The East Carolinian, November 18, 1999






www.tec.ecu.ed
days to go until 2000
NEWS
The Pirates will take on the NCSU Wolfpack
for the first time In Greenville this Saturday. Kick-
off is at noon at Dowdy-Flcklen Stadium.
Educational opportunities
ECU's Study Abroad program In Belize will
be described at an Information session at 5 p.m.
tonight in Room 1021 of the General Classroom
Building. The "Discover Belize: Catch the Ad-
venture" program is open to anyone. For more
Information contact Dr. Tope Beilo at 328-4856
or Dr. Seodlal Deena at 328-6683.
Any student interested in the North Caro-
lina State Government Internship program
should attend an informational meeting with
Internship coordinator Karen Bass at 3 p.m. to-
day in GCB Room 1024.
As part of Geography Awareness Week there
will be a special open house from 1 p.m3 p.m.
on Friday at the Department of Geography's
Spatial Analysis Lab In Brewster Room D-212. A
computer presentation will be displayed to show
the uses of the Geographic Information System
(GIS) and TV meteorologist Phillip Williams of
WNCT-TV will discuss how GIS keeps track of
the latest weather developments.
Fine arts presentations
The popular Jazz at Night program begins at
8 p.m. on Friday In Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter.
"Alice in Wonderland" will be the Family
Fare performance at 2 p.m. Saturday in Wright
Auditorium. Public tickets are $9 at the door.
Call the Central Ticket Office at 328-4788 or 1-
800-ECU-ARTS for Information.
The Don Cossacks Song and Dance Ensemble
will appear at 8 p.m. tonight in Wright Audito-
rium. The group, first formed In 1936, demon-
strates the culture of a region along Russia's Don
River. The people there are known for their songs
and dance steps that commemorate weddings,
holidays, calls to war and an end to long work
days. Tickets at the door are $30. For more in-
formation call the ECU Central Ticket Office at
328-4788 or 1-800-ECU-ARTS.
The ECU Opera Theatre will present Mozart's
"Cosi Fan Tutte" at 2 p.m. and 8 p.m. on Sun-
day in the A. J. Fletcher Recital Hall. The show
will be sung In English and the set and costumes
will be reminiscent of Greenville at the turn-of-
; the-century. Public tickets are $6. Tickets for stu-
dents and seniors are $3. Tickets are available at
the Central Ticket Office in Mendenhall by call-
ing 328-4788. The show continues evenings
through Tuesday.
Volunteers needed
Volunteers who are interested in knitting or
crocheting hats are needed by the Leo W Jenkins
Cancer Center's "Hats with Hugs" program. The
hats are donated to cancer patients who have
lost their hair. No previous knitting or crochet-
ing experience is necessary. The group will meet
from noon-1 p.m. on Tuesday, Nov. 30 in the
Surgical Conference Room on the second floor
of the Cancer Center. For more Information call
816-7867.
The National Kidney Foundation (NKF) is
looking for people to donate their used cars to
be sold at auction or for parts. Of the proceeds
collected, 70 percent will go to support programs
in research, patient services, organ donation and
public education. Donations are eligible for tax
deduction. For more Information call 1-800-488-
CARS (1-800-488-2277).
ONLINE SURVEY
Would you tear down the
goalposts if the Pirates won?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Did you register for classes online?
MYES 34 NO
PACK. PIRATES. HERE. SATURDAY.
��tTtheH�
Volume 74, Issue 77
THURSDAY, NOVI Mill K 1H, UWI
Cashier's Office prepares to change location
New site convienent
to Central Campus
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
The Cashier's Office will be
closed from Dec. 2-3 to facilitate
their move to a new location.
The Cashier's Office will be mov-
ing to the backside of the Old
Cafeteria Complex, where Uni-
versity Printing once was.
The office will reopen on
Monday, Dec. 6, and will resume
normal business hours.
All fax and phone numbers
will remain unchanged. For
those departments that have to
make deposits to the Cashier's
Office during those two days,
Sherry Speight at the Financial
The Cashier's Office will soon be located in the Old Cafeteria Complex
behind the office of Student Financial Aid. (photo by Emily Richardson)
Services Building on Second and
Reade Street will serve as the
contact person. All other busi-
ness for the Cashier's Office will
be handled on Dec. 6.
The move is being done in
order to provide a centralized lo-
cation for financial services. Ac-
cording to Dan Bishop, comp-
troller, the new office space "pro-
vides much more room, so stu-
dents can wait Inside during in-
clement weather
The Cashier's Office is the
last nonadmlnistrative office to
move from the Splllman Build-
ing. Spillman already contains
the chancellor's and vice
chancellor's offices.
"This move has been looked
at for the last fifteen years said
Michael Balko, Jr cashier.
According to Balko, the move
was delayed due to problems
relocating of the vault.
The timing of the move was
planned so it would hit during a
time when traffic is normally
slow.
The Cashier's Office handles
affairs such as payment for tu-
ition and fees, and all other fees.
Also, It gives interdepartmental
receipts.
"The Cashier's Office is a
central point of collection of all
monies collected by ECU said
Dan Bishop, comptroller.
ECU is in the process of mov-
ing all non-essential offices off
campus. The campus encom-
passes 40 acres, which, according
to Balko, is not much.
"ECU is trying to best allocate
our facilities to the maximum
Balko said.
This writer can be contacted at
cherold@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
West Campus receives
free papers as part of
pilot program
Senior Deric Brady enjoys a complimentary USA Today
in Clement Hall, (photo by Patrick Ravlet)
USA Today, Daily Reflector,
Housing work together
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
Pack vs. Pirates

Down East Showdown
State & ECU renew their rivalry
for the 22nd time Saturday
For complete coverage see Sports, page 10.
Belk, Tyler residents frustrated by phone difficulties
Problems vary from
room to room
Terra Steinbeiser
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
For the past three weeks,
many residents of Belk and
Tyler residence halls have been
experiencing flickering phone
service.
"Sometimes we'll pick up
the phone and we won't hear
anything, not even a dial tone
said Carol Smith of Belk Hall.
"Other times people will call us
and we won't hear the phone
Sophomore Lauren Cofoert (right) and freshman Crystal
Driessen (left) relax outside of Tyler Hall, the site of
several phone problems, (photo by Emily Richardson.)
ring but we'll get a voice mail
message
The problem seems to be
inconsistent in every way,
sometimes affecting whole
floors and suites while other
times only one room experi-
ences difficulties.
"The phone will Just go
dead while I'm talking to some-
one said freshman and Tyler
residenti�oniia Moore, "I'll
unplug rt and plug it in again-
nothlng works. When it goes
out, nobody's phone works on
the whole floor. It is really frus-
trating
Other residents in the same
See
University Housing Services, along with the
Daily Reflector, hopes to bring the news closer to
students. The program, which is now in its testing
stage, provides students at various residence halls
access to two newspapers, the Daily Reflector and
USA Today.
This program originated at Pennsylvania State
University after studies revealed that students still
value news print over all other forms of informa-
tive sources, including the Internet and television.
"It is a lot more convenient said Sharon Evans,
student. "You can read a paper when you .have
downtime betweeeWclasses and When yon don't
have access to a news network
The papers can be picked up at Belk, Tyler, Gar-
ret and Fletcher. These four residence halls were
specially selected; they determine an accurate cross
section of students from different sexes and class
ranks.
In its second week running this program, the
Dairy Reflector has tabulated a daily usage rate of
approximately 50 percent.
Brandy Hatchett, student, was surprised when
she discovered the program.
"One day the papers were just there Hatchett
said. "It was a nice surprise being able to get such
an asset free of charge
The pilot period is expected to last until Janu-
ary. At that time a decision will be made to either
bring the project to Its full scale or to terminate it.
Currently the papers are compliments of both the
Daily Reflector and USA Today. However, If the pro-
gram is successful, the university will take on the
costs at a reduced rate.
"It's a great program for college students said
Asa Doolittle, freshman. "Often there is this mis-
conception that we're uninterested in the news,
but it's not true
"To be honest, I never cared about actually read-
ing the paper before said sophomore Lisa Dozier,
"but now I like the fact that it's right there, and I
really do look at it more than I ever did before
Barbara Kuetemeyer, circulation sales manager
for the Daily Reflector, said that their paper encour-
ages students to get Involved and correspond with
their office. They want to hear student feedback.
For example, the paper is delivered on the campus
five days a week, but if students would like to have;
weekend issues, the paper would comply.
"This program is exceptional for university
students because it gives them access not only
world concerns, but also community Issues that
page2
.
a






The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Voters rewarded with prizes
Are you interested in
a job that offers real
life experience instead
of busy work?
The East Carolinian has an
opening for a Managing Editor.
This management level position
offers experience in newspaper
production, communication, time
management, people manage-
ment and many other useful skills.
Come by The East Carolinian
office on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building
(near Joyner and Mendenhall) to
complete an application.
SGA representative Christy Lynch distributes
raffle prizes to students, (photo by Emily
Richardson)
SCA sponsors raffle
for student participants
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
All students that voted in the
Fall 1999 Elections were automati-
cally entered in a raffle.
Students that won raffle prizes
picked up their prizes this past Tues-
day at the Student Organization
Booth in Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter from 4:30 p.m5:30 p.m.
The raffle was organized by
Christy Lynch, SGA director of pub-
lic relationsjunior class president.
"I felt that this raffle would be a
great incentive to get students to
vote Lynch said. "I plan on hav-
ing another raffle come Spring 2000
Elections
There were 37 prizes given away
and winners were selected at ran-
dom.
"I asked an employee of ECU
Winna wk in radio?
WZMB is hiring for the following positions for the Spring semester:
Program Director Music Director
News Director Sports Director
Promotions Director Grants Manager
Production Manager Disc Jockeys
Newscasters Sportscasters
jE1!H!y.
" B R7

'� ' 'm:bxpermi'ei$rtecM&?y:iustadeMreto learn
Come by the WZMB studios in the basement of Mendenhall Student
Center and complete an application before Tuesday, Dec. 7 at 5 p.m.
Mfoj
8S3
12 PRICE
WINGS
TONITE & EVERY THURS. NITE
AFTER 9PM DINE IN ONLY
AS ALWAYS, NO COVER CHARGE!
$1.99 Hi-Balls
$1.75 Heinekens!
$2.75 Pink Margaritas!
EVERY THURSDAY!
Community Square
439-0003
Downtown Greenville
7-1 666
No Fiesta Could Be Better Than
Chico's
"Bar
One Card to select students at ran-
dom from the list of students that
voted Lynch said. "Since students
use their One Card to vote, I
thought it would be a good idea to
have an employee chose the win-
ners so it would eliminate the pos-
sibilities of favoritism
According to Lynch, all of the
prizes were donated by local busi-
nesses in Greenville.
"I called local businesses Lynch
said. "Each business decided what
they wanted to donate and that is
what determined how many win-
ners we would have
Wal-mart donated a $20 gift cer-
tificate, Chili's donated $15 and $10
gift certificates, Chico's donated two
free lunches and 10 free fried ice
creams. UBE donated $100 gift cer-
tificate, Trademart donated two10
gift certificates. Percolator donated
five $2 off gas certificates, Wendy's
donated two free combo meals and
Dowdy Student Stores donated four
ECU sweatshirts and eight ECU T-
shirts.
Students claimed prizes by draw-
ing a number out of a basket which
matched a prize.
Freshman Kristin Baker and Jun-
ior David Bucci won combo meals
from Wendy's, lunior Brian Brooks,
freshman Amanda Inman and jun-
ior Sterling Jones won sweatshirts.
Freshman Casey Rappleye, fresh-
man Lauren Perry, sophomore Jus-
tin Bennet, junior LaToya Davis,
junior Leanne Bailey, sophomore
Patton Smith and junior Shaun
See SGA, page 4
CRIME SCENE
Nov. 16
Misdemeanor Breaking and Entering�A student in Jones Hall
reported that a non-student had entered her room without
permission while she was taking a shower. Subect had been
previously banned from campus due to a dispute with
victim. An arrest warrant was Issued for Breaking and Enter-
ing and a Domestic Violence Protective Order was filed. The
DVTO and arrest were served by the Pitt County Sherrlf's Dept.
Larceny�A student reported that her secured bike was sto-
len from the rack east of Tyler Hall.
Auto Accident�-Two students were involved in an auto ac-
cident at the intersection of Faculty Way and Chamberlain-
Pigford Court, south of Fletcher Hall. No injuries were reported.
Simple Possession of Marijuana and Drug Paraphernalia�Two
students in Clement Hall were issued state citations and CATS
for simple possession of marijuana and drug paraphernalia after
a coordinator noticed the smell outside their door.
Nov. 17
Fake ID�A student was issued a CAT for possession of a
fake ID after he and several others were stopped west of the
Pirate Club for suspicious activity.
Recovered Bicycle�An officer found a bike that had been
listed on the department's hot sheet. The bike was found un-
secured at the northwest corner of Umstead Hall. No suspect
information is available.
Mark A. Ward
Attorney at Law
� DWI, Traffic, and Felony Defense
� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
Criminal Law
� 24 hour message service
www.GreenvUleNCLawyer.coni
752-7529
Thursday,
www.teca
St
Junior FeledaJ
during the flooc
Deadl
applicat
An
ST
Students ,
the Wright
Sports Medici
looking for n
homes.
ECU and
workshops f
Family Relief
Bring in your old
ECU Sweatsmstand save
Bring inryourlol
will glonate i to
muon in the rece
PLUS welLffiy
ECU sweatshirt. We
Lrtland
5 OSt Si
odu
'f th pnc
evei
give ypu 25 off on a new ECU
rtveatshirr if you bring in an ol
sweatshirt. And allfinteli-
gent PiratJefaiis know anLNCSU
sweatshiitij
What a DEAL!
for.
Sale is Friday and Saturday Onlyl
November 19th and 20th .






