The East Carolinian, October 21, 1999






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www.tec.ecu.edu
eastcarolinian
Volume 74, Issue 69
SOCCER SHUTS OUT FOES
Amy Horton keeps
opponents scoreless.
72 days to go until 2000
NEWS BRIEFS
pg-
MUMmW ft Mm
ECU plays Tulane University Green
Wave for Homecoming this Saturday. The
kick-off begins at 4 p.m. at Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium.
The annual Homecoming Parade begins
at 9:45 a.m. Saturday, on East Fifth Street. It
will move west into the downtown area,
where it will turn right on Evans Street, end-
ing at Town Commons.
The Board of Trustees will meet at 11
a.m. tomorrow in Room 244 of Mendenhall
Student Center. The board's agenda in-
cludes reports and discussions about the im-
pact of Hurricane Floyd on university facili-
ties and academic organizations, along with
a report on the ECU Outreach Network and
an update on the university's preparation to
make computers and other equipment Y2K
compatible.
The new bronze pirate statue, which
stands 13 feet tall and weighs more than
6,000 pounds, will soon become a prominent
fixture at football and basketball games on
campus. The statue will be unveiled before
the Homecoming football game on Saturday.
The art work, commissioned by Irwin Belk,
stands near Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium and
Minges Coliseum. The new pirate was de-
signed and constructed by Jodi Hollnagel,
an ECU visiting artist.
A "Road to Recovery March" will take
place at 4 p.m. Friday at E.B. Aycock Middle
School, off of Greenville Blvd. Sponsor forms
are available at Dowdy Student Store, Todd
Dining Hall, 201 Cfirfsfenbury, Mendenhall
Student Center Ihtorihation Desk and the
Student Recreation Center.
An instructional seminar will take place at
2 p.m. today in Room 1020 of Joyner Li-
brary. The uses of the "Web of Science an
Internet interface that gives researchers ac-
cess to three databases that provide indexes
and other information on more than 8,000
science journals, will be demonstrated. For
more information contact Jan Lewis at 328-
2267.
Maritime historian Tim Runyan will be the
guest speaker for the annual Friends of
Joyner Library banquet at 7:30 p.m. tonight
in Mendenhall Student Center. Dr. Runyan is
the director of the ECU Maritime Studies
Program and has been involved in numer-
ous shipwreck excavations and led the cam-
paign to renovate the William G. Mather, a
618-foot ship that is now a floating museum.
Tickets to the banquet are $25. For more in-
formation contact Cari Lovins at 328-4090.
ONLINE SURVEY
Will you be attending the
Homecoming activities this
week?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Are landlords treating displaced students
fairly?
19 YES 31 NO
MORE THAN SEX pg. 8
Sexuality is part of being human:
w
TODAY'S WEATH
Showers, high of 68
and a low of 48
THURSDAY, OCTOBER 21. 1999
Concert to benefit flood victims in peril
Postponement due to
lack of funding
Terra Steinbeiser
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Devastation caused by recent flooding gave Travis
Proctor of Rocky Mount and other area musicians the
idea to put on FloodStock 99, a benefit concert to aid
flood victims in their recovery. But the concert's fate is
now uncertain.
"We wanted to do this because our town was hit
pretty hard and several of our really close friends lost
their homes and are still having to live in other places
said Robin Proctor, Travis' wife and one of the event
organizers. "Almost nobody had flood insurance, so
it's been really hard
The concert was scheduled for Sunday night at The
Ritz in Raleigh, but the insurance money needed to
put on the concert fell short.
"We still want to do this, but we don't have a date
and we don't have an idea Proctor said.
In order for the concert to continue, $3,000 must
be donated for liability insurance. This monetary fig-
ure is based on an estimate from a Raleigh insuance
company.
I
People Helping People
At this time the concert will either be canceled or
postponed.
"I'm guessing we could get the same location, but
we could go to on alternate location Proctor said.
Originally the concert was to be an indooroutdoor
event with food, games and activities for children. The
ticket price was $10.
Proctor encourages people to send donations to the
Red Cross.
Bands that were scheduled to play were The Origi-
nal Groove Riders, The Magic Pipers, Corderoy DeVille,
FacePlant, Tusk, Lil Dave and the Howlin' Blues Band.
Organizers of the event were hoping to raise10,000
for the Red Cross to assist victims.
The Ritz, which is donating its facility for the con-
cert, is able to hold 2,390 people and, according to
owner Ray Carol, raising this amount of money is a
feasible goal. The organizers of the concert have cre-
ated a web page at http:floodstock99.freeservers.com.
There has been talk of holding a flood benefit con-
cert here at ECU, but planning has been put on hold.
"We submitted a list of possible dates for the event
to the athletic department but we haven't heard any-
thing back from them yet said Student Union Presi-
dent Dennis Norton.
"We can't do any planning until we have a definite
date because all of the agents of the bands need to see
if the event will fit in their schedule said Patrick
Edwards, chair of the Popular Entertainment Commit-
tee. "We're not even looking at budgeting or anything
like that yet until we know for sure when we can do
it
The Student Union already has plans for a concert
event to take place in the stadium during the Spring
semester.
This writer can be contacted at
tsteinbeiser@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Tar River slowly
returns to normal
Plans made to
increase campus recycling
Water rises up to the Greene Street bridge which stretches over the Tar River
(photo by Emily Richardson)
Discolored water not
dangerous
Terra Steinbeiser
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
The Tar River, like the rest of
eastern NC, is slowly returning to
its pre-Hurricane Floyd condition.
The river is Greenville's main
water source, and many residents
have expressed concern upon not-
ing the yellowish tinge the water
has recently taken.
"I don't know what the deal is,
but I'm still drinking only bottled
water said Ben Opar, junior.
The yellow color is caused by
high levels of manganese that en-
tered the water when the river broke
its banks and washed into swamps
in the area.
"The water is safe to drink and
there are no public safety problems
with it said Barney Kane, a pro-
fessor in the department of environ-
mental health, safety, sciences and
technology.
"The city is in a hurry to get rid
of it because it is aesthetically un-
pleasing and it can stain your
clothes, but it is by no means toxic
Manganese is present in the
city's water supply under normal
conditions, but the" mechanisms
normally used to get rid of it are not
sufficient to deal with the currently
increased levels.
"Manganesel is much more dif-
ficult to get rid of when the water is
acidic, as it is now, and when there
is less oxygen in the water Kane
said. "We really just need to wait for
it to work itself out
Following the hurricane and its
resulting floods, the river was full
of spilt oil and choked with tree
debris and dead animals.
"We've taken lots of samples
that indicate the Tar River is not as
polluted as most people originally
thought said Al Hodge of the N.C.
Division of Water Quality. "The pol-
lution level was elevated, but not
above EPA standards
See RIVER page 2
Students encouraged to
make effort
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
Pile of recyclables at a dropoff point located on
Reedy Branch Road, (photo by Emily Richardson)
The university currently has policies that
are helping to reduce campus waste, but
various departments are hoping to do more.
According to Tom Pohlman, ECU envi-
ronmental manager, the university recycles
paper products, cardboard, aluminum cans
and metal products. All collected items are
then sent to various locations in the com-
munity, including Waste Industries in
Kinston, East Carolina Vocational Center
(ECVC) and Midsouth Metal.
"We just finished our state report
Pohlman said. "The automotive center re-
cycles tires and oil and groundskeepers re-
cycle pallets and recycle trees into mulch
for the campus grounds
Overall, 28 percent of the university's
potential wastes, including yard wastes, auto
oil, oil filters, car batteries, chemicals and
cooking grease are recycled. Pohlman hopes
that ECU will increase its recycling by 10
percent.
Environmental Health Serviees are in
the process of working with University
Housing and Dining Services to increase
their recycling ability. Both are currently in
the initial exploration stages.
University Dining Services currently re-
cycles, but Pohlman is hoping to increase
the amount.
"We recycle cardboard I guess we
could recycle cans but we don't said Phil
Sperry, Todd Dining Hall manager. "With
our massive amount of customers and
workload we would have to hire a whole
new crew just for recycling
While UHS is getting equipped to re-
cycle, there is an opportunity for students
to contribute. A recycling trailer rotates
weekly from College Hill to Cotton to Green
residence halls to collect recyclable items.
Students can place white and colored pa-
per, magazines, newspapers and cardboartf
into these trailers.
According to Pohlman, central campus
is the largest area that recycles because of
the bins that are located in all of the ad-
ministrative and classroom buildings.
"We are trying to find easier ways to
accommodate students Pohlman said.
"We are looking into placing recycling bins
into dorm trash rooms for glass, cans and
bottles, along with paper, cardboard and
newspapers
Many students have expressed the need
to make recycling on campus more avail-
able.
"I think recycling should definitely be-
come part of dorm life said sophomore
Angela Smith. "It would be nice and more
convenient for students
"We should recycle because it will save
trees and overall help the environment
said freshman Teneisha Kirby.
This writer can be contacted at
ahorne@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Town n' Gown keeps Greenville in order
ECU, city
work side by side
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
The city of Greenville and the university have cre-
ated a new partnership.
According to Dr. Jim Smith, executive assistant to
the chancellor, a group known as the "Town n' Gown
Committee" discusses issues regarding our community
and campus.
The committee's goals are to help students make their
graduation dream a reality, by making their years in
Greenville and on campus as safe and exciting as pos-
sible.
Smith, Chancellor RlchaTd Eakin Vice Chancellor
Richard Brown, Vice Chancellor of Student Life Garrie
Moore, ECU Police ChletTOregi Cti�r and a sel�Njt�l
residence hall advisor make up the gown committee.
The town committee consists of Mayor Nancy
Jenkins, representation from the city manager, the chief
of police, city engineer and a member of parks and rec-
reation services.
Town n' Gown meets twice a year for an informal
breakfast, which is alternately set between the City
Council and ECU. Meetings take place in August and
February.
Members discuss mutual interests and share ideas to
plan for the future.
This past August, the committee discussed prepara-
tions for Halloween, parking issues, neighborhood and
campus relations and violence.
"Halloween has become a major aspect of ECU
Smith said. "We want to make sure everyone has a great
time, but we also want safety issues covered
Community members feel the committee is provid-
ing a good service.
"The annual meetings are wonderful said Donna
Raynor, secretary for city manager. "They are a great
opportunity for groups to share ideas and information
with one another
According to Smith, the committee has established
great working relations and can turn to each other when-
ever in need of assistance.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@ftudentmedia. ecu. edu





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Research medical building
renamed for NC state senator
Warren's accomplishments applauded
Carolyn Herold
staff writer
I
K A new building now joins the ranks of the School
oMIedidne.
F On Tuesday, the Life Sciences Building was renamed
tft Edward Nelson Warren Life Sciences Building. State
Sfc. Ed Warren hopes this building will be a pace set-
tle for its kind in NC.
' This structure, located behind the Brody Building,
isS $14 million facility that will utilize its 75,000 square
fet of space for various programs. They include re-
sjjbching heart disease and cancer. There will also be
radiation, biology, oncology labs, allergy and gastro-
eaterology labs, as well as administrative offices for the
department of comparative medicine.
t According to Dr. Austin Bunch, assistant to the
chancellor, the ECU Board of Trustees chose Warren to
bcCthe namesake of the building because of his level of
dedication.
' "Senator Warren has been a longtime supporter of
E(3u Bunch said. "Senator Warren has garnered sup-
port for the medical area in particular
I Senator Marc Basnlght, president pro tempore of
tig state Senate, Chairman Benjamin S. Ruffin of the
"iC Board of Governors and David McRae, chief ex-
itive officer of Pitt County Memorial Hospital, all
spoke at the dedication ceremony. Following the dedi-
cation, a reception and a tour of the facility were held.
Warren is a native of Pitt County and holds degrees
from Barton College, as well as ECU. Warren is the se-
nior member of the Pitt County delegation in the Gen-
eral Assembly and Is in his fifth term as a senator. He
has also served five terms as a member of the House of
Representatives.
In his 19 years in the General Assembly, Warren
has been involved with many projects to raise money
and awareness for ECU.
"It's been a challenge, but very rewarding Warren
said. "I will continue to help as long as I am in the
General Assembly
Warren has worked on the Sports Medicine Build-
ing, raised millions of dollars for the stadium, along
with $6 million for the new Science Industry Building.
Warren's credits continue with fund raising for the ra-
diation therapy program, assisting with the MRI in the
School of Medicine, and helping to increase funding
for the general growth and future of eastern NC through
the Medical School.
"Education has been my priority Warren said.
This writer can be contacted at
cherold@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Alternative sentencing program changes worry public defenders
DURHAM (AP)�Changes to al-
ternative sentencing programs state-
wide are not as dramatic as public
defenders believe, says the judge
who helped develop them.
Beginning Jan. 1, so-called
community penalties" programs
ivill be required to share informa-
tion that counselors gleaned from
defendants and that usually only
Vefrt to defense lawyers preparing
vays to keep clients out of jail.
; Counselors often suggest alter-
hatives to incarceration, such as
jlrug rehabilitation and intensive
probation. Some lawyers are worried
befause counselors sometimes turn
(ipf information harmful to defen-
LV

dants, such as criminal histories and
drug use.
"We have devised a program
that allows judges access to the same
valuable pre-sentencing informa-
tion as defense attorneys, but (it)
also protects the rights of defen-
dants said Judge Tom Ross, direc-
tor of the Administrative Office of
the Courts.
Ross said while prosecutors will
have access to information from the
interviews, each community has the
latitude to decide when that infor-
mation is available.
But Bob Brown, Durham
County's chief public defender, said
the new law means defendants must
testify against themselves if they use
the program. For now, Brown said
he will only use the Durham sen-
tencing program on a case-by-case
basis: "I can't have clients know-
ingly place themselves in greater
jeopardy by participating
His reluctance to use the pro-
gram has prompted one local law-
yer to write a letter to Durham Su-
perior Court Judge Orlando Hudson
demanding Brown's dismissal.
i
1
1
ft

