The East Carolinian, November 9, 1999






www.tec.ecu.edu
4 the
eastcaro
WHO'S AFRAID OF? pg. 6
Control can help conquer fears and
phobias.
: 53 days to go until 2000
NEWS BRIEFS
A blood drive will be
held from noon-6 p.m.
tomorrow in Mendenhall
Student Center.
Money for students and staff severely
impacted by flooding is available through
the ECU Family Relief Fund. Those who
are interested may acess an application
through the public folder on exchange or
pick one up in the Financial Aid and SGA
offices.
The annual Chancellor's Awards for Ex-
cellence ceremony will be held at 3:30 p.m.
� Jeday in Room 244 of Mendenhall Student
Center.
The Office of International Affairs will
set up information tables in order to let stu-
dents learn more about international ex-
change and studying abroad opportunities.
The tables will be located tomarrow on the
first floor of GCB, on Nov. 17 in front of the
Wright Place and on Nov. 24 again on the
first floor of GCB.
The Fountainhead, the arts and enter-
tainment magazine of The East Carolinian,
is looking for a new editor. All interested
applicants must have a minimum GPA of
2.0 and present a writing portfolio and a
statement of intent to Holly Harris at TEC
office, located on the second floor of the
Student Publications Building. For more in-
formation call 328-6366.
A research team from North Dakota
State University has developed a treatment
for people who have experienced flood-in-
duced trauma. They will be testing this
treatment from 9 a.m5 p.m. today in Rawl
Room 113.
The men's and women's basketball
teams will play exhibition games tonight
starting at 6 p.m. when the Lady Pirates go
against the Slovakian National Team. In
� ihe men's game, ECU will play the USDBL
All-Stars at 8 p.m.
Multicultural Reading Day will take
place from 3-4:30 p.m. on Thursday, Nov.
; tj in GCB 1032. If you wish to participate
by reading one to five minutes from your
favorite author or text, contact Dr. Seodial
Deena at 328-6683 or Dr. Gay Wilentz at
328-6678 and supply the names of the au-
� thor, text and length of reading time. Power
point, electronic text and dramatization are
strongly encouraged. Admission is free and
refreshments will be served.
The City of Greenville will hold two pub-
lic information meetings for flood victims
interested in applying for a property buy-
out or funds to elevate their structure. The
first Hazard Mitigation Grant Program Pub-
lic Information Meeting will be held at 6:30
p.m. tonight in the Willis Building on the
comer of Reade and First Streets. The
second meeting will be held at 6:30 p.m.
on Wednesday, Nov. 10 at the Pitt County
Agricultural Building, located on Govern-
ment Circle off Old Creek Road.
Volume 74, Issue 74
ONLINE SURVEY
Did you register for classes
online?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Do you consider your academic adviser
helpful?
�YES 3�NO
I
PIRATES FALL TO UAB pg.8
Brooks, Blazers come back from
deficit.
TUESDAY. NOVEMBER 9. 1999
Registration begins, students face many options
Opinions vary as to
which system is best
Maura Buck
STAFF WRITER
This week students begin
registering for spring 200
classes, and many are over-
whelmed by the options avail-
able to them.
Today, via the Internet,
telephone, and terminal pro-
cedures, a student can regis-
ter in various ways.
The oldest of the register-
ing methods is the terminal.
Students must bring their reg-
istration form signed by their
academic advisor and their as-
signed registration code.
"I would certainly com-
pose a list of alternate courses
with your advisor including
not only other section num-
bers, but also other courses to
make the process a little
easier said Amy Bissette, as-
sistant registrar.
In years past, students
have been known to camp-
out and stand in line for hours
on end. Despite those pitfalls,
Senior Ashley Batts pre-registers at Whichard for Spring 2000 semester,
(photo by Emily Richardson)
many upper-class students feel
more comfortable with the ter-
minal method simply because it
is the one most familiar to them.
"I'd rather see it on screen as
the technician types It in rather
than the Web or the telephone
said Gerri Ashe, a senior Com-
munications major. "This way, I
don't have to worry about an
operator making a mistake or
the Web site crashing
Certainly there are some
valid fears with the alternate
SGA pay matches minimum wage
methods of signing up for
courses, yet other students
feel it is a welcome change to
waiting in line at their depart-
ment building.
An advantage to both the
Web and the telephone reg-
istrations are the hours of op-
eration. Throughout the
week students can commence
their scheduling process on
their designated day at 6 a.m
Income fair compared
to other campuses
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
Like most students with cam-
pus jobs, the SGA executive of-
ficers look forward to their pay-
checks at the end of every
month.
But exactly how much are
they getting paid?
Overton Harper, SGA Trea-
surer, stated that the officers'
monthly pay varies based on
their position. The president,
vice-president, secretary and
treasurer receive $400, $250,
$200 and $275, respectively.
According to SGA President
Cliff Webster, all representatives
also receive $200 a semester for
books.
SGA advisor, Dean of Stu-
dents Ron Speier, said that the
payments are approved by the
student body legislature.
"I've been the advisor for the
past 10 years Speier said. "The
payment
amounts have
been changed
over the years
based on each
representative's
workloads.
They have also
been com-
pared to other
leadership
roles on cam-
pus
Opinions
about their
salaries vary
among the stu-
dent represen-
tatives.
"I think
that our pay is
very reason-
able said SGA
Vice President
John Meriac.
"When you weigh our office
hours and work outside of the
office, the pay evens up to about
minimum wage
"I don't think the pay is rea-
sonable at all Webster said. "A
student cannot live off of $400 a
SOM device gives hope to
aneurysm victims
SGA President Cliff Webster, V. President John Monroe,
Treasurer Overton Harper and Secretary Jessica Dowdy
month. If I did not have an ex-
tra job, I would not be able to
survive
"The pay is reasonable said
Jessica Dowdy, SGA secretary. "I
See SGA, page 4
Graduate fair impresses other schools
35 programs draw
students
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
After four years of school, a
number of students are making
decision to go back to school.
The Second Annual Graduate
and Professional School Fair took
place last Thursday with under-
graduates searching for prospec-
tive schools in which they will
help them get their master's or
doctorate. Representatives from
various schools set up booths
from 10 a.m1:30 p.m in the
Multl-Purpose Room in Menden-
hall Student Center.
"I found the fair very help-
ful said junior Adam Carroll.
"I'm interested in the law schools
and there were many to choose
from. Everyone was very nice
and well-organized
According to Dr. Max Poole,
associate dean of graduate
school, the fair was successful.
"This Is a great honor for us
Poole said. "We are gaining na-
tional recognition. It's very im-
pressive to me that so many
graduate schools have come
"It's very impressive to me
that so many graduate schools
have come from such great dis-
tances. " -Dr. Max Poole, associate
dean of graduate school
from such great distances
Graduate school representa-
tives were impressed with stu-
dents.
"I've seen a fair amount of
students said Anna Basnightof
Graduate Admissions for Appa-
lachian State University. "Many
students have a good idea of
what they're looking for. It's
quite impressive
"I am delighted to be here
from the West Coast said Sandy
Lane, Bastyr University represen-
tative. "I just met a student who
yeted from UNC-Wilmington
this fair, All the stutients are
Highly motivated and impres-
sive
The day was a busy one for
students and the Over 35 gradu-
ate school representatives.
"I've had a lot of traffic said
David Snafer, a representative
from N.C. State. "Students are
focused and everything is very
organized
"This fair is amazing said
Terri Woods, ECU associate pro-
fessor department of biology.
"Usually you are lucky If you talk
to one student, but 1 just finished
talking to six. Students are ex-
cited and enthusiastic
"This is my second year
here said Pam Reynolds,
Chatham College representative.
"We had several students from
ECU apply last year and are now
in our physical assistant school
Some students were disap-
pointed with the fair.
"The fair was all right said
junior Christopher Columbus.
"I'm a physical therapy major
and some of the graduate schools
were more helpful than others
"Unfortunately there was
only one pharmacy school said
senior Ayne Adenew. "It would
be really great if ECU could in-
corporate a pharmaceutical
school
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu
Cost of treatment
estimated at $20,000
Ashley Roberts
STAFF WRITER
The Food and Drug Adminis-
tration has recently approved an
endovascular device that is being
tested at the ECU School of Medi-
cine.
According to the Medical
Center News and Information of
University Health Systems and
the School of Medicine, this de-
vice is used for treating abdomi-
nal aortic aneurysms without
major surgery.
According to Dr. William Bo-
gey, a vascular surgeon at the
School of Medicine, an abdomi-
nal aortic aneurysm affects the
main blood vessel coming out of
the heart. An aneurysm is the
"ballooning" out of the artery.
This ballooning effect can cause
the artery to burst, and the vic-
tim could bleed to death.
"Generally, but not always,
those over 60 years old tend to
be more likely to be diagnosed
with an abdominal aortic aneu-
rysm Bogey said. "People that
smoke or have hypertension also
tend to be higher at risk
According to Bogey, an ab-
dominal aortic aneurysm usually
has no effect until it ruptures.
He described how a
endovascular device would be
placed into a patient.
"It is first inserted through in-
cisions in the groin and then
loaded into a fairly large catheter
which can be released and will
stick to the walls of the aorta
Bogey said.
Bogey further described how
very small hooks are then
latched onto the wall of the
aorta. As a result, blood flows
through the catheter instead of
the aneurysm, which makes It
less likely to rupture.
He stated that the total cost
for the repair of an abdominal
aortic aneurysm, with the help
of this new device, will be ap-
proximately $20,000.
"This device is brand new on
the market and very few people
know how to use it Bogey said.
According to the ECU School
of Medicine, treatment with the
device had a 91 percent success
rate.
This writer can be contacted at
aroberts@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Staff member watchdogs for
bogus medical Web sites
Internet information
not always accurate
Carolyn Herold
STAFF WRITER
Debra Warner, a librarian
and Internet specialist at the
Laupus Health Sciences Li-
brary, knows thatiome infor-
mation posted on the Internet
is inaccurate. Even informa-
tion on medical Web sites that
are supposed to be helping
people.
Warner is interested in
helping Internet users find
valid medical Web sites. She
has taught a Web-based course
on evaluating information via
the Web and will teach a
course for librarians in SC in
January on the same thing.
Warner has also worked to
help the citizens of Eastern
NC, with a news blurb evalu-
ating health sites aired on
channel 9.
"(Evaluating sites is an
ongoing part of my position
here at ECU Warner said.
According to the research
group FINDSVP, there are ap-
proximately 12,000 medical
Web sites, only half of which
are considered respectable
sources.
An article titled "Evalua-
tion of Cancer Information
on the Internet" in the Jour-
nal Cancer states that there is
a six percent rate of clearly er-
roneous information on Web
sites, some of this erroneous
Cop
HMMiMMMMMi





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Rrown & Brown
CRIME
Nov. 3
Overdose�A student was transported to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital after overdosing on al-
lergysinus medication, cutting her wrists and tak-
ing an unknown pill in Belk Hall.
Larceny� A student reported that the passenger-
side window of his vehicle was broken while parked
north of the Student Recreation Center. A pair of
sunglasses was the only reported"missing item.
Possession of Weapon�A non-student was found
in possession of brass knuckles in Clement Hall af-
ter it was reported that a gun was possibly in the
room. A gun was not located.
Harassing Phone Calls�A student in Aycock Hall
was issued a campus appearance ticket for misusing
the telephone by placing calls to another student in
Fletcher Hall and making sexual comments.
Nov. 4
Driving While Impaired, Second Degree Trespassing�
A non-student was arrested for DWI and Second
Degree Trespassing after officers had warned him not
to come back when responding to a intoxicated and
disorderly call from Belk Hall earlier. The DWI charge
was later dropped.
Miscellaneous Call�A student in Gotten Hall re-
ported that an unknown male had approached her
in Mendenhall Student Center asking where she
lived and then stated he had followed her and did
know her address.
Larceny�A student in Greene Hall reported hav-
ing some clothing stolen from a fifth floor dryer.
Tampering with a Motor Vehicle�Two students
were issued state citations for tampering with a ve-
hicle parked in Curry Court.
Nov. 5
Damage to Property�A staff member reported that
a parking meter in the Fifth & Harding Street park-
ing lot was damaged.
Communicating Threats�A student was issued a
CAT for communicating threats to another student
on the north side of Tyler Hall.
Failure to Appear, Possession of Marijuana, Posses-
sion of'Drug Paraphernalia�Officers were dispatched
to a room in Scott Hall for a possible Controlled
Substance Act violation. While there, officers con-
ducted a consent search in which marijuana and
drug paraphernalia items were found. The two oc-
cupants of the room were issued state citations and
CATs. One of the students was arrested for failure to
appear in court on a previous offense.
Nov. 6
Vandalism�A non-student was arrested for dam-
age to real property when a staff reported seeing him
break a glass window to the Mendenhall Computer
Lab.
Possession of Weapon on Campus�Two non-stu-
dents were both arrested for misdemeanor posses-
sion of a weapon on campus. One was also charged
with felony possession of a weapon on campus. Of-
ficers found two .270 caliber rifles and one 12 gauge
shotgun in a vehicle.
24-Hour Lock-Up�A non-student was placed into
24-hour lock-up at Pitt County Detention Center
after his sister, a student, requested that he leave.
The subject was too intoxicated to do so.
Family of three in critical
condition after apparent
murder-suicide
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP)�A family of three remained
in critical condition Sunday after a man allegedly shot
his estranged wife and toddler In a motel room before
turning the gun on himself.
Ijaz Hussain, 29, of Whittier, his 26-year-old wife
Egla and 14-month-old daughter Jasmine were hospi-
talized in critical condition at the University of Cali-
fornia, Irvine Medical Center in Orange, said Sgt.
Michael Gray.
Early police statements erroneously said the father
and daughter had died.
The family checked into the Parkway Inn Friday
night. Officers were called there shortly after 5:30 a.m.
Saturday by reports of gunshots.
Hussain apparently shot his wife and daughter and
then himself, Gray said. A handgun was found at the
scene, he added.
"The shooting may be the result of a domestic vio-
lence incident" but the nature of the dispute was un-
clear, he said.
Mrs. Hussein filed for divorce in April after four years
of marriage, according to court records.
She had been separated from her husband for sev-
eral months and was living with her sister and mother
in the Los Angeles suburb of Whittier, her father,
Dagoberto Perez, told the Orange County Register.
The couple had a history of domestic violence, po-
lice and relatives said.
"One day I came home and found that he had
beaten her, so I kicked him out said Perez, who had
been living with the couple. His daughter left with
Hussain, she added.
"He kept bothering, calling her, and she tried not
to see him said Mrs. Hussain's mother, Milka Perez.
"But I guess he was putting too much pressure on her,
and so she went with him�and that's what happened
Hussain, a Pakistani immigrant, had been held at a
federal detention center in Eloy, Ariz, pending a de-
portation hearing, but was released in August.
Families mourn victims
of EgyptAir 990 crash
NEWPORT, Rhode Island (AP)�Relatives of the vic-
tims of EgyptAir Flight 990 gathered Sunday to bid them
a wrenching farewell, with one woman wailing "My
baby, my baby and others holding onto each other
after an emotional service at the edge of the sea where
their loved ones remain.
About 250 family members gathered on a clear, cold
afternoon at a park overlooking the Atlantic Ocean as
leaders of the Jewish, Christian and Islamic faiths of-
fered readings, chants and prayers in three languages.
"Your loss is great, your pain deep, but you must
find solace in the memory of those wonderful moments
you shared with your loved ones said Egyptian Am-
bassador Nebil Fahmy, who read from the Bible and
the Koran.
Relatives were led to the water through a corridor
formed by military personnel and caregivers including
workers from Red Cross, National Transportation Safety
Board and Salvation Army.
Some wept and wiped their faces with handkerchiefs
as they dropped flowers into the sea, while others left
their flowers in a wicker basket. One woman was so
overcome that she had to be helped to the beach. Oth-
ers wailed and wept.
A military honor guard carried the basket to a Coast
Guard helicopter, which hovered overhead briefly be-
fore slowly departing. The Coast Guard said the heli-
copter would drop the flowers at the crash site Tues-
day.
OPTIONS
from page 1
two hours before the terminal
method is available.
The other two methods are
similar in nature. To access either
source, the student must obtain a
PIN (Personal Identification Num-
ber). This number is acquired
through the Student Desktop at
https:intranet.ecu.edustudent
ecupin.cfm. After following the di-
rections, the PIN will be sent to the
student's Exchange e-mail account
within seconds.
The telephone number for the
telephonic registration is 328-2149
and the Web address is http:
www.student. ecii.edu.
Mike Slatken, a freshman in Ex-
ercise and Sports Science plans on
registering on the Web because "it
is so convenient. I think that it is
ridiculous to stand in line for hours,
not to mention a waste of time
"It was a disaster said Sharon
Doucet, sophomore mathematics
major. "I started dialing at 6 a.m.
to find constant busy signals until
6:15 a.m. when it began to ring and
then disconnect me. I ended up just
going to a terminal
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu
fr KryJft fcafcC
iN'KVS AT LAW
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
3493C South Evans Street
Bedford commons, Gtetnviut e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
Government looks
at Microsoft remedies
WASHINGTON (AP)�The
nation's top antitrust official
says the government is "look-
ing at a full range of remedies"
to punish Microsoft following
a judge's ruling that the soft-
ware giant misused its mo-
nopoly powers.
Despite U.S. District Judge
Thomas Penfield Jackson's
preliminary findings against
Microsoft, however, both the
government and the company
expressed a willingness to con-
sider an out-of-court settle-
ment.
In an open letter, Microsoft
Chairman Bill Gates said the
company is committed to "a
fair and responsible" resolu-
tion. The company's chief op-
erating officer, Bob Herbold,
said on the Sunday talk shows
that "there's nothing we'd like
more than to settle this case
Assistant Attorney General
Joel Klein, who also appeared
on three television programs,
said, "Obviously settlement is
always an option
Neither Klein nor Herbold
would suggest what an agree-
ment might entail.
"We would need a settle-
ment that deals with the very
findings that the court made
in this case, a settlement that
produces consumer choice, to-
SeeG0VT,page4
"Lessons of Success
and Survival for
Adult Students"
� Meets every other Wednesday
� Next session November 10
� "Understanding Your Career"
� career development for adults, dual
career relationships and career changes
� Noon-1p.m.
� 512 Wright Hall
� Attend as often as you like
For students over 24 who want to meet other adults
and succeed at ecu
Graduate Students are welcome .Bring a luncn and a friend
Call 6881 or �6661 for more Information.
PHONES
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS & CELLULAR
Pagers -$4995
Includes Activation and 1 Month Service
HA AA.iAiAll AA AA.A '�
Cellular Phones
$25.00 per month
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No Long Distance from NC SC, VA (
anywhere in the USA
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Free leal her case & ear charger
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(Across from Kinko's)
Ask About No Credit Cellular
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t . AUtttODII tD AIINT
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and get a head start on a rewarding career.
NEW APARTMENT COMPLEX
NOW OPEN
Eastgate Village
On Mosely Drive, off of Greenville Blvd.
Two Bedroom Units
Reserve One Today
Also Ask About
Wyndham Court- Dockside
Apartments
2 Bedroom; 1 Bath & 3 Bedrooms; 2.5 Bath Units;
Kitchen Appliances; Dishwasher, WasherDryer
Hookups Short Term Contracts Available, Pets
Okay With Deposite, Convenient to ECU Campus,
On Bus Route, On Site Management,
24 Hr. Emergency Service
561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SPRING SEMESTER
T
T
Healthcare is a growing and �
exciting career field. As a
volunteer, you can get a head .
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you �
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas :
to choose from, there's sure to :
be a position that fits your �;
interests. Call Pitt County i
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today. :
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhseast.com
mnwitagMfcpMilinpaalMitliciMtMMittido
Tuesday, Nov
www.tec.ecu.e
ACROS
Ohio State
photographs ha
dition for men's
the Ohio State U
rugby team pos
first.
In front of tl
rial in Washingt
was photograph
pher. from The
Twelve of the 3
were topless.
Suspended f
two games, the i
scrutiny from un
The adminis
considering poss
said David Willi
dent of Student i
Rugby is a clu
the team falls un
of Student Affair:
Head Coach J
team wants to
with a plan where
were topless in
would be punish
"The student
they did sometl
great harm to thi
definitely clear
are very willing ti
and make amend
The photogt
came about wher
in front of the Lir
take a group pho
tograph was tak
took another she
off while coverin
their hands. The I
shot them puttin
on, Moore said.
According t(
whith ran in Th
patch Monday, ti
to rparket the p
shir(s that would
pus
Moore said th
such plan.
'Let me assun
no time any org
plan by the club
ket or distribute
or calendars fea
OSU women's
Moore said.