ov. 18,1999
iedia.ecu.edu
i Jones Hall
m without
:t had been
spute with
and Enter-
s filed. The
:rrif'sDept.
ike was sto-
an auto ac-
lamberlain-
re reported.
nalia�Two
is and CATS
ernalia after
iession of a
west of the
t had been
s found un-
No suspect
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
The East Carolinian t
news0studentmedia.ecu.edu
Students, staff search for financial assistance phone
from page 1
Junior Felecia Johnson (left) and senior Holly Fulford (right) till out Phase II forms provided
during the flood workshop in the Ward Sports Medicine Building, (photo by Phillip Gilfus)
Deadline for grant
applications tomorrow
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
Students and staff walked into
the Wright Place and the Ward
Sports Medicine Building this week
looking for money to rebuild their
homes.
ECU and the United Way held
workshops for the "Phase II ECU
Family Relief Fund" which distrib-
utes funds donated by ECU families
and surrounding communities.
Student flood victims hope to
receive grant money in order to get
on with their lives.
"Everything is gone said
Yolanda Thigpen, senior. "I lived
with my grandmother in Princeville
the whole town was literally
washed out. I'm now staying with a
relative in Tarboro, and commuting
is taking a toll on me. I'm hoping
for a miracle a blessing is needed.
I don't expect ECU and United Way
will be able to replace everything,
but I don't expect them to give me
only $200 either
"1 lost everything except my
clothes said junior David Paulson.
"My home at 800 Willow Street is
gone, but I am surviving the best I
can. I'm hoping for any amount of
money I can get from the grants
Students are not the only ones
in need, though.
"I lost everything in the flood
said housekeeper Doris Moye. "The
application isn't too easy, but once
it's filled out it will be very helpful.
I lived on Old River Road now
my two kids and I live In a one bed-
room apartment. It's hard but we are
managing. FEMA helped me a little.
I hope ECU and United Way will be
able to grant me enough to help me
buy a new trailer
According to Rose Mary Stelma,
director of Financial Aid, grants will
be distributed based on need in
amounts up $2,000. Applications
are available in the Office of Finan-
cial Aid in the Old Cafeteria Com-
plex and the SGA Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. The
deadline for applications is tomor-
row.
Associate Dean of Student Life
Laura Sweet worked with students
as they entered the workshops and
helped them fill out their applica-
tions.
"These workshops are wonder-
ful Sweet said. "Students are able
to ask questions, apply for grants
and get needed documents copied.
It is going well. Students are com-
ing in prepared, and those that need
documents photocopied I am send-
ing to my office at 201 Whichard
Tonya Sanders, an employee of
United Way, worked with university
staff who were applying for grants
and went over unfinished applica-
tions.
"A lot of staff has already filled
out applications Sanders said.
"Many just needed to bring by ex-
tra verification. It's only 4 p.m. and
I have already seen 20 applicants
I'm sure I will see more by 6 p.m
So far I have received about 125
applications from staff
Student opinions varied on the
ease of the grant application pro-
cess.
"I came prepared said senior
Jesse McGill. "The application pro-
cess was pretty easy. I didn't have
to wait in line, and the process took
about ten minutes. I recommend
students check out the flood update
web site to know what they need to
complete the application
"The application process is not
easy Thigpen said. "It is tedious
and pathetic it's hard to find the
needed documents
This writer can be contacted at
ahame@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
dorms have experienced few if any
problems with their telephones.
"Our phone cut off one time on
the whole floor but there haven't
been any problems since then said
freshman Michelle DeLoatch of
Tyler.
"We haven't really had a prob-
lem, but I know that a lot of other
people have had a really hard time
with their phones lately said Brook
Crews of Belk.
Despite experiencing problems,
few students have reported the
problem.
Manny Amaro, director of Uni-
versity Housing said he "didn't
know of the problem" and
no one from telecommunica-
tions services could be reached for
comment.
If you are live in any residence
hail and are experiencing problems
with your phone, please call 328-
0100 to report the problem.
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu
PAPERS
from page 1
will broaden their horizons
Kuetemeyer said. "This community
has a vested interest in the students
at ECU. They are our kids and our
neighbors on an industrial level,
we are committed to building life-
long readers
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Everything You Need To Enjoy The Great Outdoors
ave
td fv
it si
ire;
ria
Birkenstock
Vasque
")() (otcimhc Sired
�, M 278 �
The North face
Inside (he II
Ketty
RIGGAN
SHOE REPAI
4n
3193-AEastl0St.
Greenville, NC 27858
758-0204
Shoe Repair At Its Very Best
OPEN MonFri.
7:30 AM- 6:00 PM,
Saturday
9:00 AM-2:00 PM
i
JIM
I
� 1m






4 The East Carolinian
Ww.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Thursday
www.tec.e
SGA
From page 2
EgyptAir Probe Focuses on Co-Pilot
Vaccaro won T-shirts.
Senior Tina Justice, senior Gary Wayne Baker, sopho-
more Scott Gregory, freshman Cindy Anderson, man
Cartna DiFiore won a $10 gift certificate from
Trademart.
Senior Anie Haley won the grand prize, a $100 gift
certificate from UBE.
Students were prompt when claiming prizes and ex-
cited about winning.
"This was a great incentive Inman said. "It really
encouraged students to vote
"I'm excited about winning Smith said. "I had no
idea that a raffle was even being held when I voted
"I think that the raffle really motivated students to
vote Hancock said.
"This is a good consolation prize, since I didn't win
the election Bucci said. "And I like free stuff
"It's cool that I won Bruner said. "This is a great
reward for all of the students that came out to vote. I
think that everyone should vote
Grand prize winner summed up her excitement in
two words.
f� "Awesome Haley said. "Sweet
Lynch felt the raffle went well.
"The raffle has gone well Lynch said. "It's been
successful, and I was able to inform all the winners by
phone so they could claim their prizes
According to Lynch, those who could not claim
their prizes on Tuesday could have sent a friend.
"Some students couldn't get their prizes at the time
-given so they could send a friend to claim their prize
4.ynch said. "As long as they told me before hand
�� For students who won and were not able to claim
�their prize or send a friend to get it for them on Tues-
day, they can pick up their prize in the SGA Office in
Mendenhall Student Center. ECU One Cards are needed
-to claim prize.
� � This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
WASHINGTON (AP) � A relief co-pilot
alone in the EgyptAir cockpit said "I made
my decision now; I put my faith in God's
hands" just before the jetliner began its fatal
plunge, officials close to the investigation said
Wednesday. Moments after the plane began
to dive, the pilot returned to struggle � fu-
tilely � to pull out.
As Egyptian officials won time to send
their own experts to review the cockpit voice
recorder tape, a federal law enforcement offi-
cial and other sources close to the investiga-
tion described the evidence on Wednesday
that led the United States to the verge of put-
ting the FBI in charge of the inquiry as a po-
tential criminal matter.
The current theory of the fate of EgyptAir
990, the Boeing 767 that plunged into the
Atlantic Ocean off Massachusetts killing 217
people, is both tentative and incomplete, the
law enforcement official stressed. Further elec-
tronic enhancement of the tape recording and
input from the Egyptian experts could alter
the sketchy understanding of what went on.
With no sign of any mechanical malfunc-
tion or explosion, investigators have been
drawn to actions of the crew as captured on
the cockpit voice recorder and synchronized
with the plane's movements preserved in the
flight data recorder.
The law enforcement official, comment-
ing only on condition of anonymity, and
other sources close to the case gave this ac-
count what those recorders show:
Relief co-pilot Capt. Gameel el-Batouty,
scheduled to take over much later in the 11-
hour New York-to-Cairo flight, enters the
cockpit and asks to fly. His request is accepted.
The cockpit door is opened later, after
which there is no conversation, leading in-
vestigators to conclude el-Batouty is alone.
He says in Arabic: "I made my decision
now. I put my faith in God's hands
Shortly thereafter, the autopilot is turned
off and the jet begins to descend steeply from
33,000 feet.
The cockpit door opens again. Investiga-
tors believe the pilot, Capt. Ahmed
Mahmoud el-Habashy, has returned because
he is heard to ask what's going on. They be-
lieve he tries to regain control because he is
heard to say, "PuH with me. Help me. Pull
with me There is no sound of struggle, but
some investigators believe that phrase is said
in an argumentative tone.
At about this time, there is an unusual
split in the plane's elevators: One moves up
and the other down. These flaps on either
side of the tail usually move up or down in
unison to lower or raise the plane's nose.
Boeing has told investigators crew mem-
bers must apply SO pounds of pressure in
opposite directions on the pilot's and co-
pilot's control yokes to achieve this split out-
come. Investigators surmise this may be evi-
dence of a struggle between two crew mem-
bers over how to respond to the steep dive.
Shortly thereafter the jet's two engines are
shut off. The plane regains some altitude,
stalls and drops into the sea.
In Egypt, relatives angrily rejected any
notion el-Batouty planned to commit suicide,
described him as a loving father of five and
denied the family had financial problems.
Family members said el-Batouty had just
bought two automobile tires in the United
States for his son's car and they believed the
tires were on Flight 990.
it
SILVER II
BULLET VOllS
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. 5. Touch Of Class"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 7ii.fl27fi
TVBfPAV
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
FRI&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
Uxuri 5 Mita W� of Crmrrim �. !M At Ifiebad AWdfa Smica k Ln�




You drank.
You danced.
You had se
i
v
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
The little computer Company
4&707 (7' ClS077e?A
Tired of all the superstore price wars, and "e" Systems?
THEN YOU ONLY NEED OUR A MACHINE
rOAir$f??f
Genuine Intel Celeron 366 Processor, 32MB PC 100 SDRAM.4.3G Hard Disk Drive,
AGP 3D Accelerator, 45X CD-ROM,56K Modem, 10100 Network Adapter,
Stero Surround Sound, and 60 Watt Speakers, all Packed into a Mini Tower case.
includes'Mouse, Keyboard, Windows 98, and Ass6rted Software demos, all assembled
and tested, for only $599.00! Add a VistaPoint 15" Monitor for only $145.00
Then we back the system with a "no questions asked"
1 Year Warranty, which means less hassle tor you!
The little computer Company
106 Trade Street
Greenville NC
252-355-910S voice 252-355-
6975 fax
E-MAIL littlecc "esn net j
Wireless service for
just $10 a month!
The Millennium Dance
Keach for the Stars at the
VANCE Of THE MILLENNIUM on
Friday November 19, 1999 from IOpm
until lamat tow dining hall!
100 anytime local minutes
just $10 a month more!
Unlimited local weekends
just an extra $10 a month!
Prices for BellSouth Mobility
DCS wireless service have
never been this low before.
There's never been a better time
to go wireless, so come in today!
� BELLSOUTH Mobility j
DCS"
Dress to Impress
(nnjcjii or .makers)!
Entrance fee will be $1.00 or two can goods.
Free food and drinks will be served!
All proceeds will benefit the housekeepers of (he Residence Halls who were victims
of the flood.
sponsoredby: The Residence Hll Association
"9 voice 4 your Hall"
1-888-327-2001
www.ballsouthdcs.com
BELLSOUTH MOBILITY DCS AUTHORIZED RETAILERS
Auto Audio
252-756-6654
Circuit City
252-321-8011
Express Tax Returns
252-353-6360
Fuel Doc
252-413-0757
Furniture Fair
252-756-9050
GREENVILLE
Office Depot
252-321-5542
Pager Networld
252-321-2168
Radio Shack
714 SE Rainbow Blvd.
252-756-6433
Radio Shack
230 Carolina bast Mall
252-756-8938
Sears
252-355-9700
Speedybiue Printers
252-758-1616
Staples
252-355-4093
Winoco
252-413-0828
Absolute Wireless
252-321-6141
Eleven-month service commitment required. No oirtime minutes are included with $10 monthly access fee; airtime is 39 centsminute, or you can choose the
100 anytime minutes package for on additional $10 a month. With the 100 anytime minutes package, minutes in excess of package ore 35 centsminute, and
unused package minutes expire each month. Prices do not include taxes, roaming, long distance, universal service fee, or other exactions. Weekend
package applies from 8pm Friday to 7am Monday. Limited time offer for new customers. Subject to credit approval, early cancellation fee, BellSouth Mobility
DCS Terms and Conditions, and certain other restrictions. See stores for details. 01999 BellSouth. All rights reserved.

Phillip Gilf
Susan Writ
Emily Rich;
Dan Cox, K
men
unl
OPINK
Na
OPItv
I grew up i
and discrimin;
natural order,
on the Trailwa
boy of 8 or 9
something to
back of the s
food from a si
eat the food a
You see, I
the bus static
and tables ai
people ordere
in a relaxing
not sit and ea
chairs and c
Whites Only s
coloreds were
ture into that
alive and well
of the day.
I write this
harsh memorii
ity to man are
served a table
ing informatioj
witnessed or I
ornIc
Rem
Editors note: T
pearedina 1996 edi
We include this opin
scheduled to began p
on the nature of the
Some N.C
valry between
Carolina Univ
to an end in 1
whelmed som
post-game br;
police.
Some thou
tive display ol
Greenville wo
pillage Carter-
concerned SO'
'Pack and 'Buc
ECU, long
schools of the
wants to sched
UNC-CH�wh(
1981�so they
gram.
Now NCSU
ing a dud of a
are less than
ance of the Pi
little schoolgir
playground di
will soon switc