We are now accepting applications
for all sections of the paper.
� News, Sports, & Features Writers
� Opinion columnists
� Photographers
� Copy Editors
Cartoonists
Thursday, Oct. 21,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Attention flood-stricken
students
If your home or apartment was
affected by the recent flood, you
must contact 328-4044 by Friday.
There Is a risk of losing much
needed support from FEMA if infor-
mation Is not provided about the
number of flood victims.
Please contact the above num-
ber if any of the following apply
you:
Have you lost your apartment
or home to flooding?
Are you temporarily living
with friends, relatives or others due
to flood damage in your previous
residence?
Would you consider moving
into a rent-free FEMA modular unit
academic village operated by the
university?
If you answered "yes" to any of
the above, again, contact 328-4044.
The line is available seven days a
week, 10 a.m. - midnight.
CRIME SCENE
RIVER
from page
While chemical pollutants (i.e.
petroleum products) are certainly a
threat, experts at the Division of Wa-
ter Quality are more concerned with
the high count of bacteria and the low
levels of oxygen, both caused by the
abundance of organic materials in the
water.
"The oxygen level is very low be-
cause of the large load of trees and
leaves in the water Hodge said. "They
dissolve the oxygen, which suffocates
the fish living in the river, which in
turn leads to a higher bacteria count
According to Hodge, the EPA is cur-
rently involved in all aspects of clean-
ing up the river, although no EPA rep-
resentative could be reached for com-
ment.
This writer can be contacted at
tsteinbeiser@studentmedia.ecu.edu
October 16
Underage Consumption�A student was issued a campus appear-
ance ticket after an officer observed him consuming a malt beverage in
his Jones Hall room.
Larceny�A student reported that his bike was stolen from the rack
between Clement and White Hall.
October 17
First Degree Trespassing�A non-student was arrested for first degree
trespassing after being found in in a room in Umstead Hall room
unescorted and intoxicated.
Visitation Violation�An RA reported that three males were inside a
Clement Hall room after 2 a.m. and were uncooperative in giving infor-
mation. The non-residents were issued trespass warnings.
f October 18
Larceny�A student reported that her bike was stolen from the rack
near Cotten and Fleming Halls.
Larceny�A student reported tha.t his bike was stolen from the rack
near Scott Hall.
Larceny�A student reported that his cell phone was stolen from his
book bag while riding the ECU Transit.
Health Professions Career
Information Seminar
� Tliursdm. October 28. I()')9
� liiTuslir B-102
s Interested In Health Professions
Should Vltend!
Ilii I' () I mtcrgnlllllillc Slllilii'S , ml
II Ullllvlllit lhliilllniciil
epatitis B
About 300,000 Americans each year get Hepatitis B.
ioKpeiience
of "Lifetime
You are at greater risk for
Hepatitis B if you:
� are sexually active
� have unprotected sex
� have more than one sex
partner
� have another sexually
transmitted infection
� share needles for injecting
drugs
� work in health care
� are a native of or spend large
amounts of time in areas
where Hepatitis B is endemic.
These areas include Alaska,
the Pacific Islands, Africa,
Asia, and the Amazon region
of South America.
Why take the risk?
Get vaccinated
HEPATITIS B
AWARENESS
VACCINE DAY
WHERE:
In front of the
Wright Place
Student Stores
WHEN:
Wednesday,
October 27, 1999
9:00a.m4:00p.m.
COST: $20.00 per injection
(aged 20 and over)
($10.00 per injection' for adolescent dose)
(The vaccine is a three part series of
injections. You must receive all three
injections over a specified period of time.)
Apply at our office on the second floor of the Student PuNkatiorw Building.
4 � H tl
For more information, contact the
ECU STUDENT HEALTH SERVICE at 328-6841
Thursday, O
www.tec.ecu
ACROJ
U of Florid;
black leather so
O'Connell Cen
Eduardo Sanchi
most talked atx
ers, casually a
about their noi
making style.
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smash The Bl
talked to a grout
people Thursday
sponsored by
Government's s
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tionally, they &
primary actors
script, but from
notes" given to
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24 hours a day
ate there, they si
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if we kept the a
Duke U.�I
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dent into classe
but social activil
dents dig deeper
Many studer
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reach, and the
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these perks.
"Considerin
$30;000, we sh
things for free
Nikova Mason.
ECU I
Perform
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SALE
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Includes Cha
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SALI
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ECU Athletic
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�ct. 21, 1999
iedia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Oct.21,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
The East Carolinian
newsOstudentmedia.ecu.edil'
ampus appear-
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for first degree
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ACROSS OTHER CAMPUSES
U of Florida�Slouched back in
black leather sofas on a stage in the
O'Connell Center, Dan Myrick and
Eduardo Sanchez, two of the year's
most talked about young filmmak-
ers, casually answered questions
about their nontraditional movie-
making style.
The co-directors of the summer
smash The Blair Witch Project
talked to a group of more than 3,000
people Thursday night. The talk was
sponsored by Accent, Student
Government's speaker's bureau.
The film was shot unconven-
tionally, they said, with the three
primary actors working not from a
script, but from minimal "director's
notes" given to them every day.
"We did it in a completely real
time scenario-the actors were there
24 hours a day Sanchez said. "They
ate there, they slept there, they went
to the bathroom there. We figured
if we kept the actors on their toes,
Duke U.�Duke University's
$30,000-plus Bursar's bill gets a stu-
dent into classes and dormitories,
but social activities often make stu-
dents dig deeper into their pockets.
Many students said these addi-
tional costs put some activities, par-
ticularly those in the arts, out of
reach, and they suggested that
Duke's tuition should cover more of
these perks.
"Considering the fact we pay
$30;000, we should get a lot of
things for free said Trinity senior
Nikova Mason.
they would have this dread of 'What
the hell are these guys going to do
to us tonight? From the casting
call the duo hoped to keep the ac-
tors jumping.
"We held the auditions much
the same way we shot the film-
improv Myrick said. "We asked
them immediately, 'Why do you
think you should be brought off
parole after a 12-year sentence?'
They would either fall right into
character or they wouldn't
The pair also said near the end
of the eight-day film shoot they
scaled back the amount of food
given to the actors to little more
than "a PowerBar and a banana
"We knew that they were going
to be so physically and mentally
exhausted by the end they were
going to put something on film we
couldn't produce in Hollywood
Sanchez said.
The result of that "experiment
Vice President for Student Affairs
Janet Dickerson said that a diverse
group of students have said to her
that monetary constraints left stu-
dents with few social options.
She stressed that the University
tries to keep ticket prices as low as
possible.
"Although most arts and cul-
tural programs are revenue-driven,
the Union makes a very good effort
to subsidize programs and offer
some free events she said.
While some concerts are subsi-
dized by the Union, those like the
they said, was lead character
Heather Donahue's ultra-realistic,
spookily lit, top-half-of-the-face
apology to her parents.
The two clearly showed off their
relaxed and humorous attitudes
. throughout their hour and a half
presentation. When one female
crowd member asked them how she
could be in their next movie, called
Heart of Love, Sanchez was quick to
reply.
"If you're willing to get naked,
we'll put you in he said.
Sanchez and Myrick were taken
aback, however, by a question posed
by UF freshman Kelly Hauser.
"I just wanted to know why your
movie sucked so bad she said, add-
ing later she was originally going to
ask how they got in touch with Ar-
tisan Entertainment but later
changed her mind.
Myrick's short answer: "$143
million
Dave Matthews and Tim Reynolds
performance were not cheap-run-
ning about $30 each.
"Concert tickets are expensive as
s�t said Trinity senior Stuart
Kime. He added that the jazz series
was more reasonable.
Although Ginny Wise, a Trinity
senior, said she was pleased that
most quad activities were free, she
recalled a swing dance that cost $5
or $10 dollars.
From this Homecoming court,
a king and queen will be chosen
1999 HOMECOMING COURT, LIFT TO RIGHT; JOIUTUUICYIIS, H�Y WAUEl CIIBTKI
OWENS. EIENAN G0DB01T, MICHAEL ORR, DEJWNINGMM, Elf C GABIIQ, TY1EI �UCIWBBU,
BRYAN HAIL, CORISSA CHEEK, RJWDEUA HARRIS, ARMAUNIICMIBS9H, KIM EDWAIIS. KEVIN
GAME OA9
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ECU Purple
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Regular '49.99
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ECU Purplogpld
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Tailgate Grill
Includes Charcoal & Starter
Overton's Price
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large Selection
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Marked
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Overton's Reg. Price
Skull
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Car Flag
Regular '10.99
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ECU AthletlcPeot. T-Shlrt
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$15.M
ECUws
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JS&7 iECU Stadium Cushions
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ECU Sport Balls
�9.911.M
� Phone 252-355-5783
� Open 9am - 9pm
' Monday Thru Saturday
�111 Red Banks Rd.
Greenville, N.C. 27834
i Evans St.
Mi cot �St � SI of m
mOverton's
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� NC Bar Certified Specialist in State
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� 24 hour message service
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Homecoming
WW 1 m
Headauarters.
Play 'TARGET
TULANE
Try your luck at
throwing a winning pass and
YOU COULD WIN A
$200 SHOPPING SPREE!
Friday, October 22:
2 pm - 4 pm
Saturday, October 23:
11 am -1 pm
Stop by the Student Plaza and take
two tries at throwing a football at a
target. Hit the target and you win a
prize. PLUS, you're automatically
qualified for a drawing to win a $200
Student Store shopping spreel
(Rain location: inside Wright Building lobby)
SAVE 25 on ALL
ALUMNI & ECU MOMDAD
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The East Carolinian
jjpww.tec.ecu.edu
Thursday, Oct 21,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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Dan Cox, We
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)ct21, 1999
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eastcarolinian
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Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11,000 copies ewry Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion ol the majority of the Editorial Board and is written In
turn by Editorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
for decency or brevity at the editor's discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters for publication.
All letters must be sined and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent byr-mail to edilor@sludenlmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366.
As a society we must be more aware
of the people we choose to be
intimate with and always use methods
of contraception that will prevent
pregnancy and STDs. It's easy to say
"It'll never happen to me, I know my
partner but it never hurts to be
careful.
OURVIEW
OPINION COLUMN
ms expansion creates frustration
Campi
Chris Sachs
OPINION WRITER
I have been going to school here
since the fall of 1996, and ever since
I first stepped foot on campus as a
full-time student I have noticed
construction. Construction trucks,
noises, people, fencing just once
I would like to go a semester with-
out the ugly sight of construction.
I know the campus is expand-
ing and that is a good thing, but I
am really getting tired of the blight
that the Caterpillar trucks and dirt
mounds are making this university.
Lately the chemistry building has
been shaking like a belly dancer
while the new "Sexual Disease Treat-
ment Center" is undergoing an ex-
pansion. I look across the Mall and
one of the dorms is being gutted
out. Even here at the student publi-
cations building there is a mile long
fence that keeps me from the front
door. I would give my kidney if I
could just walk around my campus
with no detours and cranes in my
view.
Another thing that I noticed
about the expansion of the school,
is that, technically, it really is not
expanding, it's condensing. The
square acreage is the same, but the
number of buildings are increasing.
It is becoming crowded. What ECU
needs to do is expand outwards and
make the campus larger. We have
many buildings downtown that are
just asking to be torn down and
have a beautiful new ECU building
placed there. Some of these old to-
bacco warehouses would be prime
locations. The walk is not that far
and it would make downtown look
better and make our campus more
impressive.
Look at Duke and UNC Chapel
Hill, their buildings are everywhere
and permeate all over the city. There
are batches of forest separating the
buildings and they have beautiful
walkways through the woods and
grassy grounds. We have one not-
so-grassy ground and buildings that
are too close together. We need to
quit chopping this pie into smaller
and smaller pieces and bake a new
one.
If we can get the money to ex-
pand, we can cut deals with the
mayor and I am sure we can afford
to buy property on land beside our
own tiny plot. How about building
a North Campus a few miles away
with a shuttle service. Why not
build a West campus? There is noth-
ing out there but corn fields.
You see, there is plenty of room,
we just need to take advantage of
it. The city of Greenville owes us. It
would be a ghost town without us
and it's about time they let us grow.
Write the chancellor and let him
know you want a bigger and better
campus. Tell him we will spring for
a new mansion on the North cam-
pus if he does.
This witer can be contacted at
csachs@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Wagoner should not be quick to point finger
The East Carolinian
editor@studentmedia.ecu.edlb
WITH THE MILLENIUM APPROACHING
JUSTIMAGINETHATSOONTHISWILLBEALLTHATIS
REFERRED TO AS
Sex is a topic that we all deal with on a daily basis. Although many of
us believe that we are experts in the "safe sex" area, it never hurts to touch
base on it one more time. It is obviously not getting through to all stu-
dents since it has been statistically proven that one in five Americans
have a sexually transmitted disease (STD) and that one in 500 college
students are infected with HIV.
Although it has been stated that abstinence is the best form of contra-
ception, that isn't always the route people choose. As a society we must be
more aware of the people we choose to be intimate with and always use
methods of contraception that will prevent pregnancy and STDs. It's easy
to say "It'll never happen to me, I know my partner but it never hurts to
be careful.
Limiting yourself to one partner reduces the risk of contracting or trans-
mitting an STD. Multiple sex partners only increases the risk. According
to the STD risk profiler, the incidence of STDs is rising, in part, because in
the last few decades young people have become sexually active earlier, yet
are marrying later. The result is that sexually active people today are more
likely to have multiple sex partners during their lives and therefore are
potentially at a greater risk for contracting STDs.
Also, if you are sexually active, getting tested on a regular basis is very
important. Some STDs do not have obvious symptoms and may cause
complications if not treated immediately.
Always use protection before any sexual encounter. Even if you are
not engaging in intercourse, if bodily fluids are being exchanged, you are
susceptible to STDs. Dental dams, female condoms, birth control pills,
spermicides and diaphragms are available and should be accompanied
with the use of a latex condom.
Ultimately it's your choice as to what you do behind closed doors. Just
take the time to be safe and avoid the unwanted consequences.
OPINION COLUMN
Thoughts of the Million-Man March still linger
on ourselves and our people, without any hint of mak-
ing atonement for those wrongs.
Why a million-man march? Because problems in the
African-American communities are sucking the life blood
out of these communities. If 1 million men were inspired
to leave Washington DC, and return to our communi-
ties with a new spirit of self-reliance and repentance for
our past-wrongdoings against durselves and our people,
there can be some serious rebuilding of these commu-
nities.
Why a million-man march? Because African-Ameri-
can communities are being inundated by the prolifera-
tion of illegal drugs. 1 million African-American men
can be motivated to stand up against those who import
and sell drugs in our communities.
Why a million-man march? Because it was needed
so that after the march, there would be less mistreat-
ment and abuse of African-American women and chil-
dren, less abandonment of positive family values and
much more effort in putting God first in our lives. a
The Million-Man March showed the world there Ma
great resource in our society and that the African-AmeS-
can man is ready and willing to take his place in leading
our community out of a destructive mode and in tola
positive one. . �jg
The message of the Million-Man March affected ev?
eryone, as witnessed by the organizing of the Promisf
Keepers rally. Everyone is affected by the moral deterioj
ration in our society, and everyone needs to come tog
gether to address these issues.
This witer can be contacted at
nakbar@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Na'rm Akbar
OPINION WRtTER
Today I will ask you to indulge me as I reflect on one
of the most influencing events of my life. This event
occurred four years ago on Oct. 16. The event was the
Million-Man March in Washington, DC.
I write about this today because I am still motivated
by some of the I lessons learned on that day. I was in
awe as I stood in the midst of the throng of men who
had gathered on the mall in front of the U.S. Capitol on
this warm day. The Million-Man March was a reality.
My mind, on that day, was focused on the many rea-
sons a million-man march was necessary and what could
be expected as the results of such a march.
It was not the organizers or the controversy surround-
ing them that permeated my mind on this day. The lead-
ership of the march had turned to the more than 1 mil-
lion men who had assembled in the nation's capitol on
this historic day.
African-American men were in need of a million-
man march because the time had come for the fallen
African-American man to rise up and begin to dignify
himself, and accept responsibility for past and present
wrongs that we committed against ourselves, our fami-
lies and our society.
I reflected on the need for not just any group of men
to gather at this event, but of the overwhelming need
for African-American men to join together to address
the many wrongs that we have been guilty of visiting
.
4
OPINION COLUMN
American politics has turned into sideshow
R.W. Hobbsjr.
OPINION COLUMNIST
Well, now I've heard everything.
It's official: Donald Trump is form-
ing an exploratory committee, and
is one step closer to running for Presi-
dent of the United States as a reform
party candidate. As if this party
needed one more character to add
to its outstanding comedic en-
semble.
Act one: A little old man with a
nasal Texas accent, tons of posters
with statistics nobody understands,
millions of dollars to waste on 30-
minute political infomercials who is
often confused for the guy on the
Perdue chicken commercials. That's
right, it's the founder of the reform
party himself, H. Ross Perot.
Almost a year ago we all find out
former wrestler Jesse "The Body"
Ventura is elected Governor of Min-
nesota. That leads me to a funda-
mental question: Is politics real or
fake? I'm also beginning to wonder
if all of those stories about St. Olaf
told by Rose on The Golden Girls
were really true. And Pat Buchanan,
everyone's favorite little Nazi, will
soon announce that he will be leav-
ing the Republican Party for the Re-
form Party. In his new book, A Re-
public Not an Empire, Buchanan
tells a tale of the war that never was
and pours out his sympathy for
Adolph Hitler. He can be seen on
political talk shows defending his
book, demanding apologies from
various networks and various presi-
dential candidates' wives. If you see
Buchanan in a talk show, do stop and
watch. Laughs are guaranteed.
Now we have successful business
man and builder of a casino empire,
Donald Trump. How would flashing
lights look on the White House?
There will be roulette in the east
wing, poker in the west wing, and
just to prove that one particular
room is still for suckers, there wit
be slot machines in the oval office
With these being the major fig�
ures in the Reform Party, you'd thinl
people would vote for another car
didate. But people are actually voffi
ing for these characters. Ross Perot
did get a large percentage of the vot�
considering he is an independents
And Jesse Ventura did get elected
governor. Most people vote for iif
dependents just to prove to thjj
other two parties that they are sic j;
of them. If you happen to be one dj
those people, please consider thj
fact that occasionally one of these
fruit cakes might actually win. fc
In the meantime, let's enjoy thi
side show that is the Reform Party-
a party which once again proves
that God has a sense of humor.
This witer can be contacted at
rhobbs@studentmedia.eai.edu.
Dear Editor,
In my past experiences I have
found it most beneficial to know
something about the person or
group I am preparing to speak down
upon. For instance, comedian Chris
Rock would not go on a TV show and
spend an hour cracking on someone
he doesn't even know anything
about, right? This is a pretty simple
and valid concept, right? Well, I
would like to know how last Tues-
day an author wrote a letter to the
editor filled with nothing but igno-
rance, and now expects credit for it?
After pondering this question, I
could only derive one answer: Idi-
ocy.
How can one begin to fathom
what a brotherhood is about when
he himself is so busy criticizing
another's actions that he is dedicat-
ing his attributes to that of his fra-
ternal organization? This question
arises when I have to witness another
member from a distinct fraternity
lash out and declaim actions from a
group that he knows nothing about.
I am almost positive that you
can visit anyone of the fraternal or-
ganizations on this campus, or any
other campus for that matter, and
when you ask them for their pur-
pose, you will get a response similar
to something like "to promote the
highest ideals of truth, honor and
integrity or maybe "to further en-
hance the personal strength of men
through the bonding of brother-
hood
After reading that letter, it seems
to me that these ideals have been
trashed. The author has failed to re-
alized what the true meaning of
brotherhood is all about. To this I can
only reply with one thing, hopefully
after realizing how badly he trashed
the perception of the Greek system,
Wagoner will be able to recognize the
mistake he made, and ultimately
overcome the imbecilic nature of his
conduct.
Wagoner alleges that Chi Phi has
"obscene character flaws andor ac-
tions I would love to know what
actions the author has physically
seen or what characteristics he has
actually observed that would lead
him to have such an uneducated and
narrow-minded perspective? To re-
ceive an answer for that question
would be most interesting to me.
Also, even more puzzling, how did
Chi Phi become "poor, aloof indi-
viduals" as Wagoner stated? By defi-
nition, this author is saying we are
individuals who have little money
and few possessions. Does this does
sound like something an upstanding
student or citizen would say about
another brotherhood or group he
doesn't even know? I should hope
not. Has Chi Phi committed some
offense that has made them physi-
cally or spiritually different from that
of other students or organizations?
Please let me know when we do.
What this author has claimed is
unfair to the representation and the
reputation of the fraternities here at
ECU. He has gone out on a limb and
made broad accusations that hold no
justification. In other words, his let-
ter portrayed his ignorance toward
fraternal life, and his lack of respect
toward the people of the IFC. Which
in fact, I am pleased to say that his
fraternity had the respect to apolo-
gize for his absurd act at the last IFC.
Thank you Phi Psi, we appreci-
ate your support, and we realize your
organization is not responsible for a
person's behavior that you knew
nothing about.
Michael Orr,
President of Chi Phi Fraternity
OPINION COLUMN
Reality should motivate university, not numbers I
on campus and is not just limited to this one particular
dining area. Todd Dining Hall is the exact same wayl
Upper-levelblack. Lower-levelwhite. Now don't get mi
wrong. There is social interaction on many different lev-
els all around the Greenville community, but where is.
that interaction on campus?
Granted, some black students do not want to hang;
out with white students and vice versa and that is a pert
sonal choice on their part. What irritates me a little if
when the student body is kind of "pushed" into social
circles by the administration's publicity grabbing
though well-meant actions. Of course, it would be won j
derful if everyone could just get along and that ther�
was no such thing as "racial tension" or even the wordjj
"minority But the reality of the situation is that an
administration cannot change the individual, regard
less of color. It is up to the individual to conduct themj
selves in a manner they see fit.
It is the same with a drug addict. You can't mak
them change unless they want to change. Do not mis,
understand me. I'm not saying all white people on cara
pus are racist, nor am I saying that all black people on;
campus are racist. Let the kids decide their friends and-
social circle. An administration can do their part to di�
versify a university, but in the long run it is up to thJ
actual students to determine their own course of action
This writer can be contacted at
, pmcmahw9studentmedio.ecu.edu.
Patrick McMahon
OPINION COLUMNIST
This is not an attack; this is a column written by no
one but me and represents some of the ponderings that
I have been focusing on lately. I invite a constructive
criticism on this subject but, please, if you reply to me
via e-mail, save the insults. I am writing this to start an
open and frank discussion about the condition of race
relations at this university. I represent no one but my-
self, a young white male attending ECU.
As we all know, the university has been bulldozing
the idea of diversification and ethnic acceptance into
us for the last few years now. As the numbers clearly
show, the effort is paying off. Minority enrollment is up
and the scene at the Wright Place is much more diverse
and not such the sea of whiteness that it has been in the
past. But take a good look around. When you look
around the dining area and outside common areas the
reality is much more relevant than any numbers can
show. Despite the booming ethnic and black popula-
tion, these groups keep mainly to themselves with little
to no intermingling.
Walk into the Wright Place at lunch. Look to the
left. What do you see? Mainly black people. Look to
your right and down the side. What do you see? Mainly
white people. This social separation occurs everywhere





