The East Carolinian, October 19, 1999






www.tec.ecu.edu
I the 1
eastcarohnian
TAKING A CHANCE
pg.4
Online cheating growing in
popularity among students
days to go until 2000
NEWS BRIEFS
If you are an ECU student and your home or
apartment was affected by the recent flood, the
university needs important information from you
by Friday, Oct. 22,1999. There is a risk of losing
some of the much needed support from FEMA if
the university is unable to provide specific infor-
mation on student flood victims. Please contact
UHS if you lost your home or apartment as a re-
sult of the flooding, are temporarily living with
friends or relatives because your previous resi-
dence was damaged or if you would consider
moving into a rent-free FEMA modular unit aca-
demic village supported by the university. UHS
may be contacted seven days a week, 10 a.m.
to midnight at 328-4044 or by visiting
www.ecu.edufloodsurveys.htm
The Edward N. Warren Life Sciences Build-
ing will be dedicated at the School of Medicine
at 3 p.m. today. The $14 million facility contains
75,000 square feet of space and will house
some of the medical school's most promising re-
search programs related to heart disease and
cancer. Warren, the building's namesake, is the
senior member of the Pitt County delegation in
the General Assembly and is in his fifth term as
senator. Dedication speakers include Sen. Marc
Basnight, president pro tempore of the state
Senate; Chairman Benjamin Ruffin of the UNC
Board of Governors and David McRae, chief ex-
ecutive officer at PCMH.
Comedian Cary Long will open Homecoming
Week with his stand-up comedy act tonight at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre. Long has appeared on
The Tonight Show with Jay Leno and Evening at
the Improv. He is a winner and semi-finalist on
Star Search as well. Students may pick up two
free tickets with valid ECU ID at the Central
Ticket Office. All other tickets are $3.
Literacy Volunteers of America-Pitt County is
holding a tutor training workshop (consisting of
four sessions) beginning Nov. 1, at 7 p.m. Vol-
unteers will learn to teach functionally illiterate
adults to read. Daytime volunteers are espe-
cially needed. For more information or to regis-
ter for the workshop, call Toni Blood at 353-
6578.
The Pitt Memorial Hospital Foundation has
awarded nearly $472,000 in grants to seven
county organizations. The grants will fund
projects as diverse as a diabetes management
program for seniors and a rural indigent care
clinic.
There are some surplus computers available
for students, although they are not Y2K compli-
ant. Elaine Owens in Material Management re-
ceived approval from Raleigh to allow the avail-
able computers to be checked out on a tempo-
rary basis to students with proper documenta-
tion. Any student desiring to pursue this option
needs to contact Owens at 328-4816 to arrange
for the temporary transport of the computer. A
form must be completed by the student and
submitted to the surplus office at the time the
computer is checked out and again when it is
returned.
The Coastal Winds Quintet, Faculty Brass
Quintet and the Faculty Saxophone Quartet will
perform at 8 p.m. on Wednesday, Oct. 20 in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. For more information,
contact the ECU School of Music at 328-6851 or
3228-4370.
ONLINE SURVEY
Will you be attending the
Homecoming activities this
week?
Vote online at tec.ecu.edu
The results of last week's question:
Are landlords treating displaced students fairly?
m, 69 YES 31 NO
ARE YOU READY?
pg.e
Volume 74, lssue"ft
TODAY'S WEATHER
First-ever Midnight Madness
brings crowd, contests, craziness
TUESDAY. OCTOBER 19. 1999
Campus race initiative continues
Graduate student
submits proposal
Cloudy with a high of 69
and a low of 52
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
Students Na'im Akbar and
Adrian Cox proposed a set of forums
to Chancellor Richard Eakin this
April in hopes of hav-
ing diversity grow.
This proposal was the
result of comments
made last year by
Board of Trustees
member Walter Will-
iams that were consid-
ered racist.
Since the com-
ment, several students
have rallied together
and discussed with
Chancellor Eakin how
to bring diversity to campus.
Akbar and Cox suggested that
the chancellor institute programs
that deal with cultural sensitivity.
In response, Eakin asked the stu-
dents to create the programs, and
Akbar proposed several forums.
These forums will begin Oct. 27
and continue until April. They will
be held at Mendenhall Student Cen-
ter (MSC) in Room 244 at 7 p.m.
A series of multicultural events
will be held in conjunction with the
forums which are intended to cel-
ebrate the richness of ECU'S diverse
population.
This semester ECU has already
sponsored two events. Earlier this
month, Dr. Christopher Edley, se-
nior advisor to President Clinton,
came to Hendrix Theater to discuss
affirmative action. This past week-
end, the Ledonia Wright Culture
Center and Joyner Library spon-
sored a slave narrative.
Now the third event promoting
diversity on campus is underway. As
the year long activities continue,
Chancellor Eakin hopes family ties
RACF FORUMS
244 Mendenhall Student Center, 7 p.m.
Student ForumOct. 27
StaffFaculty ForumNov. 17
Multicultural Holiday CelebrationDec. 8
Circle of DiversityJan. 19
Interfaith Public AddressFeb. 2000
Heritage FestMar. 2000
Native American POW-WOWApr. 2000
and relationships will grow stron-
ger at ECU.
According to sophomore
Shamika Spencer, the Holiday Cel-
ebration scheduled for Dec. 8 will
celebrate all cultures on campus and
the Circle of Diversity scheduled for
Jan. 19 plans on having representa-
tion from all cultures and beliefs on
campus. Students and staff will then
form a circle around MSC.
"We want everyone to feel like
they have a voice on campus
Spencer said. "We want everyone to
learn something from one another
The proposal committee consists
of nine students; Na'im Akbar,
Layota Davis, Dushun Evans, Jason
Evans, Elenah Godbolt, Shamika
Spencer, Roderick Stevenson,
Patrick Suarez and Yolanda Thlgpen.
Students on the proposal com-
mittee shared their thoughts on the
forums.
"On a personal level, I'm more
aware of promoting the goodness
between students Akbar said. "I
feel that it is my responsibility to
reach out to those different from
myself. Hopefully it
will become conta-
gious and all stu-
dents will be able to
build on each other
"I feel that the
forums will not only
be beneficial to Afri-
can-American stu-
dents, but to stu-
dents as a whole
Spencer said. "They
will show how di-
verse we are and help
us understand each other to better
our campus and get along
"I hope to see more minority
groups on campus so we can gain
knowledge and information from
one another said sophomore
Patrick Suarez.
According to Akbar, students
need to recognize the challenges
that colleges face with diversity.
"I hope that the forums will cre-
ate discussions between the ECU
population so we can make the step-
ping stones harmony Akbar said.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
aouu"
Community leaders discuss Floyd aftermath
Plans made
to help victims
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
The United Way of America and
about 30 local community leaders
met earlier this month to discuss the
state of our flood-stricken area.
The meeting to place on Oct. 8
at the Wachovia Bank on Red Banks
Road to discuss their thoughts and
ideas of how to meet the needs of
the area in the wake of Hurricane
Floyd and the subsequent flooding.
Betty Beene, president and CEO
of the United Way, presided over the
question and answer meeting.
"We need words of inspiration
said Dr. Rick Croskey, president of
the local board of United Way. "We
need to understand the needs of the
community and we need to gain
knowledge and ideas from those
who have gone through the same
devastation
The main concerns of the com-
munity leaders during the meeting
were homeless families. Many are
still in local shelters run by the Red
Cross, which will stay open until all
the families have other means of
shelter.
Other Pitt County families have
been forced to live in hotels or
FEMA trailers. The trailers are avail-
able to families for 18 months, rent
free. However, there are not enough
of these temporary housing units
for the area. Officials stated that the
temporary housing units are guar-
anteed to those who need them, but
it will take time.
Many present during the meet-
ing expressed their concerns about
what will happen to the flood-
stricken families when their money
and vouchers dwindle, and hotels
will no longer house them.
"The unknown scares us said
one attendee. "What should we ex-
pect as we continue through'the
rebuilding?"
"There are several things to ex-
pect Beene said.
"For one, people might start
fighting they will begin to get
frustrated because they won't un-
derstand why it's taking so long to
get things back together. Two is the
flood plain issue. Even though
someone's house wasn't affected by
the flood, it may be in a flood area,
therefore they have to get out. Third
is mental health and stress related
issues with parents, children, em-
ployers, etc
Many suggestions were made at
the meeting, and it was concluded
that a partnership, in which non-
affected families could house dev-
astated families, would be adopted.
Despite the grim mood during
the meeting, Beene tried to speak
encouraging words.
"With a natural disaster, the
community really begins to mean
something that it never did before
she said.
"I wanted to see firsthand the
problems and needs of the victims
many are hopeful, others are
weary, but there is a light at the end
of the tunnel and United Way is
here to help
There were approximately 1,(XX)
volunteers from United Way work-
ing in the community for 16-18
hour days. Eight more groups came
earlier this month to continue the
relief effort. Volunteers have been
sleeping in local office buildings and
are showering at the Greenville Rec-
reational Center.