iv. 18,1999
idia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian 1
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
2
0003
ibility
have
�fore,
�time
Dday!
thdcs.com
10
liters
6
8
eless
41
:an choose the
Isminute, and
'ons. Weekend
ISouth Mobility
eastcarolinian
Holly G.Harris, Editor
Melissa Massey, Managing Editor
Phillip Gilfus, Afeits Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Jason Latour, Statt Illustrator
Dan Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the majority ol the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Editorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
lor decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right lo edit or reject letters for publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent bye-mail to editor@sludentmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building.
Greenville, NC 27858-4353 For additional information, call
252-328-6366
This particular
game should be
one of the more
memorable tilts in a
series that has
provided many
unforgettable mo-
ments.
OURVIEW
OPINION COLUMN
��
Take a stand; reduce racism
Na'im Akbar
OPINION WRITER
I grew up in a time when racism
and discrimination seemed to be the
natural order. I remember traveling
on the Trailway busses when I was a
boy of 8 or 9 years old. If I wanted
something to eat, I had to go to the
back of the station and order my
food from a small window. I had to
eat the food as best I couid.
You see, I could not eat inside
the bus station which had chairs
and tables and a counter where
people ordered their food and ate
in a relaxing atmosphere. I could
not sit and eat because the tables,
chairs and counter were on the
Whites Only side of the station and
coloreds were not allowed to ven-
ture into that domain. Racism was
alive and well, and was the order
of the day.
I write this today because those
harsh memories of man's inhuman-
ity to man are recycled when I ob-
served a table in Wright Plaza seek-
ing information from those who had
witnessed or been a victim of dis-
crimination in some of the down-
town clubs.
I had heard of discriminatory
practices such as requiring a nonex-
istent membership for African-
Americans or a "pants too baggy"
excuse for denying entrance to Af-
rican-Americans. I had heard that
African-American students visiting
the clubs with their white "friends"
were often turned away because of
these discriminatory practices
while their white friends were al-
lowed to enter. I would first ques-
tion why a "friend" would leave me
on the outside of a club that had
denied me entrance instead of
making a statement against dis-
crimination by not patronizing
such an establishment.
There are many other issues that
can be addressed in this regard but I
choose to leave that with others. My
purpose for writing on this subject
is to bring an awareness to the situa-
tion that it might empower students
to change a condition that should
not exist in 1999. As we approach
the new millennium. I would be re-
miss in my duty and responsibility
to young students if I allowed this
situation to continue unchanged. I
am not into the club partying
scene. I would be quite satisfied if
all young students would party less
and study more. That, of course is
an old guys opinion. Although, I
feel this way, I will defend anyone's
right to patronize any place that is
opened to the public without suf-
fering a public humiliation of dis-
crimination.
As members of the ECU family,
we can make a strong statement
against this kind of discrimination
and insensitivity. We need to come
together, as students, to address this
issue because injustice anywhere is
a potential for injustice everywhere.
One of my oft-repeated state-
ments is, "As students, we are the
most important people here
A message needs to be sent out
that will let those who discriminate
know that if one of the members of
the ECU family is hurt, every mem-
ber feels that pain. We are about heal-
ing, not hurting. Take a stand, you
may be next.
This writer can be contacted at
nakbar@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Remembering beginnings of NCSU-ECU rivalry
about who was present at the worst drubbings ever
imparted upon the beloved Pirates.
Jeff Blake, the only speck of talent to grace ECU'S
football team since Cro-Magnun man died off, and
Bill Lewis, the only ECU coach who could plot strat-
egy above the little-league level, moved on to
greener pastures after ECU reached the pinnacle of
its less than blinding brilliance in its 37-34 victory
over the Wolfpack in the 1992 Peach Bowl. As won-
derful as they were, these figures are in ECU'S past.
But what is ECU'S present? To be blunt, ECU
sucks swamp water. They're so bad, it took the threat
of legislative action for them to get real teams to
even consider taking them on.
ECU used to be just a big waste of perfectly good
tax money for some down East politicians and a
cheap institution for higher "learning" where dull-
ards are toting Cannabis instead of taking classes.
Now it'll be a waste of a perfectly good Saturday
afternoon. The whole concept of East Carolina is a
joke� a ship of fools could make short work of this
peanut gallery.
But there is a bright spot to all of this� mashing
the purple and gold till they're black and blue will
be most amusing. True, beating Appalachian State
would be more of a challenge, but the sense of ac-
complishment from ruining the day for thousands
of rowdy 'bucheads'�especially after they went to
all the trouble of bathing before the game and put-
ting on their Sunday-best ECU T-shirts (sans tobacco
juice stains of course)�would more than make up
for anything lost in such a lopsided match.
Editors note: The following Is an excerpt from an editorial that ap-
peared in a 1996 edition of The Technician, N.C. State's student newspaper.
We include this opinion, taken from the era when ECU and NCSU were first
sclreduled to began playing each other again, to give Pirate fans a perspective
on the nature of the on-going rivalry between the schools.
Some N.C. State fans remember a football ri-
valry between the Wolfpack and the Pirates of East
Carolina University. This wildly popular clash came
to an end in 1987 after the euphoria of victory over-
whelmed some ECU fans and led them to incite a
post-game brawl with the friendly neighborhood
police.
Some thought that after the violently destruc-
tive display of jubilation, the boorish hordes from
Greenville would never return to West Raleigh to
pillage Carter-Finley Stadium. But thanks to some
concerned souls downtown on Jones Street, the
'Pack and 'Bucs' will soon flip for possession.
ECU, long seen as the stepchild to the flagship
schools of the best education bargain in the nation,
wants to schedule tougher opponents like NCSU and
UNC-CH�who ceased its series with the Pirates In
1981�so they may create a noteworthy football pro-
gram.
Now NCSU has had its arm twisted into accept-
ing a dud of an old rival, and there are those who
are less than pleased with the imminent reappear-
ance of the Pirates. Sure, ECU fans are as giddy as
little schoolgirls gossiping on who likes who on the
playground during recess, but we all know that it
will soon switch over to tired old veterans bragging
TONIGHTS BIG STORY
NEWSCASTERS SUCH AS MYSELF NOT ONLY
DON T WEAR PANTSWE DON'T HAVE LEGS!
NCSU felt their arm had been twisted by making them play their old
rival, ECU. The editorial below appeared in NCSU's student newspaper in
June 1996. My, how times have changed. Five months after this appeared,
the Pirates stomped the Wolfpack 50-29 in Charlotte.
NCSU knows they have their work cut out for them this time as well.
They are very aware that it is going to be a tough task to stop this Pirate
squad. With the Pirates at 8-2 and the 'Pack at 6-5, this time it will be the
Wolfpack who come in as the underdog. It will be the Pirates who put
their stellar record and national ranking on the line.
This particular game should be one of the more memorable tilts in a
series that has provided many unforgettable moments.
After hurricane-addled fans tore down the goalposts in Raleigh's Carter-
Finley Stadium in September following the Pirates' upset victory over Mi-
ami, NCSU fans took umbrage. Retaliation might come if the Wolfpack
wins on Saturday.
If NCSU wins, could there be another riot like there was after 1987's
match-up? The only precaution that can be taken is to beef up police, but
even that might not be enough to control the 48,000-plus stadium fans.
Greenville has been waiting for this game since 1932, when the first
Pirate team took the field. It is rare for any one of the "Big Four" to cross
1-95 to play a football game. For all of the NCSU-ECU rivalry's history and
tradition, the game has never been played in Greenville.
For staunch Pirate fans this game was a long time coming. Hopefully,
the final game of the century in North Carolina's most intense football
rivalry will be worth the wait.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Discrimination downtown unacceptable
Dear Editor,
Have you ever wondered why so many black stu-
dents walk the streets downtown? Ever thought it odd
that you could see very few black students in the clubs
downtown? Let me guess�you want to know why. I'll
tell you why: discrimination. That's right folks! Right
here on our doorstep, this ugly beast has dared show
its face again in our midst.
ECU students are being discriminated against down-
town simply because their skin tones happen to be a
bit darker. Of course, they will tell you it's because "No
baggy jeans are allowed Well, a lot of people where
baggy jeans�black, white, Asian, American-Indian,
Hispanic or whatever. But you can best believe that
white students are not being turned away.
How about this one: "members only Hmm, this is
an interesting one. How many nightclubs do you know
that refuse to allow someone in just because they don't
have memberships? How many of us had memberships
or were even legal when we were invited for orienta-
tion? "But it's a members-only club you say. No dice
there. I have personally been invited to several "mem-
bers-only" clubs. When you didn't have a membership,
they would go in, pull a member at random to sponsor
non-members and charge you double the cover charge.
If you don't believe this kind of discrimination goes
on downtown, ask a couple of black students. Quite a
few of the establishments downtown participate in this
disgusting practice. It happens most often at Pantana
Bob's, Sports Pad and the Cellar. So if you go down-
town and only see blacks at BW-3's, Underwater and
Boli's, its not because all we do is eat, but because those
are virtually the only places that realize the only color
in business is green. I personally salute these three es-
tablishments, although BW-3's could put a couple of
more hip-hopr & b options in the jukebox.
In conclusion, our colleagues, associates and friends
are being treated unfairly downtown. If you frequent
the establishments practicing this type of behavior, you
have the civic duty and responsibility to do something,
whether you choose to stop going or complain to man-
agement. To do nothing is to accept this kind of be-
havior in our community. If you do nothing you might
as well be the bouncer at the door telling me my pants
are too baggy, I don't have a membership, my skin is
too dark or my hair is not quite the right grade. Better
yet just tell me that you are better than I am and that I
have no rights or privileges. If you are not part of the
solution, you are part of the problem.
Marcus Frederick :
Governor, ECU Black Students' Union;
SGA Judicial Board member
OPINION COLUMN
Curse of '87 can finally be lifted
Patrick McMahon
OPINION WRITER
Well, here we are, just two days
from one of the biggest events in
the school's history, and the admin-
istration looks like they are trying
to spoil the fun for everyone in-
volved.
I mean, what in the world were
they thinking when they set kick-
off for the NCSU game at 12:08
p.m.? It is completely dumbfound-
ing that they could pull a stunt like
this. This is to the students: When
was the last time you went to a col-
lege football game that kicked off
this early? And to the alumni:
When was the last time you even
REMEMBER a game being this early?
Come on guys. You can think of a
later time than this.
The word around campus seems
to be that the 'Powers That Be' are
trying to minimize the tailgating
and pregame drinking as much as
possible. Who are they trying to
fool?
The tailgating fields open four
hours before kickoff, so that means
that the individuals who partake in
this activity must arrive at 8 a.m. to
get their spots and get ready for the
game. Instead of cooking chicken,
steaks, and various luncheon feasts,
these people must now bring skil-
lets to cook eggs and bacon for
breakfast. Do you think these people
won't still drink at eight in the
morning? Come on. You have dras-
tically underestimated the drinking
capabilities of the student body and
alumni community. Hell, I know
dozens of Pirate Club members who
can outdrink any student we have.
With that little message out of
the way to the PTB (Powers That Be),
this goes out to all the students out
there. While we are at the game, can
we at least try to show some school
pride without repeating the riot of
1987? We fought long and hard for
the chance to play these suckers on
our home field, so lets not be the
drunken, crazed idiots that the state
seems to think we are, OK? I mean,
we can be the drunken, crazed idiT
ots they think we are, but let's at
least do it in a respectful manner.
Being respectful means no bottle
throwing in the stands, no fights
and no drunks passing out in the
stands, requiring the EMT's to come
get them. This is our chance people.
This is our chance to show the world
that we ARE capable of throwing
one kick-ass game and party at the
same time without having anyone
get hurt or arrested. The cops are
only there to do their job. We re-
spect them, they respect us. The
curse of '87 is about to be lifted. Lefs
make sure it never returns.
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahon@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Pokemon inhibits children's learning
R.W. Hobbs, Jr.
OPINION WRITER
A new foreign movie began hit-
ting theaters last week�not from
France or Italy, but from Japan.
Pokemon is probably the largest
Japanese phenomenon since those
horrible black and white claymation
monster flicks from eons past
(which can still be seen on the Sci-
Fi network). But it's not just an
American craze�Pokemon is popu-
lar worldwide. The concept was cre-
ated by Nintendo and arrived here
in America as a television show and
a video game. "Pokemon" is the
number one kids show on televi-
sion. And beyond video games, the
concept has also been successful
with toys and playing cards. The
motion picture is breaking all sorts
of box office records.
Whatever happened to educa-
tional children's programming like
Big Bird and Mr. Rogers? Children
are being overloaded with strange
and flashy cartoon figures and
mountains of toys. The big problem
lies with the parents, who are con-
stantly buying these expensive toys
for the kids. Children are even steal-
ing Pokemon toys from each other
at school, and trading, and gam-
bling with them. These cartoons
have no educational features or
message for kids. 1 am convinced
that programs such as "Pokemon"
do nothing for kids except to instill
addiction in toys at an early age.
Some schools are even banning it
because parents are worried about
the likelyhood that children will
become addicted.
The toys, especially the rare and
overpriced ones, become a compe-
tition among children. This is a
trend that has been going on for a
few years now. Around Christmas a
couple of years ago the "Tickle Me
Elmo" was causing parents to knock
each other over in the aisles of stores
just to get it. The same thing hap-
pened last year with the infamous
"Furbie This year, there will prob-
ably be a $200 Pokemon, which will
probably be nothing more than a
4
ball of cotton with two eyes and a
mouth.
Some say that the Pokemon
cards help kids with math and de-
cision skills at an early age. That's
like saying it's OK for kids to jump
on their beds because it encourages
exercise, or it's good to allow kids
to slap their friends across the face
because it teaches self-defense. The
education argument does not wash
when you account for the sensory
overload of the toys, the gambling
and fighting over the cards, and the
addictive nature of the whole phe-
nomenon.
Children need to be discouraged
from viewing programs that do
nothing to educate them yet do a
lot to hinder their morals and in-
crease their brattiness. Shows like
this and their spinoffs only desen-
sitize children. We should steer kids
away from the plotless, mindless
and unpronounceable and encour-
age the more educational, American
programming.
This writer can be contaced at
rhobbs@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
6 I