The East Carolinian
titww.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Oct 21,1999
features�studentmedia.ecu.edu
Thursday,
www.tec.ee
FEATURES
Missing in action: Sodas
Kentucky Nip Sparkling Cherry Jule
The Kentucky Nip Sparkling Cherry Julep is a
refreshing cherry-raspberry carbonated soft drink
with a slight taste of mint. First introduced in the 30s,
this totally unique product Is packaged in a Georgia
green 12oz bottle with a beautifully painted label.
5K race benefits flood victims
Red Bull Energy Drink
Red Bull is a utility drink to be taken to battle mental
or physical weariness or exhaustion. Imported From
Austria, Red Bull combines two natural substances
arid important metabolic transmitters�the amino
acid taurin and the glucuronolacton�with stimulating
caffeine, vitamins and the energy provided by
carbohydrates.
Diet Lime Cola
Rather than make a diet version of Jones Vanilla
Cola, Jones decided to mix things up a bit and create
a diet lime cola, Slim Jones. Using Splenda brand
sweetener (Sucralose), Slim Jones is a zero-calorie,
zero-aftertaste soda that is so good, you'll swear that
you are drinking the real thing!
I
Red Devil
Unlike typical caffeinated sodas and sports drinks,
Red Devil provides Taurine (an amino acid), caffeine
and vitamins (C, B6, B12, Pantothenic Acid and
Niacin) to give the body and mind a quick, long-
lasting energy boost. Its delicious berry-citrus flavor
is best if served chilled or over ice.
Hanson's Functional
Hansen's Functionate is an innovative family of drinks
that were created with the health conscious
consumer in mind. They were specially formulated
5j; deliver the great taste and refreshment of a
beverage, while providing a specific functional benefit
r the body.
3y�e five types of Hansen's Functionals are:
yjtfcfi-ox: An orange flavored energy drink that
contains some of the most powerful antioxidants
currently known.
D-stress: Lightly carbonated ginger flavored with a
carefully chosen combination of many of today's
most popular natural herbs and nutrients.
Power Lightly carbonated black cherry flavored drink
specifically formulated with today's most popular and
effective power building supplements.
Energy: Lightly carbonated citrus flavored drink
specially formulated to provide an immediate boost
whenever you need it the most.
Stamina: A guarana berry flavored drink specially
designed and formulated to help maintain energy
and increase endurance by enhancing the body's
ability to metabolize energy reserves.
Fundraiser
scheduled for Oct. 24
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
Hurricane Floyd wreaked havoc
in eastern North Carolina, but as a
community Greenville residents
have done a lot to recover from our
losses. Although Greenville has
come a long way in rebuilding the
area, there's work that still needs to
be done. This weekend there will be
a race to help raise money for flood
victims.
The Hurricane Floyd Recovery
Run will take place on Oct. 24 at the
Willis Building, in front of the Town
Commons.
"I was toying around with the
idea of coordinating a race in the
spring said race director freshman
Jamie Orr, business major. "When
Floyd came along, I thought it
would be a good time to do it now
for a good cause
Orr has had experience coordi-
nating other races in his hometown
area of Baltimore, Md.
According to Orr, It wasn't diffi-
cult to find people to help sponsor
this fund-raising event. Approxi-
mately IS local businesses and com-
panies have come together to offer
their assistance in putting this race
on.
"Floyd was such a big deal to ev-
eryone in this area Orr said.
"People want to help out in any way
they can
Organizations such as WITN-7
and Aramark Food services are us-
ing their business to promote and
assist Orr in his good cause.
"As soon as Jamie told me what
he was trying to do, he had my full
support said Mike Rltter, opera-
tions manager at WTrN-7. "We're
producing a spot in order to get the
word out to a lot of people. I hope
everyone will come out and raise a
lot of money for the cause
According to Fred Bisslnger, food
service director, Aramark will pro-
vide bottled water and fresh fruits
to the race participants.
"Students do so much for us, al-
lowing Aramark to serve them for
the last 10 years Blssinger said. "It's
the least we can do
This is a SK road race. Awards
will be given out to the three men
and women who have the lqwest
finishing times of the race, and the
top three men and women from
each age group will be awarded. Al-
though this is a race, the competi-
tive atmosphere should not discour-
age those who are amateur runners;
See RACE page 7
Sponsors for the Hurricane
Floyd Recovery Run
Boulevard Bagel
Clark and James LLP
Dairy Queen
East Carolina Trophies and Signs
Gatorade
James R. Orr and Associates
Le Bleu water
Outback Steakhouse
Parker's BBQ
Ragazzl's Italian Restaurant
Runners World
Trademart
The Yardage Shop
106.5 WSFL
WITN-7
SEXUALITY, intimacy involved in students'lives
Educated decisions about
intercourse necessary
Susan Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
Sexuality is more than just the
act of having sex, it is defined as
"the quality of having a sexual char-
acter or potency by The American
Heritage Dictionary. As human be-
ings, we have a sexual character, and
it affects what we do and the deci-
sions we make. On a college cam-
pus, sexuality is an issue, and the
attitude toward sex is plastic and
constantly changing.
"Sexuality is 100 percent of ev-
erybody who lives and breathes; it
is a part of who we are said Dr.
Betty Straub, assistant dean of Stu-
dent Development and director of
Health Promotions. "It includes not
only the act of having sex, but also how you take care
of yourself daily
The attitude that a person has toward sex and sexu-
ality determines the decisions that they make regard-
ing sex.
"Traditional-age college students are considered at
risk said Heather Zophy, health educator. "Students
are making decisions on their own about their sexual-
ity and sex for the first time, and we try to give them
education resources so they can make their choices
wisely
During college, sexuality is just a part of life.
"A college student is still searching for who they
are, and it can be as simple as their style of dress or as
complex as their sexual orientation said AI Smith, the
assistant director for the Center for Counseling and
Student Development. "Ultimately, sexuality is an ac-
ceptance of self, and this can effect a person's emo-
tional well being
The attitude toward sex varies depending upon the
region. In countries such as Sweden, the beliefs are "safe
sex or no sex
"Here, it may be the Victorian mind set, but the
fact that people cannot talk about things like contra-
ceptives with their sexual partner defies the emotional
and physical intimacy that is supposed to be there
Straub said. "Talking about what we need to do is nec-
essary
Because sex is considered "taboo" in the US, there
is a need for education on the subject.
"There is limited sexual education in North Caro-
lina Zophy said. "There is HIVAIDS education in the
ninth- and tenth-grades, but the approach is abstinence
only. There are other states that are more educated
Education is a vital part of having a healthy sexual
outlook.
In order for one to have a healthy view of his or her
sexuality, many things are necessary.
"They must be comfortable with their sexual orien-
tation, whether it is homosexual, heterosexual or bi-
sexual Zophy said. "They must also be able to com-
municate openly with their partner, and they should
be educated about sex and the issues
surrounding it
In the last 20 years, there have been
different attitudes toward sexuality
and sex.
"After the AIDS information came
out in 1982, students were more care-
ful sexually because they realized 'This
could mean my life Straub said.
"About 10 years ago, after the conser-
vative fundamentalist movement, stu-
dents were becoming more conserva-
tive again and focusing on absti-
nence
Students and the general public
were becoming more educated about
the effects that sex can have both
physically and emotionally, and they
were using their discretion when it
came to their sexual behavior.
"Lately, the attitude of invulner-
ability, or 'this could never happen to
me' is on the rise Straub said.
There are a variety of attitudes toward sex and
sexuality, and any attitude which does not empha-
size sexual responsibility for each person in order to
protect themselves can be dangerous.
"In cultures where men don't believe that pro-
tection is incumbent on them, the number of STD
infections is going up as well Straub said. "People
need to realize that sexual protection and contra-
ceptives are for them and not just for their partner.
Once people begin to realize this, they will be look-
ing out more for themselves, and will be more likely
to promote the necessity of a cautious attitude to-
ward sex
Current statistics emphasize the dangers of a
more casual attitude toward sex. One in four college
students will have a sexually transmitted disease
during their college career. One in 500 students are
infected with the HIV virus.
"At ECU our trends fit right in with the national
trends Zophy said. "We are no more or less sexu-
ally active than any other college campus
V'
p
Se
Bawls Guarana
Bewls is a new adult soft drink. This highly caffeinated
beverage derives its sweet yet spicy flavor from the
legendary Guarana berry of the Amazon rain forest.
Guarana contain a naturally occurring form of
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inqians of the Amazon providing them with an energy
Uobst.
Student actors rehearse for life
A career
learned on the set
Brian Frizzelle
STAFF WRITER
Mad River
These all natural sodas are hand-crafted using the
traditional methods of a 125 year-old brewery. They
are cold brewed in small batches using fruit juices,
natural flavors and spices. The sodas are lightly
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(photos courtesy of the World Wide Web)
As they finish rehearsing the first scene of the first
act, the feeling of relief is short lived as the director
stops the actors and actresses of "Music Man" and has
them do it all over again. Getting a part is only the
beginning of the struggle to become an actor.
The current East Carolina Playhouse production,
"Music Man is a light romantic musical comedy. It
tells the story of a small conservative town whose hearts
and minds are opened up followed the arrival of con
artist, Harold Hill.
The life of a student actor puts many requirements
on them. According to senior Christine Mayers, who
plays the role of Mrs. Paroo in "Music Man they must
possess the right charisma, and be able to handle the
hectic schedule.
The personality of a student actor has to be able to
withstand the pressures that performing drama can
sometimes put on a person.
"You have to be a low stress level person to do this
Mayers said. "If I'm stressed and pulling my hair out
I'm only adding to the tension, and that doesn't work
"A person has to have a lot of balance and they
cannot be too sensitive said junior Elizabeth Lucas,
who plays Marian Paroo. "You have to be able to handle
failure and criticisms
Students must learn to rely on their emotions.
"It takes everything you are to do this said Kelly
Furlough, a junior starring in the play as the mayor's
wife, Eulalie Shinn. "When you're able to use the emo-
tions you become very connected with yourself
Mayers feels in order for the actors to effectively
portray their characters, they must do whatever research
is necessary to put themselves into that role. An ex-
ample of this is Mayer's character who speaks with an
Irish accent.
"My character is a lot older than me Mayers said.
"And that and her Irish accent makes her difficult for
me to portray. In order to pick up the accent 1 spent a
lot of time before the audition watching movies like
'Far and Away' and I got a lot of help from the dialect
department
According to senior Ben Allison, who plays Harold
Hill, student actors have very tight schedules to fol-
low. They must be able to balance studies and social
lives with learning lines and constant rehearsals. When
their school day is done, most actors still attend re-
hearsal each week night from 7 p.m. until 10:30 or 11
p.m.
"The life as a college actor is very busy Allison
said. "It's difficult to find the time for your social life,
studies and rehearsals but not necessarily in that or-
der
"You are trying to master many things at once and
trying to understand that you cannot always be right
Lucas said. "You must have patience with your profes-
sors and yourself
Like other students, spare time is coveted by the
acton, especially on the weekends.
"Weekends give you a lot of ttnjjeWFstudying and
learning lines Allison said. "It also gives you a break
to unwind and relax
For the actors, the work that they put into it is for
more than the enjoyment of being called "actors It is
a serious career choice.
"This is something that they will do later for
money Allison said. "This is the same as a law stu-
dent who is studying to become a lawyer
Allison feels that being able to work well with oth-
ers is also a good trait for the actors to possess.
"You have to have fun with everybody and let loose
SeeACT0RS,page7
RACE
everyone Is w�
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Dct.21,1999
media.ecu.edu
Thursday, Oct21,1999
www.tetjecu.edu
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FEATURES
RACE
from page &
everyone is welcome.
"We're1 not just looking for competitive runners
Orr said. "The race is open to those who want to walk
or run. We are also going to have a relay team. For
those of you who would like to bring two other friends,
you can start a team and each member runwalk one
mile
Random prizes will also be given out throughout
the event for those who participate.
To get involved, register at any of the following lo-
cations: In front of the Wright Place this week between
noon-1 p.m Carolina East Mall on Friday, Oct. 22 be-
tween 3-6 p.m the Willis Building the day of the race,
beginning at 12:30 p.m. Each runner must pay a $10
entry fee.
All proceeds from this event will go to the family
relief fund. Donations are also accepted. If it rains, the
event will take place inside the Willis Building. If you
are Interested in volunteering at this event or have any
questions, call Jamie Orr at 321-8512.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry9studentmedia.ecu.edu
ACTORS
from page 6
money Allison said. "This Is the same "is a law stu-
dent who is studying to become a lawyer
Allison feels that being able to work well with oth-
ers is also a good trait for the actors to possess.
"You have to have fun with everybody and let loose
a little Allison said. "If you are too controlling It takes
the fun out of It and tfiat can come out when you are
performing on stage
The actors must have a mutual feelings of respect
The East Carolinian 73
features@studentmedia.ecu.eda
toward one another.
"It takes respect for the other acton in the show,
the director, the lighting crew, the stage crew and the
professors who help you in every aspect of the show
Furlough said. "Everybody gains respect for participat-
ing in the show
"Music Man" begins at the McGinnis Theatre on
Thursday, Oct. 28. at 8 p.m.
"I think 'Music Man' is a good musical for all ages
Furlough said. "Students, children and adults can alt
enjoy it for the music and the comedy, you also haver
the romance, too �
This writer can be contacted at
bfrizzelie0studentmedia.ecu.edu
�Show us yours and
Experience
SPA PANTENE
FREE ON CAMPUS
Enjoy a personal
HAIR CONSULTATION,
and take in the total
SPA EXPERIENCE
leave with a FREE SAMPLE
Sponsored by: Campus Dining Services
Todd Dinning Hall Lawn Area
October 22
HAM-4PM
Get Caught in your Purple
& Gold and YOU COULD
WIN a color TV, compact
stereo, or FREE Textbooks
for Spring!
Dowdy Student Store is holding a School Spirit
Photo Contest throughout football season. Check
out our I SPY PIRATE PRIDE Display Window just outside
the store. If you see yourself in a photo, go to the store office and
fill out an entry blank.
OR, better yet, turn in YOUR OWN PHOTO showing genuine Pirate Pride!
The photographer AND the people in the photo can enter the contest!
The contest ends December 3,1999. Numerous finalists will be selected end winners names drawn at random
from the pool of finalists. Finalists will be selected from people In the photos, photographers submitting
photos, and people voting during the Annual Student Store Holiday Sale on Tuesday evening, December 7,1999.
Prizes Include a Color TV, compact stereo, FRK Textbooks for Spring Semester and More!
No purchase necessary. Umrt of 9 entries per student. Employees o( Dosvcty Student Store end NCAA erWetes in not e�3K tor prtrts IndMduah shown
h photos ore not Intended to constitute an endorsement of Dowdy Student Stores.
stfilBf6
ARE YOU HERE?
I '
�(W Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
teSt
Monday � Friday:
7:30 am -JiM pm
Saturday: 9:00 am - 3:00 pm
Wright Building 328-6731
www.studcntstorcs.ecu.edu
WARNER BROS, prbents
in association with VILLAGE ROADSHOW PICTURES and WLIAGE-HOVTS RLM fWiTNERSHIP w OUIUWV productidn
MATTHEW PERRY NEVE CAMPBELL DYLAN McDERMOTT OLIVER PLATT THREE ID TANGO"
I ,W�J0HNM.BMKERISELIG SUWVRENCEB.ABRAMSONanoBRUCEBERMAN
MUSIC I
STORY I
fflooura
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RODNEY VACCARO"�S RODNEY VAIXARQ and ALf NE BROSH McKENNA
BOBBY NEWMYER JEFREY SILVER BEflMMVMANO DWfCTS? DAMON SANTOSTEfANC
VUACI BOADSHOW MCTWB
PO-13
OPENS OCTOBER 22





The East Carolinian
woww.tec.ecu.edu
FEATURES
Thursday, Oct2T,1999
features@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Meredith Willson's
RICCAN
SHOE REPAIR
4193-A East 10"St.
Greenville, NC 27858
758-0204
ihoe Repair fit Its Very Best
Ki'pairnuliin liooLs.
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OPEN MonFri.
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FREE prizes, ami Call
in today at 4.00pm on
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thursday at 4.00pm on Cable
Channel 68
MusicMa
October 28-November 2,
November 5-6,1999
Novwnbw o proceeds to benefit flood victims
TICKETS General Public $15 and $13
ECU FacultyStaffSeniors $13 and $11
StudentYouth $10 and $8
CALL 252-328-6829
McGinnis Theatre � East Carolina University � Greenville, North Carolina
r
ELT0RO
Barber & Style
men's hair
MB styling shoppe
2800 E. 10th St.
752-3318
Appt. Or Walk In
The May Museum and Park
Seeks an Energetic Individual
to Serve as Education Curator
The position will be for one year. The position will be
three-quarter time (approximately 30 hours per week).
Responsibilities include developing, coordinating and
implementing curriculum related school (K-12), family,
outreach and public programs resulting in irtnovative
learning experience. The programming should ,
enhance the mission of the museum.
Ideal candidates should be in their third or fourth year
of college studying history education, museum studies
or elementary education with preferences given mose
seeking an advanced degree.
Salary and hours are negotiable. Please submit a Town of
FarrwiUeapphcationberweOrtoberOuirough
October 26,1999. Applications are available at Town Hall,
200 North Main Street, Farmville, NC Town Hall's operat-
ing hours are Monday through Thursday from 7:30 AM -
5:30 PM and on Friday from 8:00 AM -12 Noon. The
Town of Farmville is an equal opportunity employer and
does not discriminate against the handicapped.
r
netphone Sportsbook.
, ALL SPORTS WAGERING
on-line H o r s c Wage ring
$5,$25,$!00 Football pools
$5 - $10,000 straight bets totals teasers
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Feeling boxed
Person
Career Focus Day
October 27,1999 11 am to 1 pm
Wright Plaza
Rain space: 105 and 106 Flanagan
Learn how majors and minors
SchoolDepartment
Arts and Sciences
Anthropology
Communications
Economics
English Department
Foreign Languages
and literatures
Geography
Geology
Political Science
Sociology
Women's Studies
Army ROTC
School of Art
Clinical Laboratory Science
School of Human & Environmental Sciences
School of Music
Industrial Technology
Health Sciences Library
School of Nursing
Occupational Therapy
Recreation & Leisure Studies
Environmental Health Sciences
Safety and Technology (EHST)
Aerospace Studies Department.
School of Health and
Human Performance
Departments of Recreation and
Leisure Studies,
Health Education and Promotion,
Exercise and Sport Science.
Location
Linda WolfePlaza
Michael PoteatPlaza
Carson BaysPlaza
Sandra TawakePlaza
Sylvie HenningPlaza
Ron MitchelsonPlaza
D. LawrencePlaza
Nancy SpaldingPlaza
Richard CastonPlaza
M FarrPlaza
Chris PattersonPlaza
Alice ArnoldPlaza
Christine ZollerPlaza
Susan SmithPlaza
ciences Jannis SheaPlaza
Ginger WoodardPlaza
Britt TheurerPlaza
James ToppenPlaza
Rick PetersonPlaza
Martha JacksonHallway near
Rivers 108 11 AM to 1 PM
Scott WorleyBelk Allied
Health Bldg 218 10-11 AM
Jon McChesneyPlaza
Dan SprauPlaza
Major Esau WatersPlaza
David WhitePlaza and
foyer near the
main entry to
&'Minges near pool.