Tuescfay, Nov. 9, 1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian
news9studentmedia.ecu.edu
-N
ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
Ohio State U�Topless team
photographs have long been a tra-
dition for men's rugby teams, but
the Ohio State University women's
rugby team posing topless was a
first.
:in front of the Lincoln Memo-
rial in Washington, D.C. the team
was photographed by a photogra-
pher, from The Washington Post:
Twelve of the 37 team members
were topless.
Suspended from practice and
two games, the team is still under
scrutiny from university officials.
The administration has been
considering possible repercussions,
said David Williams II, vice presi-
dent of Student Affairs.
Rugby is a club sport at OSU, so
the team falls under the jurisdiction
of Student Affairs.
Head Coach Jon Moore said the
team wants to present Williams
with a plan where only the girls who
were topless in the photograph
would be punished.
"The students understand that
they did something that caused
great harm to the university, that's
definitely clear Moore said. "They
are very willing to make up for that
and make amends
The photograph in question
came about when the team stopped
in front of the Lincoln Memorial to
take a group photo. After the pho-
tograph was taken, a few players
took another shot with their shirts
off while covering themselves with
their hands. The Post photographer
shot them putting their shirts back
on, Moore said.
According to the Post story
whifch ran in The Columbus Dis-
patch Monday, the team had plans
to market the photograph on T-
shirs that would be sold on cam-
pus
Moore said there was never any
such plan.
'Let me assure you there was at
no time any organized intent or
plan by the club to produce, mar-
ket or distribute pictures, T-shirts,
or calendars featuring unclothed
OSU women's rugby players
Moore said.
NCSU�A lot of North Carolina
State University students helped out
with Hurricane Floyd relief by do-
nating money and supplies during
the drives here on campus. The
NCSU relief effort is now continu-
ing with the College of Veterinary
Medicine.
North Carolina's veterinarians
and interested citizens, and the
NCSU College of Veterinary Medi-
cine faculty and students came to-
gether, according to the Hurricane
Floyd Animal Relief Effort Web
page, to form a field hospital for lost
and hurt animals.
"The College of Veterinary
Medicine field hospital was estab-
lished to minimize the animal suf-
fering associated with the impact of
Hurricane Floyd describes the Web
page.
"Our number-one goal said
Kelli Ferris, director of the field hos-
pital, in a recent news release, "has
always been to reunite these ani-
mals with their owners
The Web page also explains that
donations have been made by local
businesses, corporations and citi-
zens, and these donations have paid
for food and supplies that were nec-
essary to treat over 500 lost pets.
Though the college initially
helped out in the field, now most
of the animals have been found and
treated�and the main work re-
maining is locating the owners. This
search is done using the Internet.
"We knew we needed a way for
people across the state to see pic-
tures of animals said Leigh Ann
Wilder, director of college relations
in the College of Veterinary Medi-
cine.
She said that for this reason, the
college bought a digital camera and
started taking pictures of animals
that were found when the college
worked with rescue efforts to find
and treat animals.
Color pictures of located cats
and dogs have been posted on the
Web page. The Internet provides a
perfect medium for getting the pic-
tures available to people every-
where.
Violence committed by children on the rise
PHOENIX (AP)�Penny
McCardole's stepfather used to
push a garbage can up against his
bedroom door at night, hoping
the sound of it toppling over
would wake him if the 13-year-old
tried to kill him while he slept.
Greg Virden, Penny's stepfa-
ther, says he had good reason to
be afraid.
Since she was S, Penny has hit
teachers, hurled desks and beat
other kids. A buckled wooden
door, torn from its hinges by the
girl, leans against the kitchen wall
in her Mesa mobile home.
That recent fit of rage landed
Penny in juvenile hall, one of a
steadily increasing number of kids
being sent there for domestic vio-
lence.
In 1998, 1,779 kids in
Maricopa County were cited for
domestic violence, compared
with 1,255 kids in 1994, said
Cherie Townsend, director of ju-
venile court services for Maricopa
County.
The increase is worrisome, ex-
perts say. But even more alarm-
ing, they say, is that the kids are
getting more violent. A kid who
once shoved his mother now
punches her in the face. Dad gets
beat to the floor instead of just
pushed aside. And parents who hit
their kids get it in return, blow for
blow.
"This is the most violent indus-
trialized country on the planet, so-
cially and culturally, so it's not sur-
prising to see it in homes said Tho-
mas Haines, professor of social work
at Arizona State University West.
The severity of the violence does
seem to be increasing. We're see-
ing violent crimes leading up to ho-
micides within families
This summer, a Phoenix teenager
with a history of violent behavior at
home reportedly killed his father
with a baseball bat as the man slept
on the couch, according to police.
Experts point to myriad reasons
for this violence�turbulent family
life, violence on television and in
movies, mental illness�but they
agree that all children are different,
and so are their reasons for lashing
out.
Penny's third-grade school pic-
ture shows a sweet-looking girl with
pink hearts on the collar of her shirt.
It was the last one she had taken.
Her mother, Wendy Virden,
pulled Penny out.of school shortly
after that, deciding to teach the little
girl at home. Wendy says the teacher
was so afraid of Penny that she did
not make her do any schoolwork.
Penny was fust 5 when she hit a
teacher�for the first time. She did it
again in first, second and third
grades.
Now a teenager, she's still a sweet-
faced young girl, but she talks tough
about fighting with her stepfather,
sometimes coming to blows.
Her stepfather recalls the fights
with dismay. They put the household
in turmoil and strained his relation-
ship with his new wife of just a year
and a half, he said.
In fact, the couple separated for
a short time but are now reunited
and getting counseling through their
church.
"I wasn't the perfect Mom all the
time, either Wendy admits.
When Penny was younger,
Wendy says she would leave Penny
and her brother, now 17, alone while
she went to the bar.
Penny was so hard to control that
Wendy says she often resorted to
grabbing her by the hair or hitting
her. It was something she learned
from her own parents, Wendy said.
And something she taught her
daughter.
At 6, Penny beat up a 5-year-old
boy who wouldn't share his toys.
Even the point of her pencil snap-
ping could send her into a rage.
' "She was a bomb her mother
said.
At Central Christian Church
in Mesa, Penny growled at people
who talked to her, even just to say,
"Good morning
"I wanted to curl up in a cave
and stay there she said. "I was
mad at the world
It was on Mother's Day this
year that a fight between Penny
and her stepfather got so out of
hand that Wendy called police.
When officers arrived about
1:30 p.m Penny was in her room,
shaking the bunk beds so hard
that they moved away from the
wall. It was the night Penny
wrenched the door from its
hinges.
"When I get mad, I get
strong she said.
The girl's probation officer rec-
ommended counseling, Wendy
said, rolling her eyes. Penny has
been in counseling since she was
in kindergarten. Wendy, now 36,
has been going since she was 19.
"If s not helping she said.
They needed something
more.
Nearly 100 arrested at fraternity party
BLOOMSBURG, Pa. (AP)�
About 100 people were arrested on
underage drinking and other
charges in a weekend raid on a fra-
ternity house near a police station.
Some of those arrested were as
young as 15; most of were
Bloomsburg University students or
their younger brothers and sisters,
police said.
Police estimated the basement
beer party crowd at about 200
people.
The bust appears to be the larg-
est in Bloomsburg in at least the last
decade. It came as parents of many
students were in town for the an-
nual parents' weekend to showcase
the university.
One woman was found
unconcious in the basement and
was taken to a hospital.
Plainclothes officers entered the
party about 11:30 p.m. Friday and
were charged $5 at the door, Sgt. Leo
Sokoloski said. Police had the house
under surveillance for some time.
Officers knew a party was planned
when a delivery of canned beer ar-
rived earlier in the day. A warrant
to enter the property had been pre-
pared in advance.
Fraternity members stationed
outside listened to scanners tuned
to police frequencies in hopes of
learning of any bust before it hap-
pened, Sokoloski said. But police
used coded frequencies that can't be
picked up on civilian scanners.
Local police issued 65 citations,
Sokoloski said; he estimated that
those cited by state police and liquor
agents would bring the total to
about 100.
Sokoloski noted that some of
those busted are 15 and 16 years old.
They were apparently visiting with
parents for the weekend and went
to the bash with older brothers and
sisters.
"Big brother and big sister were
showing them a good time the
sergeant said. No parents were
found in the house, he said.
Officers and members of the
GEO fraternity would not talk to
reporters.
A Bloomsburg University
spokesman said school officials are
waiting to see that all the charges
are true before taking action.
The fraternity risks losing its
charter with the university. The stu-
dents face individual hearings be-
fore the student conduct board.
GEO is currently recognized by the
university.






The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
CRIME SCENE
Nov. 3
Overdose�A student was transported to Pitt
County Memorial Hospital after overdosing on al-
lergysinus medication, cutting her wrists and tak-
ing an unknown pill in Belk Hall.
Larceny� A student reported that the passenger-
side window of his vehicle was broken while parked
north of the Student Recreation Center. A pair of
sunglasses was the only reportedmissing item.
Possession of Weapon�A non-student was found
in possession of brass knuckles in Clement Hall af-
ter it was reported that a gun was possibly in the
room. A gun was not located.
Harassing Phone Calls�A student in Aycock Hall
was issued a campus appearance ticket for misusing
the telephone by placing calls to another student in
Fletcher Hall and making sexual comments.
Nov. 4
Driving While Impaired, Second Degree Trespassing�
A non-student was arrested for DW1 and Second
Degree Trespassing after officers had warned him not
to tome back when responding to a intoxicated and
disorderly call from Belk Hall earlier. The OW1 charge
was later dropped.
Miscellaneous Call�A student in Cotten Hall re-
ported that an unknown male had approached her
in Mendenhall Student Center asking where she
lived and then stated he had followed her and did
know her address.
Larceny�A student in Greene Hall reported hav-
ing some clothing stolen from a fifth floor dryer.
Tampering with a Motor Vehicle�Two students
were issued state citations for tampering with a ve-
hicle parked in Curry Court.
NOV. 5
Damage to Property�A staff member reported that
a parking meter in the Fifth & Harding Street park-
ing lot was damaged.
Communicating Threats�A student was issued a
CAT for communicating threats to another student
on the north side of Tyler Hall.
Failure to Appear, Possession of Marijuana, Posses-
sion of Drug Paraphernalia�Officers were dispatched
to a room in Scott Hall for a possible Controlled
Substance Act violation. While there, officers con-
ducted a consent search In which marijuana and
drug paraphernalia items were found. The two oc-
cupants of the room were issued state citations and
CATs. One of the students was arrested for failure to
appear in court on a previous offense.
Nov. 6
Vandalism�A non-student was arrested for dam-
age to real property when a staff reported seeing him
break a glass window to the Mendenhall Computer
Lab.
Possession of Weapon on Campus�TWo non-stu-
dents were both arrested for misdemeanor posses-
sion of a weapon on campus. One was also charged
with felony possession of a weapon on campus. Of-
ficers found two .270 caliber rifles and one 12 gauge
shotgun in a vehicle.
24-Hour Lock-Up�A non-student was placed into
24-hour lock-up at Pitt County Detention Center
after his sister, a student, requested that he leave.
The subject was too intoxicated to do so.
Family of three in critical
condition after apparent
murder-suicide
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP)�A family of three remained
in critical condition Sunday after a man allegedly shot
his estranged wife and toddler in a motel room before
turning the gun on himself.
Ijaz Hussain, 29, of Whittier, his 26-year-old wife
Egla and 14-month-old daughter Jasmine were hospi-
talized in critical condition at the University of Cali-
fornia, Irvine Medical Center in Orange, said Sgt.
Michael Gray.
Early police statements erroneously said the father
and daughter had died.
The family checked into the Parkway Inn Friday
night. Officers were called there shortly after 5:30 a.m.
Saturday by reports of gunshots.
Hussain apparently shot his wife and daughter and
then himself, Gray said. A handgun was found at the
scene, he added.
"The shooting may be the result of a domestic vio-
lence incident" but the nature of the dispute was un-
clear, he said.
Mrs. Hussein filed for divorce in April after four years
of marriage, according to court records.
She had been separated from her husband for sev-
eral months and was living with her sister and mother
in the Los Angeles suburb of Whittier, her father,
Dagoberto Perez, told the Orange County Register.
The couple had a history of domestic violence, po-
lice and relatives said.
"One day I came home and found that he had
beaten her, so I kicked him out said Perez, who had
been living with the couple. His daughter left with
Hussain, she added.
"He kept bothering, calling her, and she tried not
to see him said Mrs. Hussain's mother, Milka Perez.
"But I guess he was putting too much pressure on her,
and so she went with him�and that's what happened
Hussain, a Pakistani immigrant, had been held at a
federal detention center in Eloy, Ariz, pending a de-
portation hearing, but was released in August.
Families mourn victims
of EgyptAir 990 crash
NEWPORT, Rhode Island (AP)�Relatives of the vic-
tims of EgyptAir Flight 990 gathered Sunday to bid them
a wrenching farewell, with one woman wailing "My
baby, my baby and others holding onto each other
after an emotional service at the edge of the sea where
their loved ones remain.
About 250 family members gathered on a clear, cold
afternoon at a park overlooking the Atlantic Ocean as
leaders of the Jewish, Christian and Islamic faiths of-
fered readings, chants and prayers in three languages.
"Your loss is great, your pain deep, but you must
find solace in the memory of those wonderful moments
you shared with your loved ones said Egyptian Am-
bassador Nebil Fahmy, who read from the Bible and
the Koran.
Relatives were led to the water through a corridor
formed by military personnel and caregivers including
workers from Red Cross, National Transportation Safety
Board and Salvation Army.
Some wept and wiped their faces with handkerchiefs
as they dropped flowers into the sea, while others left
their flowers in a wicker basket. One woman was so
overcome that she had to be helped to the beach. Oth-
ers wailed and wept.
A military honor guard carried the basket to a Coast
Guard helicopter, which hovered overhead briefly be-
fore slowly departing. The Coast Guard said the heli-
copter would drop the flowers at the crash site Tues-
day.
� i- ' u.
OPTIONS
from page 1
two hours before the terminal
method is available.
The other two methods are
similar in nature. To access either
source, the student must obtain a
PIN (Personal Identification Num-
ber). This number is acquired
through the Student Desktop at
https:lntranet.ecu.edustudent
ecupin.cfm. After following the di-
rections, the PIN will be sent to the
student's Exchange e-mail account
within seconds.
The telephone number for the
telephonic registration is 328-2149
and the Web address is http:
www.student. ecu.edu.
Mike Slatken, a freshman in Ex-
ercise and Sports Science plans on
registering on the Web because "it
is so convenient. I think that it is
ridiculous to stand in line for hours,
not to mention a waste of time
"It was a disaster said Sharon
Doucet, sophomore mathematics
major. "I started dialing at 6 a.m.
to find constant busy signals until
6:15 a.m. when it began to ring and
then disconnect me. I ended up just
going to a terminal
This writer can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Government looks
at Microsoft remedies
WASHINGTON (AP)�The
nation's top antitrust official
says the government is "look-
ing at a full range of remedies"
to punish Microsoft following
a judge's ruling that the soft-
ware giant misused its mo-
nopoly powers.
Despite U.S. District Judge
Thomas Penfield Jackson's
preliminary findings against
Microsoft, however, both the
government and the company
expressed a willingness to con-
sider an out-of-court settle-
ment.
In an open letter, Microsoft
Chairman Bill Gates said the
company is committed to "a
fair and responsible" resolu-
tion. The company's chief op-
erating officer, Bob Herbold,
said on the Sunday talk shows
that "there's nothing we'd like
more than to settle this case
Assistant Attorney General
Joel Klein, who also appeared
on three television programs,
said, "Obviously settlement is
always an option
Neither Klein nor Herbold
would suggest what an agree-
ment might entail.
"We would need a settle-
ment that deals with the very
findings that the court made
in this case, a settlement that
produces consumer choice, In-
See G0VT, page 4
o-o
Thrtfrftf "fly Mflce
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
3493C South Evans Street r J " ;�
Bedford commons, Greenviiie e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
"Lessons of success
and survival for
Adult students'