. ft! , afcS t






1 The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The wild, wacky
world of Wonka candy
Nards
Bite size morsels of hard candy dipped in a fla-
vored candy shell. Each package comes with two
Different flavors to choose from. Eat them sepa-
rately or mix 'em up for a fruity combination.
Dweebs
If you're looking for Nerds without all of the
crunch, Dweebs are for you. These sweet, plump
morsels are the candy you crave.
Everlasting Gobstoppers
Take a bite into the candy that never ends. These
; candies have multicolored layers of candy shells
I that offer many different flavors for you to delve
5 into. Also available: chewy gobstoppers.
Hunts
These fruit-shaped delights come in a variety of
-flavors ranging from banana to orange. Try them
in the regular and chewy variety.
Shock Tarts
Looking for something a little sour but still oh-so-
sweet? Shock Tarts are what you want. Enjoy
sweet flavors like lemon, grape and cherry once
you pass the tart layer if you can.
Heart-shaped runts
Why not let that special someone know how much
you care with a bag of heart-shaped runts. Same
delicious flavors as regular Runts, but they are
only available around Valentine's Day.
Wonka Bar
The chocolate candy bar we all remember from
the movie "Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Fac-
tory" is made of graham crackers covered in
smooth rich chocolate. A great treat for chocolate
lovers.
Wr ��
Tangy Taffy
Try this delicious chewy square with a kick. These
tangy goodies come in a variety of flavors like
cherry, sparkle banana, tropical trio, watermelon
and many others.
LaffyTaffy�
Enjoy a laugh with this chewy taffy candy. Each
piece is individually wrapped with jokes inscribed
on the paper and comes in a variety of flavors.
Pixy Sticks
Have a sweet tooth? Pixy Sticks will cure what
you crave. These sticks are packed with sugar
available in a variety of colors and flavors. Mix
'em up, share them with friends or add them to
your lemon-lime carbonated beverage for a new
twist.
iPhotos courtesy of the World Wide Web.)
Army ROTC cadets outshine peers at camp
Training teaches
valuable life skills
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
The Army ROTC at ECU taps the full potential of
its cadets in a variety of activities. During their field
training exercise at Ft. Bragg on Nov. 7 and 8, their
skills and abilities were tested In a series of challenging
activities.
Over the course of one weekend, 42 cadets ranging
from sophomores to seniors, were put through land
navigation exercises, a leadership reaction course and
a qualifying test at the rifle range. All of these exercises
are intended to give the cadets a taste of the challenges
the Army will present them after they leave college.
"Each of the things that they are exposed to before
they go to camp gives them more realistic training and
more realistic evaluations to see how they stack up
against their peers said Lt. Col. Michael Loftin.
ECU'S ROTC cadets, in the opinion of Loftin, ex-
celled in comparison to the other cadets who were train-
ing.
"We are head over heels above the cadets we trained
with at St. Augustine's College in Raleigh Loftin said.
The first activity, a land navigation exercise, chal-
lenges the cadet to find certain markers in the envi-
ronment using a compass. They do this exercise twice,
the first time during the day and the second at night.
"The land navigation course at night was interest-
ing because it demonstrated what skills we did or didn't
have negotiating the terrain Loftin said.
Another activity, the leadership reaction course,
gave the cadets the opportunity to see what they could
do when put in command. The cadets are broken down
See ROTC, page 7
Cadet Heather Riley (center) and teammates from St.
Augustine's move successfully through the obstacles, (photo
courtesy of Murphrey Knox)
Alumni House aids graduates in real worid
Office offers
connections, activities
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
After four (or five) years at our institution, five
lovely words ring in the ears of some of our gradu-
ates. No, not "thank goodness, I finally graduated
even though many may say that, but "what do I do
now?"
With a degree in hand, many students leave the
university to move on to bigger and better things,
never looking back. Many do not realize what a use-
ful resource ECU has available for students who are
about to cross that threshold into the real world. The
Alumni Affairs Office offers many avenues for ECU
students.
According to Phillip Home, associate vice chan-
cellor of Alumni Affairs, there are a variety of mea-
sures the Alumni Relations Office take to ensure con-
tact with ECU graduates.
"The primary mean used to keep in contact with
alumni on a regular basis would be "The ECU Re-
port a quarterly magazine that is published by
Alumni Relations Home said.
Home also said alumni should visit the award-
winning Web site which posts a variety of events and
activities taking place through the many alumni
chapters located all over the country. This site is up-
dated daily.
The Alumni House will also send direct and elec-
tronic mail to alumni, informing them of special
benefits and upcoming programs such as Homecom-
ing and reunion activities, receptions for ECU legis-
lators and policy makers, chapter golf tournaments,
alumni socialscareer exchanges, even tailgate par-
ties held at Dowdy-Ficklen.
According to Home, there are currently well over
85,000 general members, 12,000 of which are con-
sidered active members at the alumni house.
With so many students coming in and out of ECU,
what becomes of them after graduation? Out of the
multitude, let's look at two successful graduates who
have accomplished many things after leaving this
institution.
Babs Winn graduated from ECU in 1973, receiv-
ing her bachelor's of art degree in physical educa-
tion. Her true passion, however resided in dance.
Professors' passions
spark pastimes
Life continues for
everyone beyond classrooms
J. Lee Hughes
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
In front of every professor, there is a desk covered
with assignments, lesson plans and appointment cal-
endars. Behind this same professor however, are typi-
cally photos of trips they have taken and of their life
beyond ECU.
Dr. Makuck stands in front of large stacks of books in his
office, (photo by Susan Wright)
As a business professor, Dr. Dan Schisler's desk is
stacked high with various papers and such. After he
has conquered the stack and earned himself some free
time, he enjoys many of the same activities that other
North Carolinians do.
"I like hunting, fishing, scuba diving off the
See PROFESSOR, page 9
'I 9
1931 graduate Babs Winn went on be
the first presentor on the Home
Shopping Channel, (file photo)
"I wanted to
study with Ma-
vis Ray, the first
dance professor
here at ECU, but
they didn't have
a dance major,
so I minored in
it Winn said.
Beside her
regular course
load, Winn also
performed in
many of the
productions put
on by ECU and
taught at
R a m o n a ' s
School of
Dance, a small
dance studio
here in
Greenville. It
was through
R a m o n a
VanNortwick
that Winn re-
ceived her first
taste of "the Big
Apple
" Ramon a
would bring me
to New York for
dance produc-
tions where we
would stay for a
week Winn
said. "I just fell
in love with the
place 1 knew 1 had to be there
So one year after graduating from ECU, Winn
moved up to New York, and has remained there ever
since.
Currently, Winn keeps extremely busy running
many businesses. In 1988, she created a company that
coordinates demonstrations in department stores. Her
company presents a variety of items ranging from ap-
pliances to food. Winn is also the first person known
to appear on the Home Shopping Network to present
products, which she still does for specific items. Among
all of this, Winn still has time for her other passion.
A NOTCH ABOVE THE NORM
Dr. Margaret Bauer
English
Dr. Margaret Bauer's office Is decorated with tra-
ditional Southern sayings and quotes about women,
femininity and multiple copies of the North Caro-
lina Literary Review (NCLR). Bauer currently teaches
literature classes at ECU, in addition to editing the
NCLR.
After growing up in Franklin, La she followed
her ambitions. Contrary to the normal expectations
for a woman from her hometown, Bauer went on
to pursue a successful academic career.
She attended Louisiana State University, Univer-
sity of Southwest Louisiana and University of Ten-
nessee at Knoxville, and earned a Ph.D. in English
with a specialization in Southern literature. Her the-
sis was on Ellen Gilchrist, which has since been pub-
lished as a book.
Her passion, as well as her job, focuses on South-
ern literature. She also teaches women's literature
and black literature. One of the places she has taught
is Wabash University in Indiana, an all-male liberal
arts college. Bauer said It was definitely an experi-
ence teaching women's literature to a small group
of men.
During her career as a professor and an editor,
she has had the opportunity to meet several presti-
gious writers.
Fred Chappell, the poet laureate of NC, was one
she has had the pleasure of knowing, as well as Lee
Smith. According to Bauer, some of the most In-
credible Southern writers are living and writing In
NC today. It is an amazing time for N.C. literature,
and many students don't realize what is happen-
ing in literary circles now.
In her classes she is animated, upbeat and in-
volved, and encourages student discussion.
Whether conducting class or conversation, It Is ap-
parent Bauer loves her job and the Southern litera-
ture that she teaches.
performing.
"One of the major productions I've done was the
off-Broadway show called, 'Take This Show and Shove
It Winn said. "I finished that in July and have done
smaller projects since then
She also has a country-western band called "Ms.
Babs and the Kickin' Boogie Band They have just
completed their CD, "Good Home Cookin and
released it this past summer. In September, they
opened for Bryan White at the Westbury Music Fair
in Westbury, Long Island. With all of these events
going on, the Alumni Center has been giving much
support along the way.
"ECU is supporting the marketing of the CD
Winn said. "They're always thinking about people
they can hook me up with and in a couple of weeks
they will have a link on their site to my Web page;
they've been very supportive
This past May, Ryan Jasen Henne graduated from
ECU with a bachelor's of science in communications.
Currently he attends Grand Valley State University
in Michigan.
"I'm getting my master's in student affairs and
counseling Henne said.
Although it's barely been a year since Henne
graduated from ECU, he has received assistance from
Alumni Relations.
"They helped me out a lot with Project ECU, a
program created for victims of Hurricane Floyd
Henne said.
Once Henne heard about the disaster caused by
the hurricane, he immediately organized Project ECU
in order to get the student body at Grand Valley State
involved by donating items ECU students may need.
"We ended up bringing over 1,500 pounds of
items for the students of ECU Henne said.
Both Winn and Henne agree that the Alumni
House is a great asset for students to take advantage
of.
According to Winn, had she not gotten involved
with the Alumni House, it would have been "one
huge area of support she would have totally missed
out on
"There are connections I would never have made
had I not been involved with Alumni Relations
Winn said.
"I definitely recommend students get involved
with Alumni Relations because they offer a vast net-
See ALUMNI, page 7
Ian Haus Film Series
shows student projects
Amateurs display their
cinematic expertise
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
Your film could be on the big screen with hundreds
of students waiting eagerly to see your character's next
move. Thanks to the Ian Haus Film Series, students will
have the opportunity to show their film in front of an
audience.
"The idea was brought to me at a meeting by Dr.
Dale Jacobs, who teaches a film class said Cathy Black,
the Films Committee Chair for the Student Union. "The
idea was brought up to him by a student
One day during an Intro to Film class a senior named
Jesse McGill made the suggestion to Jacobs, a professor
in the English department who is also on the Films
Committee.
"I think it's a great idea Jacobs said. "There are a
lot of students interested in producing films
McGill said he had been thinking about the idea of
showing student films for awhile now.
"I watch a lot of independent films and I would
like to work in a production house someday McGill
said. Even though McGill has done a few small films
himself, he would possibly be interested in editing.
Black said that the Ian Haus Film Series was named
after Jesse McGill, because his middle name is Ian. She
said he wanted to get the ECU student's films shown,
and the Student Union was willing to put it on.
McGill also said he would like to see the Film Festi-
val turn Into an annual event here at ECU.
"Eventually we want to end up doing an Ian Haus
Film Festival next semester but it depends on what
kind of response we get from the public this semester
Black said.
See FUN, page 9
r
V





18,1999
dia.ecu.edu
nates from St
bstacles. (photo
)rid
done was the
w and Shove
id have done
d called "Ms.
ley have just
xkin and
ember, they
ry Music Fair
these events
giving much
of the CD
ibout people
iple of weeks
y Web page;
iduated from
nunications.
:e University
t affairs and
;ince Henne
istance from
aject ECU, a
:ane Floyd
er caused by
Project ECU
1 Valley State
ts may need.
) pounds of
said.
the Alumni
;e advantage
ten involved
t been "one
itally missed
r have made
Relations
;et involved
:r a vast net-
ojects
eir
e
with hundreds
haracter's next
s, students will
i in front of an
neeting by Dr.
id Cathy Black,
it Union. "The
it
i senior named
ibs, a professor
i on the Films
i. "There are a
Films
out the idea of
s and I would
leday McGill
ew small films
1 in editing,
ies was named
ime is Ian. She
s films shown,
ut it on.
the Film Festi-
:u.
ig an Ian Haus
ends on what
this semester
Thursday,Nov. 18,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
ALUMNI
from page 6
work of resources that you can pull from once you get
into the real world Henne said. "There are Pirates all
over the world and Pirates always look out for other
Pirates
MISCELLANEA
This writer can
ridry&studentmedia. ecu. edu.
be contacted at
Got Something to say?
Need somewhere to say it?
eastcarolinian
Kenton Bell
Quintessential Quotes:
"Leam everything you can, you never know when you
will need it
-Antenore Adams
"When I die, I want to be buried by my wife, so that I
can reach out and hold her hand
-William Eugene Bell
Stuff that I bat you don't cara about:
�Steve Jobs' first job was with Ataria, working the
night shift due to his bathing habits.
�Apple was chosen as the name for the fledging com-
puter company so that it appeared before Ataria in
the phone book.
�Steve Jobs and Steve Wosniak made money in col-
lege by producing "Blue Boxes" used to make free
long-distance phone calls.
�Bill Gates' first invention was the "Traf-o-meter to
determine if a intersection needs a stop light.
�If you put Bill Gates' full name in binary-code, it
equals 666.
�Microsoft owns 20 percent of Macintosh.
Computer terms:
�FTP�File transfer protocol
�HTML�Hypertext markup language
�HTTP�Hypertext transfer protocol
�GUI�Graphic users interface
�DOS�Data operating system
�RAM�Random access memory
�CD-ROM�Compact disc acting as a read-only
memory device
Challenge Quastion:
In the song "American Pie what is the Levy, Rye and
why call is it called "American Pie?"
This writer can be contacted at
kbell@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
ROTC
from page 6
East Carolina
University
Dining
Services
FREE FOOD!
FLEXIBLE HOUR
HOLIDAY CASH!
We Need:
Catering Waitstaff,
Cashiers, Cooks.
and Dishwashers
Apply at MSC-ARAMARK Office
into eight man squads, and one cadet must lead the
group through the obstacles.
"It really stressed the ability to communicate in a
small group Loftin said. "It also enhanced group dy-
namics
The leadership reaction course puts pressure on the
cadets to perform their best, and often, their best is
more than they expected from themselves.
"Before I went down there, I didn't perform up to
The East Carolir
features@stiidentmedia.ecu.edu
par said Cadet Roderick Stevenson, junior. "But when
I got there, I saw the opportunity to prove myself to
others and also to prove to myself that I was a good
cadet and that I had the leadership skills that I needed
The cadets also had the opportunity to Are M-16's
on the rifle range. Although It was the first time on the
rifle range for some, all of them qualified. They also
got to try MRE's (Meals Ready to Eat), which, accord-
ing to Loftin, they all enjoyed.
Cadet camps and field training such as this are In-
tended to teach them more about the Army and the
life they are preparing for after they graduate.
"We try to slowly Indoctrinate them into the mili-
tary way of thinking Loftin said.
The benefits of training often go beyond their ROTC
classes. According to Cadet Murphrey Knox, senior, the
training has had a positive benefit in her life.
" ROTC training) forces you to realize that you need
to manage your time Knox said. "You learn to priori-
tize different things in life. There will be a time for
everything that you have to do, and there will still be
time for doing the things that you enjoy
The cadets in Army ROTC have learned valuable
skills at camp in Ft. Bragg as well as at home. Their
training, like any other training that remains pertinent
throughout a person's life, brought out the best in ev-
ery individual.
This writer can be contacted at
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Get Pierce"
ijcmj'l
eyabrow,
earoartH�9��
navel:�5
W.
'�����
����
�W.dodl
�xMcpi�Rfeft
� W� spxfalzt k tftlMfaj ad
DOCy pMfORf Mty
� Wt vft GrtevW s only �mMi
Wi kflvt b�a h bn sfets i ever I
ymm wfti 15 ywrs txpariaeM
We will be At any
competitor's advertised
prices!
Large selection of imported
And domestic jewelry!
Tn�Sdy-TrMttdsyil-flpjrM Friday MOpjTM Safardsyitt-IOpon.
CALLUS! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
; Extension, located at 485 us Hwy. 13, Greenville.
GonupUU Seduce & Refini
EXPERT WORKMANSHIP
We. Q&aato,& Setoice: 0f,icialNalnsPectionss,a,ion
i WE USE ONLY H� BEST
Synthetic Lubricants 2fl
VOLVO � BMW � SAAB
VW � MERCEDES � AUDI
PORSCHE � NISSAN � TOYOTA
JAGUAR � PEUGOT � AND OTHERS
ALL WORK GUARANTEED
6 MONTHS6000 MILES
� Sitailidud h976 �
�) BOSCH,
NEWMAN CATHOLIC CENTER
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 21, 1999
DUE TO THE DIOCESAN-WlPfc 75TH ANNIVERSARY MASS CELEBRATION
A I INIOl ISEI M IN l-WEITI A ILLE ON fills DAY,
"HERE Will BE
ONLY ONE MASS AT 10AM
(PLEASE NOTE CHANGE OF TIME)
AT THE NEWMAN CENTER.
ou n;ir ;inv i.
757-1991)
Alice in Wonderland
Saturday, November 10
.2:00 p.m IVrighl Auditorium
Don't be late for this important date with Alice as she lalls down
a rabbit hole and meets an assortment of amazing characters.
AilViimi' liikcis ,iMiil,)lil'()loiter 7.
VJ I'ulilu
Sll K I' Iciiullysliill
Hill sludrnlymilh
All liikelsS9.il Ihiduor
l( Vciiir.il liikel olliir, Monday�1'ridiiy,flrttl ,i.mMK pan.
2UII-t7llll or l-KIHH I l-AKIS; I' I IV iVi-lilMVi or HWO-M lK
S b
(T

KNOWN, BUT NOT SPOKEN
The Holocaust: Victims, Survivors, and Descendants
Lecture, Exhibited Installation, and Closing Reception
Monday, November 22 5:00 - 8:00 p.m.
Mendenhall Gallery
Featuring the installation artist Brian DeLevie and Dr. Michael Bassman, Director, ECU Honors Program
All are invited to experience, and learn
from, this evocative presentation.
L
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Visual Arts Committee
Cultural Awareness Committee
J