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
SGA President Cliff Webster receives a donation from'
an NC State representative (courtesy photo)
NCSU collects
donations for flood
relief at ECU
Contributions total more $7,000
Angela Harne
STAFF WRITER
While ECU tried to rebuild the community,
NCSU offered a helping hand.
State students organized the 35,000 Challenge
Fund raiser, a week-long event, running from
Sept. 28-Oct.l, to offer ECU students some relief.
NCSU students raised $7,000 and collected
more than 20,000 items including clothes, blan-
kets and canned" food� - �
On Oct. 1, students hosted a campus collec-
tion party where students could drop off remain-
ing donations. Committees were created that
sought donations from the residence halls, and
various NCSU fraternities and sororities visited
local apartment complexes for contributions.
Students felt the fund raiser was a huge suc-
cess.
"Without a doubt it was an incredible experi-
ence said NCSU student Luke Perry. "The way
the university responded was amazing. Everyone
stepped up to the challenge
"Obviously the reason for the fund raiser was
sad, but it showed how generous people can be
in the time of need said NCSU student Bryan
Proffitt. "It was very heartwarming
SGA President Cliff Webster applauded the ef-
fort.
"The fund raiser was awesome Webster said.
"It brought more enthusiasm to ECU than I've
ever seen before. Out of all of the groups I've
worked with during our time of need, N.C. State
would have to be the best
Because NCSU has large enrollment of 35,000
students, it was hoped that all students and staff
members would donate one item.
"Even though we didn't reach our goal of
35,000,1 feel we contributed a great deal to ECU
Perry said. "We wish them the best as they re-
build their campus and community
This writer can be contacted at
aharne@studentmedia. ecu. edu.
Hurricane Irene moves out to sea, causes no area damage
The day after Irene hit, her effects can be seen at the bottom of College Hill (photo by Emily Richardson)
WILMINGTON (AP)�Hurricane
Irene raced out to sea today, but not
before dumping nearly a foot of rain
in parts of eastern NC and rekin-
dling fears of residents displaced by
Hurricane Floyd a month ago.
NC's third hurricane in two
months churned through Florida
during the weekend and up the
southeast U.S. coast toward the
Carolinas. Late Sunday, it turned
northeast back to sea.
Irene's maximum sustained
winds increased to 105 mph over-
night and it accelerated its move-
ment out into the Atlantic. Tropi-
cal storm warnings were canceled as
the storm moved away from the
coast. �
At 11 a.m the storm was 240
miles south of Massachusetts' Nan-
tucket Island, moving northeast at
39 mph. Storm surges of up to 4 feet
above normal were expected to de-
crease later today.
Torrential rains�tnostly from 3
inches to 6 inchebut up to 11
inches in isolated areas�closed sev-
eral dozen roads. The rain had;
stopped falling by early today, antt
forecasters expected skies to clear
rapidly.
But delayed river flooding and
washed-out roads were still the big-
gest concern to state officials. The
Tar, Neuse and Cape Fear rivers were
expected to be above flood stage by
the middle of the week. During
Floyd, most of the state's 49 deaths
involved rising water, not high
wind.
As Irene neared N.C, an evacu-
ation order was issued for several
beach towns near Wilmington, and
people living in low-lying areas and
mobile homes were encouraged to
seek shelter.
Many left homeless by Floyd
which dumped up to 20 inches of
rain Sept. 16, were evacuated from'
temporary trailer villages to shel
ters. About 6,()(K) homes were dam-
See
IRIE, page 2
,ife





f
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Think globally: the winds of climate
change blow both ways
CRIME SCENE SGA
if.
a
Planet's future uncertain;
geologists reseaching to find answers
m
Dr. Catherine Rigsby
CONTRIBUTING WRITER
� This article is the last installment in our geological se-
rifs
, You've heard it all before. It has become part of our
national culture. Human activities are causing dramatic
increases in carbon dioxide (C02), methane and other
greenhouse gases in the atmosphere. These changes are
causing global warming.
. This much is indisputable: humans have had an
immense impact on the Earth's surface and atmosphere,
the effect of that impact, however, is far from certain.
The scenario heard most often goes like this. As C02
ind other greenhouse gases are added to the atmo-
sphere, average global temperature rises. The results are
flooding, deadly heat waves and severe wind storms.
Tjhe grain belt moves north, sea level rises, our coastal
cjties drown and we all move to Canada, which is now
duite temperate.
i But there is a problem. This scenario is based on
rfcther simple models, models that don't take fully into
Recount the importance of both the oceans and the
ajtmosphere.
1 More complex models, that couple the ocean and
atmosphere, present a very different picture. As C02
and other greenhouse gases are added to the atmo-
sphere, intensified heating in the tropics evaporates
ruge amounts of water from the ocean. As evapora-
tion increases, tropical cloud belts get thicker and more
water vapor is added to the atmosphere.
Water vapor is a greenhouse gas that dwarfs the sig-
nificance of COr As water vapor increases, more rain
fills on the northern continents and oceans. The addi-
tion of all of this fresh water to the northern ocean
causes circulation in the North Atlantic to shut down.
! When it is operating, North Atlantic circulation
rfroves cold, deep water from the polar regions to the
ebuator. As it moves through the equatorial region, the
water warms and rises to the surface. This warm sur-
face water circulates back toward the poles, via currents
like the Gulf Stream, keeping the climate in places such
as NC and western Europe relatively mild.
When this circulation shuts down, the currents that
carry heat from the equator to the poles also shut down.
Without the warm water provided by these currents,
the Northern Hemisphere gets cold, very cold. Instead
of heating up, we enter a new ice age. Ice caps grow,
sea level drops, we all buy heavy wool coats and wish
we lived near the beach, which would be miles east of
where it is now.
The problem with all this is that we cannot be sure
which scenario is correct. While most media attention
has focused on C02 and temperature fluctuations, those
of us who study Earth's climate history know that wa-
ter vapor and precipitation patterns are also important.
Geologists studying global climate change are work-
ing to solve the problem of competing scenarios by
studying the record of past climate change. Our stud-
ies provide ample evidence for both wetter and dryer
and warmer and colder conditions on the Earth than
exist today.
Further, the geological record tells us that the Earth's
climate changes are not usually slow and smooth. In-
stead, they are punctuated by abrupt shifts in rainfall,
as evidenced by the periodic filling up and drying out
of large lakes worldwide and by equally abrupt and dra-
matic shifts in temperature, sometimes up to 20 de-
grees Fahrenheit within a few decades.
The last large-scale global climate shift, a short-Jived
period of severe global cooling, occurred about 10,000
years ago. Lately, we have had an unusually long pe-
riod of climatic warmth and stability. This current warm
interval has already been more than twice as long as
any during the past two million years.
Civilization is working to insure that Earth's climate
will change again soon. By adding C02 and other green-
house gases to the atmosphere, we are giving a climate
system that is poised on the brink of natural changes a
small, but powerful nudge, possibly just what it needs
to make the overdue change. But what will that change
be?
Studies of past climate change are helping to an-
swer that question. Geological data collected from sites
around the globe can be used to test the ocean-atmo-
sphere models.
This data, best preserved in sediments on the ocean
floor and in large lakes, is being gathered and exam-
ined by geologists at ECU and around the world. We
cannot study the future, but the information preserved
in geological record will provide us with valuable clues
about past climate change and help us predict and pre-
pare for the inevitable, and likely rapid, climate changes
coming our way.
October 13
Worthless Checks�A student
was served with three summons
at Belk Hall residence for using
worthless checks at UBE.
LostStolen Wallet�A student
reported that she had either lost
her wallet or it had been stolen.
She retraced her steps and was
unable to locate it.
Second Degree Rape�A stu-
dent reported that she had been
raped on Oct. 9 at approximately 6
a.m. by a friend who is also a stu-
dent.
Overdose�An officer was un-
able to locate a student after a call
was made to check on her. At
10:46 p.m aall was made to the
police department that she was in
her room and had taken several
Atvin tablets.
October 14
Larceny�A student reported
that her bike had been stolen from
the rack west of White Hall. The
front tire had been left secured to
rack.
Larceny, Possession of Stolen
Property�A student was arrested
for larceny of a bicycle and pos-
session of stolen property after an
officer observed him traveling
down 10th Street. The victim was
contacted.
SGA Meeting held on Oct. 18 at
5 p.m.
Meeting called to order.
Old Business: None
New Business: Presentation of
$10,935 to the ECU Family Relief
Fund by the Association of Student
Governments' Quarter's Campaign.
At the Nov. 8 meeting, SGA
members will propose and approve
student fees for the coming year.
Announcements: The Traffic
and Parking Committee will meet
Thursday, Oct. 21, at 3 p.m. in
Room 212 in Mendenhall Student
Center.
Meeting Adjourned.
Tuesday, Oct. 12,1999
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu
CORRECTION
Campus Nutrition Director
Laura Hartung was misquoted in
both the "The Truth About Choco-
late" and "The Freshman 15" ar-
ticles. The corrections are as follows:
Women are not 76 percent more
likely to be addicted to chocolate
than males, but are 76 percent more
likely to crave chocolate; Fruits are
not a substantial source of protein,
but are full of vitamins, minerals,
fiber and carbohydrates; It is fine to
snack, as long as it isn't made syn-
onymous with studying. Lastly, the
quotation "although men need
their daily cocoa as well" was
wrongly attributed to Hartung. We
apologize for the misinformation.
Like the army knife,
it's multi-faceted
and diverse.
See for
yourself!
All-you can eat dinner:
Mendenhall Great Room, 6 p.m
Menu: Zesty Swiss, Cheddar, and
beer soup with croutons; cassel roast
(pot roast) with ginger sauce; chicken breast with
avocado and tomato; concasse (diced vegetable topping);
colorful vegetable medley; roasted fresh herbed potatoes;
Roquefort walnut loaf; Swiss chocolate torte.
TRAVEL-ADVENTURE FILM
AND THEME DINNER SERIES
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 26, 1999 4PM & 7:30PM
HENDRIX THEATRE, MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Films are free to students with a current, valid ECU One Card. Student dinner tickets are
Si2 each. To reserve student dinner tickets visit the CTO in Mendenhall Student Center
by October 21 and pay with cash, check, credit card, meal card, or declining balance.
CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE HOURS: Monday Friday 8:30 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Tel: 252.328.4788 or 1.800.ECU.ARTS; VTTY: 252.328.4736 or 1.800.ECU.ART5
Health Professions Career
Information Seminar
� Thursday, October 28. 1999
� Brewster B-I02
� 3:30-6:OOp.m.
All Students Interested In Health Professions
Should Attend!
Sponsored by
Office of I tidergraditate Studies am
1(1.Uiitlcmic Departments
I
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
� State of the art Fitness Center.
� Pool, tennis & volleyball
� Close to campus.
� Washers & dryers available
� Great Location:
1,2 & 3
Bedroom
Apartment
Homes
CALL
TODAY
355-2198
airlane
1510 Bridle Circle

YOUR VMW& �
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THE ROCKY HORROR PICTURE SHOW
OPEN GLOW-BOWLING a BILLIARDS BINGO
ILLUSION N' FUSION (virtual reality) HORROR FLICK
FORTUNE TELLERS & PSYCHICS WITCHES' BREW
CLUBMYSTIQUEwJ ARTHUR VIDEO KARAOKE
FREE BREAKFAST BUFFET COSTUME CONTEST
Students need only present a valid ECU One
Card to enter Midnight Madness. Students may
bring a guest (high school or older), but must
obtain a guest pass prior to the event. Guest
passes will be available October 25-29 at the
Central Ticket Office in MSC from 8:30 a.m.
to 6:00 p.m. and at the Todd Dining Hall Meal
Plan office from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. On
Saturday and Sunday (Oct. 30-31), passes will
be available from 9:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m. at
the Student Recreation Center.
Tickets for The Rocky Horror
Picture Show (one per person)
will be available at Midnight
Madness from 11 p.m. - Midnight.
Prop kits will be provided; no
other props allows
,UDENf
-





ct. 12,1999
edia.ecu.edu
DTION
tlon Director
i misquoted in
1 About Choco-
shman 15" ar-
ts are as follows:
i percent more
;d to chocolate
76 percent more
olate; Fruits are
urce of protein,
mins, minerals,
ates; It is fine to
isn't made syn-
cing. Lastly, the
igh men need
as well" was
to Hartung. We
isinformation.
rmy knife,
aceted
e.
eat dinner:
Room, 6 p.m
:heddar, and
cassel roast
breast with
ite topping);
?d potatoes;
I L M
SERIES
30 PM
CENTER
ner tickets are
jdent Center
ng balance.
6:00 p.m.
ECU. ARTS
.esday.Oct. 12, 1999
wvw.tec.ecu.edu
NIIWS
ADVERTISING IN THE EAST CAROLINIAN WORKS
CALL 328-2000 TO CONTACT AN ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVE
FREEtotf
PARKING
For The Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is reserving 6 parking
spaces for you. Visit the 10th Street location
and fill out an entry form for a chance to win
one ofourPrimo Parking Spaces for a semester.
Vie spaces are within easy walking distance of the Recreation
Center, Joyner Library, Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins
Art Building and Student Health Department.
www.attic-nightclub.com
nyric
r�75'2.7303
209 E. 5th St.
One Ste.p Beyond
In Rathskellar
SATURDAY 23RD
No purchase necessary to win.
Winner will be notified, by phone.
"Spaces good January Iff 2000 through May , 2000"
Jimmies
ChicHenShacH
Coid Sweat
X In Rathskellar
iWfr0nty$4.99X
!
MELVIN SEALS
& MERL SAUNDERS
? OF THE JERRY GARCIA BAND ?
SATURDAY 30TH
s
www.livewireonline.com
The ECU Student Union Swings
into Homecoming Week '99 with
COMEDIAN
CART LONG
� THE TONIQtIT SHOW
imUHTLENO
CVENMQflTTHC
Tue Oct. 19, 1999
8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students may pick up two free
tickets from the Central Ticket Office
when valid ECU ID is presented.
All other tickets - $3.00.
� vh-i sra
� 4-TIi
scni-nrMusT
hVOlN,
.�H1DEN
University of Notre Dame - Gale Spencer "I laughed the whole hour! Cary's
act is full of everday situations that anyone can relate to. And most of all
he was clean and funny! A MUST TO GO SEE
Florida State University - Mark Striffler "Cary's performance
was hilarious. He was the only comic we had all year that was
asked to do an encore. Students have already asked to have
him back next year
University of Southern California - Susan Rosefield "Excellent
routine! The bit about relationships was hilarious! I wish my
boyfriend could have heard it. It was brilliant! Everyone we
have talked to wants to bring him back. Thanks again
For a good time, call the Student Union Entertainment Hotline, 328-6004,
or bookmark our website: www.ecu.eduStudentUnion.
Individuals requiring accomodations under The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should notify the university at least two weeks
pnor to the date of the event.Wnte. the Department for Disability Support Services, A-117, Brewster Building, or call 252-328-4802.
���.
The East Carolinian
news�studentmedia.ecu�da
RENE
from page 1
aged during Floyd, with damage
expected in the billions of dollars.
The American Red Cross re-
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than 2,100 homes and businesses
were without power in the eastern
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Moore said the worst flooding
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or more than 10 feet higher than it
climbed after Floyd.
A 43-year-old motorist died Sun-
day in a storm-related accident
when a vehicle hydroplaned into a
tree in Granvilie County. Irene has
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hurricane. One touched down Sun-
day evening near Weeksville in
Pasquotank County, destroying six
homes, damaging several more and
causing one injury. Another tor-
nado caused damage and an injury
near Jacksonville.
Meanwhile, another weather
system in the Atlantic became Tropi-
cal Storm Jose early today and was
expected to strengthen into a hur-
ricane in the next few days.
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The East Carolinian
FEATURES
Tuesday, Oct. 19, 1999
features0studentrnedia.ecu.edu
Tuesday, 0
www.tec.ecu
FEATURES BRIEFS
Great writers in history
Shakespeare, William (1564-1616)
Shakespeare was the English playwright and
poet, recognized in much of the world as the
greatest of all dramatists. Shakespeare's plays
communicate a profound knowledge of the
wellsprings of human behavior, revealed
through portrayals of a wide variety of
characters. His use of poetic and dramatic
means to create a unified aesthetic effect out
of a multiplicity of vocal expressions and actions
is recognized as a singular achievement. While
his use of poetry within his plays to express the
deepest levels of human motivation in individual,
social and universal situations is considered one
of the greatest accomplishments in literary
history.
Ibsen, Henrtk Johan (1828-1906)
Ibsen was the Norwegian dramatist, whose well-
constructed plays dealing realistically with
psychological and social problems won him
recognition as the father of modern drama.
)aV
Chekhov, Anton Pavlovich (1860-1904)
Chekhov was the Russian writer who brought
both the short story and the drama to new
.prominence in Russia and eventually the
.Western world. Chekhov conveys his
character's inner lives and feelings indirectly,
by suggestion rather than statement. His plots
'are usually simple, and the endings of both his
stories and his plays tend toward openness
father than finality. Chekhov's works create the
effect of profound experience taking place
beneath the surface in the ordinary lives of
unexceptional people.