� Meets every other Wednesday
� Next session November 10
� "Understanding Your Career"
� Career development for adults, dual
career relationships and career changes
� � Noon-ip.m.
� 312 Wright Hall
� Attend as often as you like
For students over 24 who want to meet other adults
and succeed at ecu
Graduate Students are welcome Bring a luncn and a friend .
Call 6881 or 6661 for more Information.
PHONES
AFFORDABLE BEEPERS 4 CELLULAR
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anywhere in the USA
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(Across from Kinko's)
Ask About No Credit Cellular
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� 4- A U T 0 R I I C 0 AIINT
and get a head start on a rewarding career.
NEW APARTMENT COMPLEX
NOW OPEN
Eastgate Village
On Mosely Drive, off of Greenville Blvd.
Two Bedroom Units
Reserve One Today
Also Ask About
Wyndham Court- Dockside
Apartments
2 Bedroom; 1 Bath & 3 Bedrooms; 2.5 Bath Units;
Kitchen Appliances; Dishwasher, WasherDryer
Hookups Short Term Contracts Available, Pets
Okay With Deposite, Convenient to ECU Campus,
On Bus Route, On Site Management,
24 Hr. Emergency Service
561-RENT or 531-9011
NOW TAKING APPLICATIONS FOR SPRING SEMESTER
T
T
Healthcare is a growing and
exciting career field. As a
volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you j
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhseast.com
Tuesday, Nov
www.tec.ecu.e
ACR0S
Ohio State
photographs hai
dition for men's
the Ohio State 11
rugby team pos
first.
In front of tl
rial in Washing!
was photograph
pher. from The
Twelve of the 3
were topless.
Suspended f
two games, the i
scrutiny from ur
The admini;
considering poss
said David Willi
dent of Student i
Rugby is a cli
the team falls un
of Student Affair
Head Coach J
team wants to
with a plan whert
were topless in
would be punish
"The student
they did somet
great harm to thi
definilely clear
are very willing t
and make amenc
The photogi
came about wher
in fronl of ihe Lii
lake a group phc
tograph was tak
took another she
off while coverin
their hands. The 1
shot them puttin
on, Moore said.
According t
whith ran in Th
patch Monday, ti
to market ihe p
shirfs lhai would
pus
Moore said th
such plan.
'lLet me assun
no time any orj
plan by the club
ket or distribute
or calendars fea
OSU women's
Moore said.
Uiwmty Hertti Symms d EMtm Cm Mudes m Ctvt HmH Ho,OTmrtytraji�i.liin�
horohMmlwtairKlipexfcrityopBiWhejItfcMfvte.U





Tuesday, Nov. 9,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian 3
newsOstudentmedia.ecu.edu

ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
Ohio State U�Topless team
photographs have long been a tra-
dition for men's rugby teams, but
the Ohio State University women's
rugby team posing topless was a
first.
In front of the Lincoln Memo-
rial in Washington, D.C. the team
was photographed by a photogra-
pher, from The Washington Post:
Twelve of the 37 team members
were topless.
Suspended from practice and
two games, the team is still under
scrutiny from university officials.
The administration has been
considering possible repercussions,
said David Williams II, vice presi-
dent of Student Affairs.
Rugby is a club sport at OSU, so
the team falls under the jurisdiction
of Student Affairs.
Head Coach Jon Moore said the
team wants to present Williams
with a plan where only the girls who
were topless in the photograph
would be punished.
"The students understand that
they did something that caused
great harm to the university, that's
definitely clear Moore said. "They
are very willing to make up for that
and make amends
The photograph in question
came about when the team stopped
in front of the Lincoln Memorial to
take a group photo. After the pho-
tograph was taken, a few players
took another shot with their shirts
off while covering themselves with
their hands. The Post photographer
shot them putting their shirts back
on, Moore said.
According to the Post story
whith ran in The Columbus Dis-
patch Monday, the team had plans
to market the photograph on T-
shir(s that would be sold on cam-
pus
Moore said there was never any
such plan.
Let me assure you there was at
no time any organized intent or
plan by the club to produce, mar-
ket or distribute pictures, T-shirts,
or calendars featuring unclothed
OSU women's rugby players
Moore said.
NCSU�A lot of North Carolina
State University students helped out
with Hurricane Floyd relief by do-
nating money and supplies during
the drives here on campus. The
NCSU relief effort Is now continu-
ing with the College of Veterinary
Medicine.
North Carolina's veterinarians
and interested citizens, and the
NCSU College of Veterinary Medi-
cine faculty and students came to-
gether, according to the Hurricane
Floyd Animal Relief Effort Web
page, to form a field hospital for lost
and hurt animals.
"The College of Veterinary
Medicine field hospital was estab-
lished to minimize the animal suf-
fering associated with the impact of
Hurricane Floyd describes the Web
page.
"Our number-one goal said
Kelli Ferris, director of the field hos-
pital, in a recent news release, "has
always been to reunite these ani-
mals with their owners
The Web page also explains that
donations have been made by local
businesses, corporations and citi-
zens, and these donations have paid
for food and supplies that were nec-
essary to treat over 500 lost pets.
Though the college initially
helped out in the field, now most
of the animals have been found and
treated�and the main work re-
maining is locating the owners. This
search is done using the Internet.
"We knew we needed a way for
people across the state to see pic-
tures of animals said Leigh Ann
Wilder, director of college relations
in the College of Veterinary Medi-
cine.
She said that for this reason, the
college bought a digital camera and
started taking pictures of animals
that were found when the college
worked with rescue efforts to find
and treat animals.
Color pictures of located cats
and dogs have been posted on the
Web page. The Internet provides a
perfect medium for getting the pic-
tures available to people every-
where.
Violence committed by children on the rise
PHOENIX (AP)�Penny
McCardole's stepfather used to
push a garbage can up against his
bedroom door at night, hoping
the sound of it toppling over
would wake him if the 13-year-old
tried to kill him while he slept.
Greg Virden, Penny's stepfa-
ther, says he had good reason to
be afraid.
Since she was 5, Penny has hit
teachers, hurled desks and beat
other kids. A buckled wooden
door, torn from its hinges by the
girl, leans against the kitchen wall
in her Mesa mobile home.
That recent fit of rage landed
Penny in juvenile hall, one of a
steadily increasing number of kids
being sent there for domestic vio-
lence.
In 1998, 1,779 kids in
Maricopa County were cited for
domestic violence, compared
with 1,255 kids in 1994, said
Cherie Townsend, director of ju-
venile court services for Maricopa
County.
The increase is worrisome, ex-
perts say. But even more alarm-
ing, they say, is that the kids are
getting more violent. A kid who
once shoved his mother now
punches her in the face. Dad gets
beat to the floor instead of fust
pushed aside. And parents who hit
their kids get It in return, blow for
blow.
"This is the most violent indus-
trialized country on the planet, so-
cially and culturally, so ifs not sur-
prising to see it in homes said Tho-
mas Haines, professor of social work
at Arizona State University West.
The severity of the violence does
seem to be increasing. We're see-
ing violent crimes leading up to ho-
micides within families
This summer, a Phoenix teenager
with a history of violent behavior at
home reportedly killed his father
with a baseball bat as the man slept
on the couch, according to police.
Experts point to myriad reasons
for this violence�turbulent family
life, violence on television and in
movies, mental illness�but they
agree that all children are different,
and so are their reasons for lashing
out.
Penny's third-grade school pic-
ture shows a sweet-looking girl with
pink hearts on the collar of her shirt.
It was the last one she had taken.
Her mother, Wendy Virden,
pulled Penny out.of school shortly
after that, deciding to teach the little
girl at home. Wendy says the teacher
was so afraid of Penny that she did
not make her do any schoolwork.
Penny was just 5 when she hit a
teacher�for the first time. She did It
again in first, second and third
grades.
Now a teenager, she's still a sweet-
faced young girl, but she talks tough
about fighting with her stepfather,
sometimes coming to blows.
Her stepfather recalls the fights
with dismay. They put the household
in turmoil arid strained his relation-
ship with his new wife of just a year
and a half, he said.
In fact, the couple separated for
a short time but are now reunited
and getting counseling through their
church.
"I wasn't the perfect Mom all the
rime, either Wendy admits.
When Penny was younger,
Wendy says she would leave Penny
and her brother, now 17, alone while
she went to the bar.
Penny was so hard to control that
Wendy says she often resorted to
grabbing her by the hair or hitting
her. It was something she learned
from her own parents, Wendy said.
And something she taught her
daughter.
At 6, Penny beat up a 5-year-old
boy who wouldn't share his toys.
Even the point of her pencil snap-
ping could send her into a rage.
" "She was a bomb her mother
said.
At Central Christian Church
in Mesa, Penny growled at people
who talked to her, even just to say,
"Good morning
"I wanted to curl up in a cave
and stay there she said. "I was
mad at the world
It was on Mother's Day this
year that a fight between Penny
and her stepfather got so out of
hand that Wendy called police.
When officers arrived about
1:30 p.m Penny was in her room,
shaking the bunk beds so hard
that they moved away from the
wall. It was the night Penny
wrenched the door from its
hinges.
"When I get mad, I get
strong she said.
The girl's probation officer rec-
ommended counseling, Wendy
said, rolling her eyes. Penny has
been in counseling since she was
in kindergarten. Wendjt now 36,
has been going since she was 19.
"Ifs not helping she said.
They needed something
more.
Nearly 100 arrested at fraternity party
BLOOMSBURG, Pa. (AP)�
About 100 people were arrested on
underage drinking and other
charges in a weekend raid on a fra-
ternity house near a police station.
Some of those arrested were as
young as 15; most of were
Bloomsburg University students or
their younger brothers and sisters,
police said.
Police estimated the basement
beer party crowd at about 200
people.
The bust appears to be the larg-
est in Bloomsburg in at least the last
decade. It came as parents of many
students were in town for the an-
nual parents' weekend to showcase
the university.
One woman was found
unconcious in the basement and
was taken to a hospital.
Plain clothes officers entered the
party about 11:30 p.m. Friday and
were charged $5 at the door, Sgt. Leo
Sokoloski said. Police had the house
under surveillance for some time.
Officers knew a party was planned
when a delivery of canned beer ar-
rived earlier in the day. A warrant
to enter the property had been pre-
pared in advance.
Fraternity members stationed
outside listened to scanners tuned
to police frequencies in hopes of
learning of any bust before it hap-
pened, Sokoloski said. But police
used coded frequencies that can't be
picked up on civilian scanners.
Local police issued 65 citations,
Sokoloski said; he estimated that
those cited by state police and liquor
agents would bring the total to
about 100.
Sokoloski noted that some of
those busted are 15 and 16 years old.
They were apparently visiting with
parents for the weekend and went
to the bash with older brothers and
sisters.
"Big brother and big sister were
showing them a good time the
sergeant said. No parents were
found in the house, he said.
Officers and members of the
GEO fraternity would not talk to
reporters.
A Bloomsburg University
spokesman said school officials are
waiting to see that all the charges
are true before taking action.
The fraternity risks losing its
charter with the university. The stu-
dents face individual hearings be-
fore the student conduct board.
GEO is currently recognized by the
university.






C The East Carolinian
vWw:tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, Nov. 9,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SGA
Horn page 1
work hard but I am glad I get what I
get. Every little bit helps
"fThe pay is reasonable Harper
said. "Although it depends, because
sometimes months are slow, but
other times it is really busy and the
work never seems to end. Then
when you realize you are making
less than minimum wage, it's not
so great
According to Speier, SGA salaries
are always compared to student gov-
ernment representative wages at
other NC campuses.
"I think the incomes are fairly
prepared Speier said. "All decisions
go before the student body legisla-
ture. The meetings are open and all
opinions are heard
At NCSU, representatives are
paid monthly. The student body
president makes $3,600 a year, the
student body treasurer makes
$3,300 a year. The president of the
Senate and the chief of justice both
earn $3,300 a year.
At UNC-CH, representatives are
paid by semester. The executive
president and the judicial attorney
general make $2,400 a year.
This writer can be contacted at
ahame@studentmedia.ecu.edu
MB SITES tow
information is in the Encyclope-
dia Britannlca.
There Is an honor code system
that some sites use to ensure the
viewer that the information con-
tained on their site is correct.
These sites have a button that
states they are a member of the
HON code of conduct.
These honor code sites have to
adhere to guidelines for admit-
tance into the system. Any medi-
cal advice is given by a trained and
qualified professional, unless spe-
cifically stated otherwise. The in-
formation provided is intended to
support, not replace a qualified
health care worker's advice.
This writer can be contacted at
cherold&studentmedia. ecu. edu
GOVT
from page 2
novation and competition in the
market Klein said on "Fox News
Sunday
He cited "serious issues here
about law enforcement and the an-
titrust laws. And of course if
Microsoft were prepared to engage
on those issues, we would be pre-
pared as well
In Gates' letter, which appeared
as a full-page advertisement in The
Washington Post, he wrote that
"Microsoft is committed to resolv-
ing this matter in a fair and respon-
sible manner, while ensuring that
the fundamental principles of con-
sumer benefit and innovation are
protected
"At the heart of this case he
said, "is whether a successful Ameri-
can company can continue to im-
prove its products for the benefit of
consumers
The letter, addressed "To Oifr
Customers, Partners and Sharehold-
ers also appeared on Microsoft
World Wide Web site, dated Friday,
the day Jackson released his ruling.
It was similar to a statement Gates
read on the same day.
?
Attention First-Year Students
The Office of Orientation and the
First-Year Experience presents

Wanted: Students Who Want
Jobs on Campus"
When: Tuesday, November 9th at 3:30 p.m.
WJtere: Multipurpose Room, Mendenhall
WJtat: This session will help you with your on
campus job search. Different offices will be avail-
able to answer questions and pass out applications.
Don't miss this opportunity. You may walk
out of there ivith a job, so don't forget to bring
information on your previous work experience.
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Hours of Operation
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Take out orders are available
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SATURDAY
HOME GAMES
MAGIC PIPERS
10-2AM
The Kroger Plus
It's A Whole New Way To Savel
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Kroger
Orange Juice TJ
j
Sold In family Packs
of 2-lbs or more
wampler or cold Klst Farms Fresh
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Smaller Packages Lb. S2.49 with card
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��r.iyU�,