The East Carolinian
vxvyw.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
H&R Bl
Begins
Thousands of people are
teaming the skill of income
tax preparation from H&R
Block and are earning money
as income tax preparers.
H&R Block, the world's
largest tax preparation service,
is offering an income tax
course starting November 29 ,
afternoon, and evening classes
available. Classes will be
offered at area locations.
During the course, in addi-
tion to learning the nuts and
bolts of tax preparation, you
will receive clear explanation
of the recent tax laws to your
advantage. You'll receive this
information from some of the
finest, most experienced tax
preparation instructors in the
country. And you'll have the
opportunity to expand or
enhance your job-related
skills.
H&R Block designed this
Lk Tax Course
ovember 29th
course to suit people who
want to increase their tax
knowledge and to save money
on taxes, or who are looking
for a second career or season-
al employment. It is perfect
for students or retirees
seeking part-time earnings.
Qualified course graduates
may be offered job inter-
views for positions with
Block. Many accept employ-
ment with Block because of
the flexible hours available.
However, Block is under no
obligation to offer employ-
ment, nor are graduates under
any obligation to accept
employment with H&R
Block.
One low course fee includes
all textbooks, supplies and
tax forms necessary for com-
pletion of the course.
Certificates and 6.6 continu-
ing education units will be
awarded upon successful
completion of the course.
Registration forms and a
brochure for the income tax
course may be obtained by
contacting H&R Block.
For more information,
call 1-800-TAX-2000
or visit our Web she at
wwn.hrblock.comtax
�Completion of the course is neither an
offer nor a guarantee of employment.
Greenville 756-1209
Rocky Mount 442-1535
H&R Block
We know Do you?
AA EEOFDA
piRAT
fe TAKE-OUT '
3SS- -F
An event you won't want to miss
� ate �hyt
Live Your Dream!
A High-Energy Message
Brown
� . �����
Award-winning speaker and entertainer,
author and celebrity, Brown brings his passion
to learn and hunger to realize greatness in
every individual to East Carolina University.
Tuesday, December 7, 1999
9:30 a.m 11:00 a.m.
Wright Auditorium
General Admission � Doors open at 9:00 a.m.
Shuttle Service Departure Times:
Brody Building Main Entrance: 8:45 a.m.
Belk BuildingAllied Health: 8:55 a.m.
Return service following the show
To order FREE tickets, call ECU Business
Services: 328-6910, stop by Spilman 116,
or emaihwolfej@mail.ecu.edu
This professional development presentation exclusively for ECU ttaff, faculty,
and students tt sponsored by ECU Butlneu Services, the Dvffton of
Administration and Finance, and the ECU School ofMedicine.
redeeming
Harris Teeter
Your Neighborhood Food Market
wvnvJiarristeeter.com
L!llljlfii'n1
tgyour
Dotlars
SDAIL The Best Is What We're All About!
double gobble
Save for the holidays on thousands of VIC specials
Uy h rER
Hunter
LU Ice
Cream
11II gallon
'All Natural
�,
79
With
VIC Card
W.l-Vl.iV
50
Health
Valley
�OnF, wo.vo.CfS iOUP
JM 1.9-2.68 oz.
19
With
VIC Card
30'
Entenmann's
8 inch Pies
Pumpkin,
Apple or
Mince
� �
With
VIC Card
With
VIC Card
Listerine Gel
Toothpaste
4.6 oz.
Cool Mint or
Tartar Control
Country
fllaeed Chickei
ken Hr
Ve I
Srilled Chickei
tarn - -
turns.
HEALTHY "f
Healthy
Choice
Dinner
Entrees
8.5-11.5 oz.
With
VIC Card
Harris Teeter
Premium
Orange
Juice
64 oz.
With
VIC Card
Crispix
or Rice
Krispies
12-13.5 oz.
Box
79
With
VIC Card
Ocean
Spray
Cranberry
Blends
64 oz.
With
VIC Card
Vanilla
Creme
Cake
Ring
With VIC Card

Diet Coke or
Coca-Cola
2 liter
t
Prices Effective Through November 23,1999
Prices bi TMe Ad Effestive Wednesday. November 17. Through November 23.1999
In Our Oreenville store only. We Reserve The Right lb Limit Quantities.
None Sold lb Dealers. Wfe Sladh Accept Federal Food Stamps.
Thursday, Nc
www.tec.ecu.
PROFE!
coast, anything
Whether he i
or being home w
is more to this pr
room. Of all the;
on, golf is his pe
Painting given to I
interest in aquatic

DON"
PR






e
ilthy
toice
nner
rees
1.5 oz.
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
PROFESSOR
From page 6
FILM
The East Carolinia
feaatures@studentmedia.ecu.edi
From page 6
coast, anything like that Schisler said.
Whether he is describing his work on his new deck
or being home with his wife and two daughters, there
is more to this professor than a student sees in the class-
room. Of all the activities that he spends his spare time
on, golf is his personal favorite.
Teeter
�mium
inge
luice
64 oz.
spix
Rice
pies
1.5 oz.
Box
9
With
'IC Card
:ean
ray
erry
mds
M oz.

Painting given to Makuck by M. Silverman because of his
interest in aquatic life, (photo by Susan Wright)
"I'm a three handicap Schisler said, meaning that
his average score is only three over par.
Dr. Jim Holte, a professor of the English department,
may not play golf, but his travels have taken him to
the land that invented golf�Ireland.
Holte has visited a variety of countries in England,
including Romania.
Romania may seem to be a strange place for a vaca-
tion, but for Holte, it was his interest in vampires that
brought him there.
"Transylvania is in Romania you know Holte said.
The vampire memorabilia in his office, including a
rubber bat and a life-size stuffed Dracula sitting in a
rocking chair, shows his interest in vampires.
"I've written four books on vampires and their his-
tory Holte said. "I have around 250 books of vampire
fiction in my collection, mostly all new
Holte also sits on a worldwide committee that judges
the best new vampire-based literature that comes out
each year. The committee meets in various locations
throughout Europe, so traveling is not only his pas-
sion, but is also necessary.
Dr. Peter Makuck of the English department also
likes to get out, but his adventures are of a more nauti-
cal nature. His two favorite pastimes are fishing and
scuba diving.
"I fish for anything that will put up a fight�wa-
hoo, Spanish mackerel, tuna and dolphin, sailfish too
Makuck said. "There's nothing like being out there and
landing a big one.
"All around you, any way you turn, there's nothing
out there but you and your boat. The lilac-colored wa-
ter, and you get a strike Makuck said. "Your rod-tip
dives over the edge of the boat, and your reel starts
screaming, and there's nothing you can do about it,
you just let it urn, and then you see this huge silvery-
blue marlin jump out of the water. There's nothing like
it
The experience becomes poetic and almost epic in
the telling. Expect no less from Makuck; he's written
four books of poetry and one of short stories.
Schisler, Holte and Makuck all have different lives
outside of the classroom, and they all have to get away
sometimes. Their paper-littered desks are just the tip
of the iceberg when it comes to the personality of each
and every professor at ECU.
The Series will begin showing 10 minute clips of
the student videos on Wednesdays and Fridays at 7:30
p.m. and at 3 p.m. on Sundays.
"The filmmaker must turn in a non-returnable VHS
cassette of their work to Room 236 of Mendenhall
Black said.
According to Black, this has the potential to be a
promising future ECU annual tradition, providing the
student response is high. If you are a student filmmaker
dying to have your work published, or if you enjoy
fiddling around with a camera on the weekends, come
by the Student Union and pick up more information.
Everyone has to get their start somewhere, and for
students interested in film production at ECU, this may
be the place to start. Someday the world may be watch-
ing your name flash across the big screen.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown@itudentmedia.ecu.edu.
World Cuisine
nil kk
ATE PR in
STYLE:
J PIRATES!
FANS COME TO THE NEW CIIRISTINNEK AND
CELEBRATE AFTER THE GAME!
CASUAL DRESS CODE
COMPLIMENTARY CRAB DIP FOR EACH TARLE8
NEWLY RENOVATED
CALL 355-9500
FOR RESERVATIONS
PONT WAIT, BEAT THE LINES, MAKE RESERVATIONS
TLngraved
Silver Jewelry
For the
Holidays!
G
c
if o 1� 210 e- 5th street
tlltUUg Uptown Greenville
onnection
Division Of nBiy.
M-S10-6, Sun. 1-5

srd
or
99
999






W The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
$ports�studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Graf takes center stage
one final time at MSG
The words came straight and true, just like
those fearsome forehands that kept opponents
pinned behind the baseline.
Steffi Graf was again on center court at
Madison Square Garden during the final tour-
nament of the WTA Tour, an event she has
won five times during the length of her career.
This time she wore a formal black sweater
and ankle-length black skirt and fought back
the tears, especially when she thanked her
mother, Heidi, and coach, Heinz Gunthardt.
"I don't only call you a coach Graf said to
Gunthardt, sitting next to Heidi Graf in the first
row. "I call you a friend, too
She paused, regained most of that famed
composure, and added: "I knew I would get
emotional
Fans' and fellow players who formed a pha-
lanx on the court watched a video of Grafs ca-
reer. She didn't.
Martinez unanimous
Cy Young winner
Pedro Martinez pitched another shutout,
winning the American League Cy Young Award
in a unanimous vote. Now the question is
whether he'll be elected Most Valuable Player,
too.
"It would mean a lot, probably more than
this Cy Young alone Martinez said Tuesday
after the Cy Young voting was announced.
"I've already achieved that, so the MVP would
be something different, especially to a pitcher
Martinez became only the fourth pitcher to
win the AL Cy Young Award unanimously and
joined Gaylord Perry and Randy Johnson, who
won his first NL Cy Young on Monday, as the
only pitchers to win the honor in each league.
Martinez, 23-4 with a 2.07 ERA for the
Boston Red Sox, received all 28 first-place
votes for 140 points in balloting by the Base-
ball Writers' Association of America.
MLS abandons shootout,
reworks divisions
The shootout is shot.
Major League Soccer said Wednesday it
will replace its controversial tiebreaker with
two five-minute periods of sudden-death over-
time.
The ending of the shootout � in which a
player starts 35 yards from the goal and has
five seconds to shoot at the goalkeeper �
was one of a series of changes by the 4-year-
old league.
However, MLS will not award four points
for a victory, a format that will be adopted by
the second- and third-division United Soccer
Leagues next season. Instead, MLS will use
the international norm of three points for a win
and one for a tie.
Sunday's MLS Cup championship game in
Foxboro, Mass. between two-time champion
D.C. United and the Los Angeles Galaxy, how-
ever, will still use the shootout if the game is
tied after 30 minutes of sudden-death over-
time.
Karolyi named coordinator
of women's team
Bela Karolyi, the bearish-looking coach
who helped Nadia Comaneci, Mary Lou
Retton and Kerri Strug win gold medals, is tak-
ing charge of the U.S. women's gymnastics
program less than a year before the Olympics.
Karolyi, who retired after the 1996 Olym-
pics, will be the women's national team coordi-
nator but he will not coach at the Sydney
Olympics, USA Gymnastics said Tuesday. He
will set the team's training programs and over-
see its Olympic preparations.
"We need to make some adjustments to
our women's program to improve our prepara-
tion for the 2000 Olympic Games said Bob
Colarossi, president of USA Gymnastics.
"Karolyi's efforts will make a significant differ-
ence in our ability to train at the highest level
during the 10 months prior to Sydney
Karolyi will advise the gymnasts' personal
coaches and have a role in saying who makes
the Olympic team.
"This is a special opportunity for me to con-
tinue supporting American gymnasts Karolyi
said. "This role suits me best since my retire-
ment from training individual gymnasts. I take
great pride in the results of the U.S. team and
look forward to contributing to everyone's suc-
cess
ECU, N.C State series
has brought moments of
beauty, disgrace
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
When it comes to grid
iron rivalries, NC has
got its fair share.
Some of the most storied rivalries
date back to the last century. How-
ever, the one rivalry than runs
deeper than the others and still
brings emotion out of the most se-
date fans is one of the state's young-
est.
"It's like if you and your brother
don't get along said linebacker Jeff
Kerr. "It's like a sibling rivalry
ECU played N.C. State for the
first timt in football on Oct. 10,
1970, in Raleigh. The Wolfpack
whipped the Pirates 23-6 in front of
18,000 in Raleigh's Carter Stadium.
The following season under first
year Head Coach Sonny Randle, the
Pirates beat N.C. State 31-15 and the
rivalry was born.
The rivalry that began in 1970
had been an annual affair for 17
years. It had been halted for almost
a decade and revived by an act of
law. It has been played as season
openers, season finales and bowl
games. By far, it is the most intense
football rivalry the state has seen.
The early years, 1970-1972
Many of the emotions that fuel
the rivalry come from before the
two teams ever met on the field.
For much of the century, east-
ern NC was behind the rest of the
state in many areas. Eastern NC's
feeling of inferiority extended from
a lack of economic prosperity in col-
lege football.
For years, the "Big Four" domi-
nated college sports in NC. Duke,
University of North Carolina-
Chapel Hill, N.C. State and Wake
Forest got the exposure and notori-
ety when it came to college football.
The "Big Four" had their regal
rivalries that dated back to the
1890's. They had the tradition, they
had the history, they had each other
and the prestigious Atlantic Coast
Conference.
ECU played in the lower profile
Southern Conference. The Pirates
faced conference foes such as
Furman, The Citadel and William
& Mary. The Pirates playing one of
the "Big Four" would be a major
boost for the program.
ECU did play Wake Forest once,
in Greenville on Sept. 21,1963. The
Pirates beat the Demon Deacons 20-
10 in front of 17,000 in the first
game ever played in Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium.
The game marked the first and
only time time that ECU would play
one of the "Big Four" before 1970.
The ECU-N.C. State rivalry owes
its origins to a pair of old friend talk-
ing over dinner. Former N.C. State
Head Coach Earle Edwards and
Jeff Blake (above
left) threw for 378
yards and fQur
touchdowns "in
the '92 Peach
Bowl.Luke Fisher
(above) caught 12
passes for 144
yards in ECU'S 37-
34 victory (file
photos).
longtime ECU Head Coach and Ath-
letic Director Clarence Stasavich,
discussed having their teams play
each other, while the two were at
dinner during a national coaches'
convention in the late '60s.
"They were the first in-state
school that agreed to play us said
Henry VanSant, assistant athletic di-
rector. "They helped East Carolina
a great deal by agreeing to play us
On Oct. 10,1970, the two teams
finally did suit up and play each
other in Raleigh. Edwards was on
the N.C. State sideline, while ECU
was coached by first year man, Mike
McGee. Edward's Wolfpack stomped
the Pirates, 23-6. ECU'S lone score
coming on an 11-yard pass from
John Casazza to Dick Corrada. N.C.
State's All-ACC safety, Jack Whitely
returned an ECU punt 69 yards for
a Wolfpack score.
The next year the Pirates
notched their first win against N.C.
State. On Oct. 23, 1971 two teams
that had not been playing good
football that season rame into
Carter Stadium. Both the Wolfpack
and the Pirates were at 1-5 prior to
the contest.
"The intent when we went in
was not to get embarrassed said
running back Carlester Crumpler.
"We wanted to go out and and play
hard and represent the university
well
The Pirates did just that. On the
strength of a 20-point first half, the
Pirates cruised to a 31-15 win.
"It was big Crumpler said, who
had 47 yards on nine carries. "Both
teams didn't have good years. I
think we won four games, but one
of those wins was against them
While the early games drew the
fans, it was not yet a true rivalry.
"We thought a lot about it, but
it wasn't as hyped up as it is now
Crumpler said. "State and Carolina
were the two biggest out-of-confer-
ence games that we played while I
was there
The games would be an inaus-
picious beginning to a series that
would provide some magical mo-
ments.
Building a rivalry, 1973-1987
In 1972 the Pirates began a
string of eight winning seasons.
N.C. State and ECU played every
year, always in Raleigh. During
these years of Pirate success, ECU
only beat the Wolfpack twice. In
1976 and again in 1977 the Pirates
bested the Wolfpack. By 1980, with
over a decade of games under their
belts, N.C. State held an 8-3 series
lead. The losses continued until
1983, when ECU topped the
Wolfpack, 22-16 in Raleigh.
A N.C. State win in 1984, fol-
lowed by a Pirate win in '85, fol-
lowed by a another N.C. State win
in 1986, gave credibility to what
once was a one-sided series.
Up until to this point the rivalry
was a pair of in-state schools squar-
ing off. It made for some good col-
lege football games and bragging
rights. What made the rivalry run
so deep is also what killed it for
nearly a decade.
"The rivalry was stopped be-
cause of difficulties we had in '87
VanSant said.
See RIVALRY, page 11
Pirates, Pack square off
N.C State to play in
Greenviile for first time
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Since the rivalry between N.C. State and ECU be-
gan in 1970, Pirate fans have yearned for the series to
come east of Raleigh. Saturday, they finally get the
chance to see the Pirates and the Pack go head to head
in Greenville.
"It's going to be big said quarterback David
Garrard. "The crowd Is going to be in It the whole game.
They've been waiting for State to come here for so long,
and now they're finally here. They just want to see a
good game and a good victory by the Pirates
The upcoming game sold out almost a month ago.
The crowd Is expected to be the largest In Dowdy-
Flcklen history.
"It will be electric for both teams said Head Coach
Steve Logan. "When we played in Raleigh, they had
50,000-60,000. We played over there and their place
was sold-out.
"It will be electric. It will be what college football is
supposed to be like
The game will be the 23rd renewal of one of college
football's most intense rivalries. For the seniors on this
Pirate squad, it will be the third time they have faced
the Wolfpack. For others on the team, it will be the
first time playing the Wolfpack. While they have not
faced State on the field, the teams are not strangers.
"I know a couple of players on the State team, and
I live like, 15 minutes from it Garrard said. "Actually,
that was my school in high school, but it kind of
changed a little bit
For many, including senior LaMont Chappell, the
Wolfpack team is filled with familiar faces. Chappell
went to high school at Roxboro's Person High School
along with State quarterback Jamie Barnette.
"ECU-N.C. State is a big rjvalry Chappell said. "It
will mean a lot to me because a lot of those guys are
from my hometown, who I grew up with from kinder-
garten up. I played ball with those guys since elemen-
tary school�peewee league all the way up to high
school. It will mean a lot and give me some bragging
rights when I go home
Barnette, a senior, will be a concern for the Pirates
as they prepare for the Wolfpack.
"We've got to keep Jamie Barnette from running
up and down the field on us Logan said. "He's a run-
throw guy; he can do both. People chase him around
all the time, but he gets sacked maybe once a game.
You've got to trap him with three people. One guy can't
sack him. Two guys might have a chance, but it takes
three to take him down
Another point of concern will be the talented corps
of receivers Barnette has at his disposal. Koren Robinson
and Chris Coleman have helped the Wolfpack offense
pass for an average of 201.8 yards per game.
While the Wolfpack offense has caught the atten-
tion of Pirate coaches, the defense has not gone unno-
ticed.
"I know they're going to play man-to-man
Chappell said. "They played Carolina pretty good on
defense; they've really played everybody pretty good. I
feel they're going to come out and their going to play
their hardest, for a few quarters. But if we keep pound-
ing them, we'll come out with a victory
This writer con be contacted at
sports@studentmsdia .ecu.edu,