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ict 21; 1999
iedia.ecu.edu
Thursday, Oct.21, 1999
www.teGecu.edu
SPORTS BRIEFS
Braves win NLCS
It'sJjard to watch your playoff dream's go
downjie drain because of a walk. After a lead-
off dotibia by Gerald Williams and intentional
walks-of Chipper Jones and Brian Jordan to load
the bases, Mets pitcher Kenny Rogers felt the
chill when he walked Atlanta's Andruw Jones in
the 11th inning Tuesday night to end World Se-
ries dreams for the New York Mets.
"It was an unbelievable ball game Braves
manager Bobby Cox said afterward.
Rams bolt to 5-0
The St. Louis Rams are now 5-0, and they
are showing definite playoff hopes.
"Our profile right now is equivalent to a very
fine playoff team said Coach Dick Vermeil.
Vermeil had statistics to back up his theory of
going to the playoffs:
Playoff teams won nine of 12 season open-
ers last year; the Rams beat Baltimore 27-10
this year.
Playoff teams were 7-1 at home, and thus
the Rams are 3-0.
Playoff teams convert turnovers into touch-
downs, and in that category, the Rams entered
last week's games at second place in the NFL.
"Player's tease me about this theory once
and a while when I get going, but it does define
things Vermeil said.
Young gets second opinion
49ers quarterback Steve Young will solicit a
second, and possibly a third, medical opinion re-
garding his ability to continue playing after his
latest concussion, Young's agent Leigh
Steinberg told ESPN's Andrea Kremeron Satur-
day. Young will see a Los Angeles neurologist
Tuesday for a second opinion and might also
see a doctor from Utah regarding the matter,
Steinberg said.
The 49ers will be without Young for a third
straight game Sunday.
"My advice is my opinion alone Gary
Steinberg said Thursday. "There's too many un-
knowns about this, and there's an obvious con-
cern when someone suffers multiple concussive
incidents
General manager Bill Walsh told Kremer the
earliest the team will consider bringing Young
back is after their bye week for a game in Week
9 against the Steelers on Nov. 7.
Barcelona beats Gunners
Spanish champion Barcelona demolished Ar-
senal 4-2 at Wembley in a Champions League
Group B match on Tuesday, sending out a pow-
erful reminder of its intentions to go all the way
and win the European title this season.
The reminder was all the more poignant be-
cause Barcelona's only European Cup success
to date took place at Wembley, when it beat
Sampdoria 1-0 in the 1992 final.
"It was never a comfortable victory, because
Arsenal made it very tough for us. They played
some wonderful football themselves, but we
were better said Coach Louis Van Gaal.
SPORTS
The East Carolinian
sports�studentmedia.ecu.edov
Football prepares for Tulane offense
Injured players return to
line up
Stephen Schramm
Smrrs EnrroR
Coaches Instruct the offensive line on blocking schemes, (photo by Emily Richardson)
In 1998, Tulane was undoubtedly the
class of Conference-USA. Tommy
Bowden's Green Wave tore through the
conference and won the Liberty Bowl.
Led by C-USA Player of the Year and
quarterback Shaun King, Tulane went
undefeated, logging the first and only
perfect season in C-USA history.
King has gone on to the NFL and
Bowden has left for Clemson. Also gone
are eight starters on defense and four
starters from the offense. Though this
team does not bear much resemblance to
the Green Wave of last season, it does
remind some of another C-USA power
of 1998.
"This Tulane team that is coming to
town is going to remind you a lot of the
Louisville team that came to town k�t
year said Head Coach Steve Logan.
'They have spread the entire field with
four or five receivers most of the time,
shotgun snap, throwing the ball on one
step. It's going to be a real challenge for
our defense to go out and shut these guys
down. They are very prolific on
offense
The Tulane air attack is headed by senior
wide receiver JaJuan Dawson.
"JaJuan is our go-to guy and everyone
realizes that said Tulane Head Coach
Chris Scelfo. "JaJuan is to the point
where when we had a couple of drops,
his leadership is the thing kids look at.
He doesn't live the last play, he lives the
play that's going on
The two teams will feature a pair of
sophomore quarterbacks. Tulane will
start Patrick Ramsey.
�"The one knock against Patrick is his
mobility, and when the line gives Patrick
some time it gives us a chance to win
Scelfo said.
The Tulane offense is among the best in
the conference and it has the Pirates'
respect.
"I am a fan of scoring Logan said.
"Scoring points is the only way to put
pressure on an offense like this. If you
can get ahead of these guys and then get
them out of rhythm, and-maybe make a
big defensive play, that's'where you have
to attack these guys
In addition to Tulane's offense, the
Pirates had to spend the week dealing
with injuries.
"Phoenix Evans and Devonne
Claybrooks�it looks like they're going
to be back in the lineup Logan said.
"We're hoping to get Ant wan Adams
back at free safety, we are hoping to heal
him up more this week. We put in a
Tulane game plan in last week, because
of the complexity and the strangeness of
their offense. We needed an extra week
and hopefully we will be able to go out
and line up against these guys
With the injuries and thin personnel on
defense, the healthy Pirates will have to
play at a high level.
"I think this will help us tum it up a
notch said linebacker Jeff Kerr.
This writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia@ecu. edu
Women's soccer
improves to 10-2
Lady Pirates record
fifth straight shutout
Tiffany Waters
ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The ladies' soccer team added
two more shutout wins against
Jacksonville University and Stetson
University to put the team at 10-2.
The games recorded the Lady
Pirates' fourth and fifth straight
shutout victories.
Both ECU and JU squads started
the game out well knocking off
seven shots each, but neither were
able to convert a goal.
"We started off a little slow
said Head Coach Rob
Donnenwirth. "We picked up in
intensity in the second half
After halftime, senior defender
Dana Durbin made her first career
goal in the 53rd minute off an as-
sist from sophomore forward
Amanda Duffy. "It was tough to get
our legs back in to the game said
senior goalkeeper Amy Horton.
Junior midfielder Erin Cann as-
sisted junior forward Kim Sandhoff
with the second goal of the game
that came in the 70th minute to
add to the Pirates' lead.
"At the same time, I'm happy
with our win because we pulled out
Weaver to play safety
Injuries to safeties Travis
Mazyck and Antwan Adams ha
forced Steve Logan to shift
personnel in the secondary. .
Former quarterback Bobby Weaver
might see some playing time at
free safety against Tulane this
weekend. Weaver has practiced
with the defense this week.
"We're looking at him,
said. "It's really a situation i
we don't know If the Adams)
twins are going to be ready at I
safety. Until the twins come I
it's realty a band-aid i
Weaver played
season until a pair of leg inhi
put him on the shelf.
"He played quarterback, but I
didn't play wide reefver weJJ
enough, and I'm just waiting 1
Bobby to get Interested in
uting Logan said.
Tulane will bring an offense
that will test the tender ECU
secondary.
"We're down a little bit In I.
secondary; It's going to stretch i
to a large degree Logan said.
Week off
The Pirates had an off
following the Oct. 9th ga
against Southern Miss.
"To tell you the truth we
needed a week off said
DelayoDodd.
The Pirates came out of the
game against Southern Miss
injuries in the secondary. The
week off came at a time when !
"If s helped us tremendously
said linebacker Jeff Kerr. "Ifs
helped our legs, It's helped get our
legs back under us. It gives you
that hunger you get when you
miss a game. You see everyone else'
out playing
Shaun King
ECU did not play Tulane to
1998 when the Green Wave went
12-0. They also did not face C-USA
Player of the Year, Shaun King.
They still have good athletes, I
but they don't have Shaun Hng;
thafs the most Important thing f
said defensive end Norris
McCleary. "He'd scoot up for IS, f
20 yards before you catch him.
That really hurt us the last time we
played them
Dana Durbin scored her first career goal against Jacksonville.
File Photo
the wins not under the best circum-
stances Horton said.
Senior defender Jill Davis gave
ECU an insurance goal off of jun-
ior forward Charity McClure and
sophomore midfielder Kelly Gray
in the 77th minute. "It was a long
weekend, so we came out kind of
slow but we came out with the
win Sandhoff said.
Horton recorded her fourth
game shutout with 10 saves. For
the Dolphins, Kristen Kirsh made
six saves and allowed three goals.
ECU moved to 10-2 with the
fifth consecutive shut-out victory,
beating the Stetson Hatters 2-0.
The Pirates came out strong
with a goal from Cann off
Sandhoff in the 25th minute of
play. ECU added to their lead with
an unassisted goal from Sandhoff in
the 41st.
"It was a rough weekend over-
all Sandhoff said.
Horton added her fifth consecu-
tive game shutout with seven saves.
Genevieve Roy notched IS saves on
the day and two goals allowed in a
losing effort for Stetson.
The Pirates led by Horton have
play the past 450 minutes without
a goal allowed. The two wins move
ECU to 10-2, tying the school record
for most wins in a season.
The Pirates will travel to James
Madison Friday to compete in their
last CAA regular season game.
This writer can be contacted at
twaters@studentmedia@ecu. edu
Cross country
team hoping for
improvements
Third place
still up for grabs
Tarheels fall in ACC under Torbush
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP)�The
North Carolina football program is
in quite a free fall.
The Tar Heels were a combined
21-3 in 1996-97 and were ranked as
high as No. 4 in the nation, and talk
of a talent base that could rival
Florida State's flowed among
coaches, players and fans.
As the end of October nears two
years later, North Carolina (1-5) is
in last place in the Atlantic Coast
Conference and a combined 8-10 in
the regular season under coach Carl
Torbush, who replaced Mack Brown
when he left for Texas.
North Carolina's latest loss was
a 20-12 home defeat Saturday
against Houston that produced only
126 yards of offense. It also pro-
duced a chorus of boos from fans
who have short memories.
"I don't like it at all, and I heard
it Torbush said Tuesday. "I hope
they were booing me. I can handle
it. I get paid to handle it
A loss at Maryland on Saturday
would break several North Carolina
streaks. The program has produced
a school-record nine straight win-
ning seasons since Brown's initial 2-
20 record in 1988-89. The Tar Heels
have also been to seven straight
bowl games.
Both of those streaks are likely
to end�if not this weekend, next
month�as Torbush admits the
team has shown little or no im-
provement.
"It's real simple Torbush said.
"What concerns me more than the
won-Ioss record is the fact that I
don't feel we have played as well as
we should be playing and need to
be playing. If we had done that,
then I could handle it better.
"It's important that we show
some consistency and improve-
ment
It's hard for Torbush, who says
he's never been much of "a statis-
tics guy to pinpoint exactly what's
wrong with his club. However, it
appears much of the talent base has
been gutted. Over the last two years
alone, 17 players have signed NFL
contracts.
The defense, one of the best in
the nation under Torbush in '96 and
'97, has been hit particularly hard.
North Carolina is last in the ACC
in total defense and rushing de-
fense, and eighth in scoring defense
and sacks.
The Tar Heels had a combined
82 sacks in the 21-3 run with play-
ers such as Greg Ellis, Vonnie
Holliday, Brian Simmons and Dre'
Bly; through six games in 1999,
North Carolina has just nine sacks.
"Teams have been able to run
the ball better so they haven't had
SeeUNCpagell
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
Coming into the 19.99 season,
the ECU men's cross country team
looked to be loaded with experi-
enced talent. The women were cop-
ing with the loss of their head coach
and were looking at a team depleted
of returning stars.
Less than two months into the
season, it Is the men who will have
to do without many key contribu-
tors, and both teams will look to the
CAA Championships to rebound
from a disappointing season.
The men headed to the NC In-
tercollegiate without three of last
season's key runners. Justin England
was out due to a family emergency,
Stuart Will was battling illness and
Charles NIckum did not make the
trip.
The Pirates finished 10th with a
total of 245 points.
"It was a let down said senior
Brian Beil. "I don't think it was that
bad because we were without three
of our best runners
Beil finished 30th with a time of
26:03. Beil was followed by senior
Jamie Mance in 46th and Steve
Arnold in 63rd.
See CROSS COUNTRY page 11
-





tH The East Carolinian
ukwvw.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Braves' post season
thrillers are nothing new
1999 NLCS latest in
long line of tight series
ATLANTA (AP)�Game 5 of the NL Championship
Series was an instant classic: two teams battling through
IS innings and nearly six hours in a driving rain be-
fore Robin Ventura's grand slam-single gave the Mets a
f-3 victory.
"I'd have to be in another profession to put it into
words said New York manager Bobby Valentine. "I
an't put It into words
Hmmm, that sounds familiar.
Before their 5-hour, 46-minute epic Sunday, both
the Mets and Braves were involved in two of the great-
est games in the three-decade-long history of the NLCS.
By most accounts, the granddaddy of them all is
New York's 7-6 victory over Houston in the deciding
Came 6 of the 1986 series, a 16-inning marathon filled
with incredible twists and subplots.
J The Mets' Kenny Rogers walked the winning run
AP photo
i Not far behind is Game 7 of the 1992 NLCS, when
die Braves rallied from a 2-0 deficit in the ninth in-
fling to beat the Pirates 3-2 on pinch-hitter Francisco
Cabrera's two-out, two-run single. The enduring
memory was Sid Bream chugging around third on two
aching knees, sliding into home just ahead of the tag,
then getting buried under a pile of teammates.
- Add to the list: Ventura's bases-loaded shot over the
right-field wall, which turned into a game-winning
single when his teammates mobbed him before he
reached second base.
"An unbelievable ballgame said Braves manager
Bobby Cox.
Almost 13 years earlier, New York led the Astros 3-2
In the NLCS when the best-of-7 series returned to Hous-
ton with both teams facing must-win situations.
The Astros, obviously, couldn't afford another loss,
While the Mets knew Mike Scott was ready to pitch for
Houston if the series went the distance. He had been
Virtually unhittable: allowing just one run in two com-
plete-game victories.
Bob Knepper surrendered two hits through eight
innings and the Astros, leading 3-0, were on the verge
f playing another day. But what had been just another
postseason game was about to become something spe-
cial.
; The Mets rallied for three runs, capped by Ray
flight's sacrifice fly. In the 14th, New York was three
outs from the pennant after Wally Backman's RBI single,
but Billy Hatcher tied it up in the Astros' half with a
one-out homer off the left-field foul pole.
New York seemed to put the game away by scoring
three runs in the top of the 16th, but the Astros would
not go quietly. They scored twice and had two runners
on base with two outs when Kevin Bass came to bat
against Jesse Orosco. After working the count to 3-2,
Bass swung at a low slider and missed.
The Mets had their pennant. Finally.
"I'm emotionally drained Knight said afterward.
"My legs are still shaking
The record time of 4 hours, 42 minutes has since
been eclipsed�heck, the Mets and Braves played more
than an hour longer�but the Astrodome thriller is still
longest postseason game in history by innings.
"From a fan's standpoint, I don't see how you could
have asked for much more said Astros pitcher Nolan
Ryan.
Six years later, that theory was severely tested in an
NLCS rematch between the Braves and Pirates.
Atlanta, having demonstrated that its worst-to-first
of 1991 was no fluke, built a 3-1 lead over Pittsburgh
in the series. But the Pirates routed the Braves 7-1 and
13-4 to set up a Game 7 at Atlanta-Fulton County Sta-
dium.
In a reprise of Knepper's performance, Doug Drabek
blanked the Braves through eight innings while the
Pirates built a 2-0 lead. Three more outs, and Pittsburgh
was heading to the World Series.
But Terry Pendleton led off the ninth with a double
and second baseman Jose Lind bobbled David Justice's
routine grounder for an error. The tomahawk-chopping
crowd, resigned to defeat a few minutes earlier, could
sense a miracle.
Drabek walked Bream to load the bases and Pirates
manager Jim Leyland was forced to go to a bullpen that
had been unreliable all year. Stan Belinda allowed a
sacrifice fly to Ron Gant, cutting the lead to 2-1, then
walked Damon Berryhill to load the bases again.
Belinda was on the verge of escaping when Brian
Hunter popped out behind second. The Braves, their
bench almost empty, sent up Cabrera, who had batted
only 10 times all season
Cabrera lined a shot into left field. Justice scored
the tying nan and Bream barely beat Barry Bonds' throw
to the plate. It was the first time a team had won a
decisive postseason game while trailing before the fi-
nal pitch.
"I've never been part of something that went from
down there to up here so quick Gant said. "I was
hyperventilating. I thought I was going to have a heart
attack. I never dreamed of anything like this
Hmmm, that sounds familiar.
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:WU
STARTS FR
OCTOBER