�Jov. 9,1999
iedia.ecu.edu
inciples of con-
innovation are
f this case he
jccessful Ameri-
.ontinue to Irri-
ar the benefit of
ressed "To Ou
; and Sha rehpld-
on Microsoft
te, dated Friday,
:ased his ruling,
tatement Gates
er
&
t
mtsr
Tuesday, Nov. 9,1999
'www.tec.ecu.edu
' east
Holly G. Harris, Editor
Melissa 0. Massey, Manama Editor
Phillip Gilfus, Nam Editor Stephen Schramm, Soorts Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head CoovEditor
Ifrhily Ricnardson, PhotooraohvEditor Jason Latour, Staff illustrator
Dan Cox, Wab Media Director Janet Respess, AdManaaer
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILteciastudentmedia.ecu.edu
Serviro the ECU commgrutv since 1925. The East Carolinian
orinn 11.000 cooiet evarv Tuesday and Thunxtav durino the
nwiar academic war. The lead (xftoriH in aMh�Monk)fw
ooinion of the maionW of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn bvEditarial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which mav be edited
for decencv or brevity at �w editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the rioht to editorreiect letters for publication
All letters must be sianed and include a teleohone number.
Lertersrriavbesentbve-maitoeditofOstuderrtmerJa.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian. Student Publications BuHdino
Greenville. NC 27858-4353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366
The question is, do we as students feel
comfortable with the status quo? Do
; we think our representatives are paid
too much? Too little? Just right? How
do we feel about our representatives
working at two jobs just to make ends
meet?
0URVIEW

OPINION COLUMN
Take control over TV's adverse effects
Christie Marra
OPINION COLUMNIST
Here's an idea from my little corner of the world to
yours: action�don't talk about it, be about it. 1 got
that from a skateboard company, and it makes perfect
sense in response to Kenton Bell's article about the
media. All over the place people complain about how
much violence there is on TV and the negative ideas
that it puts into the minds of our youth, but no one
seems to do much about this problem. We all have the
power to stop the madness and regain control of our
lives. Lucky you, I am going to tell you exactly what
needs to be done.
I grew up with TV and Sesame Street like any other
kid out there. When I lived at home, my parents had
cable and all the other stuff. My first two years here, I
had TV and cable, until now. Now, 1 have non of the
above. Yep, that's right. 1 am probably one of the few
studentsPitt County residents without this modern
"necessity Honestly, I miss Saturday morning car-
toons, but I have gained something in the midst of my
yearning for Sylvester and Speedy Gonzalez.
Since my involuntary hiatus from the "magical box"
I have become a far better conversationalist than I could
have ever imagined. Sorry to blow my own horn (actu-
ally I'm not) but without the TV you are actually forced
to hold lengthy conversations with your company, lis-
ten to music with them, and become an active part of
life instead of a mindless vegetable transplanted into
the sofa.
In regards to the action statement from the begin-
ning, each one of us has the power to become spar-
kling conversationalist and put an end to the mind-
numbing informericals, brain-rotting soap operas and
mindless other programs. This power lies in the palm
of your hands or the cracks in between the cushions of
your couches�the remote and the off button. Yes,
when both are used as a team, they can solve may of
the problems you are facing today.
Someone I know said the TV was evil. Actually I
agree with him, look at what it has done for society
today. People complain about there not being enough
communication in their relationships�well get off your
ass, turn off your TV, and actually talk to your signifi-
cant other. If you have kids and you don't like the
shows they watch, you can regain your dwindling con-
trol just by pressing that little button and sending your
children to play in traffic. It's amazing how when the
TV is involved people will magically turn into blindly
obedient slaves.
So, each and every one of us can regain control of
our lives and quite possibly become better conversa-
tionalist without that damn TV. Instead of complain-
ing about nothing being on TV or having a relation-
ship that lacks what is essential to it, just press the but-
ton. I know you can do it, so why haven't you done so
already?
This writes con be contacted at
cmarra@studentmedia.ecu.edu
OPINION COLUMN
Daily stressors take toll on writer
Ryan Kennemur
� opinion column1-
Hello my friends! Long time, no
see! 1 haven't had an article for the
past" couple of weeks, and some
people thought I might have been
fired or something. But make no
mistake, the Ryan Dogg is like the
Energizer Bunny, the only difference
being that he doesn't shed acid if
left out in the open too long.
Well, let's get to it. A lot of things
ire going on these days in my life.
Over the past month, I have had
multiple projects, exams, deaths in
ih'e family, two-thirds of my income
(the Fountainhead is taking a hia-
jus) taken away and various other
ferras of stress to deal with. You're
p'roBably asking yourself I low do
you deal with it, Dof,?" My only
answer to this is�I don't.
Just like the majority of the stu-
i iem i here at ECU, I have no earthly
. mi as u Mow to handle stress. I go
out and exercise, throw rocks
through windows and run from the
police, but I can never get past the
tension that builds right there in the
small of your backyou know that
spotright the I wake up at 8 every
morning and read up for my classes,
even though I don't have class un-
til noon. This is just to keep up with
my studies, so it's not like I'm read-
ing about why Miss April doesn't
like hang gliding. That's usually re-
served for between classes, anyway.
But my point is that I just don't have
any true "Ryan time" anymore.
I know that all of this work is
for my future career, but sometimes
a person just needs to get away. I'd
love to be able to just sit back and
let my parents pay for everything,
but this is the life I have chosen. I
lived Belk for three years, and
belie, ne, that was easier than
paying bills and dealing with land-
lords. The biggest complaints I ever
had in the dorm were about the
heat, the parking, and the fact that
my roommate and his girlfriend
would wake me up in the middle of
the night with their "wrestling
So, what do we (you and I) do
about these stressors that have
found their way into our lives? We
could schedule time each day to do
whatever we want, or we could stop
procrastinating and get our assign-
ments done right when we get
them, or we could just flunk out of
school and live poor and homeless.
Well, scratch that last one. I like
Bojangles too much to give up my
future. ! guess I may never know
how to effectively deal with stress.
Hmmmaybe Miss April knows
This writer can be contacted at
rkennemur@studentmedia. ecu. edu
The East Carolinian $
editor�studentrrtedia.ecu.edu
mosT uh6lv tec HEv�xnes OP
the new rwLLGrajm-
SPORTS
3. ecu footbiu. cormnuES to stow
nman.LV r�hed opponsnTSj
destroyed ev st. Ains school
fop. ths euro add osaf
FETTURES
5. BACH STREET BOVS EGOS CAUSE
HEADS TO SWELL TO mASS SIZE.
TAHE ORBIT ABOUnO THE SUfl
DEWS
1. HOT DOG RECOGTUZED AS
nORTH CAHQLinAS OEUJ
STATE BIRD
A lot of students can remember back a couple of years to when SCA
members voted to raise their salary. The general uproar was considerable,
but eventually blew over without any major effects. Many students were
upset to learn that their SCA representatives had the power to increase
their own pay by vote.
So what's the going rate for presidents, secretaries, vice presidents
and treasurers around here these days?
This year's administration is making a pretty competitive salary com-
pared to those at other schools.
NCSU student body presidents make $3,600 a year. Compare that
with Cliff Webster's $4,800 salary. UIMC-CH executive presidents come in
at rock-bottom with a $2,400 yearly salary.
Even so, our SGA president takes his salary to task, claiming, "A stu-
dent cannot live off of $400 a month
Webster, while being the highest-paid SCA official, also says he has to
have another job to survive.
The SCA executives say that they're being paid about minimum wage,
which is probably true, considering all the long hours and dedication they
put into their jobs. But compared to officials at other schools, they live like
kings.
The question is, do we as students feel comfortable with the status
quo? Do we think our representatives are paid too much? Too little? ust
right? How do we feel about our representatives working at two jobs just
to make ends meet?
It's up to the administration to vote for their own pay, but an informed
student body makes all the difference in the outcome of the vote. Know-
ing what we think about the issue will make the SCA more likely to com-
ply with our wishes.
Next time the question comes up, we need to consider how much
we're willing to pay our hard-working representatives. Next time, per-
haps we should get the facts before we get upset about a pay-raise. After
all, they're only making minimum wage.

LETTER FROM THE
Support your campus voice
Thank you so much for your continued support of
The East Carolinian. Without your input and contin-
ued readership, it would be impossible for us to go about
the business of reporting campus news. Currently this
is a time of great transition for us, and I would like to
share with you some of our current struggles and tri-
umphs.
Firstly, we have been engaged in a progressive rede-
sign of the publication throughout this semester in
order to make your newspaper more reader-friendly.
We have added teasers on the top of the front page
highlighting important stories inside the paper, and
have provided sidebars of fast facts down the side of
each section to allow you to get the information you
need quickly.
This new focus on user-friendly devices has also led
us to revamp our Web site to include discussion boards,
comics and a listing of our classified ads. In that vein,
we have made an attempt to combine the two medi-
ums with the addition of the writers' e-mail addresses
at the end of every story or column, an addition which
leads to this editor's primary concern�student partici-
pation in TEC.
I, and the more than 50 staff members that work
each week to put out editions of your campus newspa-
per would love to see your faces, hear your voices and
read your e-mails. It is our goal and our responsibility
to give voice to every type of student concern, but it is
difficult for us to do this without hearing from the
people for which we publish.
I urge you to take advantage of the forum that you
have right at your fingertips. Please send us your story
ideas, letters and pictures. Or, more importantly, we
want you on our staff covering the news and issues
that are vital to us all. From sports to human interest
stories to design positions, there is a job here for every
interest and talent.
Right now, we are seeking a new editor for our
award-winning arts and entertainment magazine, Foun-
tainhead. This publication will not appear on the stands
for a month as we endeavor to redesign the look and
re-evaluate the type of material we include within its
covers. If you, or anyone you know, would like to have
input on this process, or apply for the editorial posi-
tion, please give us a call at 328-6366.
Lastly, as many of you may have noticed, several of
the latest editions of TEC have been reaching the racks
early in the afternoon instead of early in the morning.
These editions of the paper have been prepared with
no less care and attention than issues in the past. How-
ever, we have been faced with several technical print-
ing problems that have caused us to deliver the paper
to campus later than we would wish. We appreciate
your continued patience as we continue to work
through these difficulties.
Again, please feel free to contact us about any con-
cerns or ideas you may have.
Remember, we are your campus voice.
This writer can be reached at
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
OPINION COLUMN
Deviant political
( behavior influences our vote
Marvelle Sullivan
OPINION columnist
Presidential campaigns and elec-
tions never cease to amaze. There is
no way to prepare or expect the
twists that occur in each stage of the
seemingly long and drawn out pro-
cess. Oddly enough, voting behav-
ior is one of the few variables that
possesses a somewhat relative pre-
dictability. Electoral patterns based
on gender, age, race, religion, etc.
are reliable determinants when fore-
casting election results, especially
on the national level.
However, the current presiden-
tial race is presenting a true voting
behavior puzzle. Clinton's success in
the two previous elections is largely
due to his overwhelming support
from the female electorate. Despite
his moral shortcomings that would
seemingly dissuade female voters,
his political agenda is tailored to
promoting women's issues and con-
cerns in many aspects through
health care plans and other related
focuses. Women obviously found
Clinton's politics more important
than his private escapades.
Generally, one would conclude
that if a candidate existed that
'would both continue Clinton's
strides and could possess some sense
of personal and family values, this
candidate would be a shoe-in for the
female vote.We have that described
candidate, but we do not have that
strong female support.
Al Gore is constantly trailing
George W. Bush, Jr. in the polls
among women. The Democrats are
understandably shocked and
amazed that someone with Gore's
experience, ideology and (seeming)
character is still not locking in the
very vote that ushered Clinton in
the Oval Office�not once, but
twice!
It is almost comical that women
are preferring Bush, someone whose
background is questionable (i.e. al-
leged cocaine use and marital infi-
delity) and is very gray on women's
issues to someone like Gore who
champions both family and female
values. It's not that the decision is
necessarily bad, but rather it is baf-
fling, and women are not the only
Clinton-supporting voting segment
that is leaning away from Gore. The
female turn is just a prime example
of a large political phenomenon.
This brings the puzzle to the
underlying questions: Is it really
possible that we are now in an age
when voters (particularly women)
really do favor the candidate that is
associated with more human-like or
tragic flaws, even if that means
straying from traditionally concrete
voting behavior?
Is the kind of charisma that
drives politicians (like Bush, Jr
Kennedy and Clinton) to less than
socially desirable br.iavior more
magnetic and attractive than the
steadfastness of such politicians that
provide much less excitement and
enthusiasm (like Gore, Carter, and
Ford)? Or, is it just that our societal
norms and expectations are chang-
ing and that the political arena is
an example of politics imitating life?
The answers to these questions
can not be determined at this point.
To be sure, the 2000 election will
provide very interesting insight into
the changing nature of the modern
political era.
This writer can be contacted at
msullivan@studentmedia.ecu.edu
OPINION COLUMN
Beware of corporate monopolies
Jeff Buck
OPINION COLUMNIST
Merger. This seems to be a very
reoccurring word in the news these
days. From pharmaceuticals to web
browsers, everyone is buying out
who ever is left. While this may
seem like no big deal, it is.
In the business world you know
the bottom line and that is money.
It can keep you going and it can
break you. When a company be-
comes large enough it has access to
money that can be used to form a
monopoly in the industry. To mo-
nopolize, you simply eliminate
competitors and lower production
cost. In other words, if you sell
books, buy out all your competitors,
buy paper mills and lumber sup-
plies.
So what does it have to do with
you? The answer to that lies in what
happens after a merger. When two
companies merger, they usually
claim to have a bigger company that
can do bigger and better things with
its products for the consumers; how-
ever, it usually ends up as a bigger
hold on the industry, which leads
to higher pricing and doing about
whatever it wants.
Take the recent pharmaceutical
merger. You like Advil? One of the
companies makes this and if they
own a big enough share of the mar-
ket, they can eliminate other head-
ache remedies. Then what else
could you buy? If you can't buy
something else you will either pay
what they want you to pay or keep
the migraine.
Now, don't go crazy thinking
that Advil will cost you 20 dollars
a pop. The company will try to keep
its prices down and the good old
government will step in if necessary.
But, you can look at other industries
and see that this ideal balance and
check system doesn't always work
the way it should. The railroad in-
dustry in the 19th century is a great
example. Have you heard of
Rockefeller? Yes, he was a man that
monopolized the rail industry and
made millions. Have you heard of
Bill Gates? He is currently being ac-
cused of a monopoly in the com-
puter industry.
It is simple to see that many
companies sell out every day, and
no one is hurt. Some companies buy
out others and gain lots of the mar-
ket. But, we must stay alert and be-
ware of the giant evil "corpses" and
what they are planning to do. Most
of all, we need to know what can
go wrong and make sure that it
doesn't happen. So look out for
yourself. After all, history can re-
peat itself.
This writer can be contacted at
ibuck@stuaentmedia.ecu.edu