av. 18,1999
nedia.ecu.edu
1 Coach and Ath-
rence Stasavich,
:heir teams play
the two were at
ational coaches'
late '60s.
le first in-state
to play us said
istant athletic di-
ed East Carolina
seing to play us
'0, the two teams
d and play each
Edwards was on
:line, while ECU
it year man, Mike
olfpack stomped
ECU'S lone score
-yard pass from
ick Corrada. N.C.
etyJackWhitely
junt 69 yards for
ar the Pirates
win against N.C.
1971 two teams
;n playing good
ison rame into
jth the Wolfpack
ire at 1-5 prior to
hen we went in
nbarrassed said
lester Crumpler.
out and and play
it the university
just that. On the
jint first half, the
i 31-15 win.
umpler said, who
ine carries. "Both
re good years. I
r games, but one
against them
y games drew the
it a true rivalry,
i lot about it, but
I up as it is now
tate and Carolina
est out-of-confer-
ve played while I
tuld be an inaus-
5 to a series that
ime magical mo-
airy, 1973-1987
Pirates began a
inning seasons.
CU played every
Raleigh. During
ate success, ECU
olfpack twice. In
�1977 the Pirates
ick. By 1980, with
james under their
leld an 8-3 series
continued until
"U topped the
n Raleigh,
win in 1984, fol-
S win in '85, fol-
ler N.C. State win
edibility to what
ded series,
s point the rivalry
ate schools squar-
r some good col-
les and bragging
le the rivalry run
trhat killed it for
was stopped be-
es we had in '87
BY, page 11
tte from running
i said. "He's a run-
:hase him around
ybe once a game,
pie. One guy can't
lance, but it takes
the talented corps
il. Koren Robinson
Wolfpack offense
;r game.
caught the atten-
is not gone unno-
y man-to-man
a pretty good on
wdy pretty good. I
heir going to play
if we keep pound-
tory
Ktedat
xu.edu.
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports0studentmedia.ecu.edu
RIVALRY
from page 10
What happened on the night of Sept. 5, 1987 ce-
mented the rivalry and made Into the intense feud that
it is today.
The season opener for the Pirates was going to be a
stern test for Head Coach Art Baker. Baker, in his third
year as head coach, had an undistinguished tenure at
the helm of the Pirate program. Having led the Pirates
to a 2-9 finish in 1985 and a 3-8 record in 1986, the
match up with N.C. State would be of the utmost im-
portance to Baker's future at the school.
The game itself was uneventful. On a rainy, late-sum-
mer evening, 56,000 fans watched ECU take apart the
Wolfpack. The Pirates' run and shoot offense was click-
ing with Travis Hunter at the helm. The Pirates opened
up a 13-7 lead at halftime and cruised to a 32-14 win.
ECU racked up 330 rushing yards in the victory.
With 10 seconds remaining, and the scoreboard pro-
jecting the all-but-certain ECU victory, hoards of Pirates
fans streamed from the grassy hill behind the South end
zone of Carter-Finley. The stampede was turned back by
an infuriated Baker. However, as the final seconds ticked
away, neither Baker nor the police could stop what was
about to happen.
Storming the field following a Pirate win in Carter-
Finley was nothing new. Pirate fans had taken to the
field after every Pirate win since 1971. It was usually a
peaceful, uneventful action. However, on this night, it
was different.
Thousands of Pirate fans ran over a chain link fence
and took to the field. This time N.C. State fans were
waiting. While the ECU fans headed for the goal posts,
N.C. State fans tried to defend their home field. When
the two factions met, a riot ensued. Police were unable
to control the melee.
Maj. Larry D. Liles, of the NCSU Department of Pub-
lic Safety, told the News and Observer that he estimated
over 2,000 people were on the field during the incident.
In the chaos, fist fights broke out and both goal posts
were torn down.
The incident outraged fans of both teams. As a re-
sult, the series that had been played every year since
1970 was halted indefinitely.
"One of the great college football games, period
Jan. 1,1992
If the 1987 game gave the rivalry its intensity, then
the 1992 Peach Bowl gave it its magic.
The effects of the game are still felt today in this part
of the state. Names like Jeff Blake, Robert Jones and Luke
Fisher still resonate like the names of heroes in a legend.
Almost every restaurant or shop in Greenville pays hom-
age to this team and this game with a picture on the
wall, a jersey on display or some other relic from that
January day in Atlanta.
"It was just one of the great college football games,
period said Head Coach Steve Logan, who then was
the offensive coordinator.
The Pirates began the 1991 campaign with a loss at
Illinois. It would be the last time the team lost all year.
The team rattled off 10 straight wins, many in dramatic
fashions. Of the teams' 10 regular season wins, four were
by seven points or less.
The team's winning streak garnered much attention
and its motto, "We Believe" adorned buttons and bill-
boards across the state.
The team accepted a bid to go to the Peach Bowl in
Atlanta to face N.C. State.
The game would be the last Peach Bowl played in
Atlanta's Fulton County Stadium. With 59,322 fans in
attendance the game kicked off. N.C. State took the early
lead on a 2-yard touchdown run from Gary Downs. A 5-
yard touchdown pass from Blake to Cedric Van Buren
knotted the score at seven. The Wolfpack took a seven
point lead when quarterback Terry Jordan found fight
end Todd Harrison for a 4-yard touchdown reception.
ECU countered with 10 points of their own, seven com-
ing on a 55-yard touchdown strike from Blake to Hunter
Gallimore. The Pirates went Into halftime up, 17-14.
The third quarter saw N.C. State score 13 unanswered
points. A 52-yard touchdown pass from halfback Ledel
George to split end Charles Davenport put the Wolfpack
up by 17 with 13:01 left in the game.
"I have been a part of some storybook things here at
East Carolina Logan said. "The '92 Peach Bowl was
storybook
What happened next was storybook. After ECU got
the ball following a muffed N.C. State punt with 8:41
on the clock, Blake led the Pirates back from the brink.
Blake scored on a 2-yard run to cut the Wolfpack lead to
10. On the following ECU possession, Blake moved the
Pirates 80 yards and found Dion Johnson for a 17-yard
touchdown pass.
Head Coach Bill Lewis opted for the two point con-
version. It failed and the Pirates were down four with
4:18 remaining. On the Pirates final possession, Blake
hit the tight end, Fisher for a 22-yard touchdown. This
put the Pirates up 34-31.
When Damon Hartman's 49-yard field goal attempt
fell short, the Pirates had completed the greatest come-
back in ECU history. ECU had put up 20 unanswered
points and taken their place among NC's elite football
programs.
From the gridiron to the legislature, 1992-1997
The 1992 Peach Bowl re-energized the rivalry be-
tween the two schools. The game, combined with both
teams' moderate success in the early and mid '90s, cre-
ated a movement to get the two schools to renew their
annual series. State senator, Mark Basnight (D-Dare) in-
troduced bills In the General Assembly to require ECU
to play N.C. State and UNC-CH. The measure worked
and UNC-CH and N.C. State agreed to play ECU, start-
ing with N.C. State taking on the Pirates in 19.
The two teams'first meeting since the Peach Bowl
came on Nov. 30, 1996 in Charlotte's Ericsson Sta-
dium.
On that rainy day, it was aU Pirates. ECU took
control early and never let up, cruising to a 50-29
blowout.
"To go down there and just totally beat them, it
meant a lot to us said defensive lineman, Norris
McCleary.
Pirate running back Scott Harley set an NCAA
record for rushing yards as a sophomore, racking up
351 yards on the ground.
"That was really the cap on the bottle Logan
said. "We were denied a bowl bid that year. We kind
of used that game as a bowl game. The kids really
responded well
The next year, the series shifted to Raleigh, where
N.C. State pulled out a dramatic victory on the last
play of the game.
"They beat us on the last play of the game, and
that hurts McCleary said. "We emphasize winning
on the last play of the game. They beat us at our own
game
The rivalry will be renewed Saturday, and again
next year, in Charlotte.
"We could be 3-8 or they could be 3-8 or 8-3, it
doesn't matter Logan said. "When that game comes
around, if s going to be very intense, very emotional
and everything that college football is supposed to
be, that game will be
This writer can be contacted at
sports&studentmedia .ecu.edu.
W
$50 ECU Scuba $5J
Open Water Rebate
Congratulations on becoming
a diver! $50 Rebate
towards the purchase of
any in-stock
SCUBA package
ttC.Kq.On�.Ctuf,)�
Blue Region Scuba
Carolina East Center
321-2670
� � �
Get your special
edition T-shirt!
UT A DYING
EED OUT
OF ITS
MISERY-
Drop your
NC State
regardless of
its condition
apparel
in the wolf cage and
get a like ECU item
112 price!
Thurs, Nov 18 - Sat, Nov 20
Afcft
topher Kidd &
David Sinsleton,
co-authors of
Backyard Brawl
The ECU vs. NCSU Rivalry
Friday, November 19
12:00 -1:00 p.m.
Student Plaza
ie Wolf Pack
Practice Game
See the
leeleaders
12:00- 1:00 p.m.
Friday, November 19
Student Plaza
Rain location: inside Student Store
Ronald E
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wrisht Building � 328-6731 � www.studentstores.ecu.edu
MONPAY
All toy Pitchers
Miller IHe. M-MlebUte
60oz Prtehers �50
Imports
Bass. New Casfle. KHHaro
60oz Pitchers �&50
� Piseoimt WL off food purchases w IP
THWSPAY
ni5 Pomestie Potties
t25 Import Potties
SUNPAY After 2PM 12 Prlee App
tiwm
5 PUCKS
1675E. Rreiwer Rd.
In Front of Camilla Cinema 12
Pine In or Carry Out
IZtt) 355-5800
Full Service
IMOpm Sun. - Tburs.
IMlpw Fri. & Sat.
SERVING GREEK STYLE PIZZA S ITALIAN SPECIALTIES