Thursday, Oct21,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
The East Carolinian un
sportsOstudentmedia.ecu.edu
With
VIC Card
dle
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0.75 02.
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Soup
turan
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NICOLAS CAGE
:l:liHr1IHrItlllft(:i4)Jili
NT PICTURES moTOUCHSTDNE PICTURES � T RUDIN - CAPPADE F1MA
TIN SCORSESE w � NICOLAS CAGE "BRINGING OUT THE DEAD"
. � "OOOMAN VING RHAMES TOM . STEEL
. ;DAMSCHROEDER�BRUCES.PUSTIir V N RWK
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.OECONNELLY V,MWS PAULSChRADER '
� MARTIN SCORSESE
: �� 1t ed toot- .�" � � 't
Cross Country
from page 9
"We didn't do as well as I would
have liked said Head Coach
Leonard Klepack. Both teams were
forced to cope with the long layoff
caused by the hurricane.
"We're still not sharp, when
you've got people who run three to
five miles who are. not training as a
group, we are have a disadvantage
Klepack said.
The women's team finished sev-
enth with 197 points.
"I was very pleased with Fran
Lattie Klepack said.
The top finisher for the Pirates
was freshman Kay Livick. Livick fin-
ished 32nd followed by Becky Testa
in 35th.
On Oct. 30th the Pirates will
travel to Williamsburg, Va. for the
CAA Championships.
"We've talked about It and third
place in conference is anyone's
game said David Balon.
This writer can be contacted at
sports9studentmedia.ecu.edu.
UNC
from page 9
to rely on throwing the ball as
much on third-down situations,
and our coverage hasn't been as
good Torbush said.
"Sometimes recruiting is over-
rated in a lot of ways he said. "I go
back to the great teams that we had,
a lot of those great players were not
national top 100 guys in the coun-
try.
Torbush said he understands the
fan frustration.
"Thaf s part of competitive ath-
letes, that's part of big athletics he
said. "When you become accus-
tomed to winning and winning big,
the bottom line is winni ng.
"They don't ask you about mis-
takes, they don't ask you about in-
juries; you don't get asked about los-
ing close ball games, you get asked
one simple question at the end of the
year: 'How many did you win and
how many did you lose?"
"I can only control what I can
control he said. I feel very secure
in what I'm doing. I feel very secure
In the way we're doing it"
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ECU COMMUNITY FORUM
(Part of ECU ON)
"Hurricanes, Floods, Urbanization, Health"
� All students, staff, faculty, and administrators are invited
� Please feel free to attend all or part of the forum
� A series of short presentations with plenty of time for questions and discussion will
attempt to dispel many of the misconceptions about hurricanes, floods, and their effects.
Friday, October 22,1999
2:30-5:30, HoweU 103
Time Speaker
2:30-2:35 Stephen Culver (Geology)
at Phy'�1 Mm
2:35-2:55 Paul Cares (Geography)
2:55-3:15 Richard Spruill (Geology)
3:15-3:35 Questions and Answers
The Human Influence
3:35-3:55 Stan Riggs (Geology)
3:55-4:05 Questions and Answers
Impact of Flooding
4:05-4:25 David Knowles (Biology)
Topic
Introduction
Water on the Land
Floods and Predictions of Floods
Human Modification of Drainage
Systems
Impact of Floods on Our Living
Environment
4:25-4:45 Barney Kane (Environmental Health) Health and Floods
4:45-5:05 Questions and Answers
5:05-5:25 Open Discussion
5:25-5:30 A! Delia Closing Remarks
(Regional Development Institute)
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The East Carolinian
vjjjvw.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
Thursday, Oct. 21999
newss@studentmedia.eco.edu
Thursday,
www.tec.ei
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UnilttJ I )nw uitir in. ,kh.iIks i.nif tiii lid'
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STUDENTS. LOOKING FOR A
GREAT JOB ON CAMPUS?
CAMPUS DINING IS RECRUITING
CASHIERS, GRILL COOKS, DISHWASH-
ERS, AND WAITSTAFF. ENJOY FREE
MEALS AND CONVENIENT SCHEDUL-
ING AROUND YOUR CLASSES. MUST
BE FRIENDLY AND DEPENDABLE. IF
THIS IS YOU. BRING COMPLETE WORK
HISTORY & APPLY AT MENDENHALL
STUDENT CTR-ECU FROM 9AM-4-PM
M-F COMPETITIVE PAY & BENEFITS!
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
sEOE MFDV. J
HELP WANTED
YEAR 2000 internships "Don't gat
a summer job run a summer
business" www.tuitionpaint-
ers.com email: tuipaintSbell-
south.net 363-4831.
NEEDfor your team, club, fraterni-
ty, sorority? Earn1000-S2000 with
easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event. Groups
love it because there's no sales re-
quired. Dates are filling up, so call to-
day. 1-888-522-4350.
SSMANAGE a business on your cam-
pus$$ Versity.com, an Internet note-
taking company is looking for an en-
trepreneurial student to run business
on your campus. Manage students,
make tons of money, excellent oppor-
tunity! Apply on-line at www.versi-
ty.com contact jobs9versity.com or
call 734-483-1600 ext. 888
1993 TOYOTA Celica ST Burgundy, ex-
cellent condition, 75 K miles, CD play-
er stereo, sunroof and spoiler, automat-
ic ac. Call Kim 830-3691.
.SPRING BREAK 2000
� Free Trips, Free Drinks, Free Meals'
.lumaica, Canun, Kloridu. Harbados, Hutiuniu
Hunk no� fur lriT Mwils & 2 Free Trips
Hook bv IH'cvnbcr 17th for Lowest Rales
1-800-426-7710
www.sunsplashlours.com
Titree ways to
beat the high
cost of college,
1. The Montgomery Gl Bill
2. Student loan repayment
3. Part-time income
The Army Reserve Alternate
Training Program is a smart way to
pay for college.
First, if you qualify, the Mont-
gomery GI Bill can provide you with
up lo S7.124 for current college ex-
penses or approved votech training.
Second, if you have�or obtain�a
qualified student loan not in default,
you may get it paid off at the rate of
15 per year or $500, whichever is
greater, up to a maximum of $10,000.
Selected military skills can double that
maximum.
Third, you can earn part-time
money in college, and here's how it
works: One summer you take Basic
Training, and the next summer you
receive skill training at an Army
school. You'll earn over $1,500 for
Basic and even more for skill training.
Then you'll attend monthly meetings
at an Army Reserve unit near your
college, usually one weekend a month
plus two weeks a year. You'll be paid
over $107 a weekend to start. It's
worth thinking about. Give us a call:
756-9695
BE ALL TOUCAN BE.
ARMY RESERVE
www.aoannv.com
HELP WANTED
THE JEWISH Mother Restaurant is
now accepting applications for all po-
sitions apply in person'between noon
and 6pm M-Sat in the Plaza mall for-
merly Annabell's 714 SE Greenville
Blvd.
ACT NOW! GET THE BEST SPRING
BREAK PRICESI SOUTH PADRE,
CANCUN, JAMAICA, BAHAMAS,
ACAPULCO, FLORIDA ft
MARDIGRAS. REPS NEEDED.
TRAVEL FREE, EARN $$$. GROUP
DISCOUNTS FOR 6 800-838-
8203 WWW.LEISURE-
TOURS COM
NEEDfor your Team, Club, Fratern-
ity, Sorority? Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event.
Groups love it because there's no sales
required. Dates are filling up so call
today. 1-888-522-4350.
FREE TRIPS and Cash Spring Break
2000. StudentCity.com is looking for
Highly Motivated Students to promote
Spring Break 2000! Organize a small
group and travel FREE! Top campus
reps can earn Free Trips and over
$ 10,000! Choose Cancun, Jamaica or
Nassau! Book Trips on-line Iqg in and
win Free Stuff. Sign Up now on line
www.studentcity.com or 1-800-293-
1443.
WEB PAGE Developer. Needed to up-
grade existing web page. Good oppro-
tunity to gain experience and earn
some bucks working with congenial
local family business. Call Dr. Gowen
at 752-4086.
PERSON(S) WITH pick-up truck to
gather and remove yard debris. $10
hr. Please call 321-2422.
SPRING BREAK reps needed to
promote campus trips. Earntravel
free! No cost. We train you. You work
on your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www.springbreakdirect.com
BROWSE ICPT.COM Win a Free trip
for Springbreak 2000. All destina-
tions offered. Trip participants, Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or rep registration Call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
PART TIME jobs available. Joan's
Fashion, a local women's clothing store
is now filling part-time positions. Ap-
plicants must be available for Tuesday
afternoons. Thursday mornings and
or Thursday afternoons. The positions
are for between 7 and 20 hours per
week, depending on your schedule
and on business needs. The pay is
commensurate with your experience
and job performance and is supple-
mented by an employee discount. Ap-
ply in person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans St Greenville
(Uptown Greenville).
S$$$TUTORS NEEDED$$$$ Look-
ing for some extra money (best pay
on campus) and a way to improve aca-
demically? Do you have a 3.0 or bet-
ter GPA? Become a tutor for the Of-
fice of Student Development-Athelet-
ics. We need individuals capable of
tutoring ACCT 2401. 2521: ASIP 2112.
2221; BIOL 1050. 2130; CHEM 1120,
1150; DSCI 4103, 4113; GEOG 1000;
GEOL 1500; ITEC 2000; MATH 1065,
3228; NUHM 2105; PSYC 1000. 2101.
3310. 4375; and THEA 1000. Under-
graduate students are paid six dollars
($6) an hour and graduate students
are paid seven dollars ($7) an hour-
may be paid up to ten dollars ($10)
an hour. If this sounds like the job for
you. join us for one of our orientation
meetings in 236B Ward Sports Medi-
cine Building (behind Mlnges Coli-
seum) on either 1021 at 4:30pm, 10
25 at 4:30pm or 1028 at 4:30pm.
Questions? Need more information?
Contact Isha Williams at 328-4691 for
further information.
GIRLZ NITE Out is a local party-plan
business looking for distributors. Full
time money working part-time hours!
Own your own business. Call for de-
tails 412-5366.
DANCERS EXOTIC Legal lap danc-
ing $1000-$ 1500week. First in the
state. Show up ready 8pm. Sid's Show-
girls. Goldsboro
MEDICAL RECORDS Coordinator -
part-time position in medical records
department of a busy surgical practice.
Must be an organized, detail-oriented
individual with experience in word pro-
cessing. Great work environment with
flexible hours. If interested, call Vicky
at 758-5800.
EARN FREE Trips and Cash Spring
Break 2000. Cancun, Jamaica. For 10
years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinguished itself as the most re-
liable student event and marketing or-
ganization in North America. Motivat-
ed reps can go on Spring Break FREE
and earn over10.000! Contact us to-
day for details! 800328-1509
www.classtravelintl.com
HELP WANTED
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED dancers
needed. Make over $1500 weakly.
Must have transportation, phone and
be DRUG FREE. Call 758-2737 for more
information.
NIGHT FRONT DESK CLERK NEED-
ED 10:30PM TO 3:30AM. ECONOMY
INN APPLY IN PERSON. COMPUTER
SKILL AN ASSET WILL TRAIN. REF-
ERENCES. RESUMES WELCOME.
CALL 754-8047.
LOOKING FOR 20 guys and gals for
local radio station phone promotion.
Earn $6 plus bonus per hour. Full and
part time, morning, day and evening
hours available. Near campus location
at 223 West 10th St. Suite 107 (in-
side Wilcar Executive Center) just
down the street from McDonalds and
Krispy Kreme. Apply ASAP in person
only 10am through 6pm (no calls
please).
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon we had.
PERSONAL
THE CARD Post. Report 342. Rite
Inn. The Card Post's99 Wayne co.
Election Paper Forum.is now open.
Will publish all questions from all can-
didates. Will be in front of Goldsboro
City Hall 1021 7am-7pm to receive
questions, requests for copies of ques-
tions to be mailed at same time as
mailed to candidates on 1022 & re-
quest for copies of all candidates an-
swers received by 1028. Answers will
be mailed 1029. Further instructions
for scribing andor subscribing will be
published here in this column 10
20 & a pager ft fax for any other
questions. Checked at the voters reg-
istration office for candidate mailing
list. One candidate was marked off due
to a primary run off I believe. Recog-
nizing the potential of a fully function-
ing public address system to enhance
the the best candidate on the ballot or
a 'write in' is electedcopies of all
questions will be mailed to that previ-
ous address(present?) candidate, and
any other citizens any citizens wishes
to question & or vote forthough will
respect the request(s) of any potential
candidate(s)that is not on the candi-
dates listthat any question directed
to them will remain a private matter.
Will follow the questioner's directions
of best way to contact the perspec-
tive candidate. Though I believe a
write in vote' does not require the per-
mission of a perspective candidate.
Thoughwill know & publish fact(s)
1020. Prosper n' Live Long. Tom
Drew.
great time at Friday's social. Love flrL
pha Delta Pi.
THE MOTHERS of Phi Kappa Oaf
would like to thank Alpha Omioron J
for a great social last Friday. Let's
together again soon. Phi Kappa I
GREAT JOB Holly and Jaime in i
kie of the year. We love you. Love 1
Chi Omega sisters.
ALPHA DELTA Pi wouldhke to CO
gratulate Heather Kearney on her acj
ceptance into Nursing School.
ALL OF the sisters of Delta Zeta i
looking forward to big sis week,
love you girls.
GOOD LUCK Sigma Sigma Sigma
and Sigma Phi Epsilon on your home
coming float, love the sisters of Si0-
ma Sigma Sigma.
homecoming week and welcomes all
alumni.
THANKS KAPPA Sigma for a won
derful pref night. We really had a great J
time! Love. Chi Omega.
THANKS TO the lovely ladies of A.
pha Delta Pi for a terrific social. We
love you gals and can't wait to do it
again! The brothers of Delta Chi.
i
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma sisti
would like to wish Chi Omega our
ter sorority, a great week. We look for-
ward to seeing you soon!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Jessij
Swanstrom for becoming the new j
Panhellenic of Public relations I
Delta Zeta.
OTHER
DJ FOR Hire: Sororities and Fr
ties book now for your formal and i
er functions. Guaranteed lowest i
and guaranteed quality service! Lai
hits and old favorites make your
together an event to remember. Ft
lighting systems available upon it
quest. Please call soon, limited datei
available! Cakalaky Entertainment
(Jeff) at 757-2037,
FREE CD of cool indie music when
you register at mybytes.com, the ut-
timate website for your college needs.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GREEK PERSONALS
CHI OMEGA congratulates their flag
football team on being ranked �1. We
love you girls.
BASEBALL AND Golf teams, thank
you for such a great time Friday! It was
a blast! We can't wait to do it again.
Love, Chi Omega.
TO ALL our blind dates thank you for
such a fun time. Everyone looked great
with their props! Love, Chi Omega.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha hope to see
everyone at homecoming this wee-
kend. Welcome all new pledges. Have
a great week.
CONGRATULATIONS WHITNEY
Bishop on winning Sophomore class
Vice President. We are so proud of you!
Love Chi Omega.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank the
Rugby team for the social last Thurs-
day, we all had a great time.
JOE. CONGRATULATIONS on your
recent lavalier of Laura Brandon. You
two are great. Good luck. The broth-
ers of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet Thui
day, October 21st at 5pm in GC 1031
Last day for dues! http:
www.ecu.eduorggbp
CAREER ALERT: All General I
students interested in a career i
bining business and healthcare me
schedule an appointment with an ad
visor in the Health Information Mar
agement Department during the v
of November 1-November 5. Call Mrl
Brown (328-4436) or Mr. Bell (32
4468) for a pre-registration I
appointment.
ECU'S 8TH AnnualTechnology E
sition will be held in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room on October 28F
1999 from 10am-3pm. Look for prsfr
senters and topics in the October 26
issue.
PIRATE CHASE 5k runwalk. The ar
nual Pirate Chase is back! It's a I
runwalk event that will be held I
vember 7th at 2pm starting at the)
rate Club bldg. Registration Deadlin
is Nov.2, 5pm in the Student I
tion Center main office or the day a
event. Pre-registered cost is $5megfc
$10non-mem. Day of event registrl
tion, the cost is $8mem-$ 15norf
mem. For more information please caF
aafLAAM
328-6387.
eve a fghf ass cat a�rd
nme dollars a wpnjh!
yeah .yoo heard �ne rigKf
unlimited 56k in-fernef access 01
COMMUNICATIONS S?-0767
ADAPTED SPORTS Day Saturday,
Nov. 6, 9-4 at the Student Recreate
Center. Experienced instructors wijj
disabilities teach a variety of sporj
and activities through participati
workshops. Registration forms eva'
able at SRC main office. 328-6387.
VOLUNTEERS THAT can kmt or
chet hats are needed by the Leo I
Jenkins Cancer Center's "Hat 11
Hugs' program. In this program i
unteers make hats end donate i
to cancer patterns who have lost thee
hair. Crochet and knitting novices s
welcome lo come learn how to maej
hats Yarn donations ere efsov
The group wif I meet on Tuesday, I
from noon to 1pm in the Surge!
ference Urn on the 2nd Moor i
center center For more I
call 818-7887
IXPLOMNO H8A4TH Career t
riiiMJJtiniliinn in iieiieaiidl I
Cvaober 28 from � 304 30 I
heefth etude woteomo Ct
l out mow atom no �eu ftt
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The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
COMICS
I
SEATS LEFT
BY JASON LAI OUK THE JOKY SHOW
Thursday, Oct. 2W 999
newss@studentmedia.eca.edu
BY IOEY EELIS
4SEATS LEFT
BY TASONLATOURBRAIN VOMIT
BY STEWART SINEATH
www.attic-nightclub.com
Uptown Greenville
209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
TONIGHT
! dj JEa
NC's Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 01 at ECU and Top 100 College Bars In
the Nation by Playboy magazine October 1997
New entrance on 5th St.
Entertainment Complex
Vi.1
The Connells
Advance Tickets
One Step Beyond
80's Retro Rock
In Rathskellar
SATURDAY 23RD
Jimmies
Chicken ShacH
Cold Sweat
In Rathskellar
MWM�cct�Vt,
fall
Hey, you
Whatcha doin'?!
Staying in to watch ECU 3EL
'take Tulane in Homecoming '95?
Cheering the Pirates to victory
from your favorite chair?
We've got your front row seat for
comfort, convenience A value at
EASTBROOK & VILLAGE 6REEN!
You won't miss a single play from
our roomy 1 2- A 3-bedroom apartment homes!
Join our winning team today!
WE SUPPORT THE
ECU PIRATES
60 PURPLE 6 GOLD
Eostbrook A Village Green Apts.
204 Eostbrook Drive
(Off Greenville Blvd.Behind Pizza Inn)
752-5100
Thursday, C
www.tac.eci
�n
THREE BLOCI
bedroom, off str
petsOK380v$
9592 antl 1eav
Novemjgrtpt.
HAVINttJWari
a canopy! 10x2
for sale. Easy to
0 412-5386.
2 BEDROOM
lease, fully furni
to campus on
12 utilities and
deposit'until a'
ASAP. Call 830
RINGGG
Ndw'Tak
1 bebVoor
Effeienc
CALL
�fBhpcMonttt
niim 15M11W
-WESLEY COI
roonw, PlttB),
dry I
busi
All propertiei
malntaini
m
n
rop.
MALE&HRI!
bedroorlRSplt.
students. $261
message. ;
URGENT ROC
be at feast a
Leave message
1106. �
m
ROOMMATE
at Wilsflb Acres
montlvSpring i
ROOMMATE
WesleCbmm
Prefer ,pjraduat
D. Calk Robert
FEMALE RO
subleeree roor
2nd floor wit
montbOctobe
in ASAP. Call I
MF TO subl
$260mo. '
at 353-5056.
FEMALE RO(
miles f rQtn Ore
plus 12 iltiliti
backyardCall
ROOMMATE'
2 bedroom api
Apartments $2
ities, phone 5
AAAI CAN
SpnngBreak Sp
tel. meals, drir
small business
standing ethics
1-800-678-638
lDAPPI
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ct. 211999
edia.eca.edu
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B�ur Wraps
I 4EXT TINE
JEAIII
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tory
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for
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ThursUay, Oct.21. 1999
www.tBC.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
THREE BLOCKS from campus. One
bedroom, oft street parking, quiet area,
pets OK33HJV $225 a month. Call 830-
9592 arifl leave message. Available
NovemjjMst.
HAVIrattJfSarty? What if it rains? Buy
a canopy'M0x20 peaked roof canopy
for sale: Easy to set up!199 call Jenn
@ 412-5366,
2 BEDROOM apt. available for sub-
lease, fully furnished, walking distance
to campus on 10th St. $475mo.
12 utilities and phone will wave $200
deposit" until available, need to rent
ASAP. Call 830-4907.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Ndw'Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
5$1Q0 OFF
! Security Deposit
I wfth presentation of this coupon, offer
' 8KplM�1211W)no1v�adwt�rianyotlw
coupon
Y COMMON SOUTH: 1 or 2 bed
rafrlgWMor, frM
if hookup, laun-
bloc� from campus, ECU
- All Properties have 24 hr. emergency
maintenance- Call 758-1921
riopity ' i
onogemeti
IpBMHrti A Natl kxaas
ROOMMATES WANTED
MALr�iCHRISTIAN to share a four
bedrooiTTipt. at Player's Club with 3
students. $260.00 321-8194 leave a
message. ;
URGENT ROOMMATE needed, must
be at feast a sophomore or junior.
Leave message on voicemail (252) 412-
1106. -
,m
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Three Bdrm
at Wilgflb Acres: 12 utilities. $240 per
monthrSpring semester call 329-7160.
ROOMMATE NEEDED: Two BDR at
WesleCbmmons South. 12 of bills.
Prefer graduate student: W. NS. N
D. Call Robert at 329-0266.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
sublease room in Wyndham court,
2nd floor with balcony $212.50 a
month-October paid for already, move
in ASAP. Call Kristin at 439-1410.
MF TO sublease at Player's Club
$260mo. 14 utilities. Call Carla
at 353-5056.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed 10
miles frffirt;($reenville $200 per month"
plus 1� utilities Pets ok, fenced in
backyaroVCall 757-3365.
ROOMMATE WANTED: for spacious
2 bedroom apartment. Cannon Court
Apartments $220 month plus 12 util-
ities, phone 561-7754, leave a mes-
m
AAAI CANCUN & Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air. ho-
tel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of 6
small businesses recognized for out-
standing ethics! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
IDAPPER DANSI
Retro Clothes
Vintage and Silver
Jewelry
and more cool stuff
4(7 Evans Street
Downtown
752-I750
"HAUOWKN IS COMING
FOR SALE
1997 SATURN 38k CDplayer Au-
tomatic well maintained service regu-
larly 11,564 great deal! Monthly pay-
ments $250 compared to dealers price
$15,500 767-1669.
A 1976 Volkswagen Beetle in excel-
lent condition. 2000 miles on a rebuilt
engine with new carburetor. Alterna-
tor, oil pump and fuel pump. New Du-
pont emron paint job in Red. All new
interior, headliner. seats, carpet, dash
and windows. All seals through out
the car are new. Brakes, tires wheel
cylinders, master cylinders. Heater
works, with new exhausts new wind-
shield motor and all electrical has been
reworked. A must see. Asking
3,500.00 with complete folder of Parts
warranty. Call 328-3209 ask for Pete
if no answer leave message.
1993 TOYOTA Celica ST Burgundy, ex-
cellent condition, 75 K miles. CD play-
er stereo, sunroof and spoiler, automat-
ic ac. Call Kim 830-3691.
FOR SALE Onkyo Stereo receiver w
remote control. Includes an extended
service contract which expires 903.
One year old but rarely used. $200.Call
Amy 758-4894.
FOR SALE 1994 Honda Accord LX ex-
cellent condition only 55k miles. Call
353-2826 for more information.
AAAI SPRING Break Specials! Baha-
mas Party Cruise 5 days $279! In-
cludes most meals! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City. Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
BLACK LAB puppy for sale. Three
month old female, very friendly. Has
some shots. $50 Call 752-8508.
SERVICES
DID YOU FAIL your biology test? Tu-
toring available for all sections of BIOL
1050. 1100. 1200. $8hr. Call 758-
7729. Ask for Jennifer.
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CMOMU SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
FREE CD of cool indie music when
you register at mybytes.com. the ul-
timate website for your college needs.
OJ FOR Hire: Book now for your ev-
ent. Special discounts for students.
Music for any occasion and full lightn-
ing available. Competitive pricing and
guaranteed fun! Call Jeff 757-2037.
HELP WANTED
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
Iskxikinif i i kVii uwmcN loliut.1 vansand
link Mil lniilet. lui tlk-iimshiti Inmrs lUUuitt 10 H.mi.
$7,5Uhotin Unlit m .inmsI.hkv h uMv alter M �di v
lutiini.aii.vrt)()nntiniil�.MiHr.Uiiiinanit rwtflilijp
mini uu&ible. Aiilruitioiisuinlx-iilk-vliitit at 2410
United Dmvini-ar l!iikiuliOvUitM iiiU'MVillt'
STUDENTS, LOOKING FOR A
GREAT JOB ON CAMPUS?
CAMPUS DINING IS RECRUITING
CASHIERS, GRILL COOKS, DISHWASH-
ERS, AND WAITSTAFF. ENJOY FREE
MEALS AND CONVENIENT SCHEDUL-
ING AROUND YOUR CLASSES. MUST
BE FRIENDLY AND DEPENDABLE. IF
THIS IS YOU. BRING COMPLETE WORK
HISTORY & APPLY AT MENDENHALL
STUDENT CTR-ECU FROM 9AM-4-PM
M-F. COMPETITIVE PAY & BENEFITS!
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
EOE MFDV.y
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED
YEAR 2000 internships "Don't gat
a aummar Job run a aummar
bualnaaa" www.tuitionpaint-
ara.com amail: tuipaintflboll-
south.net 353-4831.
NEEDfor your team, club, fraterni-
ty, sorority? Earn1000-$2000 with
easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event. Groups
love it because there's no sales re-
quired. Dates are filling up, so call to-
day. 1-888-522-4350.
SSMANAGE a business on your cam-
pus$$ Versity.com, an Internet note-
taking company is looking for an en-
trepreneurial student to run business
on your campus. Manage students,
make tons of money, excellent oppor-
tunity! Apply on-line at www.versi-
ty.com contact jobs9versity.com or
call 734-483-1600 ext. 888
ACT NOW! GET THE BEST SPRING
BREAK PRICES! SOUTH PADRE,
CANCUN. JAMAICA, BAHAMAS,
ACAPULCO, FLORIDA ft
MARDIGRAS. REPS NEEDED.
TRAVEL FREE, EARN $$$. GROUP
DISCOUNTS FOR 6 800-838-
8203 WWW.LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
NEEDfor your Team. Club, Fratern-
ity, Sorority? Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event.
Groups love it because there's no sales
required. Dates are filling up so call
today. 1-888-522-4350.
FREE TRIPS and Cash Spring Break
2000. StudentCity.com is looking for
Highly Motivated Students to promote
Spring Break 2000! Organize a small
group and travel FREE! Top campus
reps can earn Free Trips and over
$ 10,000! Choose Cancun, Jamaica or
Nassau! Book Trips on-line Iqe in and
win Free Stuff. Sign Up now on line
www.studentcity.com or 1-800-293-
1443.
.SPRING BREAK 2000
�uniiiira, Canun, Florida. Burhudos, Bamimus
Hook now for Free Mvuls & 2 Free Trips
Book by December 17ih for Lowctl Rates
1-800-426-7710
www.sunspla.slilours.com
Three ways to
beat the high
cost of college.
1. The Montgomery Cl Bill
2. Student loan repayment
3. Part-time Income
The Army Reserve Alternate
Training Program is a smarl way to
pay for college.
First, if you qualify, the Mont-
gomery GI Bill can provide you with
up to $7,124 for current college ex-
penses or approved votech training.
Second, if you have�or obtain�a
qualified student loan not in default,
you may get it paid off at the rate of
15 per year or $500, whichever is
greater, up to a maximum of $10,000.
Selected military skills can double that
maximum.
Third, you can earn part-time
money in college, and here's how it
works: One summer you take Basic
Training, and the next summer you
receive skill training at an Army
school. You'll earn over $1,500 for
Basic and even more for skill training.
Then you'll attend monthly meetings
at an Army Reserve unit near your
college, usually one weekend a month
plus two weeks a year. You'll be paid
over $107 a weekend to start. It's
worth thinking about. Give us a call:
756-9695
BE ALL YOU CAM BE.
ARMY RESERVE
www.qoanny.com
HELP WANTED
THE JEWISH Mother Restaurant is
now accepting applications for all po-
sitions apply in person' between noon
and 6pm M-Sat in the Plaza mall for-
merly Annabell's 714 SE Greenville
Blvd.
WEB PAGE Developer. Needed to up-
grade existing web page. Good oppro-
tunity to gain experience and earn
some bucks working with congenial
local family business. Call Dr. Gowen
at 752-4086.
PERSON(S) WITH pick-up truck to
gather and remove yard debris. $10
hr. Please call 321-2422.
SPRING BREAK reps needed to
promote campus trips. Earntravel
free! No cost. We train you. You work
on your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www.springbreakdirect.com
BROWSE ICPT.COM Win a Free trip
for Springbreak 2000 All destina-
tions offered. Trip participants. Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or rep registration Call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
PART TIME jobs available. Joan's
Fashion, a local women's clothing store
is now filling part-time positions. Ap-
plicants must be available for Tuesday
afternoons, Thursday mornings and
or Thursday afternoons. The positions
are for between 7 and 20 hours per
week, depending on your schedule
and on business needs. The pay is
commensurate with your experience
and job performance and is supple-
mented by an employee discount. Ap-
ply in person to Store Manager, Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans St Greenville
(Uptown Greenville).
SSSSTUTORS NEEDEDSBSS Look-
ing for some extra money (best pay
on campus) and a way to improve aca-
demically? Do you have a 3.0 or bet-
ter GPA? Become a tutor for the Of-
fice of Student Development-Athelet-
ics. We need individuals capable of
tutoring ACCT 2401, 2521: ASIP 2112.
2221: BIOL 1050. 2130; CHEM 1120.
1150; DSCI 4103. 4113; GEOG 1000;
GEOL 1500; ITEC 2000; MATH 1065,
3228; NUHM 2105; PSYC 1000. 2101.
3310. 4375; and THEA 1000. Under-
graduate students are paid six dollars
($6) an hour and graduate students
are paid seven dollars ($7) an hour-
may be paid up to ten dollars ($10)
an hour. If this sounds like the job for
you. join us for one of our orientation
meetings in 236B Ward Sports Medi-
cine Building (behind Mlnges Coli-
seum) on either 1021 at4:30pm. 10
25 at 4:30pm or 1028 at 4:30pm.
Questions? Need more information?
Contact Isha Williams at 328-4691 for
further information.
GIRLZ MITE Out is a local party-plan
business looking for distributors. Full
time money working part-time hours!
Own your own business. Call for de-
tails 412-5366.
DANCERS EXOTIC Legal lap danc-
ing $1000-$1500week. First in the
state. Show up ready 8pm. Sid's Show-
girls. Goldsboro
MEDICAL RECORDS Coordinator -
part-time position in medical records
department of a busy surgical practice.
Must be an organized, detail-oriented
individual with experience in word pro-
cessing. Great work environment with
flexible hours. If interested, call Vicky
at 758-5800.
EARN FREE Trips and Cash Spring
Break 2000. Cancun. Jamaica. For 10
years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinguished itself as the most re-
liable student event and marketing or-
ganization in North America. Motivat-
ed reps can go on Spring Break FREE
and earn over $10,000! Contact us to-
day for details! 800328-1509
www.classtravelintl.com
HELP WANTED
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED dancers
needed. Make over $1500 weakly.
Must have transportation, phone and
be DRUG FREE. Call 758-2737 for more
information.
NIGHT FRONT DESK CLERK NEED-
ED 10:30PM TO 3:30AM. ECONOMY
INN APPLY IN PERSON. COMPUTER
SKILL AN ASSET WILL TRAIN. REF-
ERENCES. RESUMES WELCOME.
CALL 754-8047.
LOOKING FOR 20 guys and gals for
local radio station phone promotion.
Earn $6 plus bonus per hour. Full and
part tima, morning, day and evening
hours available. Near campus location
at 223 West 10th St. Suite �107 (in-
side Wilcar Executive Center) just
down the street from McDonalds and
Krispy Kreme. Apply ASAP in person
only 10am through 6pm (no calls
please).
PERSONAL
eve a-ft3hf ass caw a�r(
nine dollars a monfh
yeahy�o heart Hie right
Uhln�iffe4 56k mfernef access only
COMMUNICATIONS 59076?
incorporated
7o-A SE Greenville fW4 across fr, The Plaaa Mall
s�wie restrict" apply. see sf�r Cr �tefsfb.
The East Caroli?
ads@studentmedi;
ANNOUNCEMENTS
.3
SIGMA ALPHA Epsilon we had,
great time at Friday' social. Love 4y
pha Delta Pi.
THE CARD Post. Report 342. Rite
Inn. The Card Post's99 Wayne co.
Election Paper Forumjs now open.
Will publish all questions from all can-
didates. Will be in front of Goldsboro
City Hall 1021 7am-7pm to receive
questions, requests for copies of ques-
tions to be mailed at same time as
mailed to candidates on 1022& re-
quest for copies of all candidates an-
swers received by 1028. Answers will
be mailed 1029. Further instructions
for scribing andor subscribing will be
published here in this column 10
20& a pager & fax for any other
questions. Checked at the voters reg-
istration office for candidate mailing
list. One candidate was marked off due
to a primary run off I believe. Recog-
nizing the potential of a fully function-
ing public address system to enhance
the the best candidate on the ballot or
a write in' is elected copies of all
questions will be mailed to that previ-
ous address(present?) candidate, and
any other citizens any citizens wishes
to question & or vote for. though will
respect the request(s) of any potential
candidate(s) that is not on the candi-
dates listthat any question directed
to them will remain a private matter.
Will follow the questioner's directions
of best way to contact the perspec-
tive candidate. Though believe a
write in vote' does not require the per-
mission of a perspective candidate.
Thoughwill know & publish fact(s)
1020. Prosper n' Live Long. Tom
Drew.
GREEK PERSONALS
CHI OMEGA congratulates their flag
football team on being ranked 1. We
love you girls.
BASEBALL AND Golf teams, thank
you for such a great time Friday! It was
a blast! We can't wait to do it again.
Love, Chi Omega.
TO ALL our blind dates thank you for
such a fun time. Everyone looked great
with their props! Love. Chi Omega.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha hope to see
everyone at homecoming this wee-
kend. Welcome all new pledges. Have
a great week.
CONGRATULATIONS WHITNEY
Bishop on winning Sophomore class
Vice President. We are so proud of you!
Love Chi Omega.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank the
Rugby team for the social last Thurs-
day, we all had a great time.
JOE, CONGRATULATIONS on your
recent lavalier of Laura Brandon. You
two are great. Good luck. The broth-
ers of Sigma Phi Epsilon.
THE BROTHERS of Phi Kappa Psi
would like to thank Alpha Omicron,
for a great social last Friday. Let's i
together again soon. Phi Kappa Pij
GREAT JOB Holly and Jaime in I
kie of the year. We love you. Lova t
Chi Omega sisters.
ALPHA DELTA Pi would like to cd
gratulate Heather Kearney on her air
ceptance into Nursing School.
ALL OF the sisters of Delta Zeta i
looking forward to big sis week,
love you girls.
GOOD LUCK Sigma Sigma Sigma
and Sigma Phi Epsilon on your home- !i
coming float, love the sisters of Sig-S
ma Sigma Sigma.
CHI OMEGA wishes everyone a greitf '
homecoming week and welcomes all j
alumni.
THANKS KAPPA Sigma for a wofl
derful pref night. We really had a great J
time! Love. Chi Omega.
THANKS TO the lovely ladies of Af
pha Delta Pi for a terrific social. We
love you gals and can't wait to do a
again! The brothers of Delta Chi.
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma sist�
would like to wish Chi Omega our a
ter sorority, a great week. We look for- j
ward to seeing you soon!
CONGRATULATIONS TO JessM
Swanstrom for becoming the new j
Panhellenic of Public relations
Delta Zeta.
OTHER
J
DJ FOR Hire: Sororities and Fral
ties book now for your formal and
er functions. Guaranteed lowest pr
and guaranteed quality service! Lati
hits and old favorites make your gj
together an event to remember,
lighting systems available upon r
quest. Please call soon, limited date
available! Cakalaky Entertainment
(Jeff) at 757-2037.I
FREE CD of cool indie music when
you register at mybytes.com. the ul-
timate website for your college needs.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet Thur.
day. October 21st at 5pm in GC 1031
Last day "for duesT http:
www.ecu.eduorggbp
CAREER ALERT: All General Colleg
students interested in a career con
bining business and healthcare ma
schedule an appointment with an ad
visor in the Health Information Malj
agement Department during the v
of November 1-November 5. Call Mrs7
Brown (328-4436) or Mr. Bell (32
4468) for a pre-registration advis
appointment.
ECU'S 8TH AnnualTechnology Expi
sition will be held in the Mendenhall.
Multipurpose Room on October 2ar
1999 from 10am-3pm. Look for pt0
senters and topics in the October 26tft
issue.
PIRATE CHASE 5k runwalk. The arjf
nual Pirate Chase is back! It's a i
runwalk event that will be held I
vember 7th at 2pm starting at the)
rate Club bldg. Registration Deadlii
is Nov.2. 5pm in the Student Recre
tion Center main office or the day &
event. Pre-registered cost is $5meg
$10non-mem. Day of event registn
tion, the cost is $8mem-$ 15noq
mem. For more information please c
328-6387.
ADAPTED SPORTS Day Saturday
Nov. 6. 9-4 at the Student Recreatiq
Center. Experienced instructors wit
disabilities teach a variety of sporj
and activities through participator
workshops. Registration forms aval
able at SRC main office. 328-6387;
VOLUNTEERS THAT can knit or
chet hats are needed by the Leo I
Jenkins Cancer Center's "Hat's wifj
Hugs" program. In this program
unteers make hats and donate the1
to cancer patients who have lost thB�
hair. Crochet and knitting novices at
welcome to come learn how to maN
hats. Yarn donations are also wetc
The group will meet on Tuesday. I
from noon to 1 pm in the Surgical
ference Rm on the 2nd floor of
cancer center. For more informatH
call 816-7867.
EXPLORING HEALTH Career Alte
tives Workshop in Mendenhall Rm-ZlJ
October 26 from 5:30-6:30. All prj
health students welcome. Come
find out more about how you fit i
health careers.
GOLDEN KEY National Honor SocJ
ty will meet Monday Oct. 25 at 5
in Mendenhall 244. If you have ad
questions please call Amy at 551-102
We will have an information tab
outside of the Wright Place on Md
day from 11-2.
TAI CHI. The session runs Tues. a
Thurs. Oct.26-Oec.9. 12:05-12:50
the SRC 238. The cost is $20m
$30non-mem. Registration
Qct 18 For information call






HEALTHY HABITS
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Sports JNFutrition.
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262-439-1899
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fr
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rtyrriak
Flowers & Balloons
756-8606
422 E. Arlington Blvd. � Greenville, NC
tiV Open 7 Davs A Week -a
BEEF BARN
Tonight
Friday before the game.
Saturday after the game.
Reservations Accepted 756-1161
HUM 1VL
SILL IV
Join the
Road to Recovery March1
When: Friday, Oct. 22 at 4:00pm
Where: E.B.Aycock Middle School
off Greenville Blvd.
Pick up applications at Mendenhall Student
Center,Todd dining Hall,The Student Store or
Christianbury Rm. 105 or 201
Any Questions call: Trevor Austin 757-2023
Patrick Sharland 695-0099
Professor
W
ESPNGameday "�M?fi
Doing Monday Might Football
longer, harder & better for 15 years!
Find us in the Winn-Dixie
Shopping Center comer of
GreerwiMe Blvd. & Arlington
Blvd. Opens at 11 a.m.
seven days a week
355-294-0
WCW & WWF Pay Per View Events!
TiM
'McDonalds
presents
2 Big Macs
for
2 BUCKS
'�� &�:
i
1 1
1 '?
s
1
1
Of-
A

Tickets for The M
person) will
11 p.m
other pn
'icture Show (one per
t Madness from
ovided; no
THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW-VIDEO KARAOKE
BINGO -HORROR FLICK -CLUBMYSTIQUE (W J ARTH0R)
WITCHES' BREW -OPEN GLOW -BOWLING & BILLIARDS
COSTUME CONTEST - ILLUSIONN"FUSION (virtual reality)
FREE BREAKFAST BUFFET -FORTUNETELLERS & PSYCHICS

.�v
Students need only present a valid ECU One Card to enter Midnight Madness. Students may bring a guest (high school or older), but must obtain a guest pass prior
to the event. Quest passes will be available October 25-29 at the Central Ticket Office in MSC from 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. and at the Todd Dining Hall Meal Plan
office from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. On Saturday and Sunday (Oct. 30-31), passes will be available from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. at the Student Recreation Center.