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Mystic's Favorite: Tarot Cards
Tarot is the name given to a deck of cards mainly
used for fortunetelling. The cards were first intro-
duced into Europe by Crusaders or by the Roma
(Gypsies) between 1095 and 1270 and are known
to have been in use in Italy during the early 14th
century. Today, increasing numbers of people use
tarot cards as a tool for self-exploration and per-
sonal growth. Their exact origin is uncertain.
FEATURES
Tuesday, Nov. 9,194?
features@studentmedia.ecu.edo'
A full tarot deck consists of 78 cards: the Minor
Arcana (56 suit cards) and the Major Arcana, also
known as trumps (22 pictorial symbol cards). The
Minor Arcana, looking somewhat like a deck of
modern playing cards, consist of suits of wands
(clubs), cups (hearts), swords (spades) and pen-
tacles (diamonds). Each suit contains 14 cards:
four court cards (king, queen, knight and page)
plus cards numbered from ace to 10. The Major
Arcana consist of a fool (also called a madman)
card and pictorial cards numbered from one to 21.
The Universal Waite Tarot
For many decades, The Rider Waite Tarot Deck
has been the most popular Tarot deck sold. Now in
this new publication of that Tarot artist, Mary
Hanson-Roberts recolors the originals in softer
colors that are easier on the eye and therefore
more conducive to meditation.
The Robin Wood Tarot Deck
The illustrations are lifelike and friendly. Unlike
other decks that portray emotionless figures,
Robin Woods' characters wear expressions of wis-
dom, approval, joy, concern, fear and contempla-
tion, making this one of the easiest decks to read.
The Renaissance Tarot Deck
A full-color, 78-card deck rendered in golden hues
and delicate pastel shading. The 22 Major Arcana
cards feature all 12 deities of Olympus, plus other
classical gods and demigods. The four suits in the
56 Minor Arcana are represented by four classical
myth cycles with an interlocking system of planets,
constellations, seasons and elements.
The Sacred Circle Tarot
The Sacred Circle Tarot is a new concept in tarot
design, combining photographs, computer imaging
and traditional drawing techniques to create stun-
ning images. It draws on the sacred Pagan heri-
tage sites of Britain and Ireland and their land-
scapes. Key symbols unlock the deepest levels of
Pagan teaching.
The Old English Tarot
This deck is set against a tapestry of medieval En-
gland. The Major Arcana features traditional
scenes and figures while the Minor Arcana is a vi-
sual journey into an era that spans the imagina-
tion.
10
The Druid Animal Oracle
The 33 animals in the deck, brilliantly illustrated by
Bill Worthington, represent specific powers and ar-
eas of knowledge to connect us with ancient Celtic
earth-based spirituality.
All tarot cards courtesy of Chivalry Sports Renais-
sance Store at w.renstore.cqmtarot.shtml.
Weaves save damaged
tresses from additional distress
Keep style trends, avoid split ends
:
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
It seems as if hair styles change as fast as a New
York minute. It can be difficult on the pockets (and on
one's hair) to keep up with all the new 'dos and colors.
And wouldn't it be nice to change the length of your
hair without a pair of scissors touching one strand of
it? Well, all of this and more is possible with the won-
derful world of hair extensions.
Hair extensions have been growing in popularity
among many women. Even in Hollywood, many ce-
lebrities such as Jennifer Lopez, Brittany Spears and Toni
Braxton have accentuated their own locks with exten-
sions. According to Gregg Gilchrist, owner of Gregg's
Total Care Salon, in his four years in business, he sees
hair extensions as a growing field and has seen an in-
crease of its use in the area. Also the purpose of why
women use them has changed over the years.
"Previously, extensions and weaves were used to
cover damaged and weak areas in the hair Gilchrist
said. "Now instead of changing the color, length or
the style of one's hair, one can use the extensions. It's a
way to get the desired style without changing the tex-
ture of one's hair.
Women can either go to a salon and have a hair
technician put weaves in for them or purchase the hair
at a beauty supply shop and put it in themselves. The
hair comes in a variety of lengths, colors and textures.
According to Samantha Edmondson, employee at
Sally's Beauty Supply, the two types they sell are syn-
thetic and human hair extensions.
"Most of the time we sell synthetic hair, but a lot of
women buy human hair because of its texture
Edmondson said. "It's softer and finer than synthetic
hair
Also the cost of hair extensions vary depending on
the length and type one purchases.
"Hair prices range from as cheap as $.79 to $20 per
package Edmondson said.
Fear immobilizes;
INVIGORATES PEOPLE
Control necessary for
onquering situations
Susan Wright
Features Editor
Your throat is dry, your
hands are clammy and
you have to give a speech in 30
seconds. If this sounds familiar,
you may suffer from a fear of
public speaking. Fear, in one
form or another, affects almost
everyone, and it can usually be
overcome by gaining control.
According to Dr. Susan
McCammon, a psychology pro-
fessor, some of the most com-
mon fears are of public speak-
ing, flying, enclosed spaces and
heights.
The type of fear an individual
has is partially dependent on his
or her age. After the age of two,
one can develop a fear of the
dark that may last a short time.
Occasionally, this fear can persist
until adulthood. In early adoles-
cence, people tend to fear tests
and examinations. This fear is
also prevalent in college-age stu-
Sex is another determinant in
the prevalence of certain fears.
Women are more likely to have
environmental fears, such as a
fear of big animals, spiders and
snakes. The fear of heights, how-
ever, is pretty equally distributed
throughout both of the sexes.
A phobia, however, is a subcat-
egory of fear with a few subtle
differences.
"A fear becomes a phobia when
it is out of proportion to the situ-
ation, it cannot be reasoned
away and it causes the person to
avoid the feared thing
McCammon said.
About ten percent of the popu-
lation has a diagnosable phobia
of something, whether it be
claustrophobia or arachnopho-
bia. These phobias do not just
appear in a person's head; they
are usually thought out uncon-
sciously by the person who expe-
riences them.
"A phobia is created over time
said Dr. Beverly Harju, associate
professor in the psychology
department.
Harju gave an example of a
woman who had a fear of flying
and couldn't understand why.
The woman would become sick
within minutes of boarding a
plane and soon began fearing
her and her husband would die
on a plane. The woman did not
want to leave her child without
parents because this was what
had happened to her when she
was a child. After realizing the
reason behind her fear of planes,
she began taking control of the
situation, and her fear of-flying
began to dissipate. Control is a
vital component of fear control.
"When a person is afraid, they
are often lacking self-confi-
dence Harju said. "They feel
unable to control the situation.
They must focus on the choices
that they do have: 'How am I
going to manage the situation?
A person who has a fear or pho-
bia of something should face
their fear.
"If you're afraid of something
and you avoid it, your fear won't
extinguish because you'll never
have the opportunity to see that
the bad consequences aren't
true McCammon said.
According to McCammon,
avoidance of the feared object
can intensify the fear at the same
time that it can cure it. It is a
tricky situation to get rid of a fear
or phobia, but in most cases, it is
possible.
Post-traumatic stress disorder
(PTSD), which is caused by a
traumatic experience, causes the
person to act in much the same
way they would if they were
experiencing a reaction to a fear
or a phobia.
"Some of the symptoms of
PTSD are recurring nightmares,
intrusive images and the feeling
like it is happening all over
again said Dr. jWie Ross, staff
psychologist. "PTSD is caused by
external or internal cues and it
can affect appetite, sleeping
habits and concentration
According to Dr. Ross, the sever-
ity of the event determines the
level and severity of post-trau-
matic stress symptoms. A situa-
tion such as the flooding that
occurred recently would usually
cause post-traumatic stress, but
there have not been many docu-
mented cases at ECU.
"Not very many people are
coming in with PTSD because of
the flood Ross said. "The soon-
er you talk about and deal with
something, it becomes less and
less likely that there will be peo-
ple suffering from PTSD because
of the event
Fear, phobias and PTSD are
both physiological and psycho-
logical occurrences. People suffer
from all three stressors, and con-
trol is the best way to pacify each
of them. A psychologist can help
people realize and overcome
their fears. One must take con-
trol and acknowledge the cause
in order to keep from living his
or her life in fear.
Wigs cover the whole head while hair extensions and
traditional weave add to the length of one's own hair. (Photo
by Emily Richardson)
There are many reasons why women have chosen
to go with hair extensions. Some women want to try
different styles now and again without putting a lot of
stressful hair products like colorants, bleaches and
perms in their own hair.
See WEAVE, page 7
MISCELLANEA
Kenton Bell
Fascinating Facts
"Are there really pink elephants? In regions of India
where the soil is red, elephants take on a permanent
pink tinge because they regularly spray dust over trieir
bodies to protect themselves against insects.
In the kingdom of Bhutan, all citizens officially become
one year older on New Year's Day.
"Of the 206 bones in the average human adult's body,
106 are in the hands and feet. (54 in the hands and 52
in the feet)
"The average air speed of the common housefly is 4.5
mph. A housefly beats its wings about 20,000 times
per minute.
"The diameter of the wire in a standard paper clip is 1
millimeter, or about 0.04 inch.
"The 1997 Jack Nicholson film, "As Good As It Gets
is known in China as "Mr. Cat Poop
"Famed Chef Wolfgang Puck chose the Italian word
"Spago" as the name for his popular chain of restau-
rants. In Italian, spago means "string" or "twine which
are slang for spaghetti.
"Giraffes are the only animals born with horns. Both
males and females are born with bony knobs on the
forehead.
"The English word pajamas has its origin in Persian. It
is a combination of the Persian words pa (leg) arid
jamah (garment).
"Noah Webster was referred to as "the walking ques-
tion mark" during his student days at Yale.
"46 percent of the world's water is in the Pacific Ocean.
The Atlantic has 23.9 percent; the Indian, 20.3; the
Arctic, 3.7 percent.
The numbers on opposite sides of a die always add
up to seven.
"The state of Oregon has one city named Sisters and
another called Brothers. Sisters got its name from a
nearby trio of peaks in the Cascade Mountains known
as the Three Sisters. Brothers was named as a counter-
part to Sisters.
Quintessential Quotes:
"A man is but a product of his thoughts; what he thinks,
that he becomes
- Mohandas K. Gandhi
"We are shaped and fashioned by what we love
- Johann Wolfgang Von Goethe
"Few things are harder to put up with than a good ex-
ample
- Mark Twain
"Never mistake motion for action
- Ernest Hemingway
Challenge Question:
Which president is the only one never to use the letter
ili in his inaugural speech?
Answer to Last Question:
What is the highest-rated single TV show of all time?
The final episode of M.A.S.H.
This writer can be contacted at
kbell@studentmedia.ecu.edu
INTERESTING MAJOR HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT
People-oriented careers
offer changing opportunities
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
At ECU, students are learning how to deal with
people and cater to their many needs in the hosptiality
management program. As a hospitality management
major, a student learns how to survive managing res-
taurants and lodging facilities successfully.
According to Dori Finley, professor and chairper-
son of Hospitality Management, the program prepares
students for positions in restaurants and lodging facili-
ties.
"The students usually start out In assistant man-
ager positions and move up Finley said.
The program has been at ECU for 12 years and has
been growing continually.
According to Jim Chandler, an assistant professor
in hospitality management, there are over 200 students
in the program. It is the largest program in North Caro-
lina and the third largest in the Southeast.
"I would recommend this career to anyone who
enjoys a variety of activities and working with other
people Chandler said. "It is very challenging, very
rewarding and can make lots of money
Alex Cheek is an officer In the Hospitality Manage-
ment Association (HMA) and has been working as a
front desk clerk at the Hilton since January 1998. Cheek
loves the program because it gives students like him-
self a chance to .
"I like helping people, and the field has a lot of
opportunities and the flexibility to move around he
said. "Every semester is a new thing
Cheek loves the diversity of the classes in the pro-
gram and being able to be involved in the community.
Several of the classes allow students to give back to the
community. For example, one class is based around
students preparing and serving a meal to 40-50 people.
The students must come up with the menu, theme and
budget.
Another class brings in executives from different
businesses to speak about their fields and set up inter-
views for the students. One class also allows students
to examine and propose ways to better their commu-
nity.
Students in the program are now examining more
family-oriented restaurants in Greenville while one
particular class allows students to examine a hotel and
analyze what makes it work.
"When you see what all goes into running a hotel,
you really have an appreciation for what the hourly
employees do every day Cheek said.
Cheek also complemented the hospitality manage-
ment faculty, adding that the staff are always ready to
help.
"Coming to work and knowing that you are going
to make a difference is so rewarding Cheek said.
Hospitality management is a field that is expand-
ing quickly every day.
This writer can be contacted at
lbrown@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, No
www.Jec.ecu
Stm
Editor's note; The to
written by sociology
aftermath of the hur
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v.9,199
�dia.ecu.edu'
Tuesday, Nov. 9,1999
wvwv4ec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
The East Carolinian f
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Students transcribe thoughts, feelings surrounding Floyd In verse
sxtensions and
own hair. (Photo
n have chosen
en want to try
putting a lot of
bleaches and
igions of India
t a permanent
dust over their
sects,
ficially become
n adult's body,
! hands and 52
housefly is 4.5
t 20,000 times
I paper clip is 1
od As It Gets
e Italian word
lain of restau-
" twine which
th horns. Both
knobs on the
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s pa (leg) arTd
walking ques-
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iie always add
led Sisters and
name from a
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lan a good ex-
Editor's note; The following poems were
written by sociology students during tthe
a(terma)h of the hurricane.
"Untitled"
Bryan Joyner
Through the night he crept in and
stayed for a day, destroying what-
ever would get in his way.
He caused lots of turmoil, destruc-
tion, and fear, he left with one hell
of a rebuilding year.
Thousands are homeless now, mil-
lions in damage, the storm caused
more flooding than one town could
manage.
Floyd is now gone and the high
winds are dead, but I can't help
wonder if the worst lies ahead.
"Floyd"
Jennifer Klstler
NO water, only rain
NO electricity, only batteries
NO gas, only candles
NO phones, only neighbors
NO WAY OUT
"Unreplaceable"
Jacqueline Brimley
When we first heard of Floyd, we
hoped he would come.
The only reason for this was to
sleep-in some.
The day after the storm we woke up
to see
That the city had gone through a
catastrophe.
A glance through the window
showed a few broken trees.
I still wonder why we felt so at ease.
Little did we know the hurricane
would give
My best friend's belongings to the
river where she used to live.
Her life-long possessions weren't the
only things gone.
Eliza, her kitty, was found dead on
her neighbor's lawn.
Her life and her hopes taken away,
And now she doesn't even have a
place to stay.
With no job and no money and in
debt to a school loan,
The only way out was to withdraw
from school and go home.
Abandoned at youth, the only fam-
ilv she had
BeaHero,
Save a Life,
Mendenhall
Student Center
Sponsored by:
Epsilon Sigma Alpha
American Red Cross
Blood lantoMMld-AUalitlc Region
Wednesday
November 10th
1999
12:00 - 6:00 PM
use the letter
�v of all time?
at u
rom different i set up inter-lows students their commu-
imining more 1e while one le a hotel and
ining a hotel, at the hourly
ality manage-ways ready to
you are going leek said, at is expand-
er
The
Ian Haus
Film Series
Interested in making ADULT films?
Well too bad, but we are interested in Filmmakers who
would like their independent works shown on the big screen at
Hendrix Auditorium. The Student Union Films Committee is
bringing you the opportunity to have your works shown on
Wednesday's and Friday's at 7:30pm and on Sunday's at
3:00pm, All that is required of you is to submit a non-returnable
VHS cassette of your work to Cathy Black in room 236
Mendenhall. All videos turned in will be reviewed and only a
select few will be chosen. If you have any questions you can
reach Jesse McGill at ian.mcgill@mailcity.com or give
Cathy a call at
328-4715.
Get To Work and Create Sbmething!
Was a man not related that she
sometimes called dad.
Even though Floyd did not harm
anything of mine.
He took away my closest friend and
all our future good times.
Sitting on the couch I lay
Thinking, Tar River to flood, no
way!
The next day Floyd had done its told
The apartment now starts to turn
to mold.
The street, beside the pool house,
now a lake
I can't believe my eyes, for goodness
sake.
Under water are cars and trucks
This indeed, very bad luck
I head to my dorm traveling on Elm
Street
The roads ahead now not so neat.
Cop pulls me over, writes me a ticket
for breaking curfew
Me I didn't know, the cop well he
knew.
He sends me back; this could be bad
If I was to die what would now be
sad.
Floodwaters now becoming oh so
high
Just why can't everything be dry?
The sun falls and now its night
Water coming up through the rug,
what a sight.
Must get out soon
Under this dark and dreary moon.
I finally get to safety back in my
room
Realizing now that just could had
been my tomb.
"Floyd's Grip"
Brandon Howell
The sky was dark, the winds were
strong
the rains poured down all night
long
the storm created new fears
and brought about many tears
the flood waters rose
and nobody knows
the damage that was done
that the winds of Floyd spun
homes were shattered
and families were scattered
all across the state
we all had to wait
for the hands of Floyd to let us go
"Natural Disaster"
Joseph Takacs
It started as a tropical depression
In the deep Atlantic
Soon winds at 155
Everybody was frantic
With bottled up memories
From Hurricane Fran
The whole East Coast was prepar-
ing
Not knowing where he would hit
land
With the weather men predicting
No further that Georgia, at the most
Floyd took a turn to the north
And threatened the Carolina coast
On Thursday night still,
He was very much alive
Although losing strength
Winds were still at 125
With all the high winds
There were thoughts of pure slaugh-
ter
But what the Carolinians didn't ex-
pect
Were the high floodwaters
From Wilson to Greenville
And Rocky Mount to Tarboro
The devastation and destruction
Was widespread and thorough
People all the sudden
Had nothing and were homeless
Some people were lucky
That they still had their family to
Photos by Emily Richardson
WEAVE
from page 6
"People are definitely getting away from chemi-
cal styling. They are more concerned with the health
of their hair Gilchrist said. "People are becoming
more health conscious about their hair
According to Edmondson, some women may want
to style their hair like their friend's, but just don't
have the right cut or length to do so. Others simply
may not have the patience to let their natural hair
grow.
"Some women's hair may not grjpw as quickly, so
getting an extension is the easiest way to get the de-
sired style Edmondson said.
There are different ways to have a hair extension
placed in with one's own hair: it can be bonded or
sewn in. According to Gilchrist, to have the hair
bonded, there is a special type of hair glue that at-
taches the hair tracks to the root of one's hair. With
the other option, sewing it in, the stylist braids your
natural hair and then the extension is sewn or stitched
into the braid. This process takes about an hour and
a half.
Of the above methods, Gilchrist suggests having ex-
tensions sewn in.
"It's more expensive, but it's safer Gilchrist said.
"The glue can cause a chemical reaction with one's
natural hair oils
Another option for hair elongation which is becom-
ing more popular is wig extensions. According to
Gilchrist, the stylist formats a net to one's head and
weaves the hair into the net.
"We have a technician in our salon who does this
Gilchrist said.
According to Gilchrist, women should maintain
their extensions every four to five weeks and there is
no set time period of how long you can keep the ex-
tensions in.
"The length of time you keep them in depends on
how well they are maintained Gilchrist said.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia.ecu.edu
East Carolina
University
Dining
Services
FREE FOOD!
FLEXIBLE HOURS!
HOLIDAY CASH!
We Need:
Catering Waitstaff.
Cashiers, Cooks,
and Dishwashers
Apply at MSC-ARAMARK Office
London 157
Paris 208
Barcelona 244
Amsterdam 223
From RaleighDurl
each way based on a
purchase. Fares do
include tares, are
valid for departures
in November and are
subject to change
Restrictions apply.
1-800-2COUNCIL
ham
artaw
'Rassle a gator.
Swim underground.
See Florida as
you never
have before
All-you can eat dinner
Mendenhall Great Room, 6 p.m.
Menu: Fresh fruit salad with raspberry yogurt dressing; time
and herb marinated flank steak with mushroom glace; fresh
red snapper with almond parsley butter; vichy asparagus and
carrots (clear herbed sauce); skillet fried potatoes with
parsley; homestyle rolls; Key lime pie.
T R A V E L - A D V E N T U R E F I L
AND THEME DINNER SER
M
I E
TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 16, 1999 4PM & 7:30PM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One Card. Student dinner tickets are
S12 each. To reserve student dinner tickets visit the CT0 in Mendenhall Student Center
by November 11 and pay with cash, check, credit card, meal card, or declining balance.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS: Monday Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Tel: 252.328.4788 or I.800.ECU.ARTS; VTTY: 252.328.4736 or 1.800.EOJ.ARTS
752-7303
f Uptown
?Greenvilk
209 E7 5th St.
TICKET LOCATIONS
CD Alley � Wash Pub
East Coast Music � Skully's ;
COMING SOON:
FRI. 12th
i Mike MrsnwW
www.livewirconline.com