H The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tabs leads men's swim team
J inHi.rfXn� a� rantain I am like a 1CS academi
Co-captain emphasizes
fun, sportsmanship
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
Go to a swim meet at ECU and you
will see an athlete who is energy per-
sonified. That young man is the men's
co-captain, Matt Jabs.
"He is the fuel to the fire�very in-
tense. Before I swim he tries to pump
me up said freshman Casey Charles.
Jabs has worked hard to get to the
level he is at now. He came in as a great
athlete and has grown to be a leader.
He understands his role.
"I'm surprised 1 have grown up so
fast Jabs said. "Freshman year feels like
yesterday. Now 1 have responsibility as
a leader. You have to deal with people
College Grads
No Experience Needed
Earn up to 35k after 1 yr.
40k after 2 years
IMS. a biomedic.it software
firm in Silver Springs MD, is
offering a free 4 week pro-
gramming course. We hire
95"o of students who take the
course. Course starts 110.
For details see imsweb.com or
call (888) 680-5057
WWW.
ELTORO
Barber & Style
men's hair
styling shoppe
2800 E. 10th St.
Special
$700
Style and Cut
Stain Will Rogers Carpet
Glass
El
Tero
Easlgale Shopping Cti.
752-3318
Appt. Or Walk In
www.attic-nightciub.com
:L&52-7303
J
? Uptown
? Greenville
I 209 E7 5th St. 4
? TICKET LOCATIONS
I CD Alley � Wash Pub 4
? East Coast Music � Skulhs
tBSBH
wmn
?
4-
FRIDAY 19TH
LeTi
:
J1 CM I
Matt jabs is the captain
swim team (file photo).
of the ECU
individually. As captain I am like a
mediator between coaches and play-
ers. The other players look to me to dis-
cuss team issues with the coaches
Jabs understands that it takes time
to get to know teammates and really
understand them as people, especially
freshmen.
"As a freshman you come in and
kind of put on a front for everybody,
Jabs said, "but as you prove yourself,
more of your true self comes out. We
have a very closefly knit team. We have
a lot of fun
This season has been a very pro-
ductive one for the men's swim team.
Jabs has led them to only one loss out
of five meets this season. He will gradu-
ate next fall with a degree in exercise
and sports science with a recreation and
leisure minor. Jabs got his drive for ex-
cellence from his parents.
"They not only emphasized athlet-
ics; academics was very important
Jabs said. "When I was a sophomore in
high school my parents pulled me from
the team. 1 wasn't failing, but I wasn't
meeting what they expected of me.
That showed me what was really im-
portant"
As an athlete and captain he has
made a lasting impression on his
coaches. His hard work shows in how
his peers look at him.
"He came in as a great athlete and
is leaving as a much faster swimmer
said Head Coach Rick Kobe. "He's one
of the fastest in the conference. He has
a game plan and is very mature and
has done his growing up
If you are at a swim meet and want
to find Matt Jabs, just look for the guy
having the most fun and you'll spot
him easily.
This writer can be contacted at
rdowney@studentmedia.ecu. edu.
NEW APARTMENT COMPLEX
NOW OPEN
Eastgate Village
On Mosely Drive, off of Greenville Blvd.
Two Bedroom Units
Reserve One Today
Also Ask About
Wyndham Court- Dockside
Apartments
2 Bedroom; 1 Bath & 3 Bedrooms; 2.5 Bath Units;
Kitchen Appliances; Dishwasher, WasherDryer
Hookups Short Term Contracts Available, Pets
Okay With Deposite, Convenient to ECU Campus,
On Bus Route, On Site Management,
24 Hr. Emergency Service
561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SPRING SEMESTER
zrTHEFAS
SELLING
E ARE AT:
-1 NOSTALGI,
919 Dicki
; � Greenvil
1-252
:
?
4
Rockin'RythmSt Bluest
NOW, Bigger a Better than ever before!
2nd Annual
Alternative Spring Break
break
alternative spring
east Carolina
university hinislnii sprvltr
Surf & Stentc
Thursday 111599
7:00 PM
itibriaiMe
MSC fireat Rm. 1
What you put into it takes a week,
what you take out of it lasts a lifetime
2 Year Anniversary Sale!
Everything m me store 15 off
Monday Nov. 22
ifir New location, next to American Eagle)
The Plaza Mall, Greenville 321-4884
HEA
HELP WANTED
JOHNNY DEPP CHRISTINA RJ
MlrUfQUNTnCIUKSj
,SC0n! OIOSfji 0P
mmw mmwm mlg� wmm iefiito
0RDC0P?0L LWUlN'CO

STARTS FRIDAY,
NOVEMBER 19!
CARMIKE
CARMIKE12
1685 E. Fire Tower Rd.
353-4988
-SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT -
NO PASSES OR DISCOUNT
TICKETS ACCEPTED
available now
ECU TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS
ECU TRANSIT is looking for mature, dependable,
and outgoing individuals to provide quality service
for the transit system. Must be a registered ECU
Student or incoming student with at least two or
more semesters remaining to work.
Punctuality a must!
Must have a good driving, record!
(DWTS and Frequently ticketed drivers need not applv!)
North Carolina class "B" CDL license with passenger
endorsement required.
We will help you obtain your license.
Previous experience is a plus, but not necessary.
Must be in good standing with the University and
have at least a 2.0 GPA.
For more information and applications, stop by
Mendenhall Student Center Basement, around the
comer from WZMB or call 328-4724
Monday - Thursday 12:30PM- 4:00PM
;m





lvd.
tide
h Units;
f Dryer
Pets
ampus,
t,
J011
EMESTER
rTHB FASTEST
SELLING DC COMICS
� ARE AT:
L
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
Men's soccer closes season
ERS
lable,
jrvice
ECU
oor
apply!)
senger
sary.
'and
)by
dthe
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
All types of Auto & Truck Repair
Foreign & Domestic
- Major & Minor Repairs
- Manual Transmissions
- Brakes, Tires & Batteries
- Free Towing with Major Repair
- Clutches
- Tune-ups
- 10 off with college ID
830-6131 � 627 S. Clarke � Greenville
William & Mary win
championship again
Emily Koperniak
STAFF writer
ECU men's soccer team ended
the season with a loss in the first
round of the CAA tournament on
Tuesday.
"As a team we played with our
heart, we gave great effort and came
together said junior defender Nick
Errato. "We gave a great performance
as a whole. It was a heartbreaker for
the seniors to go out with a loss
The Pirates went into the tour-
nament at Virginia Beach, Va. hold-
ing the number seven seed. They
faced VCU, who held the second
seed, and has been ranked seventh
in the nation. ECU lost to VCU in
the final season game as well.
"It was pretty bad said senior
forward AJ. Gray. "We played good.
It was a close game, close at half
time
VCU attempted 20 shots
throughout the game, but did not
score until the 82nd minute. "It was
the senior's last game, going out like
that is crappy Gray said.
"There was like eight minutes left
in the game when a real controver-
sial goal was made, Gray said. "It
kind of killed us; we didn't have
much of a chance
The controversial goal Gray re-
ferred to was a possible handball
made by the offense of VCU before
the goal was scored. ECU tallied three
shots on the day.
"The ref may have overlooked
the calls, but we played our hearts
out and gained respect said senior
defender Brett Waxer. "We worked
so hard from beginning to end
Freshman goalkeeper R.J.
Marvtnney earned five saves and one
goal allowed. Marvlnney completed
the game in the goalkeeper's posi-
tion.
"Our record does not reflect how
we played Waxer said. "We stuck
together and worked through the ob-
stacles
The Pirates ended the 1999 sea-
son with the quarter final game.
William & Mary won their fifth soc-
cer championship 4-2 over VCU.
This writer can be contacted at
ekoperniak@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
PHONES
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS & CELLULAR
Pagers-$4995
Includes Activation and 1 Month Service
la Am. � - � -A a. AA AA.A � AA k A �
Cellular Phones
$25.00 per month
�125 Minnies
�No Roaming in NCSCVA
No Long Distance from NCSC, V
anywhere in (lit- USA
�Phones as low as M.00
Free leather case & car charger
T ?
?
presents
14 lb. Cheeseburger
Medium
931-0009 � 316-D E. 10th St.
(Across from Kinko's)
Ask About No Credit Cellular
Medium
BEEF BARN
Tonight
Friday before the game.
Saturday after the game.
Reservations Accepted 756-1161
Win a $10,000 Shopping Spree
http:WinStuflHeie.com

US. Cellular
lutmiiii �gint
Win Holiday Gift Certificates
http:WinStuffHere.coin
ATTEND PIRATE AND LADY
BAf KETBALL �AMEf, �T FRI E WIFE
IT'S THAT AMPLE.
You . �n ptes tor .ttondO, Pir. an. JSSSStSJTSSIS Ki
qualify for the prizes.
The breakdown of prizes:
Fnr attending 8 games: Blackbeard's Bench t-shirt
Fnr attending 10 games: Free pizza coupon
Fnr attending 12 games: Free Gatorade gear (t-shirt, water bottle, towel)
Fnr attending 14 games: Invitation to the pregame party
For attending all 17 games: Your name is entered into the drawing for a free Lazy
Boy recUnerth cooler and phone IN the chair provided by Bostic Sugg Furmture!
IB
JBencft
1999-2000
FOR MORI INFORMATION, CAU H8-45S0






rhe East Carolinian
www. tec. fcu.edu
COMICS
Thursday, Nov. 18,1999
comicsOstudentnudiaei i. �
SEATS LEFT
bv oison ltour
THE JOEV SHOW
BV JOeV ELLIS
Hi �M�R-fe�cY a
rje fosr Carolinian is mow
accepting applications for a
student to take over in January as
editor of Fountainhead, our weekly arts
� entertainment supplement.
We're looking for a creative person
with fresh ideas willing to inject some
new life into this tabloid.
Apply at The Bast Carolinian office
before 5 p.m Nov. 13.
Call 328-6366 for more information.

v
Smoking Affect f
THE
GREAT
AMERICAN
SMCKECttT
THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 18,1999 5.00 P. M MNKNHAU
Be at Mendenhall for "The Great Debate a FR��DINN�R,
and ��GIVEAWAYS! You don't have to be a smoker to participate!
For additional giveaway opportunities, bring some type of
tobacco product (cigarette, cigar, ashtray, lighter, dip, etc.)
to fuel our StVffiAll
We don't expect you to stop smoking on the spot that day,
but you will receive information on how to quit and upcoming
smoking cessation workshops.
I
Sponsored by ECU Student Health. Counseling Center. Office of Health Promotion , & the American Cancer Society