Arts b Entertainment Magazine of The
East Carolinian g
tmtmkffld,
Thursday, October 21,1999

I
ECU SCHOOL OF ART
-
There's some-
thing not quite
rightabout
"Mumford
Ntwi
Snake Oil
Medicine Show
makes'hoe-
down soup
Paul BuSLv Here's a peek at the
McCartney's 29Rebel winners
Run Devil Run
combines griefHF
and sentiment
Movie Review Band Review CD Review
Last Word

fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville, NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366 � Fax 3284558 � Advertising 328-2000 � www.fountainhead.ecu.edu





Movie Review
EVERYONE'S SCREWY HERE
"Mumford" is a
fun brain-buster
Kenton Bell
Staff Writer
Mumford is a delightful tale that
centers on a former IRS agent with a
penchant for cocaine and his partner's
wife. The unlikely curmudgeon
becomes the mental health hero of a
small town. Loren Dean ("Gattaca
"Enemy of the State") does a stellar
job of bringing the role of Mumford to
life.
The story unravels after Mumford
tires of his life full of drugs and goes
to a monastery to find himself. In his
solitude he begins to understand what
it is like to want to change and decides
to help others. He takes the name of a
childhood friend, finds a town of the
same name and the sitcom cliches
abound when he sets himself up as a
psychologist there.
The new town doctor seems to be
taking away business from the two
other psychologists in town, and they
begin to question his qualifications.
Add to the melee the dramatic acting
of Hope Davis playing a patient
named Sophie Crisp.
Sophie seems to always be tired,
and is under the tyrannical rule of an
oppressive mother. Jason Lee
("Chasing Amy") provides levity in
the role of Skip Skipperton, computer
genius, billionaire, social outcast and
loser in love. This eccentric character-
based movie includes a rich woman
who buys trinkets to forget a broken
marriage and a young lady with no
self-esteem from too many beauty
magazines.
The cast rounds out with pharma-
cist addicted to 1950's pulp novels and
a waitress who would rather take
showers than find a man.
The characters develop lives of their
own that aren't forced and the plot
unfolds naturally. The movie is has an
odd tandem, but the dialogue is at
times quite mesmerizing. Mumford's
interaction with each patient, and the
method used to "cure" them of their
maladies is intriguing to watch.
His approach is simple: never give
your opinion, and tell them what they
are telling you, and let them figure it
out for themselves.
So, what happens when the powers
that be look into Dr. Mumford's past?
Seems everyone who can qualify his
story is dead. Will the young lady find
solace outside the pages of "Cosmo"?
Is it possible that a pharmacist has the
cure for a rich lady's broken heart?
Will the computer Boy Wonder teach
someone mat showers are not most
relaxing thing one can to do right
before bed? The story extends in a
wonderful flow of deadpan humor,
sardonic wit and insight into each one
of us.
The ending is handled very well
with a feel-good sense about humani-
ty, and that inside we are all alike.
People are simply looking for answers,
and Mumford shows that sometimes
it is best to answer our own questions.
This trriier can be contacted at
kbell9studentmedia.ecu.edu
"Holly
Melissa
Miccah Smith Editor
Caleb Rose Assistant Editor
Stephanie WhMockO
GttGailowray latent
linn RopasMwnianiMwoK
ItarwHF. Cos WriMetha Director
Semiigihe ECU community since IBrVlne tea Cetolnien pubbshes
uirffcaflWHW'WM�'mfl�ortwn.tlMie��w
rountetnheed, out new arts end enterhvetrnarii megarme. are pub-
lished rrety Wednesday The lied editorial m each edition of die ten
Coohruan �the opmwn nf the Editorial Board The Fast Carolinian
welcomes tenets lo the color, limited to 2S0 emits, which may be
edited lor decency or brertry. The East Caiohnien teservet the tight to
edit or reject tetters lot publication All toilets must be soned. letters
should be addressed lo Opinion earn .The Een CarolHiisn Student
Publications Building ECU. Greenyi Z0584053 Ftt information
caff tM2t 6366
Movie Review
ASHLEY JUDD PLAYS IT COOL
"Double Jeopardy" courts
the "what ifi"factor
Maura Buck
Staff Writer
"Hi NickI have learned a lot in
prison I can shoot you right in the
middle of Mardi Gras and they can't
touch me
Sound familiar? There aren't too
many of us who haven't heard or seen
the trailers for the newly released
action thrillerDouble Jeoparay
Perhaps that is the one disappointing
aspect of the film. Although the ad
campaigns are meant to capture a few
fascinating moments and encourage
moviegoers to seek out the film,
Paramount pictures definitely went a
little overboard with this one.
Nearly all of the most fascinating
and revealing scenes were already
viewed prior to the actual release of
the film in theaters. AltWigh there is
much more to this flick than the 3-
minute promos, it does take a bit away
from the film in terms of suspense
Regardless, it is a great film that
undoubtedly delivers the promised
106 minutes of thrilling entertain-
ment
The one commodi-
ty that more or less
carries the film is the
characterization.
Ashley Judd ("Kiss
the Girls") is absolute-
ly remarkable in her
role of Libby Parsons,
a woman who at one
point appears to have
kail. However as the
film progresses, she
loses, in the blink of
an eye, her hus-
band, child and in
essence, her life. She
plays a role similar to
Sally Fields in "Eye for
an Eye
Truly, she delivers
an honest and
delightful perfor-
mance. After being
wrongly charged for
her husband's death, Parsons is sen-
tenced to six years in prison where she
demonstrates her strength as a woman
facing adversity. While there, she real-
See Jeopardy, continued on page 6
TO IMITATE LIFE
2 Thursday, October 21,1999
The School of
Art celebrates 90 years
Kenton Bell
StaffWriter �
The East Carolina School of Art is
celebrating its ninety-year commit-
ment to art education this year. Plans
for the future, and memories of yore
are present all over the campus. A ban-
ner waves proudly over the ferikins
Fine Arts Center announcing the
achievement, and commercials have
been shown during ECU Football
games.
The School of Art will celebrate the
culmination of long-held dreams with
several events, two of which will hap-
pen this month. Students who gradu-
ate during the celebration will receive a
pewter medallion commemorating the
event The Wellington R Gray gallery
named for the for the first dean of
ECU will be reopened January 1st after
going through a million-dollar renova-
tion.
A chronicle of the first ninety years
was prepared in the volume called "An
Art school in the Carolinas: Art tradi-
tion at East Carolina University" writ-
ten by Dr. Michael Duffy, coordinator
of art history at the School of Art He
culled the information from newspa-
pers, retired professors, and available
archives. The research and develop-
ment took about five months to com-
plete and will be released in about two
weeks.
The informative text will indude a
history of the curriculum, and center
on some of the guest artists, gallery
openings and organizations such as
the artists guild.
"The most interesting part for me
putting the history together was seeing
how the separate milestones develop,
such as the department becoming a
school, and watching the professional
areas grow, and how our art school
developed with the national trends
Duffy said.
A new statue of the famed ECU
pirate will be dedicated Homecoming
Saturday as part of the nineteenth
anniversary celebration. The statue
weighs 6,000 lbs. and is 30 feet from
the base of the statue to the tip of the
sword.
"The hardest part was the grinding
and sanding for days on end said Jodi
1 lollnagel-Jubran, the artist who
designed the new statue. "When some-
one poses you the question of a twice-
size pirate or anything difficult to do,
(you take the challenge and just do it"
The new foundry that made the
casting of the statue possible was
funded by a donation from Irwin Belk.
The entire process of developing the
statue from maquette (a scale model)
to completion will be part of a 16-
minutc documentary that will show in
WITN cable channel &, Oct 23.
"This is a very old school, but it is
nevertheless current and timely, very
much part of the twenty-first century?'
said Michael A. Dorsey, dean of the
School of Art.
The statement that art imitates life
can be seen in a school that chooses to
celebrate its virtues by going beyond
them, and striving forward.
This tsriter can be contacted at
ibelt@studentmedia.ecu.edu
, j, i.n t i �





LOOKING FOR YOUR
Pirate Underground
tries expansion
Robbie Schwartz
Staff Writer
No, I am not talking about the
degree. But if you've seen the flyers
around campus, you know what I am
talking about: the Pirate Underground.
Sponsored by the ECU Student Union
Popular Entertainment Committee,
the Pirate Underground offers stu-
dents something different to do on
Saturday nights.
Every Saturday night in the
Mendenhall pool room, the Pirate
Underground offers free (yes, free)
refreshments and live bands perform-
ing on a stage. The Pirate
Underground invites bands from all
over the Eastern seaboard to come
play. From swing music to Latin ska,
the Underground brings it to you.
FLAVOR
OF THE
PH. D.?
"Vfe are trying to broaden our clien-
tele so we can include all the different
genres that are found here at ECU
said Patrick Edwards, Popular
Entertainment chairperson.
The event originally started as The
Coffeehouse, highlighting local and
regional talent, but has grown over the
years to become the Underground.
Committee members now go out and
recruit bands, or bands send the com-
mittee press packets and the commit-
tee votes on who gets to perform.
Bands like Mandorico and Lake
Trout have attracted large crowds, but
on average the event only attracts
about 40-50 people each night
"I enjoyed Eleven Foot Seven and I
think that the set-up is pretty nice
said Chrisie Moritz, graci studentBut
the crowd was too small for me to
really get into it
"1 think that a large part of the prob-
lem is the students just don't know
what actually goes on there and the
location makes it hard to find said
Nick Errato, junior.
This is a problem that Edwards and
his committee are trying to tackle
head-on.
"Everybody knows about the
Wednesday night movies at
Mendenhall said Edwards. "And that
is the kind of recognition that we are
aiming for this year"
Along with more publicity, the group
is also trying something eke this year.
The first Saturday of every month, the
Pirate Underground sponsors an
"Open Mic" night, and anyone can
come and perform.
So come out and see what you are
missing. Upcoming bands include The
Rutabaga on Friday, October 22 and
Chin Ho on Saturday, November 20, or
you can come show your stuff on
"Open Mic" night
This tenter can be contacted at
rsckwartz@studentmedia.ecu.edu
CD Review
MCCARTNEY DIGS DEEP
THEIR MAMAS
WEEK DRESS THEM FUNNY
The Snake Oi Medicine
Show earns its keep
D. Miccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
My mentor and personal hero,
Zaphod Beeblebrox, says drink-
ing a Pan-Galactic Gargle-Blaster
is like "having your brains
smashed out by a slice of lemon
wrapped around a gold brick
I took this definition with me
to the Saturday night Snake Oil
Medicine Show performance at
Peasant's, but found those words
a little over-effusive for what I
saw there.
The Medicine Show is famous
for inspiring crowds to cross-
dress, parading giant puppets
through the audience, hosting
live tlainethrowing performances by a
man named Wbozle and providing
other assorted circus-style diversions.
Sadly, all the really weird and neat-o
elements touted by other musk
reviewers were nowhere to be seen,
which of these kids is doing hi own thing?
leaving the Medicine Show to rely
almost solely on their superb musi-
cianship to carry the evening.
Still, if you like the idea of being
licked by a butterfly while somebody
pours apple cider down your pants,
you may have an idea of what the
show was like.
Hailing from Boone, the band loves
performing for groups of all ages, and
is garnering an enthusiastic following
in the Southeast with their cheerfully
nonsensical tunes and party-style pre-
sentation, sprinkled with vocals by the
Bessie Smith-inspired Caroline Pond,
whose mean country fiddle provides a
sharp contrast with her glittery anime-
heroine persona.
Dubious delights of the evening
included some slow and laborious
onstage psychedelic painting by artist
Phil Cheney, breakdancing by guitarist
and lead vocalist "M.C. Wirpextor
1 CosmoverseTand a rousing number
J during which the band led the audi-
ence through an inspiring chorus con-
J sistingofthewordAyiiieee
At first glance, the Medicine Show,
decked as they were with leis, wild
clothing, waxed mustaches and the
like, seemed to be trying a teensy bit
too hard to be "wacky but endearing
I was mistaken.
The audience took a long time to
trickle in, and an even longer time to
Sh SOUS, continued on page 6
Run DevU Run is a solid,
well-constructed hit
Ryan Kennemur
Beatle
4 and 12 Ryam out of 5 Ryans
"Hey Paul, don't make it bad. Take a
sad song, and make it betterr Of
course, that is a paraphrase from the
song "Hey Jude written by McCartney
for John Lennon's son, Julian.
The point in the reference is that
this is what we find Paul McCartney
doing these days: taking old standbys
and turning them into his own, which
is a lot more than what many of us
critics were expecting.
Indeed, Paul's loving wife Linda lost
a long batt le w ith cancer recently, and
one can assume that the making of his
new album Run Devil Run, a collec-
tion of rip-roaring covers and Chuck
Berry-esque original compositions,
was very therapeutic for him.
Ifs almost like a tribute to life, and
all that's good about it Themes of
love, heartache, movies, partying, and
even religion all appear frequently.
But then, these universal themes
were all very significant to the era
when these songs were born, just
around the time when the Beatles
"with an 'a were getting started.
During their days before coming to
America, Paul and the boys (then with
the worthless Pete Best playing
drums) used to rock the underground
clubs of Hamburg, Germany, most
notably the Cavern Club. Rent the
movie "Back Beat" for more informa-
tion on that
With this album, Paul enlisted the
help of Pink Floyd's David Gilmour on
guitar and Deep Purple's Ian Pake on
drums and headed to his homeland,
AKA Abbey Road Studios. This is the
place where so much of the magic
happened, not to mention the record
that bears the same name. Paul was
attempting to get that old feeling back,
like the old days covering country and
rockabilly standards in Hamburg, and
damn if he didn't accomplish exactly
what he set out to do.
Covering the likes of Gene Vincent,
Larry Williams, Ricky Nelson, Carl
Perkins, Chuck Berry, Fats Domino,
Little Richard, and yes, even Elvis
would be quite a chore for even the
most seasoned musical veterans.
But Paul takes on these tunes with
reckless abandon that makes even the
most rhythm impaired fool tap his
toe, whereas the rest of us are stomp-
ing along.
In light of what could have been the
most depressing album of our time,
Run Devil Run comes across as ram-
bunctious and wild-eyed as anything
the Beatles ever did. �
As for Paul's three original tunes
included, none of them get lost in the
shuffle, but add to the genuine solidity
of this album. And even though
"What it is is dedicated to Linda, one
can't help but think that "Try Not to
Cry" was actually written with her pk-
ture in the foreground.
With lyrics like "111 try not to cry
over you" and "I want to enjoy being
alive Don't want to leave before I
arrive you get the feeling that Paul's
grief was still swirling in his mind.
But we are all luckier for it, in a way.
His pain made him return to his plea-
sure, and thus, so did mine upon hear-
ing the album. I guarantee it will cure
what ails you, and if it doesn't, then
just read the liner notes on how every-
thing on the album came to be, then
get back to me.
This tenter can be contacted at
riennemur@studentmedia.ecu.edu
TrursfeKtaotor21.B99 3





2
: ��
THINGS
TO DO
THURSDAY
OCTOBER 21
The Cellar: In Tune
Entertainment Karaoke (10:00
PM)
Peasant's Cafe: All That
Sports PadSplash: In Tune
The Cashmere Jungle Lords will grease Peasants up Saturday.
Sports PadSplash: In Tune
Entertainment Karaoke (10:00
PM)
Cluck out Mtyrfa USA r� Tilt Caw
Friday at Trw Atrk
Entertainment Karaoke (10:00
PM)
Underwater Cafe: (Mug Nite)
FRIDAY
OCTOBER 22
The Attic: The Connells with
The Mayflies USA
' Cat's Cradle: The Blue Rags
The Cellar: In Tune
Entertainment Karaoke (10:00
PM)
� Peasant's Cafe: Mandorico
4 Thursday, October 21,1999
SATURDAY
OCTOBER 23
The Attic: Jimmie's Chicken
Shack
Cat's Cradle: Junior Brown
. The Cellar: In Tune
' Entertainment Karaoke
(10:00 PM)
I Peasant's Cafe: Cashmere
I Jungle Lords
I Sports PadSplash: In
I Tune Entertainment Karaoke
(10:00 PM)
SUNDAY
OCTOBER 24
Courtyard Tavern: (Yard Party-
No Cover)
Peasant's Cafe: (Open Mic
Nite)
MONDAY
OCTOBER 25
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall:
Premiere Performances of
Works by ECU Composers (8:00
PM)
Sports PadSplash: Monday
Night Wrasslin'
TUESDAY
OCTOBER 26
Hendrix Theatre: Travel
Adventure Film-Inside
Switzerland, Clint Denn (4:00
and 7:30 PM)
Peasant's Cafe: (Mug Nite)