O'Neill, Eugene (1888-1953)
O'Neill was the American playwright whose
work dramatizes the plight of people driven by
elemental passions, by memory and dream and
by an awareness of the forces that threaten to
overwhelm them. His early plays, appearing
between 1916-1920, helped initiate American
theater's shift away from elegant parlor dramas
and toward gritty naturalistic plays.
Genet, Jean (1910-1986)
Genet was the French novelist and dramatist,
whose writings, dwelling upon bizarre, and
grotesque aspects of human existence, express
profound rebellion against society and its
conventions. Born in Paris, Genet was the
illegitimate child of a prostitute. He was caught
stealing at the age of 10 and by early
adolescence had begun to serve a series of
sentences, spanning nearly 30 years, for theft
and homosexual prostitution.
Mamet, David (1947-)
Mamet is the American playwright, screenwriter
and director, whose dramatic style reflects the
inarticulateness and violence in alienated
members of the lower-middle class. Poetic,
comically fragmented and often shocking,
Mamet's use of language has been compared
to that of Greek dramatist Aristophanes,
American writer Emest Hemingway, Irish author
Samuel Beckett and English playwright Harold
Pinter.
(photos courtesy of the World Wide Web)
Online cheating violates conduct code
Students can now use computers to cheat as well as study and type. (Photos by Emily Richardson & Patrick Raulet)
Students can suffer
detrimental consequences
Nina M. Dry
ASSISTANT FEATURES EDITOR
You're in class all day and work a double shift every
night. Homework is a task you have mastered com-
pleting in between classes. All of a sudden, as you
glimpse at your syllabus, you realize a major paper is
due in two days that will count 40 percent of your fi-
nal grade. As you stress about creating a 15 page paper
in two days, you begin to daydream of a magical place
where you can get a paper that has already been writ-
ten. Sound too good to be true? Not in this day and
age. Finding sites where you can receive pre-written
papers is not hard to come by as cheatingplagiarizing
online becomes more pppular.
Judicial coordinator, Dean Mary Louise Antieau re-
alize these sites are in existence.
"We've began picking up on these sites about five
years ago Antieau said.
According to Antieau, as a member The Associa-
tion of Student Judicial Affairs, she and other profes-
sors discuss online cheating. According to Donna
Patchett of Marymount University, "if you go to any
internet search engine and type in 'term papers you
will find hundreds of sites offering term papers for free
and some that will send free sample pages before
you buy
The system is quite simple. On most sites you can
get many things accomplished, from writing a term
paper or book report to creating a professional resume
or answering the questions on college entrance essays.
With a few keystrokes, you can obtain a custom pa-
per�for a price. For example, on one particular site,
the first page of a book report will cost $30, each addi-
tional page $15. Be prepared to shell out more money
if you want to include a bibliography or footnotes.
There are other sites that will post papers under
certain categories and are just right for the picking, if
you're lucky to find one that fits the description of what
professors are looking for. According to Antieau, she
wouldn't consider using these sources.
"Some sites have students who write Ipapers). put
them on the web and sell them or give them away
Antieau said.
She said she has read some of these papers that have
gone on the net for free and, as a former high school
teacher, she wouldn't even give them a "D" on the
work, had it been their own.
Although many of these sites use disclaimers such
as "students should use these papers as a tool to better
understand the particular subject matter and the site
cannot be held accountable for plagiarism if the stu-
dent chooses to hand in the pre-written work it is
still considered cheating ifyou turn in the work as your
own.
"No matter what medium is used to obtain these
papers, it's still a violation of ECU's code of conduct
Antieau said.
Within her first year as judicial coordinator at ECU,
Antieau has not encountered a case of cheating involv-
Independent films
given outlet on campus
Mercury cinema
growing in popularity
Jennifer Brown
STAFF WRITER
Independent films that are not shown at main-
stream theaters like Carmike 12 get less time in the
public eye. Mercury Cinema at ECU gives students a
chance to see independent films.
"Mercury Cinema shows independent films that
aren't Blockbusters and aren't usually well-known to
the general public said Cathy Black, a senior at ECU.
Black is the film chair, which means she supervises a
group of 12 students who select the movies to be shown.
These students start by browsing through catalogs
of films and then compile a huge list of movies they
are interested in viewing. The list is eventually narrowed
down. Also, surveys were passed out to all incoming
students to see which movies they were interested in
seeing.
"Mercury Cinema shows independent films that
aren't Blockbusters and aren't usually well-known to
the general public
Cathy Black
ECU Student
Then after defining their list they vote and Black
orders the films that are available. Students can get
involved by going by Mendenhall 236 and picking up
an application from the Student Union.
Mercury Cinema began last year, according to
Stephen Gray, the student activities director. Gray said
that the response to the cinema has been very large
this year with audiences ranging from 150-175 people
per showing.
Mercury Cinema movies are shown at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesdays and 10 p.m. on Thursdays. Blockbusters
are shown Thursdays Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays
at 7:30 p.m.
"Life is Beautiful will be shown on Nov. 3-4 in con-
junction with an artistic instillation about the holo-
caust that will be in the Mendenhall Gallery, Oct. 25-
Nov. 22 said Lynn Caverly, the assistant director of
student activities.
This Is just one of the many films to be shown at
the cinema this year. Freshmen Brad Whitley and
Amanda Smith enjoy going to the Mercury Cinema.
Whitley said they have seen such films as Midsummer
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Elizabeth was released at Mercury Cinema for students and
staff. (Photo courtesy of the World Wide Web)
Night's Dream, Walking Ned Divine and Austin Powers.
"It's great and the movies are very current Whit-
ley said.
"It's free and easily accessible Smith said.
Mercury Cinema shows a variety of films chosen
by students, and every show is free. This is a chance to
view quality movies that didn't make Blockbuster sta-
tus, and it is the only place you will see these movies
on the big screen.
This writer can be contacted at
jbrown@studentmedia. ecu. edu
Ing the internet.
For some, although, it Is in violation with our
university's regulations.Jhey will take the chance and
submit these essays. But according to university attor-
ney, Ben Irons, it isn't the smartest thing.
"Online plagiarism) compromises a student's in-
tegrity and undermines their education Irons said.
"Faculty members are aware of these sites and do
recognize that It is a problem. However, faculty mem-
bers are equipped to detect plagiarism
According to Antieau, one way professors can de-
tect plagiarism is the changes in the style of writing.
"Generally speaking, it's pretty easy in most sub-
jects because most students who cheat aren't very dis-
ciplined themselves Antieau said. "It would be easy
for a professor to note the change of writing styles in a
student
"If the written product is inconsistent with previ-
ous products, professors will become suspicious Irons
said.
And the consequences that go along with getting
caught can be severe.
"If one is caught cheating, consequences such as
an 'F' in the course may occur Irons said. "If allega-
tions are serious enough and repeated, it could extend
from probation, suspension, possibly expulsion.
Although cheating seems to have immediate re-
wards, occasionally the consequences can be a severe
as expulsion. Whether it is online or in person, cheat-
ing is a violation of the code of conduct and can be
detrimental to one's academic career if he or she is
caught.
ECU's Cod? of ConductAcademic Honor Code
�Owatina: The actual fiviiq w raceiving of any uruHTthorized aid or
or ttae givmi) or racaivmg of any �faff advantage on any form of arrv
KfleiMHi nvinu
'Ptagumnr. Copying Hi laonjage, itractw, Men, mtlm awejto of
another ad passing same as ana's original work.
�httfabtic StrtNMt if my iailn�tJwvBibaVyoriiiwittii�.
regarding any DrctmstMCos rotative ta anaemic work.
Possible reasons why students cheat
1. StfM is ley, bit itl MM good poets.
2. Student wants to post and Hay in school.
3. Student ii dnvan by ttw need to get good orMet.
4. Student comes to college with insileQMts preparation, he or she is going
about succeeding in college the wrong way.
'reasons compiled try Dean Antieau during mterview
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia.ecu.edu
MISCELLANEA
Kenton Bell
Vocabulary for the verbose
Botts dots- the raised reflective dots in the middle of
highways.
Tittle- the dot over the letter 'i
Octothorp- the pound sign on a phone.
Virgule-te slash mark used in web address also called a
solidus.
Spoonerism- switching letters. For example, saying jag
of Flapan, instead of flag of Japan.
� Coprolites- dinosaur droppings.
Money mania
-A quarter has 119 grooves around the edge.
-A dime has 118 ridges around the edge.
-The first U.S. coin to bear the words "United States o
America was a penny piece made in 1727. It was als
inscribed with the plain-spoken motto: "Mind You
Own Business
-There are 293 ways to make change for a dollar.