Tuesday, Nov. 16,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Can
ads@studentrnedu
FOR RENT
)H.
AVAILABLE NOW. Close to ECU. 1
bedroom apartment $315month. 125
Avery Street near park. Walk to cam-
pus. 758-6596. Ask for MC.
WALK TO campus 2 bdrm. 1 bath
apartment 2 blocks from campus or
3rd street $375mo $375dep garage
laundry HU available starting Decem-
ber 1st. Contact Kerry 752-3769 even-
ings.
2 BR 2 BA 14 by 80 mobile home for
rent only $395 a month, in good con-
dition. Lot already supplied. For more
info call 830-8241.
MALE CHRISTIAN roommate want-
ed to take over lease. Two male Chris-
tian roommates already in apartment.
$260mo. starting mid December call
215-0078 for details. Players Club
Apartments.
FEMALE NEEDED ASAP to share two
bedroom apartment at Eastgate Vil-
lage. Clean, studious, non-smoker.
$242.50mo. plus utilities, cable,
phone. Two bedroom, one bath, wd.
balcony. Call 329-1154.
WALK TO ECU. Newly remodeled 1
bedroom apartment $315month.
Available Jan 1st. 125 Avery Street,
near campus. 758-6596 ask for PG.
ri
! -WESLEY COMMON SOUTH:
1 or 2 bed rooms, 1 bath, range,
'refrigerator, free watersewer,
'washerdryer hookups, laundry
facilities, 5 blocks from campus,
lECU bus services.
ROOMMATE WANTED
TIRED OF where your living, Move
Out! 2 roommates needed in Dockside
$250 per person 13 utilities, all luxu-
ries included. Needed mid-Dec or
January. Call 757-8781.
PREFER RESPONSIBLE female room-
mate to share two bedroom on bath
apt. approx. one mile from ECU on East
5th St. Rent $175 monthly, deposit
$175. 12 utilities. If interested call
Rick at 752-4559. !
HELP WANTED
FOR SALE
NOW PRELEASING
FOR JANUARY
�MPzsz&zsrK'
i
I
Hopaclp I I
ionoaerant
AAAAI SPRING Break Specials! Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 5 days $279! In-
cludes most meals! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City. Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
PENTIUM 120MHZ 16 megs RAM
1.2 gig harddrive win. 98 office 97 cd
rom free 14" color monitor free print-
er $350.00. Call David 353-5103.
AAAAI CANCUN & Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air, ho-
tel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of 6
small businesses recognized for out-
standing ethics! springbreaktravel.com
1 -800-678-6386
PALMTOP COMPUTER- HP 320LX
w docking cradle. Two years old.
Functions perfectly. $800 when pur-
chased. $150 now. 328-6795 (w) or
752-6372 (h).
SERVICES
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
LIARNTO
SKYDIVE!
CMOUUA SKY SPORTS
1919)496-2224
ROOMMATE WANTED
MALE OR female roommates want-
ed. Prefer grad student for Jan-June
2000. Nice spacious two bedroom 1
2 baths. Cheap utilities $202.50
month, cab include On ECOTrarT
sit call 752-0608 ASAP.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 3
bedroom apartment. Rent is $196.66
plus 13 utilities and phone. Located
in Courtney Square off Arlington.
Please call (252) 353-8402.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
take over lease 3 bedroom, 2 bath du-
plex deposit and rent paid already
through December. Rent $217.50 plus
13 bills washerdryer included. Must
not mind smoking or dog. Call Megan
754-2958 or Jennifer 757-1280.
GRADUATE STUDENT or profession-
al non-smoking roommate wanted to
share two bedroom apartment with
female graduate student. Convenient
to hospital and ECU. Must be respon-
sible. 551-7607.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom Apt. at Wilson Acres w 2
male roommates. $240mth 13
utilities. Call Neal 329-7160.
DJ FOR Hire: Book now for your ev-
ent. Special discounts for students.
Music for any occasion and full lightn-
ing available. Competitive pricing and
guaranteed fun! Call Jeff 757-2037.
OVERWEIGHT77 LOSE 7-14lbs per
month! All natural. Doctor developed.
19 years of guaranteed results! If your
weight is unbecoming to you, you
should be coming to me Call 931-
7197. Independent herbalife distributor.
OO. YOU need a mature, creative,
trustworthy, organized person to pro-
vide enriching childcare. clean your
home or office, organize your closets,
cabinets, children's rooms, or your pa-
perwork (have a business degree).
Could also plan parties. References.
Call Patricia at 746-6928.
SPRING TOxJffifc
� � t . . IJ UnltiinlQl
lamaica.CaiH.in. Florida. Barbados, Bahamas
Bonk now ror Free Meals & 2 Free Trips
Book by December 17th for Lowest Kates
1-800-426-7710
www.sunsplashtours.com
MF TO sublease at Players Club.
$260mo. 14 utilities negotiable. Ful-
ly furnished with washerdryer. On
ECU transit. Available after December.
Call Carla at 353-5056.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 BR.
1 bath furnished apt. at Elm Villas.
Walking distance to ECU. Rent $212.5
mo with central AC, heat & hot water
included. Call 328-6319(w) or 830-
9447 leave message.
SIZE DOES Matter! Biggest break
package. Best price from $29.
WWW.SPRINGBREAKHQ.COM. 1-
800-224-GULF.
HELP WANTED
NEED $$$ for your team, club, fra-
ternity or sorority? Earn1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event.
Groups love it because there's no sales
involved. Dates are filling up. so call
today! 1-888-522-4350.
CLERICAL POSITION: ideal for busi-
ness student, general office duties. 2-
4 hours per day MonFri. Call 758-
0897 or apply in person at 1525 South
Evans Street.
ECU RECREATION Services - Utility
Assistant. Responsible for the main-
tenance of the facility, vehicles, equip-
ment, and supplies relating to the de-
partment. A valid driver's license is re-
quired. For more information, call Re-
creational Services at 328-6387.
DANCERS EXOTIC Legal lap danc-
ing $1000-$1500week. First in the
state. Show up ready 8pm. Sid's Show-
girls. Goldsboro
5 STUDENTS needed immediately.
Internet related. Prefer students who
have created a web page. Location-
Greenville. Make your own schedule
10 to 20 hours per week. $200-$400
per week potential. Call (252) 527-
2969.
COMPUTER SCIENCE student need-
ed for new software company. Basic
computer skills a must. Flexible hours.
20hrswk. Call (252)756-8715. leave
message.
FREE BABY BOOM BOX EARN
$12001 FUNDRAISER FOR STUD-
ENT GROUPS & ORGANIZATIONS.
EARN UP TO $4 PER MASTER-
CARD APP. CALL FOR INFO OR
VISIT OUR WEBSITE. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE A FREE BABY
BOOM BOX. 1-S00-932-O528 EXT.
119 OR EXT. 126 WWW.OCMCON-
CEPTS.COM
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring student to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5.50 per hour plus bo-
nuses. Make your own schedule. If in-
terested, call 328-4212, M-TH between
the hours of 3-6 p.m.
GREENVILLE RECREATION and
Parks Department, Gymnastics instruc-
tor needed for 3-7 year olds. Basic
tumbling and floor exercises: January
25- March 9 (Tuesdays & Thursdays)
3:30-5:30pm. Call 329-4542 to apply
immediately.
PART-TIME, Full-time, and substitute
positions available for teachers. Great
experience for CDFR and ELEM ma-
jors. Call Greenhouse preschool at
355-2404 for more information.
EARN FREE Trips and Cash Spring
Break 2000. Cancun, Jamaica. For 10
years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinquished itself as the most re-
liable student event and marketing or-
ganization in North America. Motivat-
ed reps can go on Spring Break FREE
and earn over10,000! Contact us to-
day for details! 800328-1509
www.classtravelintl.com ' "
$$MANAGE a business on your cam-
pus$$ Versity.com. an Internet note-
taking company is looking for an en-
trepreneurial student to run business
on your campus. Manage students,
make tons of money, excellent oppor-
tunity! Apply on-line at www.versi-
ty.com contact jobs@versity.com or
call 734-483-1600 ext. 888
JOIN THE BBC The Buffalo Brew
Crew. BW-3 Buffalo Wild Wings is
now hiring 1 delivery driver, 1 cash-
ier, and 1 cook. 114 East 5th Street,
applications are accepted 2-4 p.m.
Mon-Thur. Please no calls.
INTERNATIONAL COMPANY ex-
panding earn $500-$1500 PT
$2000-$6000 FT per month. Health
fitness majors and International stud-
ents strongly encouraged! Only five
people needed! Full training! Call 757-
2763, ext.75.
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED dancers
needed. Make over $1500 weekly.
Must have transportation, phone and
be DRUG FREE. Call 758-2737 for more
information. i
GO DIRECT 1 Internet-based
Spring Break company offering
WHOLESALE pricing! We have the oth-
er companies begging for mercy! All
destinations! Guaranteed Lowest Price!
1-800-367-1252 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
HELP WANTED
ACTNOWtGETTHE BEST SPRING
BREAK PRICES! SOUTH PADRE.
CANCUN, JAMAICA. BAHAMAS,
ACAPULCO. FLORIDA B
MARDIGRAS. REPS NEEDED.
TRAVEL FREE, EARN S$S. GROUP
DISCOUNTS FOR 6 800-838-
8203 WWW.LEISURE-
TOURS COM
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GREEK PERSONALS
$ NEED MONEY? $
WE PAY CASH FOR YOUR NICE QUALITY
n
USED MEN'S CLOTHING
Toniniy Hilfigger � SHIRTS, PANTS
POLO, Nautica � JEANS, SHOES
AND OTHER QUALITY BRANDS.
NOW
Buying & Selling At
Our New Location
GREENVILLE FLEA MARKET
(At Buyers Market- Memorial Drive)
Come to Back Door Loading Dock!
OPEN FRI. 12:00-7:00, SAT 10:00-7:00, SUN. 12:30-5:30
752-3866
ALPHA OMICRON Pi - Thanks so
much for the rides last week! We real-
ly appreciate it! Thanks again! Love
Zeta Tau Alpha.
PI KAPPA Alpha- Thanks for a great
time at the tailgate . We had a lot of
fun. Love Alpha Phi.
DELTA ZETA Thanks for a great time
at the blow out Sat. night. We had an
awesome time. Hope to get together
again soon! The Chi Phi guys!
PI KAPPA Alpha, thanks for the so-
cial last Tuesday night. We will have
to get together again soon. Love Del-
ta Zeta.
THANKS LAMBDA Chi Alpha for the
tailgate for the Cincinnati game. We
had a great time. Love Alpha Delta Pi.
DJ FOR Hire: Sororities and Fraterni-
ties book now for your formal and oth-
er functions. Guaranteed lowest price
and guaranteed quality service! Latest
hits and old favorites make your get
together an event to remember. Full
lighting systems available upon re-
quest. Please call soon, limited dates
available! Cakalaky Entertainment
(Jeff) at 757-2037.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Chi
Phi for the social last Saturday night.
We all had a good time thanks guy.
Love Delta Zeta.
WHEELPOWER DANCE Troupe Prac-
tice: 3pm-5pm Sunday Nov. 21. An-
yone interested in participating is wel-
come. For more information please call
328-6387.
GAMMA BETA Phi Society will meet
Thursday. November 18th at 5pm in
Mendenhall social Rm. hup:
www.ecu.eduorggbp
TIME MANAGEMENT. The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on November 23, 11:00. If you
are interested in this program contact
the Center at 328-6661.
DUE TO the Diocesan wide celebra-
tion in Fayetteville on Sunday. Novem-
ber 21. 1999 there will be only one
mass at 10am at the Newman Cen-
ter. Call Fr. Paul if you have any ques-
tions 757-1991.
BECOMING A Successful Student:
The one-hour session will give you the
opportunity to discuss academic con-
cerns and learn general study skills.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent development is offering the follow-
ing workshop on Monday November
22. 11:00. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
A SLIDE show of the Baha'i holy
places in Haifa Isreal will be shown
November 18 at 7pm in room 129
Speight building. A brief discussion on
the principles of the Baha'i Faith will
follow.
COPING WITH Grief and Loss: This
group is designed to provide support
to students who have experienced the
death of a loved one. Meeting every
Monday at 3:30. It you are interested
please call the Center for Counseling
and Student Development at 328-6661.
ALPHA PHI would like to thank all of
the new sisters for throwing us a great
sister's party. You guys did a great
job. We love you all.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the newly
initiated sisters of Delta Zeta. We love
you. Love the sisters of Delta Zeta.
KAPPA SIGMA. Thanks for the great
tailgate on Saturday for the game.
Love, Delta Zeta.
TO THE new members of Delta Zeta
thanks for the fruit basket! Love Alpha
Xi Delta.
PANHELLENIC WOULD like to con-
gratulate, these sisters of the week Al-
pha Delta Pi-Courtney White; Alpha
Phi- Jen Bumpass. Delta Zeta- Kath-
leen Wickersty. Alpha Omicron Pi- An-
nie Cox. Alpha Delta- Alexi Hasapis,
Alpha Xi Delta- Kathy Ringgold. Chi
Omega- Erin Adam. Zeta Tau Alpha-
Newly elected EC and Gamma Sigma
Sigma- Tiffany Call.
CHI OMEGA ball and chain was a
blast Fri. night. We hope you ladies
had as much fun as we did! We look
forward to more good times. The Chi
Phi guys!
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon, we had a
blast at the social on Thursday. Love
Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Pi
Kappa Alpha for the social last Thurs-
day.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Sig-
ma Alpha Epsilon for the social last
Thursday night. We all had a lot of fun.
love Delta Zeta.
YEAR 2000 internships "Don't gat
a summer job run a summer
businass" www.tuitionpaint-
ars.com email: tuipaintSbell-
south.net 363-4831.
PART TIME jobs available. Joans
fashions, a local women's clothing
store, has positions for students who
will remain in the area during Thanks-
giving and Christmas breaks. The po-
sitions are not limited to the holiday
period and can be for 7 to 20 hours
per week, depending on your sched-
ule and on business needs. Individu-
als must be available for Saturday
work. The jobs are within walking dis-
tance of ECU and the hours are flexi-
ble. Pay is commensurate with your
experience and job performance and
is supplemented by an employee dis-
count. Apply in person to store man-
ager, Joan's Fashions, 423 S. Evans
Street. Greenville (Uptown Greenville).
"Shunting?
You're in the right place!
OTHER
SUBLEASE PIRATE Cove Apartment.
One or two rooms available. Private
bathroom and phone line. Fully fur-
nished call anytime 758-8348.
What is
the only
station for
Lady Pirate
basketball
broadcasts?
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
I. looking ta nwa nuW t. load ���� i aaU
tnlltn I" Mt �" ���� tau" iM " �
SI.50IKHK ��" I � ,n" J�
luuii cimf aaaartiailttM 1" op��o�. ni BIJJJJ
MM PIU HPHIC.MW. ��� �� �� g ���
Wr?MB
91.3 FM on the dial
ANNOUNCEMENT
ALPHA EPSILON Delta. The Pre-med-
ical Honors Society will meet Tubs
Nov. 30th. 7:00pm in GCB 1031. Our
guests wiH be medical students from
the ECU School of Medicine. Every-
one is invited to attend.
THE EXSS Majors club wiH meet Tues-
day. November 23rd at 7:30pm in the
Pirate Club Building. AM majors and
intended majors are invited to attend.
WHEELCHAIR BASKETBALL :
11am-12:30pm Saturday. Nov.20. An-
yone that is interested in playing is wel-
come. For more information please caH
328-6387.
SNOWSHOE PRE X-Mas party. Dec.
17-20. Come experience lots of skiing
at one of the east's premiere ski re-
sorts. Long runs and fast lifts make
this a must for all skiers and boarders
looking to get the cobwebs off their
equipment. So come join adventure
programs for 3 days of fun in the snow.
Registration Deadline is Nov. 19.5pm.
Cost is $165mem-$185non-mem.
For more information please call 28-
6387
PILOT MOUNTAIN Dec.4. Spend a
day on the rocks at our closest climb-
ing area. Expect a day of great climb-
ing at Pilot Mountain State Park. Pilot
offers gre8t diversity fro beginners as
well as advanced climbers. Come join
Adventure Programs for the last climb-
ing trip of the year. Cost is $30mem-
$40non-mem. Registration deadline
is Nov. 23. 5pm.
FREE MEDICAL School! US Air Force
recruiters will be here Thursday. No-
vember 18 in Biology N-109 at noon
to talk about full scholarships for
Health Professional Schools. Call 328-
6306 for more information.
perien
if
srow
2 o oV TO
DAYNIGHTS
LIFTLODGING
PARTIESLIVE BANDS
ef
rou must be 18 to consume alcohol in Conodo
www.skitravel.com 1-800-999SKI9
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5$ each
Must present a valid ECU ID. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue





Say congratulations to your
friends, co-workers and
others who are graduating
There's no better way to bid your friends, brothers,
sisters, co-workers and classmates good-bye and good luck
than with an ad in our graduation tabloid.
Distributed in the Dec. 7 edition of The East Carolinian
as well as at the commencement ceremonies on Dec. 11,
this special edition is a keepsake that graduates and their
families will treasure for years to come.
Make sure they don't get away without saying you're proud
of them.
Only $35
for an ad
like the one
at right.
You may
use a photo
if you wish
in the ad.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA GRADS
The sisters of Sigma Alpha congratulate our
members who are graduating this Fall:
Betty Smithfield
Jerri Jenkins
F A Mary Ann Betermeyer
Sally Bestwick
XJIjL Janet Briley
Don't get left out. Come by The East Carolinian office
before the December 1 deadline to place your ad.
IfYour Place
To Fall In Love
NOV. 18 AT 10 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Shakespeare In Love (R) To go or not to go? That's not the question. Just go! You
and a guest get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Go Down To South Park
NOV. 18-20 AT 7:30 P.M. AND NOV. 21 AT 3 P.M.
IN HENDRIX THEATRE
South Park (R) "Oh My God. they killed Kenny! You
�$ What more can we say? You and a guest
get in free when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Do A little Dance
NOV. 18 AT 8 P.M. IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
These routines may .not be the ones you can use in a dance club, but they are sure
amazing to watch! The Don Cossacks of Rostov, an incredible dance troupe of
performers, will recreate the feel of Old Russia with their renditions of genuine folk
songs and dances, along with beautiful, authentic costumes. Show your valid ECU
One Card at the Central Ticket Office to get advance discount tickets. All tickets
purchased at the door will be full price.
To Jazz It Up
NOV. 19 AT 8 P.M. IN THE GREAT ROOM
Jazz at night enters its fifth year and will show-
case the latest student talent from the ECU School
of Music backed up with several of the music fac-
ulty. Get your free tickets (limit two per ECU One
Card) by showing your valid ECU One Card at the
Central Ticket Office. Better hurrythese things
go quick!
ToWinPhatCASH
NOV. 21 AT 6 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDERGROUND
You know the lingo, well now its time to BINGO. Bingo Night is fun for everyone,
especially when there is cash involved. But no need to bring cash to play - Bingo
Night is FREE to all ECU students with a valid ECU One Card.
ToCatchaRide
Want to get home to fill up on Mom's big Thanksgiving feast,
but don't have a ride? Don't be a turkey - check out the Ride
Rider Board at the foot of the stairs as you venture into the
Pirate Underground.
Mendenhall Student Canter will be closing early on Wednesday,
Nov. 24 at 5 p.m. and will remain closed through Sunday, Nov. 28
for Thanksgiving Break. It will reopen at 8 a.m. on Monday,
Nov. 29 with normal business hours.
MSC Hours: Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p.m.Fri. 8 a.m. - MidnightSat. Noon-Midnight Sun. Noon -11 p.m.
Attack the P,
1
'Twas five days til Thanksgiving
and out on the field,
Our Pirates are ready to give us
a thrill.
Purple &� Sold spirit dominates
the stands,
There's no one quite like our
True ECU fans!
Tar River Estateshaeks the
Pirates once more,
Wolfjpack look out
Touchdown, Pirates
SCORE!
i
&
1501� 1st St - Mobile
Greenville, NC 27SSS
tfif (252) 752-4225
www.000647@AIMCO
38
D.com
www.tec.ee
� nil i i' n
ANNUAL Fl
Th;
36 da
NEWS
Hoi ida
Classes wil
nally schedule
Break. Monday
make up for thi
to the hurricam
ECU will be
for the Thanksi
. The ECUb
Wisconsin-Gre
Minges Colisei
gram. The hats
tients who hav
knitting or croc
sary. The grou
oh Tuesday, N
ence Room on
cer Center. Fo
7867.
, , � -�.�
The Nation
looking for pec
to be sold at ai
ceeds collecte
port programs
organ donatior
tions are eligib
information cal
� 468-2277).
5
The Office
sponsoring infi
know more ar
program and s
Will be out on
GCB.
Part
Visitors of I
(F-CMH) will bi
ployee lot acre
Boulevard fror
main visitor pa
nance. Signs i
rect visitors to
and employee
lots to make re
tal officials tha
tion and apolo
this maintenar
Fine A
The East C
"Gardenia" tor
Theatre.
An Opera"
place tonight i
cital Hall. For i
tickets, call 32
ONLIN
Do you la
infected
Vote o
The resu
Woi
goalp


Title
The East Carolinian, November 18, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 18, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1367
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy