. 4413 Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC
27893 or call 252-237-8218 or e-mail
me at hronjak@simflex.com. You can
also check my website at www.sim-
flex.comusershronjak
GREENVILLE UTILITIES Commission
Employment Opportunity. Temporary
PT Engineering Technician. Temporary
position available for person to work
twenty hours per week. Monday
through Friday, in the Water Resourc-
es Engineering Section. This position
will involve reading and interpreting
maps and preparing databases and
spreadsheets. Qualified candidate
should have completed one year of col-
lege level course work in engineering,
geography, or computer related field.
Ability to read and interpret maps re-
quired. Possession of a valid North Car-
olina driver's license is also required.
Applications accepted through Janu-
ary 28, 2000. Salary $8.00hour. Em-
ployment is contingent upon passing
a physical examination including a
drug screening urinalysis. To ensure
consideration, a completed Greenville
Utilities' application must be received
in the Human Resources Office. Con-
tact the Human Resources Office, PO
Box 1847, Greenville. NC 27835 (200
Martin Luther King. Jr. Drive) or call
(252) 551-1513. '
APPOINTMENT SETTING telemar-
keters. Full-time or part-time. Flexi-
ble hours. Great for students or ca-
reer marketers. Health insurance, paid
vacation. Great pay plus benefits and
bonuses. Call Thermal -Gard 355-0210.
AFTERNOON Sitter needed for two
boys, ages 6 and 8, from 2:15 PM to
5:00 PM. four days per week. Will pick
up children from school on 5th Street,
and take home for care. Require ma-
ture, highly dependable student with
cleansafe driving record. Referenc-
es required. Good pay. Please call 756-
8262 after 5:00PM.
PART-TIME Positions perfect for col-
lege students 2-way radios allow un-
paralleled freedom when not deliver-
ing (study, hang out with your friends
or just watch TV). Reliable transporta-
tion imperative. Knowledge of Green-
ville advantageous. Contact Restaurant
Runners, 756-5527 or www.restauran-
trunners.com. Average pay $8 to $15
per hour.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available 11
am -2 p.m. Flexible work schedule. For
more information contact Jim Sakell
or Ronald Barrett at Cypress Glen Re-
tirement Community. 830-0713.
BABYSITTER NEEDED TO come into
my home all day on Thursdays to care
for my 3 year old. Call 355-7875. No
morning classes, please.
PART-TIME office help needed imme-
diately. Afternoons: 20 to 25 hours per
week. Responsibilities; clerical duties
and computer inputs. Computer ex-
perience preferred. Respond to Tom-
my or Debbie at 757-0234.
GO DIRECT 1 Internet-based
Spring Break company offering
WHOLESALE pricing! We have the oth-
er companies begging for mercy! All
destinations! Guaranteed Lowest Price!
1-800-367-1252 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
$7.00 PER hour plus $150.00 per
month housing allowance. Largest
rental service on the Outer Banks of
North Carolina (Nags Head). Call Dona
for application and housing infq 800-
662-2122.
WAIT, HOST and bus staff needed
for friendly and fun work environment.
Must have some morning week day
availability. Experience helpful but not
necessary. Pick up application @ Ba-
sil's Restaurant on Firetower Rd.
FARMVILLE DAYCARE has 2 part-
time positions available: toddler teach-
er Et afterschdbl teacher (approx. 1-
6p.m.). Must have experience or be in
CDFR. early childhood or related field.
Call 753-4866 between 10a.m. &
6p.m.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL HAS
full-time and pan-time teacher posi-
tions. Great experience for ELEM and
CDFR majors. Call 355-2404 for more
information.
WANTED: PAYING $6 50hr. plus
bonuses for qualified telemarketers.
No Friday or Saturday work. Hours
4:30-9 p.m. Monday-Wednesday;
3:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Call Energy Sav-
ers Windows 6- Doors. Inc. at 758-
8700 for appointment.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FREE AQUA Fitness! Jan. 10-14 at the
Student Recreation Center pool. Experi-
ence a great workout that is easily cus-
tomized to your fitness level. Check
the weekly fitness schedule for class
days and times. For more informa-
tion call 328-6387.
ARISE PRESENTS a climbing wall
workshop Jan. 13, 7pm-9pm at SRC.
This instructional session teaches
proper use of the harness, various
climbing strategies, equipment and be-
laying. Freemem-$5non-mem. For
more information call 328-6387.
RECREATION EXPO! If you have any
questions or just want to find out what
is coming up in Recreational Services
Spring semester come visit us Jan. 11-
13 from 4-6pm.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING Feb. 1-24.
TuesThurs 7-10pm and two Sat. 9am-
4pm. Become American Red Cross
Lifeguard certified through this pro-
gram. Cost is $110mem-$130non-
mem. Reg. is Jan. 10-31. Participants
must be at least 15 years of age. For
more information call 328-6387.
TEST ANXIETY. Learn ways NOT to
stress over tests, including ways to
help you gain the grade you want. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is offering the following
workshop on January 20. 1:30. If you
are interested in this program, contact
the center at 328-6661.
AB SOLUTIONS. Jan. 19 or 20. 4pm
- 5pm. Reg. Jan. 11-14. Take the guess
work out of your abdominal training
and learn to incorporate specific exer-
cises and different equipment to gain
strong, lean abdominals. FREE to
members- $5non-mem. Spaces are
limited so sign up early. For more in-
formation please call 328-6387.
IT'S COLD outside come in from the
cold and catch the latest heat wave �
Airwaves. The new ECU Media Socie-
ty will hold its first meeting on Janu-
ary 18th at 1:43 p.m. We'll tackle the
dreaded topic of building your resume
tape. Speakers will include local news
media professionals. Check out our fly-
ers in Joyner East for more info.
TRY YOGAI Treat yourself to the re-
laxation you deserve. Cost is $15
mem-$25non-mem. Yoga beginner
Jan.26-March 2. Wed. 4pm-5:15 or
Thurs. 5:30pm-6:45. Reg. Jan. 10-26.
Yoga intermediate Jan. 25-Feb. 29,
Tues. 5:30-6:45. Reg. Jan. 10-24. Yoga
Advanced Jan. 24- Feb. 28. Mon. 4-
5:15, Reg. Jan. 10-21. Power Yoga Jan.
25-Feb.10. Tues & Thurs. 4-5:15. Reg.
Jan. 10-24. For more information call
328-6387.
CRYSTAL RIVER Manatee experi-
ence. Jan. 28-30. Come snorkel with
this lovable but endangered species
and enjoy a weekend in Florida. Cost
is145mem-$ 165non-rnem. Regis-
tration Deadline is Jan. 17. 5pm. For
more information call 328-6387.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post Report 350 All
ready Already Inn. Overcoming trib-
ulationswith elations of times to
comeThe Card Post's New Year's Re-
port will enable young & Old to enter
the new millenium.though old-
eryounger.viaMUSIC'S presenta-
tion Help
GREEK PERSONALS
WINTER COURSE, Jan. 21-23. Prac-
tice backcountry skills in a winter en-
vironment. Expect cold and hopefully
snow with moderate to strenuous 8-
10 mile hike. Location will be chosen
based on forecasted weather. Cost is
$50mem-$65non-mem. Reg. Dead-
line is Jan. 14, 5pm. For more infor-
mation call 328-6387.
WHEELPOWERDANCETroupe"p7afr
tice. Jan. 16. 3pm-5pm at the SRC. If
interested contact Terri Edwards at the
SRC 107 or call 328-6387.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share two
bedroom townhouse. $175. free ws
and 12 utilities. 756-7755.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP 2 bed-
room house. $210 plus 12 utilities
10 min walk from campus, call 931-
0772.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 BR
house at 409 E. Third St. Rent is $300
mo. Call 561-7889.
MALE ROOMMATE needed pronto
to split three bedroom house. Close
to campus. $225mo. Call 757-8724.
ROOMMATE NEEDED three bdrm at
Wilson Acres 13 utilities, $240 per
month. Spring semester call 329-0196.
ROOMMATE WANTED - 3 bedroom
house- male preferredfemale. Newly
painted, washer, dryer, large well-kept
yard. Call after 8 p.m. 746-6468, 746-
2575.�
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
bedroom apt Cypress Gardens 225
12 utilities. Call Holly at 752-9663.
BROWSE ICPT.COM WIN a FREE trip
for Springbreak "2000 ALL destina-
tions offered. Trip Participants. Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels 8- prices.
For reservations or Rep registration call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
RECEPTIONIST WANTED for small
law firm of 4 attorneys: full-time or
part-time. If interested, please call 758-
4257 or fax resume to 758-9282.
TO ANDY Bagwell, Happy Graduation.
Love, Heather Holleman. P.S. My Can-
dy Man
CONGRATULATIONS SCOTTBaiT-
er on Alpha Omicron Pi Sweetheart
Award. You worked hard for it.
Crotcha!
BASKETBALL PREVIEW reg. meet-
ing and intramural sports captain's cer-
tification for those who are interested
in playing intramural basketball. Men.
women and coed leagues are avail-
able. The meeting will be held Jan.
18. 5pm at MSC 244. If you have ques-
tions or would like more information
call 328-6387
I love
Digital Library Center
Hours: 7:30am - 9:30 am.
MonSat. $5.15hour
10pm-2am SunThurs.
$6.16hour
Applications accepted in
Administration,
Room 2400, 2nd floor,
Joyner Library
HI, MY name is Jamie Austin,
big trucks, and I can not lie!
CONGRATULATIONS SHANNON
Butler on your engagement. Love your
Gamma Sigma Sigma sisters.
JON PELKOWSKI, meet me at the
BP, love. Courtney
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma wishes eve-
ryone a wonderful spring semester.
TO EZ, we are friends forever. Love
always. Watson
JARROD WILLIAMSON, even
though you graduated, you can run.
but you can't hide! Forever Mine, Car-
olyn
BECOMING A Successful Student:
Want to be the best you can be? Dis-
cover ways to become a great student
and areas to consider for entrance into
Graduate School or your career goal.
If you are interested in this workshop,
please call the Center for Counseling
and Student Development at 328-6661
or join us on January 18, at 3:30pm.
IIHUTini III 111
illc ill't'd
Hold OffiM-
This position provides overall project support including
receptionist, set-up and maintaining of job-site files and
records, and general secretarialclerical duties. Interested
candidates must have word processing (Word Perfect &
Excel) experience and excellent people skills. This is a part
time (16-24 hrswk) position for approx 2 years. High
payCasual dress Please send resumes to:
r ' CAMP DRESSER & McKEE
1724 Old River Road
Greenville, NC 27834
attn: DAP
-f
JON JENNINGS, I've missed you
since I went to Costa Rica. Can't wait
till you visit in March. Love. Marissa
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Did the
holidays damper your motivation for
schoolLearn effective ways to stay
"on the ball The Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development is offer-
ing the following workshop on Janu-
ary 19. 11:00. If you are interested in
this workshop, please contact the Cen-
ter at 328-6661.
Sp"B &M Twtf MM 1 of 6 unifl busneuM A tf US in 1998 to M
rccognnd for outstmding etftcs Or Councrt of Btnif Businm 8ureji'
Bahamas Party
Cruise $279
bdiys � Mast Meait � free Parties � Includes Taiet
Panama $139
City Bofdw�. Hobday Inn Sunspree 4 More
Florida $149
7 toghtt � Daytona, South Beach. Cocoa Beach
Cancun & Jamaica $439
7 rights � AirHoW � Free Food 30 His of Drinks
springbrcaktravcl.com - Our 13th Year!
1-800-678-6386
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
POLAR BEAR jump 2000! Plunge into
the new millennium. Come enjoy free
food, hot chocolate, and t-shirts with
a chance to win a new bike. Jan. 13.
7pm at the SRC pool.
HEY STUDENTS, the Greenville Re-
creation and Parks Special Population
Department is currently recruiting vol-
unteers for their 2000 Spring pro-
grams in: Track & Field. Bowling.
Swimming. Recreation Camp. Roller
Skating and the 2000 Special Olymp-
ics Spring Games. For more informa-
tion contact Kelvin Yarrell or Dean Foy
at 329-4844 or 329-4541.
ANOUNCEMENTS
CHOOSING A major and a career:
This workshop is designed to help you
explore your interests, values, and abil-
ities to find out possible career and
major choices. You will learn effec-
tive tools in the greatest hunt of you
life. Contact the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Development at 328-
6661 for more details. This workshop
meets every Thursday from 3:30-6.
TAI CHI Jan. 25-March 9. Tues.
Thurs. 12:05pm-12:50pm. Experience
the art of maintaining the body and
mind, relaxation and self-defense. Reg.
is Jan. 10-28. For more information call
328-6387.
What is the fltfp
station For Lacfy Pirate
basketball broadcasts?
?l
91.3 FM on the dial
NEED A DATE?
Try our campus calendar at
clubhouse.ecu.edu.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5$ each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
J� - fc� �� . -





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Title
The East Carolinian, January 13, 2000
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 13, 2000
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1381
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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