-The car in the foreground on the back of a $10 bill is
1925 Huptmobile.
Mugs on money
' $1 - George Washington
$2 - Thomas Jefferson
$5 - Abraham Lincoln
$10 - Alexander Hamilton
$20 - Andrew Jackson
$50 - Ulysses Grant
$100 - Benjamin Franklin
$500 - William McKinley (discontinued 1969)
$1,000 - Grover Cleveland (discontinued 1969)
$5,000 -James Madison (discontinued 1969)
$10,000 - Salmon P. Chase (Supreme Court Chief Jus
tice: 1864-73; discontinued 1969)
$100,000 - Woodrow Wilson (used only in Federal Re
serveTreasury transactions)
Curious Comments
"Nothing on earth consumes a man more quickly thai
the passion of resentment
"Life in its very essence is determined in the moment
when one must decide between standing shackled tc
the burden of consequence, or lying naked with tht
mistress of regret
Challenge Question:
Define Tmesis, and supply an example. Hint: It is of
ten used in the presence of alcohol.
Answer to Last Challenge:
Name the cast of the Golden Girls, and give their rea:
names. Dorothy Zbornak (Bea Arthur), Rose Nylunfl
(Betty White), Blanche Devereaux (Rue McClanahan),
Sophia Petrillo (Estelle Getty).
Students who answered correctly: Dawn Choate,
Tiffanie Sweet, Wanda Tindal, Patricia Lafuente, Claes
Lindgren.
Anyone who answers today's challenge question will
have their name published in Thursday's paper.
This writer can be contacted at
kbell9studentmedia.ecu.edu
e,
Phillip Gilfus,
Susan Wright,
Emily Richard
Dan Cox, Web
If we cor
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OPINIOI
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LETTER
Step
Dear Editor:
Last spring the
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Ct. 19, 1999
iedia.ecu.edu
de
jtion with our
the chance and
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luences such as
said. "If allega-
it could extend
;xpulsion.
immediate re-
can be a severe
1 person, cheat-
uct and can be
if he or she is
Tuesday, Oct. 12,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
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editorOstudentmedia.ecu.edu
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"oastcarolinian
Holly G. Harris, Editor

Melissa Massey, Managing Editor
Phillip Gilfus, News Editor Stephen Schramm, Sports Editor
Susan Wright, Features Editor Melyssa Ojeda, Head Copy Editor
Emily Richardson, Photography Editor Jason Latour, Staff Illustrator
Dan Cox, Web Media Director Janet Respess, Ad Manager
NEWSROOM252-328-6366
ADVERTISING252-328-2000
FAX252-328-6558
E-MAILtec@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Serving the ECU community since 1925, The East Carolinian
prints 11,000 copies every Tuesday and Thursday during the
regular academic year. The lead editorial in each edition is the
opinion of the majority of the Editorial Board and is written in
turn by Editorial Board members. The East Carolinian welcomes
letters to the editor, limited to 250 words (which may be edited
lor decency or brevity at the editors discretion). The East Caro-
linian reserves the right to edit or reject letters lor publication.
All letters must be signed and include a telephone number.
Letters may be sent by e-mail to editor@studentmedia.ecu.edu
or to The East Carolinian, Student Publications Building,
Greenville, NC 27858-4353. For additional information, call
252-328-6366
If we continue to neglect our
responsibility to the environment that
feeds and nourishes us as well as
gives us beauty to appreciate
aesthetically, how can we say that we
are gaming a wider perspective or
that we are interested in the well
being of the world and the people
around US'?
OURVIEW
Recycling: is it an overrated movement left over from the hippies, or is
it a valid way of participating in the fight to preserve the natural resources
that we have left?
At ECU, we are at about 50 percent of our recycling capabilities. We
could recycle less, but there is room for us to recycle much more.
There are recycling bins all over CC and the other academic buildings
on campus, but do you always stop to put your old papers in them or do
you aim for the nearest trash can? Maybe everyone should stop and think
next time they walk around with that pathetic test grade, and decide if
you want it forever in a landfill or forever erased and made into another
sheet of paper for another merciless teacher to write a heart breaking
grade on.
Not a difficult decision to make, but many decide that they want these
papers and soda cans, bottles, memos and newspapers to forever sit and
rot beneath neighborhoods or city parks.
The trees that we have left are producing enough oxygen for the out-
rageous amount of men and women populating this planet at a mind-
blowing rate, but how long will that last if they are burned and chopped
down to make toothpicks and other wood products? If we could preserve
the natural resources we have by recycling the things that we use, than
our forests and rain forests might possibly be around for more genera-
tions to look at and benefit from.
Why bother having recycling bins if we are not going to use them? As
students, we should be educated and aware of the effect of the things we
do. If we continue to neglect our responsibility to the environment that
feeds and nourishes us as well as gives us beauty to appreciate aestheti-
cally, how can we say that we are gaining a wider perspective or that we
are interested in the well being of the world and the people around us?
Next time you carelessly trash that recyclable good, think again. Would
you rather cause the needless destruction of another tree, or will you give
that piece of paper, no matter how foul the writing on it may be, another
life?
OPINION COLUMN
University should reinstate reading day
OPINION COLUMN
Consumer fever eats the American conscience
Demosthenes
OPINION WRITER
In the latest pinnacle of western
culture, the United States has em-
braced a sick philosophy. It is called
consumer fever and it is spreading.
The majority of citizens of this na-
tion believe that if they can buy, eat,
burn, possess and consume enough
material substance that it will make
them happy.
It is quite evident by the fact that
Americans use more eas, food, pa-
per and so on than any other na-
tion. This is no way to live in har-
mony with our surroundings. Con-
sumerism is the great lawn mower
of the world.
You can look at this phenom-
enon from a smaller perspective. A
bacteria colony in a petri dish full
of food will grow in population
until supplies begin to run short. Its
population will then decrease until
all are dead. This event follows a
simple bell curve that exists
throughout nature.
Has mankind not risen above
this base biological law? Obviously,
3ur petri dish has not yet reached
ts capacity, but we are beginning
to see the strain we cause. Why do
you think there is a big push to de-
velop planetary colonization tech-
nology?
In eastern thought there is a
much larger emphasis on living
within your surroundings, never
upsetting the delicate balance that
nature has established. This can he
accomplished by slowing down,
paying attention to what is around
you and using only what you need.
For example, why do Americans
eat so much food? People in this
country eat like they have not seen
food in weeks. Next time you walk
through the lines at Todd or
Mendenhall think about how much
food do you really need to consume
and if everyone ate no more than
they needed how much the quality
of the food would increase.
When you go out to buy a new
stereo, bicycle, book or tool, think
about if you buy one with some sub-
stance quality to it, you might
spend a little extra money now, but
you will not have to run out and
buy another one in three years
when this one is useless. When
something of yours breaks, the im-
mediate consumer fever response is
to run out for another. A great al-
ternative which seems to have been
forgotten is to simply get it fixed.
One more thing which I think
plays a vital role in harmonious liv-
ing is reusing resources. Recycling
applies not only to glass and paper,
but to everything around you. If we
could learn to reuse materials in-
stead of discarding everything into
giant underground dumps we
would be one step closer to har-
mony.
As 1 watch Europe put up its own
versions of Walmart, and I see chil-
dren in Nepal wearing Sylvester
Stalone T-shirts, I can only hope
that humanity will not fall for these
consumer fever methods. Keep
shopping at your small independent
bakery, your fish market and your
deli. Reuse and recycle anything you
can and find new ways to do so, and
do not discard your broken posses-
sions only to go out and buy a new
piece of garbage to replace it. Let us
not take more from the petri dish
than we can return. Be thoughtful
and conscious, until we meet again.
This wrier can be contacted at
Demonsthenes0studentmedia.ecu.edu
Marvelle Sullivan
Everyone is making adjustments due to Hurricane
Floyd and its disastrous aftermath. Not only did the
hurricane reek havoc in our day to day lives by de-
stroying housing, contaminating water and bolstering
the amount of local mosquitoes but it also created uni-
versity chaos. Classes being canceled for two weeks is
resulting in unmitigated academic hell for both the
students and professors. In the attempt to compensate
for the classes missed because of this natural disaster,
the university decided to eliminate fall break, cut out a
day of Thanksgiving break, add a Saturday class and
replace Reading Day with a normal class day. While
the university is making great and respectable strides
to lower stress and ease the transition back into a regu-
lar schedule, a major mistake is being made.
No one can reasonably deny that missing class for
two weeks creates a major obstacle to meeting course
requirements and objectives. After all, class curriculums
are designed for an allotted number of days and class
meetings; however, jamming the hours into breaks and
weekends is counterproductive. This is especially true
of one day in particular, Reading Day.
Taking away our fall break is bad; it's not as if dis-
missed classes due to national states of emergency fall
under "rest and relaxation" time. Admittedly though,
desperate times call for desperate measures so the elimi-
nation of fall break, while bad, is understandable. Cut-
ting a day out of Thanksgiving seems odd, to say the
least. Thanksgiving is family time, and for those like
myself with a night class that Wednesday, a definite
strain is caused to get home in time for Thanksgiving
dinner. The Saturday class, even though the most logi-
cal, is equally the most laughable. Having class on Sat-
urday is not natural and it violates everything we have
ever known about school since age 5. Nevertheless, like
the previous examples, there is method to the mad-
ness of the solution, except for Reading Day.