The East Carolinian
vwwwitec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, Nov. 9, T?9?
sports�studentmedia.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tiger becomes
first million dollar man
Colts off to best start since 1977
Lions roar past Rams behind Frerotte
Stewart dominates
in desert for second win
'
Pirates burned by Blazers
Brooks leads UAB
back from 14 point deficit
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Late in the first half, down 17-3 with their best
player en route to the hospital, UAB looked to be down
for the count. In a twenty( minute span, the Blazers
rattled off 33 unanswered points, shut down the Pirate
offense and secured the first win over a ranked team in
the school's history, beating the 17th ranked Pirates
36-17 in Birmingham.
"We thought that we had everything under con-
trol at halftime said Head Coach, Steve Logan. "Then
in the second half, it was one thing after another, which
was a lot to their credit
UAB's Rodregis Brooks left the game in the second
quarter with a neck injury. He was carried off the field
on a stretcher and was taken to the hospital for x-rays.
"A guy (ECU's Keith Stokes) caught the ball out in
the flat and I came up to make the tackle and when I
hit the guy, one of our defenders came up from the
back and hit the front of my helmet Brooks said. "The
left side, my arm and neck went numb. It was kind of
scary. At first it did not bother me, then the pain started
shooting down my left arm and body
Brooks returned in the third quarter to put the hurt
on the Pirates with a 59-yard punt return that set up a
touchdown and a 91-yard interception return for a
touchdown in the fourth quarter.
"He has been getting it done all year long said
UAB Head Coach, Watson Brown. "He is leading the
country in punt returns, and I don't know if he is lead-
ing the country in interceptions, but he is a play maker.
He could play for anybody in the country
After an injury to starter Daniel Dixon, UAB was
forced to start redshirt freshman, Thomas Cox at quar-
terback.
"Thomas knew Wednesday afternoon that it was
very likely that he was going to be the starter today
Brown said. Daniel (Dixon) stepped on a shoe in prac-
tice Wednesday and went down hard and has not prac-
ticed a snap since
Cox went 10-20 for 122 yards and a touchdown.
He also rushed for two scores.
"The young man had great poise and I only remem-
ber one bad play when he fumbled in the first half. He
played great in the whole game Brown said.
The win was UAB's first win over a ranked team in
the school's short football history.
"It's just another step. Every time we do something
it is a first Brown said. "I told them before the game
thatrfhey have to understand that as that ticker goes
across the screen on Headline News and ESPN or wher-
ever our score is all over the country all day long so I
think that people around the country will know that
UAB plays football now Brooks said.
For the Pirates it was their second conference loss
and effectively knocked them out of the C-USA cham-
pionship hunt.
"We have some work to do Logan said. "We have
to watch some film and prepare for next week
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
1
Pirate players return in
top form
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
The 1999-2000 men's basketball
season effectively began in March
with the announcement that after
four seasons at the helm of the Pi-
rates, Joe Dooley would be stepping
down as head coach. On March 31,
Bill Herrion was named the new
head basketball coach.
Herrion comes to ECU after
eight seasons at Drexel University
in Philadelphia. Herrion compiled
a record of 167r71 as coach of the
dragons. His winning percentage of
.702 puts him 15th among active
coaches. The change at the top cre-
ated much excitement among fans.
The team will not experience
much change on the court from the
team that went 13-14 last year.
Among those coming back is 6-
9 power forward and 2000 CAA
"Player of the Year candidate Evaldas
Joeys. The Lithuanian led the Pirates
in scoring last season, averaging
13.8 points per game and 6.2 re-
bounds.
Also returning is guard Garrett
Black welder. Blackwelder started all
22 games and was second on the
team in scoring with 11.8 points per
game.
Junior David Taylor, senior Neil
Punt and sophomore Brandon
Hawkins give the Pirates experience.
Seven-footers Quincy Hall and
Alphons van.Ireland will provide
height in the post.
All of the returning talent
should make for many position
battles.
"I think there's all five position
battles Herrion said. "That's how
we build our program, and that's
Pirates look to rebound in
while
Evaldas Jocys(left)was the Pirates leading scorer last season,
GarrettBlackwelder started all 22 games(file photo).
and go to the NCAA tournament
how we approach practice, every
day. I've never been a big guy on
starting linueps. Obviously you've
got to start five players every game.
But we really base our team on
practice and the program on com-
petition every day at every posi-
tion. Right now we've got some
great competition at all five spots
Herrion said. �
Despite the returning scorers,
the most noticeable changes will
not come on offense.
"We will play harder defense
Joeys said.
With the Pirates returning their
top seven scorers, they are consid-
ered among the contenders for the
league crown.
"Our ultimate goal is to win the
league championship in March
Swimmers rally past 0DU;W&M
Herrion said.
The Pirates will face a tough CAA
schedule.
"It's a pretty strong conference,
George Mason, Old Dominion and
Wilmington are going to be tough
to beat Blackwelder said. "Pretty
much every team is going to be
tough to beat
The Pirates will take the floor
tonight in their first exhibition
game.
"We've been practicing now for
about three weeks Herrion said. "I
think we're getting a little bit sick
and tired of banging against each
other. So I'm really anxious for Tues-
day night, out first exhibition
game Herrion said.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia. ecu, edu.
Pirate women win
two, men lose one
Ryan Downey
STAFF WRITER
The men's and women's swim
teams had two outstanding meets
this weekend. The women's team
had a strong victory over Old Do-
minion this past Saturday. The
women took control early in the
meet and never let up cruising to a
152-85 victory that was more of a
rout than the score might make it
seem.
"We did very well and worked
hard as a team, we worked hard
until the last relay even though we
had already won said Erin Brauer.
Saturday's victory was the
women's fourth of the year and sec-
ond in the conference which sets up
a chance at 5-0 for Sunday's meet
against William and Mary.
The men lost Saturday to an Old
Dominion team�picked to finish
first in the conference this year�in
an exciting match that came down
to the very last relay. The Pirates led
early on in the meet but were un-
able to hold on at the end when
ODU started their final push.
The men's team was not discour-
aged after the loss which was a
much closer meet this year than last
year.
"I think we swam really well
said Mathew Jabs. "Last year they
came in and beat us bad but this
year we took them to the final race,
some teams are stronger in their first
halves we did what we wanted when
we knocked them back early
Sunday was a great day for both
the women's and men's teams. The
women picked up their second, vic-
tory on the weekend knocking off
William and Mary 135-110. It was
another display of athletic excel-
lence by the women's team in front
of a packed house at Minges Aquatic
Center.
"The Girls continue to be awe-
some said Kobe. "They won for the
fifth time this year it was a great
win
The men added another win
Sunday, avenging a bad loss to Wil-
liam and Mary last year defeating
them 144-99.
This writer can be contacted at
rdowney@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
WWft
Wwutrwuum
MP
Freshman Molly Speers counts for a teammate in the 500yard freestyle
(photo by Emily Richardson).
Volleyball falls to
James Madison
Pirates lose to Dukes
in three straight games
Emily Koperniak z
STAFF WRITER
The ECU women's volleyball team lost a difficult
match to James Madison University Friday here at
Minges. The Pirates lost three straight games (15-8,15-
10,15-1) to the Dukes. This CAA game puts the Pirates
at 8-13 for the season and 3-6 for league play.
"I think the first couple of games we played real
good but the third game was like a whole totally differ-
ent team. I saw some good stuff in the first couple of
games that made me think we were going to win, or
win the best out of five said Lucinda Mason. 'The
third game it was like nobody had any fire, any mo-
mentum, no determination or anything. I think we
need to work on defense, blocking, and serving
Mason as well as Shannon Kaess each added seven
digs.
Throughout the first game, East Carolina managed
to keep within a two-point difference. James Madison
pulled ahead late and claimed the first victory of the
night. JMUoutshot ECU.
James Madison did not seem to come on as-slrong
throughout the second match as their hitting percent-
age decreased. This advantage did not help ECU as.their
percentage fell into a negative value as well.
"We came on strong the first two games andin the
third game we beat ourselves. No one was talking, no
one was playing defense the way they were supposed
to, and no one has hitting the ball said Cinta Claro.
"After that second game we just lost everythirtg that
we came into the whole match with
Claro subbed as setter for Lisa Donovan who was
injured. She contributed twelve assists, four digs, and
five kills'for the night.
The third game brought the Pirates down. The
Dukes scored ten points before ECU was even able .to
score. James Madison University outshot the .Pirates
throughout the entire match.
"I think we need to work on talking, defensebaii-
cally everything. We all just need to decide whetKer
we want to finish this season strong or whether we
just want to give up and quit Claro said. "I think some-
one on this team needs to step up and sayLook berg's
the line, you either need to cross it or you stay behind
East Carolina will host UNCW, Wednesday, Nov.
10 at 7 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at -
ekoperniak@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Intramural
sports updates
(as of Monday, November 8): :
Wiffleball
Playoff contenders
Fraternity Gold Finalists - Phi Kappa Tau, Theta
Chi . '
Men's Gold Finalists - Damn Yankees, Sox
Men's Purple Finalists - The Cubs, Almighty
Gringos
Co-Rec Finalists
Room Temperature,
Big Bailers Too . I
3-on-3 Basketball
fraternity Gold :
Theta Chi A 2-0
Lambda Chi Alpha A 2-0
Sigma Nu A 2-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon A 1-1
Sigma Alpha Ep A 1-1
Kappa Sigma A 1-1
Pi Kappa Alpha A 1-1
Pi Lambda Phi A 0-2
Phi Kappa Tau A 0-2
Pi Kappa Phi A 0-2
Fraternity Purple
Theta Chi B 2-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon B 2-0 .
Sigma Pi 2-0
Pi Kappa Alpha B 2-0
Sigma Alpha Epsilon B 1-1
Lambda Chi Alpha B 1-1
Alpha Sigma Phi 1-1
Phi Kappa Psi 1-1
Kappa Sigma B 0-2
Phi Kappa Tau B 0-2
Pi Kappa Phi B 0-2
Men's Cold
Fab. College All-Stars 2-0
The Roaches 2-0
Slackers 2-0
Young Bucks 1-1
Too Cool 1-1
We Ready 1-1
Muff Divers 1-1
Umstead Bailers 0-2
Rain 0-2
The Jaunts 0-2
See STANDINGS, page 9





tov. 9, T999
iedia.ecu.edu
11s to
ison
mes
n lost a difficult
t Friday here at
games (15-8,15-
! puts the Pirates
;ue play.
s we played real
ole totally differ-
le first couple of
going to win, or
da Mason. "The
ny fire, any mo-
ling. 1 think we
id serving
ach added seven
irolina managed
. James Madison
st victory of the
me on as -strong
� hitting petcent-
tielp ECU aitheir
is well.
;ames and in the
; was talking, no
y were supposed
said Cinta Clara
everything that
movan who was
:s, four digs, and
ates down. The
was even able'to
tshot the .Pirates
ig, defensebajsi-
decide whetKer
5 or whether we
id. "I think some-
1 say'Look berg's
ou stay behind
Wednesday, Nov.
ted at -
u.edu.
1
tes
nber 8):
i X
iders :r
ppa Tau, Theta
kees, Sox
s, Almighty
ure, ;
�tball
old :
-o
iaA 2-0
2-0
iA 1-1
A 1-1
1-1
1-1
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2-0
i B 2-0 .
0
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Ttwsday, Nov. 9,1999
vwvw.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian �
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
STANDINGS ,page 9
Men's Purple
i Wilson- Tar All-Stars 2-0Flyers 0-2
BlingBling 2-0Air Force 0-2
The Basketball Team 2-0BoTox 0-2
Hand Tosses 2-0Hooters 0-2
Big Bailers 1-0
TheGalleyz 1-1 Rollin'Yodas 1-1Women's Cold
Sigma Phi Epsilon C 1-1Regulators 2-0
Caucasian Persuasion 1-1Brawlers 1-1
Dirty Nicks 1-1TheDonnettes 1-1
' TheRiddlers 1-1The Zippers 0-2
1 ' Rock Bottom 0-1
Co-rec Flag
Football
Cold
Knuckleheadz 1-1
Everbody Gets Lei'd 1-1
Warriors 0-2
Purple
Kellum h Jones 2-0
The Cocks 2-0
� Richmond Raiders 1-0
Flyers 2-0
Silent Attack 2-0Soccer
Pray For Rain 1-0JVVVVl
Sharks 1-0 All-Stars 1-0Fraternity Cold
Prime Time 1-1Sigma Phi Epsilon "A" 2-0
Da Freaks 1-1Pi Kappa Phi "A" 2-0
Spyder 1-1Theta Chi "A" 2-0
Ambassadors Team 1 0-1Kappa Sigma "A" 2-0
Ambassadors Team 2 0-1Delta Sigma Phi 1-1
Da Fuzz 0-1Sigma PI "A" 1-1
Gina and the Horses 0-1Sigma Alpha Epsilon "A"
Pimps N' Ho's 0-11-1
Crazy Utters 0-1Sigma Nu 1-1
DG Wannabes 0-2Delta Chi 0-2
Case by Case 0-2Phi Kappa Tau "A" 0-2
Ruff Ryders 0-2Lambda Chi Alpha "A" 0-2
Pi Kappa Alpha "A" 0-2!
Fraternity Purple
Delta Chi "B" 2-0
Sigma Phi Epsilon "B" 2
0
Kappa Sigma "B" 2-1
Phi Kappa Psi 1-1
Sigma Alpha Epsilon "B" 1-1
Theta Chi "B" 1-1
Pi Kappa Phi "B" 1-1
Phi Kappa Tau "B" 1-1
Lambda Chi Alpha "B" 1-1
Pi Kappa Alpha "B" 0-2
HOW? At The Sigma Tau Delta Spelling Bee.
First, you challenge your professor, then you find the word or words to pro-
vide, and advise the Sigma Tau Delta Faculty aclviser of the challenge.
Finally, you, your professor, your words, and your money ($1word) come to
Joyner East, Rm. 201 on Thursday, November 11 from 4�p.m. Ybu may also
chaMenge any administrative staff member.
We will provide dictionaries but students are welcome to
bring their own. All words must be English, and no proper
nouns, legalese, or medical jargon. A special prire goes
to the most orthographic professor and booby prizes to
the rest. Contact ProfeHor Palumbo through voteotnail
at 328-6548 or leave a piece of paper with your name
and your piofoMor'i name under his door In the Large
English Dept Suite. You may also e-mail Bate Freeman
(thebabs@startretanail.com).
Thb is meant to be FUNdraising activity and not too serious.
P.S. Don't tell your professor the word(s) you've chosen, but bring
of the HumbleBee. And please, don't forget your money.
the day
HELP WANTED
ECU TRANSIT BUS DRIVERS
ECU TRANSIT is looking for mature, dependable,
and outgoing individuals to provide quality service
for the transit system. Must be a registered ECU
Student or incoming student with at least two or
more semesters remaining to work.
Punctuality a must!
Must have a good driving record!
(DWI'S and Frequently ticketed drivers need not apply!)
North Carolina class "B" CDL license with passenger
endorsement required.
We will help you obtain your license.
Previous experience is a plus, but not necessary.
Must be in good standing with the University and
have at least a 2.0 GPA.
For more information and applications, stop by
Mendenhall Student Center Basement, around the
corner from WZMB or call 328-4724
Monday - Thursday 12:30PM-4:00PM
MMtSrf
i& Dinner MonSat. ll:30-Unlil
1011-A Red Banks Road 321-MESH
IX1:
MESH FAVORITES
APPETIZERS & STARTERS
Buffalo Drummettes - Prepared to a spicy medium and
served with your choice of Bleu Cheese or Ranch and
celery sticks$6.50
PASTA
"Wild" Mushroom Ravioli (Gotta be a mushroom
lover!) Portabella, crimini and shitake mushrooms
sauteed with fresh garlic and placed over mushroom
stuffed ravioli. Laced with a light mushroom alfredo
sauce
12$7.50 Full$11.50
Chicken & Broccoli Tortellini Tri-colored tortellini
tossed with boneless chicken and fresh broccoli. All
nestled in a creamy alfredo sauce.
112$8.00 Full$12.00
Portabella, Tomato and Artichoke Pasta All sauteed
with fresh basil and placed overpenne pasta, nestled in
a vegetable broth & sprinkled with Parmesan cheese
112$7.50 . Full$11.00
Mesh Pasta Cajun chicken, portabella mushrooms,
andouille sausage, garlic, onion, Rome tomato and fresh
herbs overpenne pasta.
112$9.00 Full$13.00
SANDWICHES
The Mesh French Onion Steak Sandwich A seasoned,
grilled steak, caramelized onions, garlic aioli on a crusty
French Bread with melted provobne cheese
$8.25
Grilled Portabella & Vegetable Sandwich Portabella
mushrooms, eggplant, tomatoes and onions. All grilled,
placed on foccoacia bread with herb mayo and topped
with sprouts$6.25
Crab Cake "Po' Boy" Sandwich Our signature crab
cake placed on crusty French Bread with lettuce, tomato,
red onion & ginger mayo spreadMkt. price
The Cuban Meltdown Sliced Prime Rib "open-faced'
with a horseradish cheese sauce and topped with crispy
fried onions. Definitely a "forkabte" sandwich$7.50
DESSERTS
Mesh Style Banana Foster Chef Foster's favorite! (just
not tableside) and served inside a cinnamon bowl $7.00
White Chocolate Cheesecake Staff favorite! With
macadamia caramel sauce$6.00
Mint Chip - Chocolate Cake Sundae Christinne's
favorite! Whipped cream and hot fudge. Totally irresistible
$5.00
Write, 0 Letter
FREETfoM?
PARKING
For The Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is reserving 6 parking
spaces for you. Visit the 10th Street location
and fill out an entry form for a chance to win
one of our Primo Parking Spaces for a semester.
The spaces am within easy walking distance of the Reaeation
Center, Joyner Library, Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins
Art Building and Student Health Department.
@w@S&,
No purchase necessary to win.
Winner will he notifieaby phone.
"Spaces good January I0r, 2000 through May II, 2000"
1