WEDNESDAY
OCTOBER 27
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall:
Recital: Christine Gustafson,
flute; Alisa Gilliam, piano (8:00
PM)
The Attic: (Comedy Zone)
Mendenhall Movies: Lock
Stock and Two Smoking Barrels
Sports PadSplash: Free Shag
Lessons (8:00-9:00)
Underwater Cafe: Karaoke
For More Information
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
�8ig Jake's Bar
Williamston.NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252) 967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 752-4668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Deadwood
Greenville, NC 792-8938
The Elbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114
10
TOP I V LIST
Top Ten Ways
to Enrage a
State Fan
10. Tip his cow
9. Take his last
plug of Skoal
8. Cut his over-
all straps
7. Remind him
that he goes to
State
6. Spank him
5. Point at his
mama andor
girlfriend and
laugh
4. Er, beat his
team
3. Neuter his
mascot
2. Tug on his
nipple rings
l.Remmdhim
again that he
goes to State
Mai your Top Ten List topics to
UkahbiBtaaitaaSitaiat-
� '�'�





ARIES:
(MARCH 21-APRIL 20)
It's a great week to improve relation-
ships, particularly within the family.
This may be the opportune time to
reach out to someone who looks up to
you, possibly a child.
TAURUS:
(APRIL 21-MAY 21)
You are looking and feeling your best,
so use this positive energy to your
advantage - get out and accomplish
things.
GEMINI:
(MAY 22-JUNE 21)
Make it a point of getting chores and
errands out of the way earlier, because
it looks like rest, relaxation and party-
ing is in store for later.
CANCER:
(JUNE 22-JULY 23)
Personal financial planning is favored.
Your intuition is sharpened concern-
ing money matters.
LEO:
(JULY 24-AUGUST 23)
It will be a busy week for you. Hard
work on your part will bring you clos-
er to your career and personal goals.
VIRGO:
(AUGUST 24 -SEPTEMBER 23)
You are eager to help out wherever
needed, but avoid those who manipu-
late your actions. Be sure that your
efforts go to a good cause.
LIBRA:
(SEPTEMBER 24-OCTOBER 23)
You are ready to conquer any obstacles
this week, ft may not he abad idea to
spend some time alone,
because your criticisms of others
may get you in deep water.
SCORPIO:
(OCTOBER 24 - NOVEMBER 22)
This week finds you in tune with your
lover or mate, which makes for great
fun and accomplishments for the next
several days.
SAGITTARIUS:
(NOVEMBER 23-DECEMBER 21)
You need to get away from your hectic
routine to be alone with your
thoughts. Be confident of success in
business dealings.
CAPRICORN:
(DECEMBER 22-JANUARY 20)
A friend challenges you to break out of
your shell and promote yourself for
advancement Maybe it's time - trust
yourself and you'll be happier in the
long run.
AQUARIUS:
(JANUARY 21-FEBRUARY 19)
It's hard to avoid confrontations.
Someone you have recently befriended
may turn on you. It'll be better to
remain silent than be drawn into
unnecessary arguments.
PISCES:
(FEBRUARY 20-MARCH 20)
Career advancement seems effortless,
so pursue your most cherished goal.
Co-workers will welcome your great
ideas.
IF THIS WEEK IS YOUR BIRTHDAY:
You usually prefer to follow the logical
path rather than trusting your intu-
ition. However, your intuition can
enhance your accuracy about situa-
tions when you team it with reason.
NOW
SHOWING
CARMIKE12
AMERICAN BEAUTY
BLUE STREAK PG-1
DOUBLE JEOPARDY
DRIVE ME CRAZY PG-1
FIGHT CLUB
FOR LOVE OF THE GAME PG-1
RANDOM HEARTS
SUPERSTAR PG-1
THE OMEGA CODE PG-1
THE SIXTH SENSE PG-1
THE STORY OF US
THREE KINGS
CAROLINA EAST 4
IN TOO DEEP
MYSTERY, ALASKA
STIGMATA
STIR OF ECHOES
THE BUCCANEER
DEEP BLUE SEA
DUDLEY DO RIGHT
INSPECTOR 6AD6ET
CREA
A THICK
RICH LATHER.
LIKE RABIES.
fc�S
Check out Tight Club itwiing Brad Prtt wd Meitlcnf, itthe Cm B
TEC has teamed up
with Barnes and Noble
- ���
to bring book reviews to
Wednesday's rounfainhead
in our new program
ntaEfgffiWftaffirirraUM&d
Wc arc looking lor fellow book lovers to
read and review best sellers fcr a good
cause. Each Semester we will donate these
best sellers to the Ronald McDonald House
where they will be available far the family
members of seriously ill children to read.
If you would like to write a review
please call Miccah at 328366
Thursday. October 21,099 5






MUNCHIE
MADNESS
HUMAN PERSON,
ENJOY THIS TUNA DIP
SUMS, continued from page 2
get moving. But by about 1 a.m after
an intensely beautiful duet between
Pond's fiddle and a banjo played by
Andraus Ponderelli, feet were mov-
ing in true Peasant's form, giving cre-
dence to my prior inkling that maybe
there was something to this band,
after all.
And just how were those feet mov-
ing? Why, to the most gloriously bas-
tardized form of music North
Carolina has seen in, uh, well, forever.
Take some 70s R&B, pure blue-
grass, Ricky Ricardo, Bohemian
gypsy folk music, early Smashing
Pumpkins, intense musical training,
about a quart of patchouli oil and
some 50s pulp sci-fi, put in a blender
set to "chunk pour into a chilled fish
bowl and serve with one of those lit-
tle umbrellas.
Then, and only then, can you begin
to understand it. Bottoms up.
This renter can be contacted atounlain-
nead@sluiientmedia.ecu.edu
This is by no mews a celebrity endorsement
Jeopardy, continued from page 2
izes that her sleazy hubby has master-
minded a scheme to run off with her
one-time best friend while taking her
beloved son Matty with them. After
she serves out her sentence, Parsons
receives three years probation under
parole officer, Travis (Tommy Lee
Jones).
Jones also does a bang-up job
although he seems to have taken on a
cast-iron role in Hollywood as he
played a somewhat similar role as a
US. Marshall in "The Fugitive"a few
years back. Yet had he not been cast,
the character would be neither effec-
tive nor interesting.
Although the truly crucial
sequences in the plot are revealed in
the ads, a number of action-packed
scenes are also extremely impressive.
Not too many women could survive
plunging off the Washington State
Ferry into the ocean while hand
cuffed to a car door, let alone strategi-
cally find her way out of a closed cas-
ket as Judd does so elegantly.
She establishes herself as tenacious,
relentless and poised individual from
the very beginning of the film to the
DELLA REESE'S
SPICY TUNA DIP
Ingredients:
1 lovely man-made (13-oz) can
tuna
1 beauty (6.5-oz) jar or can
jalapeno chiles, chopped
1 angelic onion, minced, person
12 cup darling mayonnaise
Chopped cilantro
Tortilla chips (optional, sweetie,
person, human)
Instructions:
What you want to do, person,
human, person, darling: Mix tuna
with chopped jalapeno chiles and
jalapeno liquid. Add onion to tuna
mixture. Stir in mayonnaise until
consistency is mushy. Sprinkle
cilantro on top and serve with tor-
tilla chips, if desired, person,
human, person, darling.
AMERICAN
ODDITIES
6 Thursday October 21,899
'SPIDERMAN' SEEKS MORE
CHICAGO BUILDINGS TO
SCALE ILLEGALLY
CHICAGO (AP) The French dare-
devil known to fans as Spiderman
came back to Chicago seven weeks
after scaling the 110-story Sears Tower
and said he wouldn't mind climbing
some other buildings around town.
"I would like to climb the Lake Point
Tower Alain Robert, 37, of Pezenas,
France, said Wednesday as he arrived
at a West Side police court on charges
stemming from his Aug. 20 Sears
Tower climb.
His ascent to the roof of the 1,450-
foot Sears Tower made him a celebrity
among youngsters in the poverty-
wracked neighborhood surrounding
the courthouse.
"Hey, Spiderman! they shouted to
the slight figure who arrived in snug-
fitting turquoise trousers and snake-
skin boots with his long, heavily perox-
ided hair blowing in the wind. A sham-
poo maker pays him a regular monthly
stipend to pursue what he calls his
"way of life
That consists of climbing buildings
and bridges, with structures in Paris
and Barcelona on his list of potential
climbs as well as Lake Point Tower, the
luxury condo complex on the lake-
front.
Robert also said that if builders go
ahead with plans to erect the world's
tallest building in downtown Chicago,
he would like to scale it
Robert was arrested on misde-
meanor charges of trespassing and
performing an aerial act without safety
equipment for scaling the Sears Tower.
Circuit Judge Edward O'Brien set a
new court date for Nov. 17 and gave
Robert permission to remain in France
that day, since the case is guaranteed to
be continued again. Eventually, it is
expected to be decided by a jury with
Robert explaining why he climbs.
He explained it to reporters
Wednesday.
. .uWhes1w�eej�3F.
INFLATED GORILLA RETURNED
TO WORRIED OWNER
TULSA, Okk(AP) The thieves who
took a 400-pound inflated gorilla from
the roof of a Tulsa store last summer
have been found
And it's no small bananas what busi-
nessman Ed Leinbach is paying the
person who tipped off police.
Leinbach, whose company leases the
store property from which the gorilla
was taken, gave $5,000 Tuesday to the
tipster who led police to the gorilla
snatchers.
The gorilla wasn't so lucky.
The life was blown right out of the
33-foot-tall primate. The two young
men who took the gorilla told police
they buried it under tons of debris in a
Tulsa landfill, Leinbach said
Wednesday.
The thieves did pay the $10,000 cost
of the gorilla to its owner, he said.
As for the Sun & Ski Sports, where
the gorilla was snatched from,
Leinbach said he doesn't know if they
will be getting another gorilla soon.
"I would like to think that they
would he said It's a real neat gorilla
70-YEAR-OLD WOMAN
PLEADS GUILTY TO
credits.
The cinematography was another
fabulous feature with the work of
Peter James capturing crucial racial
expressions and amazing action
series. James' work, combined with the
direction of Bruce Beresford ("Driving
Miss Daisy") make for an interesting
and worthwhile movie.
"Double Jeopardy" is truly a unique
film in that it isn't your typical action
piece. It explores uncharted territory
in plot, which revolves around the
Fifth Amendment to the Constitution.
In
essence, it does for the double jeop-
ardy law what the movieThe Net"
did for the Internet.
If not for anything else, go see the
film for the character Judd plays. She
really does a fabulous job of stepping
into the role of Libby Parsons while
making the film believable.
This trriter can be contacted at
mbuck@studentmedia.ecu.edu
SWEARING AT CHILDREN
CLINTON TOWNSHIP, Mich. (AP)
A 70-year-old woman pleaded guilty to
disorderly conduct for swearing at chil-
dren in a schoolyard near her home.
Frances Price of Clinton Township
entered the plea to the 90-day misde-
meanor this week. She was ordered to
pay $360 in fines and to attend anger
management classes unless she moves
out of the home by Nov. 6, court offi-
cials said.
She also goes on non-reporting pro-
bation for one year.
Mrs. Price and her husband, Robert,
63, own a home next to SL Thecla
Rectory.
"There's a privacy fence between
them said Clinton police Detective
James Hall, who handled the case.
"They've said they had no problem
until the school got some new play-
ground equipment that's pretty tall, so
they could see and hear kids over the
fence
Police and court records show that
students and a school employee appar-
ently heard Mrs. Price call the young-
sters obscene names while telling them
tobequiet
"Kids are kids,and this area's right
by the playscape said the Rev. Gary
Smetanka of St. Thecla. He said neither
SeeODDmfS.contiimdimPsvJ

.
HnQHRMRVninMnVMHinHlMaK





Oddities, continued from Page 6
the church nor the school has any
quarrel with the Prices, though he said
an employee brought the matter to
court
MAN KEEPS DEAD
MOTHER'S REMAINS
JEFFERSONVILLE,Ind.(AP) An
Elizabeth man who left his mother's
remains in the chair where she died for
more than five years was released from
a Jeffersonville mental-health center,
authorities said.
Arthur Petrie Jr. intends to return to
his family's property and to live there
in a camper, since his home has been
condemned, Harrison County
Prosecutor Ron Simpson said.
Authorities took Petrie into custody
Monday after finding his mother's
bones inside the run-down, garbage-
filled shack she and her son called
home. The bones had been on a chair,
covered by a blanket, since Myrtle
Petrie was found dead one February
morning in 1994.
She would have been 75 years old at
the time.
Petrie, who is about 50, told investi-
gators he was so distraught over the
prospect of arranging his mother's
funeral that he left her body in the
chair after discovering her dead one
morning
Authorities believe Myrtle Petrie died
of natural causes but are continuing to
investigate.
Results of an autopsy by the
Kentucky medical examiner's office in
Louisville, due in about nine days,
should clear up several questions,
Simpson said.
A second examination of bank
transactions and other records, under
way by the Social Security
Administration, should determine
what happened to Social Security
checks that were sent to Myrtle Petrie
and deposited electronically into a joint
bank account she and her son shared.
Federal examiners didn't say when
they expect to complete their investiga-
tion, but Simpson said he doesn't antic-
ipate hearing anything for several
weeks.
"NAKED COWBOY" PER-
FORMER DRAWS A CROWD
NEW YORK (AP) When a
Cincinnati guitarist stripped to his
underwear and went on a national tour
in search of exposure, he got a chilly
reception in many parts of the country.
But when John Robert Burdcs
"Naked Cowboy" tour hit Tunes Square
on Friday, the fens - well, passersby -
went crazy.
"I want to be the most celebrated
entertainer of all time and I'm doing
everything I can to entertain as many
people as possible said the 28-year-
old, dressed in a cowboy hat, boots,
and briefs as he braved a 56-degree
October chill to play guitar and pose
for photos with eager tourists.
"Come on, you don't want to come to
New York City and miss the naked
cowboy he called to a group of
European tourists crossing Broadway.
"That's what you came here for, isn't it?
This is what you wanted to see?"
"We did, yes answered one woman,
stopping briefly to pose with him while
a friend snapped a picture. "It must be
freezing she added, looking a bit con-
cerned as she wrapped her coat around
herself more tightly.
"Naaah. Freezing's 32 (degrees), he
said without missing a beat "In Boston
it was 20 degrees.This is a blessing
Cars honked as they whizzed by on
either side of him and crowds gathered
to take pictures or shoot home videos,
as Burck basked in the attention. He is
promoting his compact disc, Naked
Cowboy, and, since Oct 1, his first cor-
porate sponsor.
"They're the first people to actually
pay me to go on tour he said, making
sure to hand out plenty of protein bars
to his new fens.
"He's a natural Parillo Bars compa-
ny spokesman Steve Hampton said by
phone from Cincinnati. "He's got a
good physique, he's a good-looking guy
and he's pretty much flamboyant"
But, Hampton added, the company
did worry that Burck might catch cold
as his tour continues into the autumn.
Burck said he eats about 16 bars a
day and couldn't fed better. And he
seemed to be enjoying all the friendli-
ness, for a change.
"I've been arrested probably 40-
something times, city to city he said,
citing cold receptions in Louisiana and
elsewhere during his trek through
cities.
Across the street Officer Evelyn
Rodriguez merely shook her head and
smiled.
"It's legal And, hey, if he takes his
briefs off, we just take him away" she
said, adding that she'd seen him wear
skimpier underwear in the street
before.
Burdcs persistent publicity efforts
seem to be paying off. He said that
since January he has been on 31 televi-
sion shows and sold plenty of CDs.
"It's great publicity agreed Tony -
Roberts, a college student from
Houston But it must hurt wearing
those boots all day"
Nathan Clark, 34, of Queens, set
down his giant yellow bunny costume
and stood in awe.
"I've been dressing up as Sunny
Bunny every day for the past five
months.sol'mkindofinthe same
business said Clark. "If publicity were
an Olympic event he'd come home
with a gold
zatchil-
If s Your Place
To Win Phat CASH
OCT. 24 AT 6 P.M. IN PIRATE UNDER-
GROUND
You know the lingo, now its time to BINGO.
Bingo Night is fun for everyone, especially
when cash is involved. But no need to bring
cash to play - Bingo Night is FREE to all ECU
students with a valid ECU One Card.
Jo Catch a Free Flick
OCT. 27 AT 7:30 P.M. AND OCT. 28 AT 10
P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Lock, Stock, and Two Smoking Barrels (R)
Four lads find themselves in debt after a
crooked card game. After overhearing a
plot to hold up a group of drug dealers, they
decide to stick up the robbers in turn. The
confusion starts when a pair of double-bar-
reled shotguns disappear in a completely
different scam. You and a guest get in free
when you present your valid ECU One Card.
To Ski the Alps
OCTOBER 26 AT 4:00 P.M. AND 7:30 P.M.
IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Like its famed army knife, Switzerland is a
potpourri of variety. Surrounded by Ger-
many, Italy, and France, there is a fascinat-
ing mix of cultures to experience in the land
of the Swiss. You can add an optional tantalizer
to this excursion by purchasing a ticket for the
gourmet all-you-can-eat theme dinner. Dead-
line for purchasing dinner tickets is today.
Dinner tickets are $12 and may be purchased
using either your meal plan, declining balance,
or cash. Get your film tickets for free at the
Central Ticket Office by showing your valid
ECU One Card.
To Celebrate in Style
OCT. 31 FROM 9 P.M. TO 2 A.M. IN
MENDENHAU.
It's Midnight Madness 1999-the bash of the
year. Wear costumes, or come as you are for
loads of food, video karaoke, Illusion N' Fu-
sion virtual reality experience, bingo, bowling,
and billiards � all FREE. Not to mention the
ECU debut of The Rocky Horror Picture Show,
and a costume contest with cash prizes fea-
turing a Rocky Horror category. Fortunetell-
ers and a psychic hotline will be on hand, and
your favorite DJ, J Arthur, will be spinnin' the
hottest jams all night long. ECU Students will
be admitted free with a valid ECU One Card.
You may also bring a guest (high school age
or older) but you must obtain a guest pass prior
to the event from the Central Ticket Office,
Todd Meal Plan Office, or the Rec. Center.
MSC Houcs; Mon-Thurs. 8 a.m -11 p,m,Fri. 8 a.m. - felidhlgntfSat. NoonjyjirJnight Sun. Noon 1.1.p,m
Leap on over to a job
at easfcarolinian
fcpply at ovlt offices on the
Second floor of the Student
Publications Building.
'� V ' I � 1 �
if I- - I �' � u u





-1 AST WORD
REBEL '99 winners
1st Place, Graphic
Design, "U.S. Currency
Bryan Flynn.
1st Place, Textile Design,
"Untitled Jenny Love.
1st Place, Photography, "00
Robin Vuchnich
1st Place, Ceramics,
"Star Light, Starbright
Jamie Kirkpatrick
2nd Place, Sculpture, "68 Miles to
Sedona Courtney Dellinger.
in Show, "Essence Jason Bryant
All photos by D. Miccah Smith
i .
Chair Kevin C. Cale


Title
The East Carolinian, October 21, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 21, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2814
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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