Reading Day is not just some day that can come �
and go on a whim. It has a specific academic purpose,
Some students may not take it seriously, but some stu-
dents don't take school in general seriously. The corf- ;
cept of Reading Day is so important that most schools
allot for days or even a week in between classes ami
exams. Taking away one of the most crucial days pre-
ceding final exams is ludicrous. Essentially, it's adding
insult to injury. There are times to scramble around �
and make up for something lost and then there are �
times, like right now, that you just have to chalk it up '�
to misfortune and accept that it is lost and it's not com- !
ing back. The university needs to let go of the notion
that we are actually going to be able to fully recuperate
academically from the hurricane and in the process, �
give us our Reading Day back.
This writer can be contacted at
msullivon@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Football team deserves praise, not jabs
Dear Editor,
I was reading the opinion col-
umn of Mr. Ryan Kennemuf ("Fans
Bragging Rights Not Earned Oct.
12) and was wondering what he was
talking about. The idea that anyone,
much less someone that is supposed
to be a supporter of the school,
would call any program such as ours
receives as "unneeded" is foolish.
Who cares who claims ECU as their
home team? I've worked with the
ECU football team for the last two
and a half years and consider any-
one willing to come to our games
an asset, regardless of how long
they've been supporters.
By the way, Ryan Dogg, where
were you on Saturday? "We-suck-
land?" Don't condemn anyone who
was there supporting your school
when you couldn't find the time to
come to a game that is free for you
to attend. I am sure that the several
thousand other fans would agree on
this matter. Also, the next time you
decide to rant on a topic, STICK TO
IT, instead of rambling on about
superfluous subjects that have little
or nothing to do with what you're
writing about. Exactly how does a
NASCAR fan compare to a fair-
weather Pirate fan?
Lastly, no one person should
ever call the one loss we suffered last
Saturday as inevitable. The work
that these young men have piU
forth to obtain a goal, that is obvi-
ously beyond your comprehension,
goes above and beyond what is ex-
pected of the average student. This
team deserves every bit of gratitude
that can be given to them at this
early part of the season. Besides,
when, not if, we are awarded a bowl
bid, 1 am sure that once again you
will be writing a column on the
greatness of the fans and program
you seem so willing to put down
now.
Ed Rinehart, senior
ECU Coach's Assistant
New Greeks don't have a clue

i
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Step up to the challenge; support your teams
Dear Editor:
Last spring there was an article
n The East Carolinian entitled, "Af-
ican-American Coaches Still Face
)bstacles I was called to make a
omment about the number of Af-
ican-American head coaches in
)ivision I sports. I found the article
o be very nice.
There was a comment made by
junior communications major
hat really caught my eye. In the
rticle, he stated "It makes you ask
ourself why there aren't more than
wo African-American head coaches
it ECU here. I am busy asking
nyself are they just not finding
ualified ones, or what?"
The reason that the comment
intrigued me was because of the lack
of support for specifically women's
basketball. I would like to challenge
that young man and the rest of the
student body not to criticize the
hiring practices here at ECU but,
instead, to make a difference by sup-
porting the coaches that are here!
How many of you know that our
volleyball team started off the sea-
son 5-0? How many of you knew
that my basketball team had its first
winning season in six years last year
in my first year as head coach and
were six points from advancing to
the NCAA tournament?
We need your support! If you
love ECU, you'll come out and sup-
port us this season. We need you to
give us a home court advantage so
that we can be even more success-
ful than we already have been.
If you support us, I promise to
support you in any way possible. I
would love to help any student or-
ganization on campus. I am a mem-
ber of the Alpha Kappa Alpha So-
rority, Inc and they know that they
have my full support as well.
How many of you PIRATES will
step up to the challenge?
See you at the games.
Dee Gibson
Head Women's Basketball Coach
Selfishness, greed and arrogance
are often devastating characteristics
of one's persona and usually when
these words are used to describe a
person (in this case persons) or their
behavior, those persons are unaware
of these obscene character flaws
andor actions. Blinded by these
wretched personality traits, these
persons continue on whatever trek,
plan or scheme they have con-
cocted.
Why am I babbling about these
particular 'gems' of the human
psyche and personality? Because I
would like to inform a group em-
bodying these traits and actions to
the letter, on a daily basis, that it is
time to stop.
Who are these poor, aloof indi-
viduals? The members of the new
Chi Phi "colony" trying to gain ad-
mittance to the inter-fraternity
council, and into an oversaturated
Greek community. I know, I know,
we are supposed to encourage
people to chase after their dreams
and shoot for lofty goals but in this
case it's just not fair to the other
male Greek letter organizations on
this campus.
It is a simple matter of numbers.
Membership is at an all-time low
here at ECU, as well as around the
country, which translates into less
opportunities for the eighteen fra-
ternities to recruit quality men. The
Greek student population as a
whole is only about 10 percent-
down from 15 percent just a few
short years ago. The balance be-
tween fraternities and sororities is
severely lopsided, a two-to-one ra-
tio, which means that the social
outlet is already hanging on a tight
noose.
What members of the Chi Phi
colony are doing is putting an
abominable strain on an already
tapped Greek system. There are
enough fraternities here that offer
every type of social diversity that
one could ever ask for.
What these men are doing is
unfair to the members of the Greek
community. You are not enhanc-
ing the population, you are tearing
it down, because you are either A.
too selfish to go out and rush and
see what everyone has to offer, B.
so pompous that you think that you
are better than everyone else, C. so
blinded by greed andor a lack of
self-esteem that you think this will
catapult you into instant social ac-
ceptance. Or, D. you are just plain
old clue less.
I hope that the answer is D be-
cause I hate to think that I have to
share a community with people that
have such low moral character and
lack of conviction as you seem to
possess.
Bryce Wagoner III





The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SPORTS
Tuesday, Oct. 19,1999
sports@studentmedia.eeu.edu
jesday, (
www.tec.ee
j
SPORTS BRIEFS
Miracle Mets stay alive
Robin Ventura's grand slam turned single
kept New York's title hopes alive in the 15th in-
ning of game 5 of the National League Champi-
onship Series against the Atlanta Braves.
"I'm just glad we're actually going back after
getting down 3-0 Ventura said.
Ventura's slam off of the Braves' Kevin
McGlinchy cleared the Shea Stadium wall.
Ventura was mobbed by his teammates and
never rounded the bases. The winning run
scored and Ventura's hit was scored an RBI
single. The final score was 4-3.
"If we come back and win the series, this will
?go down as one of the great games in history
� said the Mets' Orel Hershiser.
The game lasted 5 hours and 46 minutes.
�,Game 6 will be held today in Atlanta.
eld's tost
Panthers drop Niners
The Carolina Panthers defeated the San
Francisco 49ers 31-29, Sunday at 3Com Park.
The loss snapped the 49ers 19 game home
winning streak. It also marked the return of
former 49ers head coach George Seifert.
"I don't care what you say, it was not just an-
other game said Panthers tight end Wesley
I-Walls. "There is a special feeling in this locker
Jroom and part of it is that we beat the 49ers
S The Panthers' Steve Beuerlein threw four
vtouchdown passes.
Broncos beat Packers
The Denver Broncos won their second game
of the season, defeating the Green Bay Packers
31-10. The Packers' Brett Favre was unable to
notch another comeback win. Favre was 7 for
23 and threw for only 120 yards.
"I didn't expect to play like this Favre said. I
didn't expect to lose like this. This is a character
check
Earnhardt wins Winston 500
Dale Earnhardt notched his second straight
win at Talladega, winning the Winston 500.
"This car was good, but I didn't think it was
going to run up front Earnhardt said. "Even
late in the race, I didn't think I had the car to win
it, but Bobby LaBonte and Mike Skinner
Earnhardt's teammate) worked with me there at
the end and helped me to the front
Chargers take over AFC West
The San Deigo Chargers beat the Seattle
Seahawks 13-10 in a match up of unlikely AFC
West heavyweights. A41-yard John Carney
field goal as time expired sealed the win for the
Chargers. The win sends the Chargers to 4-1
and drops the Seahawks to 3-2. The Chargers
now stand alone atop the AFC West.
Midnight Madness kicks off basketball season
Pep rally, contests draw 1,400
Susanne Milenkevich
SENIOR WRITER
ECU'S basketball programs began their seasons with
a new twist this year, as the Pirates held their first ever
Minges Midnight Madness to kick off the 1999-2000
basketball season.