li The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
Tuesday, Nov. 9,199
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu,
Tuesday, No
?
wwwCtec.ecu.
4 SEATS LEFT
BV uMSOn LvTOUR
Mr. wotken, omo people consider you
the most EVIL, VILE. SINISTER, REPTILIAN.
S,O.B.InHolwoo4,riowdQVOurwpood to hot?
EVERYMAN HAS HIS CRITICS, HOW
EVER MINE HHD IT HARD TO WRITE ONCE
I HAVE SMASHED THERKNUCKLES WITH A1ACK
HAMMER AND CASTRATED THEMWITH ARUSTED
BUTTERKNWI ANDPtEASE CALL ME RONALD.
Who do vow despise rnoretten anything?
GOODNESS, VIRTUE, KINDNESS, AMY JU0EO-
CHRISTIAN VALUEYOUIAND BAKED BEANS
THEY GIVE ME CAS LIKE THE FIRES OF HELL!
BUT I AM BEING INCRACIOUS WOULD
YOU LIKE SOME FINE CHAMPAGNE?
Whol would be your dream role?
OH THERE ARE SO MANYPROBABLY THE MAN WHO
WEARS THE SIGH OF THE BEAST WHEN THE
FLAMESOFTHE APOCALYPSE SEND US
SCORCHING TO OBLIVION'OR AS TIHKY-WINKY
FROM THE TELETUBBIES.rM TOO TALL
TO BE PO, LAALAA, OR OIPSY!
THE UOEV SHOUJ
kHl ��r6opY Ar4p
eft
of
M&HITp M.MirJS
BV �JOGV GLLI5
6,oiPg -to p 4cc-t
HE UJHO HnOUIS F6JR
HLMnS nr "vTHM �MHfiF
iTMn
tTfn r0-f vwfft'r9 9nt3
H A
H G
id at ch'i ne
tec comics
12 7 9 9
Tor a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252-328-6004
or bookmark our web site at: www.ecM.edustudent union
� �
Known
but
not
Spoken
I :iuli ix Theatre
M E N D E
Yii'iKim cim:ia
Wed. @ 7:30 p.m. & Thur. at 10:00 p.m
L LI "��� Y
lEKteiuliM
� IMM
Isarrtces
mr
"new rodTX -
v.99 )
A T U R I
r,an Dele vie
MSC Gallery
1024 thro 1125
movie
Reviews
VERY BAD THINGS (R)
A group of friends head to Las Vegas for �
bachelor party, only things go wrong and a
woman is killed. Soon, the bodies are piling up
and the friends find themselves turning against
one another as the cover builds.
AMERICAN PIE R1
At a high-school party, four friends (Jim, Kevin,
Finch, and Oz) find that losing their collective
virginity isn't as easy as they had thought. But
they still believe that they need to do so before
collage. To motivate themselves, they enter a
pact to try to be the first one to "score And of
course, the senior prom is their last best
chance. As the fateful date draws near, the boys
wonder who among them wHI get lucky. More
importantly, do they really want to do it at all.
SHAKESPEARE IN LOVE R
Romantic comedy set In London In the late 16th
century: Young playwright William Shakespeare
struggles with his latest work "Romeo and
Ethel the Pirate's Daughter A great fan of
Shakespeare's plays is young, wealthy Viola
who Is about to be married to the cold-hearted
Lord Wessex, but constantly dreams of
becoming an actress. Women were not allowed
to act on stage at that time (female role were
played by men, too), but dressed up as a boy,
Viola successfully auditions for the part of
Romeo. Soon she and William are caught In a
forbidden romance that provides rich
Inspiration for his play.
For additional information contact the: Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East Carolina
University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353, or call
252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or
VTTY 252.328.4736,8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m Monday -
Friday. Individuals who require accommodations
under ADA should contact the Department for
Disability Support Services at 252.328.4802 forty-
eight hours prior to the start of the program.
WicHed Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: Very Bad Things
7:30pm Hendrix
Thirsty Thursday
Blockbuster Film: American Pie
7:30pm Hendrix
Mercury Cinema: Very Bad Things
10pm Hendrix
Fabulous Friday
Blockbuster Film: American Pie
7:30pm Hendrix
Sensational Saturday
ECU FOOTBALL: Cincinnati
4pmFicklen Stadium
Blockbuster Film: American Pie
7:30pm Hendrix
Super Sunday
Blockbuster Film: American Pie
3pm Hendrix
Wicked Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: Shakespeare In Love
7:30pm Hendrix
WALK TO ECU.
bedroom apart
Available Jan 1;
near campus. 7
TWO BEDROOI
private balcony,
campus on 10th
lease ASAP call
mo. utilities ar
36E6HB0M3
campus, no pets
$600 830-2083
-WESLEY CO
,1twtti
dry tadttttM, 5 bk
-LANGSTOi
ibrti, range, refri
wMharMryw tea
6 btocto from cam
COMPLETELY HE
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nop
RINGGOI
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MALE CHRIST
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tian roommates
$$6dmo. starti
2?�3Xf78 for d
Apartments.
tMo'bIdroc
merit located ju
puaGrily 405.0
ediai! 764-280
ROOMMJ
ROOMMATE N
1; bath furnishe
Walking distance
rr)o with central
included. Call
9447 leave mes
ROOMMATE W
2 bedroom apai
Apartments $22
ities, phone 56
sage.
MALE OR fern
ed. Prefer jrad
2000. Nice spac
2 ba8j� Chea
monthceble in
sit carl 752-060
ROt)MMATtT
BDRJapt. fully fu
from campus.
Rent $195 1
1377n 707-738
maLe room
one bedroom
phone lines. $3!
no smoking. 1
7136.
MF ROOMM
bedroom 112
fessional quiet
student prefern
tionlplease call
ROOMMATE I
apt. Pent $225
Cypress Garder
TIRES FOR sal
with 6.000 mi
tread wear, n
Stephen at 551-
AAAA! SPRIN
hamas Party Cr
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QUEEN SIZE m
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rom free 14" cc
er $360.00. Ca
CERTIFIED DU
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appraised at $
see. She'll love
328-8125.
ADVE
THCCL
If w





� 9,199
a.ecu.edu
Tuesday, Nov. 9,1999
wwwhet.ecu.edu
CLASSIFIEDS
The East Carolinian ' H
ads9studentmedia.ecu.axiu
� a� a fP
FOR RENT
SERVICES
it?