Midnight Madness is a tradition at many schools
across the nation. University of North Carolina and
Duke University both hold this event which consists
of a pep rally and contests that begin late the night
before practice can officially start according to the
NCAA regulations. At 12:01 a.m. many teams begin
the season by splitting the players into two teams to
scrimmage before their fans and coaches.
"I've been to midnight madness's before at other
colleges and I think it's great that ECU is starting one
here said junior Karen Flayner, a hospitality manage-
ment major.
According to Media Relations, the night began when
the doors opened at 10:45 p.m. and about 1,400 ECU
fans poured in.
Performances by the Pure Gold Dance Team, the
ECU cheerleaders and the Pep Band began at 11:1S p.m.
followed by the introduction of this year's coaches.
Women's Head Coach Dee Gibson was introduced
for her second season with the Pirates.
"Let me tell you something Gibson said. "You guys
haven't seen nothing yet
Last year Gibson lead the women to their first win-
ning season in six years with a record of 16-13. This
year, Gibson has bigger plans.
"We played in the finals at the conference tourna-
ment last year and lost to number five in the country,
Old Dominion Gibson said. "This year we're going
to beat Old Dominion
Gibson called for the support to make it happen.
"Let me tell you something Gibson said. "We need
your help. We need you here
First year coach Bill Herrion was then introduced
as "no stranger to the NCAA tournament as he joins us
from coaching a Drexel University team that made the
tournament four times under his leadership
"I'm starting to get excited already Herrion said.
"Even though this place is not full yet (imagine) how
loud it would get if we put people in the stands this
year. I think we could really turn this into a great home
court atmosphere
Herrion also called for support from the fans as he
announced the men's season begins at home Nov. 23
against Wisconsin-Green Bay.
"We want to pack this place when we play Wiscon-
sin-Green Bay Herrion said.
The Pirates had a special guest in the crowd Friday
night as they were joined by WNBA Cleveland Rockers
player Chastity Melvin.
Melvin played for N.C. State and just finished her
first season in the WNBA. Melvin's younger sister,
Danielle plays for ECU.
"I love the girls on the ECU team Melvin said. "I
know all of them, they're like all my little sisters so I
had to come watch them play
Since the WNBA's season is in the summer, Melvin
said she will attend many of the games this year.
"I think they'll do well coming off last year Melvin
said. "If they just work hard and play with confidence
See MADNESS, page 7
Player's determination leads to success
Stephen Schramm
SPORTS EDITOR
For a while in the fourth quar-
ter against Southern Miss, David
Garrard looked as if he were back
at Southern Durham high school.
Tacklers hitting the 235 pound
quarterback only to be shaken off
and watch as Garrard would
make the play and keep the drive
alive.
"I was just determined not to
go down that last drive, and it was
working out for the most part
Garrard said.
Determination is something
Garrard has shown throughout
the 1999 campaign.
Against West Virginia, it was
his ability to run for key yards and
break tackles that propelled the Pi-
rates to the 30-23 victory. It was
his touchdown run with 56 sec-
onds left that gave the Pirates the
lead.
It was his determination that
helped lead the Pirates to victories
over Duke and South Carolina.
It was his determination that
kept him and the Pirates from
folding when they were down 20-
0 against Miami.
It was determination that
helped Garrard throw for 300
yards against Army and get the C-
USA offensive Player-of-the-
Week. The next week, he threw for
249 yards and rushed for 56
against Southern Miss in a losing
effort. However it was his late
game heroics that electrified the
crowd of 39,000 at Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium.
"He's a very amazing guy
said Senior flanker LaMont
Chappell. "The stuff he does,
sometimes it's funny to sit a
watch him and how elusive he
is. He brings a lot to the table,
as far as being our quarterback
and making plays
The spectacular plays and
consistent performance that
Garrard has shown this season
should come as no surprise to
Pirate fans.
Garrard finished 1998 ranked
No. 23 nationally in passing effi-
ciency and No. 2 among freshmen.
He broke 16 ECU passing records
including the highest completion
percentage in ECU history, 61.6. He
also broke the record for most pass-
ing yards in a game with a 414 yard
performance against Memphis.
The record was formerly held by
Pirate legend, Marcus Crandall.
Garrard's growth as a quarter-
back has been tremendous since he
took over for Bobby Weaver in Oc-
tober of 1998. In only one year as
a starter, he has become a force
in the conference and a leader in
the locker room.
"It's about as dramatic as it
could be said Head Coach
Steve Logan. "Compared to the J
young man that was playing last ;
year at about this time, compared
to what we've got right now.
He's an outstanding student of
the game. He is very coachable,
teachable and he's got the God-
given ability to make plays
This writer can be contacted
at sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Men, women swim to success
Women's relay takes first place,
men win eleven events
ECU men's swim vs. JMU
400-medley relayteam time 3:32.46
50 free Matt jabs 21.75
Emily Koperniak
STAFF WRITER
Cheers echoed throughout Minges Aquatic Center
as ECU'S men's and women's swim teams opened with
an exciting victory over James Madison University on
Friday. The men took a victory with a finai score of
149-92. They won every event except one.
The 400-medley relay team won a first place finish
with a time of 3:32.46. This win set the pace for six
successive first-place finishes. The men were able to
come out on top in 11 events.
"I think we came out amazing said Matt Jabs, se-
nior co-captain. "The attitude was prepared and we had
a lot of support. We stayed fired up
Jabs aided the Pirates in their win when he com-
pleted the 50 free with a time of 21.75.
Junior Claes Lindgren won the 200 back with a time
of 1:56.05 pushing the Pirates closer to their victory.
Sophomore Josh LePree topped it off with a first place
in the 200 breast at 2:13.54.
The women's team continued the success with a
time of 4:01.11 in the 400-medley relay. Dana Fuller
won the first individual win of the year with a time of
10:30.74 in the 1000 free.
Freshmen Aryn Lettermen and senior co-captain
Hollie Butler came in second and third in the 200 free
with times of 1:57.84 and 1:58.71. Courtney Foster
came out on top in the 50 free with a time of 26.41
followed by a second place finish by Mary Bennett
Inskeep.
Leslie Baronklin took first in the 200 back at 2:08.83.
The Lady Pirates' freestyle relay team took a first place
finish for the last event of the meet. The women fin-
ished with a score of 143-102.
"I think everybody had an awesome meet Butler
said. "There was a lot of energy and cheering. We were
a little worried with it being the first meet. We thought
we weren't prepared but we came together
"We are ecstatic on how we swam for the first meet
of the year said Head Coach Rick Kobe. "The women
beat the top team of the conference. JMU's men's team
200 backClaes Lindgren1:56.05
200 breastjosh LePree2:13.54
ECU women's swim vs. JMU
400-medley relayteam time4:01.11
1000 freeDana Fuller10:30.74
200 freeAryn Letternman1:57.84
200 freeHollie Butler1:58.71
50 freeCourtney Foster24.61
50 freeMary Bennett Inskeep24.78
200 backLeslie Baronklin2:08.83
400 relay freeteam time3:37.44
ECU women's swim vs. Ga. Southern
200-medley relayteam time1:57.87
100 freeHollie Butler10:42.74
200 freeCourtney Foster24.61
50 freeMary Bennett Inskeep24.80
100 backAmy Hendrick59.31
500 freeDana Fuller5:18.99
won the championship last year so we are ecstatic the
men won
Butler also contributed to the women's meet this
past Saturday against Georgia Southern. She was able
to pull off another victory in the 1000 free.
Courtney Foster took first in the 200 free along with
Mary Bennett Inkseep in the 50 free. Amy Hendrick
took a first place in the 100 back, while Dana Fuller
closed the meet with a first place finish in the 500 free.
The women finished with a score of 139 over Georgia
Southern's 92.
The men and women will compete next at College
of Charleston in a dual meet on Oct. 30 at 1 p.m.
This writer can be contacted at
ekopemiak@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Golf team finishes ninth
at Adam's Cup
Murray Pool
STAFF WRITER
The ECU golf team finished ninth out of 1.4 at th
Adam's Cup in Narragansett, R.I. This tournampnt fea-
tured high praised teams such as Furman, Michigan
State, Virginia Tech and Toledo (who won the tourna-
ment).
The team had to battle terrible weather conditions
throughout the tournament with winds reaching up
to 30 mph and gusting as high as 50 mph. Coach
Kevin Williams had never seen playing conditions ol
that caliber but knows it was still a competition.
"Conditions dictate how you play but everyone had
to play in those conditions Williams said !
Despite the tough weather conditions, -ECU die
have a bright spot with Stephen Satterly earning a top
20 finish rounding out the tournament with a final
round 80 to finish in a tie for 16th.
Chad Webb and Frank Adams had good final round:
as they moved up to 23rd and 32nd.
"The wind was really bad and tough on everyone
Webb said. "It was blowing so hard that no one coulc
play as well as they could
The Pirate golf squad has a record of 13 wns anc
14 losses so far this season.