mo
. :
, . :
�w rodTX-
B )
al Ticket
tlina
I
or
mday �
ions
or
2 forty-
igs
igs
n Love
WALK TO ECU. Newly remodeled 1
bedroom apartment $315month.
Available Jan 1st. 125 Avery Street,
near campus. 758-6596 ask for PG.
TWO BEDROOM fully furnished apt
private balcony, walking distance to
campus on 10th Street, need to sub-
lease ASAP call 830-4907 rent is 450
mo. utilities and phone.
3T6EDROOM duplex 5 blocks from
campus, no pets. Avail. Dec. 1-5. rent
$600 830-2083 leave message.
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or 2
I room, 1 bath, r�ng�, refrtgaiMar, fret
WMmr. itaafiarftlryer hookup laun-
dry tacttWM, 5 btodo) from campus, ECU
-LANGSTON PARK: 2 b�Jroomt,
ibrth, rang, raMojrator. oWwyahw and
irw wafrraawar. approx 900 aq. ft,
w�rrdry�r accMilhla, eanM hsatMr,
6 block from campus.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED UNITS AVAILABLE
-AD ProperUas heva 24 hr. arnsrgancy
hCKI 758-1921
L2E55lL1�
� mm
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
. Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
MALE CHRISTIAN roommate want-
ed4o take over lease. Two male Chris-
tian roommates already in apartment.
$260mo. starting mid December call
2)63x08 for details. Player's Club
Apartments.
TWO' BEDROOM townhouse apart-
ment located just minutes from cam-
pus. Only 405.00 a month. If interest-
ediaH 7S4-2801. Ask for Kendra.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 BR.
1; bath furnished apt. at Elm Villas.
Walking distance to ECU. Rent $212.5
rr)o with central AC, heat & hot water
included. Call 328-6319(w) or 830-
9447 leave message.
ROOMMATE WANTED: for spacious
2 bedroom apartment. Cannon Court
Apartments $220 month plus 12 util-
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sage.
MALE OR female roommates want-
ed. Prefer -grad student for Jan-June
2000. Nice spacious two bedroom 1
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month-cable included. On ECU tran-
sit oatf752-OeOJTASAP.
ROOMMATE WANTED to share 2
BDF�apt. fully furnished, WD 2 blocks
from campus, must be NS, clean.
Rent $195 12 utilities. Call 355-
1377n 707-7389d.
MALE ROOMMATE needed ASAP
one'bedroom with private bath and
phoha lines. $300 per month, no pets,
no smoking, 13 utilizes. Call 752-
7138.
MF ROOMMATE wanted to share
bedroom 112 bath townhouse. Pro-
fessional quiet clean nonsmoker grad.
student preferred. For more informa-
tioniplease call 321-2114 after 5pm.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2 BR
apt. Rent $225 plus 12 utilities, at
Cypress Gardens. Call 413-6824.
DJ FOR Hire: Book now for your ev-
ent. Special discounts for students.
Music for any occasion and full lightn-
ing available. Competitive pricing and
guaranteed funl Call Jeff 757-2037.
FREE CD of cool indie music when
you register at mybytes.com, the ul-
timate website for your college needs.
FOR SALE
TIRES FOR sale: 4 BFG All-terrains
with 6.000 miles left on tread. Even
tread wear, no leaks. $40. Call
Stephen at 551-9027.
AAAA! SPRING Break Specials! Ba-
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cludes most meals! Awesome
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QUEEN SIZE mattress, box-spring and
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PENTIUM 120MHZ 16 megs RAM
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CERTIFIED DIAMOND Solitaire Ring
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ADVERTISE IN
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IT WORKS!
SKYDIVE!
CMHHUSIYSPNTS
(9191496-2224
HELP WANTED
WAREHOUSE WORKER needed! Du-
ties include pulling boxes from shelves,
locating files within and entering data
in computer. Must be able to lift up to
30 pounds. Hours are M-F 1p-5p. $7
hr. Call 353-8007 for more informa-
tion.
LOOKING FOR several guys and gals
for local radio station phone promo-
tion. Earn $6 per hour plus bonus. Will
train for full and part time, morning,
day and evening hours available. Near
campus location at 223 West 10th St.
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Donalds and Krispy Kreme. Apply
ASAP in person only 10am through
6pm (no calls please).
DANCERS EXOTIC Legal lap danc-
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years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinquished itself as the most re-
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and earn over10.000! Contact us to-
day for details! 800328-1509
www.classtravelintl.com
DO YOU need a good job? The ECU
Telefund is hiring student to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund. $5.50 per hour plus bo-
nuses. Make your own schedule. If in-
terested, call 328-4212. MTH between
the hours of 3-6 p.m.
YEAR 2000 internships "Don't gat
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GREAT HOURS and great pay Bo-
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fill part-time positions as customer
service representatives. Hours: 3p.m.
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other weekend). Qualified individuals
must have: a positive and quality con-
scious attitude, sales personality, ba-
sic computer skills. Applications ac-
cepted at the Bells Fork location.
POSTMENOPAUSAL WOMEN
needed for research study. Must be a
non-smoker, non-obese, sedentary. &
not currently on hormone replacement
therapy. Call 328-4677 (Dr. Hickner) or
328-4684 (Mary Ellen). Reimburse-
ment $200
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED dancers
needed. Make over $1500 weekly.
Must have transportation, phone and
be DRUG FREE. Call 758-2737 for more
information.
HELP WANTED
GO DIRECTII 1 Internet-based
Spring Break company offering
WHOLESALE pricing! We have the oth-
er companies begging for mercy) All
destinations! Guaranteed lowest Price!
1-800-367-1262 www.springbreakdi-
rect.com
$$MANAGE a business oh your cam-
pus$$ Versity.com. an Internet note-
taking company is looking for an en-
trepreneurial student to run business
on your campus. Manage students,
make tons of money, excellent oppor-
tunity! Apply on-line at www.versi-
ty.corrt uontact jobsOversity.com or
call 734-483-1600 ext. 888
WANTED: PAYING $6 50hr plus bo-
nuses for qualified telemarketers. No
Friday or Saturday work. Hours 5:00-
9:00 PM Monday - Wednesday; 4:00-
9:00 PM Sunday. Call Energy Savers
Windows & Doors. Inc. at 758-8700.
PART-TIME Instructor needed to pro-
vide individualized instruction in a posi-
tive learning environment. Possible
hours Monday-Thursday (3:30-8:30).
Individual must be competent in the
areas of algebra, geometry, calculus,
biology, and chemistry. Pick up appli-
cation at Sylvan Learning Center. 2428
S. Charles Blvd. Greenville. NC.
FREE BABY BOOM BOX EARN
$12001 FUNDRAISER FOR STUD-
ENT GROUPS fr ORGANIZATIONS.
EARN UP TO $4 PER MASTER-
CARD APP. CALL FOR INFO OR
VISIT OUR WEBSITE. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE A FREE BABY
BOOM BOX. 1-800-832-0528 EXT.
119 OR EXT. 125 WWW.OCMCON-
CEPTS.COM
SOCCER COACH is needed for a U-
12 traveling soccer team. For more in-
formation contact Lisa Gay at 752-
9011.
GREEK PERSONALS
NEED A PART TIME JOB? h
RPS INC.
Is VrjVmf, i.� ruici j hvj�ikio kal wins and
unload nailers lor Uxram shirr luxirs teJfjartl to 8am.
S7.5olicxir: tuition assisuinu; aviillaUr after 30 days.
Future career upportunltta in operations and niaraisf
mail pusiufc. AuuKaHon! can U- lilkd mi at 3410
Umtal Drtwinwi (ivv anuiteanlen UawMUl
art-TimeJob�
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Working For
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COLLECTIONS
Earn Up!
$
Mon-Fri � to � p.m.
Sat � a.m. to Neon
ONLINE Colleotlone is
looking for tho 6 most
aggressive people in
Groonvno to workM tele-
phone collectors. The
perfect pert-tfme job.
Excellent pay. Ouroreda
get hired beeed on their
experience working for
ue. Minimum 20 hour
per week. Contact Henry
Parker et 767-2151.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post. Report 343.3. Pro-
gress Inn. The Card Post's '99 Elec-
tion Paper Forum' was mailed 1023.
4pm. Began calling 1025,6pm to ver-
ify receipt& with none received yet.
though a few candidates said address-
es mailed to are not their usual mail-
ing addresses. Checked voting office
1026 & was told addresses on list
are for 'residencythough may not be
candidates choice mailing address.
Called all 57 candidates from same list
1026, 6-9pm. Results: received 21,
left message on answering machine
of 13. they said call beck next day 10.
busy, busy, busy 2. no answer 2. would
page confirmation 2. disconnected 1,
wrong number 1, phone number does
not receive anonymous calls (record-
ing) 1, out of race 1. dysfunctional an-
swering machine 2. Will recheck 10
27. Prosper 'n Live Long, TKD.
THE CARD POST. Report 343.2.
Squeak Inn. While waiting for the re-
sponse from the Wayne Co. Chamber
of Commerce's 1027 Forum's mod-
eratorthe following questions were
forwarded to the Chamber's President
aor coordinator of the 1027 Cham-
ber Forum: (1) How does the Cham-
ber decide which media& which me-
dia representative(s) participate in the
forum? (2) What is the best way to
interview media representativespar-
ticipants prior& after the forum? (3)
Is it possible for a citizen reporter to
be present & or participate? With
checking back at 3pm 1026assis-
tants for both confirmed that no re-
sponse was available. Will check back
for availability for post-forum Report.
Prosper 'n Live Long. Tom Drew. P.S.
The sing'n wheelsounds to please
THE CARD Post. Report 343. X-Cell
Inn. The following 4 questions re-
ceived for The Card Post's "99 Elec-
tion Paper Forum' will be mailed 10
23 to all candidates: (1) What is your
definition for the word 'forum'? (2) Is
the 'forum' the foundation for democ-
racy & education? (3) Do you recog-
nize the intellectual property rights of
all citizensof democratic coun-
trieswho have ideas to save money
in all areas of government? (4) What
is fair trade for those ideas? Should
response exceed budget of publishing
answers here 1031public access in-
formation will be published here 10
31. Presently seeking to interview mod-
erator of the Wayne Co. Chamber of
Commerce's 1027 candidate for-
umfor a pre-forum report here 10
26. Prosper 'n Live Long. Tom Drew.
GREEK PERSONALS
TO ALL our dates: you made Semi-
Formal great! Friday night was a blast!
We love you guys! Love, Zeta Tau Al-
pha
GAMMA COOKOUT Thursday No-
vember 11 at the Alpha Phi house from
4:30 to 7 p.m. A canned food dona-
tion is required for admission.
CONGRATULATIONS SIGMA Sig-
ma Sigma on your soccer intermural
victory over Alpha XI Delta, love your
sisters.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Sig-
ma Epsilon for the social last Friday.
Love Delta Zeta.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank Kap-
pa Alpha for the social last Thursday.
We had fun shaggin in the sands. Love
Delta Zeta.
DJ FOR Hire: Sororities and Fraterni-
ties book now for your formal and oth-
er functions. Guaranteed lowest price
and guaranteed quality service! Latest
hits and old favorites make your get
together an event to remember. Full
lighting systems available upon re-
quest. Please call soon, limited dates
available! Cakalaky Entertainment
(Jeff) at 757-2037.
THANKS DELTA Chi. Alpha Delta Pi.
Sigma Alpha Epsilon for the pumpkins.
Love.the sisters and new members of
Alpha Xi Delta.
ALPHA XI Delta would like to thank
the brothers of Phi Kappa Psi for the
bomb social Tuesday night.
CONGRATULATIONS NEW mem-
bers of Sigma Sigma Sigma in plac-
ing second in the homecoming skits,
lover your Sigma sisters.
TO THE Xi class of the Phi Kappa Psi.
thanks for the show-Love Alpha Xi Del-
ta.
THE SISTERS of Delta Zeta would like
to thank the new members for the best
big sis party ever. We all had a good
time.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new
program council of Zeta Tau Alpha:
Alumnae Chair: Ann Vogel, Asst. Treas-
urer: Jaime Grafton. Asst. New mem-
ber chair: Hillary Andrews. Corre-
sponding Secretary: Jenn Rihgtsell.
Fundraiser chair: Jeni Andrews, Gam-
ma rep: Stephanie Costanzo. House
Manager: Marci Petrocci. Intramurals:
Linsday Grimes. Judicial chain Casey '
Rushton, Service Chair: LaUren Dwy-
er. Sisterhood chair: Mackenzie Veh-
lies. Social Chair Meredith Braun. Spe-
cial Events: Misty Caskey. Sunshine
chair: Jenn Wrenn. Standards chair:
Nikki Frith.
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to thank
Pi Kappa Alpha for the "Anything for a
Dollar' social. We had a great time.
WE ARE proud.to have Alpha Phi as
our sister sorority! Love the sisters and
new members of Alpha Xi Delta.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like to
congratulate our new pledges. We
hope your years in ESA are as memo-
rial and special as ours have been. Love
your sisters.
PANHELLENIC WOULD LIKE to con-
gratulate these sisters of the week: Al-
pha Delta Pi- Lesley Miller; Chi Ome-
ga- Gillian Rafferty; Alpha Omicron Pi-
Dana Dunn; Delta Zeta- Heather Schul-
tises; Zeta Tau Alpha- The newly ini-
tiated sisters; Alpha Phi- Taylor Leo-
nard; Pi Delta- Tabitha Redding; Pan-
hellenic Council-Tyler Blackwelder and
Emily Smith; Alpha Xi Delta- Marybeth
Petteway; Sigma Sigma Sigma- Sage
Hunihafl and Gamma Sigma Sigma -
Bianca Dishman.
THE SISTERS and new members of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to congratu-
late our volleyball team on winning the
championship.
� SPRING BREAK 2000
Jamaica, Cam an, Florida. Barbados, Bahamas
Book now tor Fret Meals & 2 Free Trips
Book by December 17th for Lowest Rales
1-800-426-7710
'www.sunsplashtours.com
ANNOUNCEMENTS
TABLE TENNIS Tournament. Nov.10.
Are you interested in participating in
a table tennis tournament? Come reg-
ister at the SRC 128. 10am-6pm on
Nov.9. For more information please
call 328-6387.
ECCO BOWLING Night Nov.10 at
AMF. from 10-12. $6 all you can bowl!
CHOOSING A Major and a Career: A
one-session workshop that helps you
explore your interests, values, abilities.
and personality and find out which oc-
cupations match well with you. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is now offering this work-
shop on Thursdays at 3:30-5. Contact
the Center at 328-6661 if you are in-
terested.
ASSERT1VENESS TRAINING: A two-
session workshop that teaches you the
importance of being assertive and
helps you become more aware of why
it is difficult for you to do so. The Cen-
ter for Counseling and Student Devel-
opment is offering the following work-
shop on November 9 & 16: 3:30. If
you are interested please contact the
center at 328-6661.
HUMBLE YOUR professor at the Sig-
ma Tau Delta spelling bee. For a meag-
er1 per word you can test your pro-
fessor's spelling abilities. Date is
Nov. 11. location is Joyner East Rm 201.
See posted flyers for more information.
CHOOSING A Major and a Career: A
one-session workshop that helps you
explore your interests, values, abilities
and personality and find out which oc-
cupations match well with you. The
Center for Counseling and Student De-
velopment is mow offering the follow-
ing workshop Tuesday November 9,
11:00. Contact the Center at 328-6661
if you are interested.
LESSONS OF Success and Survival
for Adult Students: Understand your
career development, dual relation-
ships, and changing your career as an
" adult. Starts November 10. at noon-
. 1pm at Wright Hall, room 312. If you
are interested please contact the cen-
ter at 328-6661.
BACKPACKING AT Mt. Mitchell.
You'll never forget the incredible views
all along the this hike and a sense of
accomplishment as you experience
two days of uphill hiking at the high-
est mountain east of the Mississippi.
Spots are limited so sign up ASAP. Trip
dates: Nov. 12-14. Cost is $50mem-
i $65non-mem. For more information
please call 328387.
CYCLEMANIAI COME participate in
the fitness craze! Session runs from
Nov. 1-Dec.8. Earn five Fitness Bucks
for attending ten RPM classes during
the five week session. Fitness Bucks
can be redeemed foe a Cyclemania T-
shirt or applied toward any SRC fitness
program. Sign up at any RPM class
during the effective dates. For more
information please call 328-6387.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THOSE STUDENTS in the Honor
Program who are graduating in De-
cember 1999, or May 2000. must con-
tact the Honors Program Office (6373)
as soon as possible.
ALPHA EPSILON Delta. The Pre-Med-
ical Honors Society will be having their
annual bake sale on Tues. Nov.9th in
from of the Student Stores. Slop by
and pick up some delicious treats.
ALPHA EPSILON Delta, The Pre-med-
ical Honors Society will meet Tues
Nov. 9th. 7:00pm in GCB 1031. Our
guest will be Dr. Kathleen Previll- Pe-
diatric Medicine. Everyone is invited ;
to attend.
LESSONS OF Success and Survival
for Adult Students: Understand your
career development, dual relationships
and changing your career as an adult.
Starts November 10 at noon-1pm at
Wright Hall Room 312. If you are inter-
ested please call 328-6661.
THE LOVELY ladies of the Theta Al-
pha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha So-
rority Inc. invite you to their self-de-
fense program. Protect yourself, learn
techniques from professional crime
fighters that will enhance your knowl-
edge of safety precautions and steps
to take in emergency situations. If you
are tired of feeling like the victim and
want to be transformed into a con-
queror come out and learn how No-
vember 9th G 8pm in Mendenhall.
Great room 3. Free to all.
SUPPLIES FOR Flood Victims.
Wesley Foundation at ECU has re Z
ceived numerous items from students JJ
at Elon College and members of sev-
eral United Methodist Churches in the
Burlington area. Supplies include: food
items, school supplies, linens, blan-
kets, towels, and cleaning supplies.
Come by the Methodist Student Cen- �
ter between 10:Q0an3:00pm. Mon-
day through Thursday. Located at the
corner of 5th and Holly Streets, across
from Garret Hall. Call 758-2030 for
more information or email wesleye-
cuOesn.net.
TABLE TENNIS Tournament. Nov. 10.
Are you interested in participating in
a table tennis tournament? Come reg-
ister today at the SRC 128. 10am-6pm
For more information please call 328-
6387. '
CYCLEMANIAI COME participate in
the newest fitness craze! Session runs
from Nov. 1-Dec.8. Earn five Fitness
Bucks for attending ten RPM classes
during the five week session. Fitness
Bucks can be redeemed for a Cycle-
mania T-shirt or applied toward an SRC
fitness program. Sign up at any RPM
class during the effective dates. For
more information please call 328-6387�-
CREATION VS. Evolution: Is seeing
believing? New Life Christian Fellow- ;
ship sponsors a talk and discussion
with M.I.T. and Duke University gradu-
ate Dr. Brian J. Miller on Nov. 11 at
7:00pm in GCB room 1026.
OTHER
LOST CAMERA on Stancil Dr near
flood waters maybe. Was in a pink
and black shoulder case. If found
please contact Heather at 757-1372.
FREE CD of cool indie music when
you register at mybytes.com, the ul-
timate website for your college needs.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
JOIN B-GLAD every Wednesday at
7:30pm in the Pirate Underground.
ROCK CLIMBING at Stone Mountain.
Nov. 19-21. Let your feet do the talkin'
at this premiere friction climbing area.
We will climb Sat. and Sun. Beginners
are welcome but belaying experience
is recommended. Registration Dead-
line is Nov. 10.5pm. Cost is $65mem-
$80non-mem. For more information
please call 328-6387.
COPING WITH Grief and Loss: This
group is designed to provide support
to students who have experienced the
death of a loved one. Meeting every
Monday at 3:30. If you are interested.
please call The Center for Counseling
and Student Development at 328-6661.
THE AEROBICS Fitness Challenge
'99. Monday Nov.l-Monday Dec.6.
Due dates, holidays, exams, long
nights and short days. We challenge
you to stay focused and stay fit desp-
ite the distractions. We are giving you
31 days to complete 16 group fitness
classes. The rewards include free T-
shirts and free passes for the spring
semester 2000 and most of all. Ac-
complishment . For more information
please call 328-6387.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
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Kick Weight Gain
Can you believe another holiday season is upon us? Here
come the goodies! Stuffing and gravies and puddings and pies,
candies and cookies stacked miles and miles high! Halloween
seems to start-off the holiday food madness. Then comes
Thanksgiving with its hard-held traditions: family gatherings,
football on t.v plenty of hearty, home-cooked food and the
after-dinner dash for the couch. It's not just the turkey that
ends up being stuffed! By Christmas, "ho, ho, ho" can quickly
urn into "oh no, oh no, oh no, I can't fit into my clothes
!&mericans average a 4-6 pound weight gain over the holidays.
Good news - you can fight the battle of the holiday bulge if
you take precautions. To stuff thy turkey without stuffing thy-
self at your holiday gatherings, take the following tips into
consideration.
1. First and foremost be selective. Remember, it's the first bite
-that counts. After the fifth cookie or second piece of pie, they all taste the same. So, take a
sample rather than pigging out, while savoring flavor and the company.
2. Decide ahead of time what and how much you will eat and drink. Then stick to your plan
� even if you deviate a little from your original eating goals, at least you didn't go in with an
attitude of feeling you have a license to overeat simply because it is the holiday season.
3. Limit alcohol. Even one beer or wine spritzer can break down your defenses and lead you
to overeating. If you want to drink, dilute your cocktails or alternate one alcoholic beverage
with two non-alcoholic beverages. And go easy on the eggnog!
4. Be polite, not nice. Rehearse ahead of time how you gracefully will say "no" to offers of
homemade foods you really don't want.
5. Do not skip meals. Omitting breakfast or other meals will lead to overrating at the party or
Thanksgiving meal. Enjoy a light and nutrient-dense breakfast and lunch. Don't go to any
holiday event on an empty stomach.
6. EXERCISE! EXERCISE! EXERCISE! The holiday season often leaves us feeling tired,
ragged and run-down. At a time like this many people feel they have no time for exercise.
Regardless, this is the most crucial time period to start or increase your current exercise rou-
tine. Make a commitment before Jan. 1st comes around! Make the commitment to get up
before class to walk, run, bike, row or ski at least 30 minutes 4-5 days per week. Add some
weight training 2-3 times per week.
You'll be amazed how well you'll handle the pressures the holiday season sends your way, not
to mention what it will do for your waistline. Do yourself a favor and take a 45-minute walk
before your Thanksgiving meal. You'll feel refreshed and energized before those activities
begin, increase your metabolism and put a curb on your appetite so you don't gobble,
gobble, gobble!
"Kick Butt
Great American
Smokeout, ECU
Style
O.KIt's time! Let's not wait for a New Year's Resolution or some other excuse to pack away
our Puffs. Thursday, November 18th marks the date for the annual American Cancer
Society, Great American Smokeout! ECU Division of Student Life will be tying into this
event in an effort to reduce the amount of smoking that takes place here at good 'ol ECU.
Head to the Union (Mendenhall that is) on Thursday the 18th for a FREE DINNER and
giveaways (around 5:00) To be eligible all you have to do is fuel our Bon Fire with some
type of tobacco product or accessory (cigarette, cigar, dip, lighter, ashtray, etc.). While you
eat and gather all of your giveaway goodies, you'll also receive information on HOW TO
QUIT No, we don't expect for you to stop on the spot that day, but you will receive infor-
mation on Smoking Cessation Programs, scheduled to begin early in the millennium
You don't have to be a smoker to get involved with this event. Bring your smoker fricnds-
and tell them to "Get Your Butt Out of My Face" (cigarette butt that is), and come enjoy all
of the FREE FOOD and FUN For more information you can contact Health Promotion at
328-6793, Student Health at 328-6794 or Center for Counseling and Student Development at
328-6661.
As campus life runs along each day, photographers
will be out and about to capture us, the students, at
our best. If you can identify yourself in any of our
pictures, present yourself to MSC 109 to the staff
there. Rewards will be on hand for your efforts, so
keep a close eye on those pictures.
Kick In
Trade Your Ideas For Food and Eat For FREE!
We want your ideas and opinions about how to improve campus restaurants, meal plans,
and menus. Join others at monthly Student Food Advisory Counsil meetings to offer
comments, suggestions, and compliments about your dining experiences at ECU.
Meeting attendees enjoy a scrumptious free catered meal prior to the SFAC meeting
and have the opportunity to meet and socialize with the entire dining service manage-
ment team. To make a reservation for our November 10th meeting call 328-2337.
Unable to attend? We're still eager to hear from you. Feel free to complete an Edible
Suggestion card at anytime and drop it in our collection boxes located at any of our .
seven campus restaurants.
Kickboxing
In light of the global popularity of kickboxing, many forms of the sport have taken to
the exercise studio creating excitement, confusion, and even controversy. How do you
choose a kickboxing class, instructor, or video that is effective and safe for everyone?
Videos, while great for home use, fall short of providing individual pacing and feedback
specific to your form and technique. This information is paramount in decreasing your
injury risk. In addition, videos cannot prescribe appropriate pacing or provide an ongo-
ing source of motivation to keep you coming back for more. When seeking a live kick-
boxing fitness class, make sure you look for instructors that are trained to teach exercise
to general population adults. Kickboxing, while great fun, is a sport requiring specific
skills and athleticism. The instructor should be well versed in modifying the move-
ments for those of us who are not trained in the sport
of kickboxing. Music speed, repetition, body posi-
tions and kick height are just a few of the things that
need to be suited to the individual. Seek out instruc-
tors that are certified exercise leaders with training
and experience in fitness kickboxing techniques.
Organizations such as the Aerobics Fitness
Association of America or the American Council on
Exercise now offer practical and written exams for
instructors in fitness and kickboxing.
ECU Recreational Services can take out some of the
guesswork with the extremely popular Cardio-Boxx
workout. This class features one hour of effective
punching, kicking, and sport drills designed to
improve cardio-vascular health, muscle strength, and
body composition. Each class is taught by instructors
prepared to evaluate your technique thereby reducing
injury risk while ensuring great results. All of the
movements employed are suited to the general popu-
lation, as well as modified for fitness versus sport.
Fitness Kickboxing is fun, effective, easy to follow
and is earning its place in the fitness arena. Just
remember that the workouts are for health, fun and
vitality, serving in no capacity as self-defense or mar-
tial arts training.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 9, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 09, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1364
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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