"It is really hard to tell where we are at considerinj
everything that has gone on this semester with thi
flooding Williams said. "Losing our first two tourna
ments put us really far behind. 1 thought the breal
might help our players because they would have raon
time to work on their game while they were at home
The Pirates took a vicious blow at the beginning o
the season when Marc Miller decided to be redshirted
Since the NCAA tournament will be held in his home
town of Durham in the year 2001, he wanted ahanc
to play there either as a team or individually.
"Sometimes it's frustrating to know that I could b(
helping the team and that is when I do miss it Millei
said. ,
The Pirates next go into battle on Oct. 25-ZS at the
ODUSeascape Invitational at the Seascape GaffLinks.
The tournament will be hosted by Old DominEn Uni-
versity and will take place in Kitty Hawk. �5
This writer can be contacted at "Z,
mpool@studentmedia.ecu.edu. "Z
� �
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TICKETS
ECU Fac
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Stopb
twotri
target.
prize.
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YOU MA
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jesday;Oct. 19,1999
www.tec.ecu.edu
brllnTS
The East Carolinian "T
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
'CRYSTAL
CTION
&c gifts
Clothing � Men's Sterling Rings
handles � Wooden Boxes � Beads
i � Tapestries � Cards � Hemp
JiHV �� � '�� ' .�0$
ifaes � Tarot Cards & Runes
uif iqjue 6t for!tinique people
�422 Fttllglvd. Greenville, NC 27858 � 252-355-8250
"Come and. join our frequent purchaser incense and candle club
MADNESS
from page 6
I think they'll do well
The Dowdy Student Store held
the "$10,000 Shot of a Lifetime"
near the end of the events, which
gave someone the opportunity to
take a shot from half court lo win
$10,000.
Ginny McClure, a junior nurs-
ing major, had the chance but
missed.
"I think it's a really good promo-
tion McClure said referring to the
chance to win the money. "It got a
lot of people out here. I was really
nervous though
To top off the night, Greenville
Toyota sponsored "Fly Me into a
New Car" which gave everyone a
chance to fly a paper airplane into
a box the size of the sunroof of a
2000 Toyota Corolla to win the car.
No one successfully flew their plane
into to box.
"It's Midnight Madness) really
good to get people coming out to
their basketball games McClure
said. "It's really a lot of fun
t
Volleyball team endures rough game!
Injury plagues team
Emily Koperniak
STAFF WHITER
The ECU volleyball team had a
tough weekend of competition at
li nru
William and Mary took victory
over the Pirates Friday night with a
final score of 3-2. With close hitting
percentages from both teams all
night, William and Mary gained an
advantage with a percentage of .467
intfiefast'game.
Cinta Claro and Lucinda Mason
completed the night with 13 kills
apiece. Mason added four block as-
sists along with Sarah Kary's 14 digs
and four block assists. Lisa
Donovan, who was unable to play
the last two matches, gave the Pi-
rates 40 assists with eight digs.
Saturday afternoon, ECU lost a
tough battle against Virginia Com-
monwealth University (10-15, 7-15,
15-11,13-15). VCU outshot the Pi-
rates .364 140 in the first game. A
reinjury to Donovan's ankle placed
Claro as setter for the afternoon.
VCU claimed another victory fo
Hie second game.
The Pirates stepped It up durin
the third game with a hitting per
centage of .256 over VCU's .067
The referee called a net violation ok
the Pirates after they caught up froif
a 7 point difference. VCU was lead-
ing at match-point when this cai
was made, ending the match.
"I think there was some confu-
sion Chrissy McPheters said. "I)
took that for us to turn it up and
get back in the game. We were lost
without Lisa
McPheters had 10 kills as well
and three block assists. Mason led.
ECU with 14 kills, 18 digs and four
block assists.
"We had a good weekend with
some good points Mason said.
"There are some things we need to
work on. We have lots of potential
and a bright future
"I feel like we finally picked II
up in the last match, we got our fire
back said Cinta Claro. "We had a
hard match last night, and that
showed. I'm excited about next
weekend
i
Try your luck at
throwing a winning pass and
YOU COULD WIN A
$200 SHOPPING SPREE!
Friday, October 22:
2 pm - 4 pm
Saturday, October 23:
i1 am -1 pm
Stop by the Student Plaza and take
two tries at throwing a football at a
target. Hit the target and you win a
prize. PLUS, you're automatically
qualified for a drawing to win a $200
Student Store shopping spree!
(Rain location: inside Wright Building lobby)
Show the cashier your class ring and take
1 OFF your purchase of regular price ap-
parel for each year you've been awayl (Up
to 30 discounts - that would be for class
of 1969 and beyond)
See our YEARBOOK DISPLAY!
T
Check our Photo
Contest Display In the
Store Window Case. If
you see yourself in a
photo come into the
office and register for
a chance to WIN a
Color TV, stereo, and other great prizes!
Contest runs throughout football season.
YOU MAY ALSO bring in your own school
j 'spirit photo to add to the display for a
chance to winl ENTER TODAY!
1
We've Got Your Ticket
to ECU Football
Student and Student Guest
ticket pick up:
Tuesday - Thursday:
9:00 am - 7:00 pm
Must show your ECU One Card
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I
The East Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
SEATS LEFT
COMICS
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Tuesday, Oct. 12,1999
comics@studentmedia.ecu.edu
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lease, fully ft
to campus-1
12 utilities i
depostQinti
ASAP.Jft
ROOM FOP
eludes utilitii
change for t
entrance. K
house. Furni
pasture avai
miles from
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Mosiers62
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i
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i
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i
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'room, 1 bat
walwaewer, �
idry facilities, i
bus earvieoB.
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mainta
k
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FEMA1E RC
sublease roo
monthjjjptobi
in ASA (tall
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ROOMMATE
WesleiCComrr
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FEMALE RO
miles ftSm Gre
plus 12 utilil
backyard. Call
MF TfTsubl
$260mo�
at 353-5066.
ROOMMATE
2 bedroom ap
Apartments $5
ities. phone 5
sage. ��
MALETCHRIS
bedroonjapt.
student. $26!
message.
AAA! SPRINC
mas Pjirty Cri
eludes" Ttlost
beaches, night
tona. South E
springbreaktr;
6386
AAA! CAN
SpringBreak Sp
tel. meals, drin
small businessi
standing ethics!
1-800-678-638
BILLARONG 4,
perfect conditic
gate 8 inch sp
$100. Call Jasc
1997 SAIUHI
toma well ma
larly 11.564 gre
ments $250 con
$15,500 757-1E
FOR SALE 1994
cellent conditior
353-2826 for m.
A 1975 Volksw
lent conSTition. 2i
engine y"1 nev
tor. oil lmp ant
pont emron pair
interior, headline
and windows. ,
the car are new
cylinders, mast
works, with new
shield motor and
reworked. A
3.500.00 with cc
warranty. Call 3:
if no answer lea
MUST SALE 2
processor with
$100 firm, call P
1993 TOYOTA Ci
cellent condition,
er stereo, sunroof
ic ac. Call Kim 8:
DID YOU FAIL y
toring available fc
1050. J100. 120
7729. Ask for Jer
J IEAI
SKYI
(WHIN.
� (91914!





ct. 12,1999
edia.ecu.edu
0 1.11
'�JbCO'hOjH
uesday, Oct. 19, 1999
yvww.tec.ecu.edu
FOR RENT
2 BEDROOM apt. available for sub-
lease, fully furnished, walking distance
to campus- on 10th St. $475mo.
12 utilities and phone will wave $200
deposBjjuuil available, need to rent
ASAP.J830-4907.
ROOM f OR Rent on farm $250 in-
cludes utilities. Rent negotiable in ex-
change for babysitting. Private bath
entrance. Kitchenlaundry in main
house. Furnishedunfurnished, horse
pasture available. Some pets OK. 2
miles from campus, near B's BBQ.
Non-smoker. Privatequiet. Call the
Mosiers7S2-4345. Leave message.
CLASSIFIEDS
HELP WANTED
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
! SecDrSy Deposit j
wiltt-presentaflon of this coupon, offer I
exptret 121199 not valid wllti any oth� j
coupon
I -WESLEY COMMON SOUTH: 1 or 2 bed!
room, 1 b�th, r�noe, refrigerator, free'
iWateraewer, vrasharAJryer hookup, laun-
idry facilities, 5 Mock from campus, ECUi
bus sarvlew.
- All Properties have 24 hr. emergency
malntainance- Call 758-1921
a
onogemont
tfoivmn & fM Uruw
ROtiMMATES WANTED
FEMAXE ROOMMATE needed to
sublease room in Wyndham court
.nu nutui wiki oatcony &ZVS50 a
monthjgtober paid for already, move
in ASA Call Kristin at 439-1410.
ROONttllATE NKeF:1woBDR at
WeslejDommons South. 12 of bills.
Preferjraduate student: W, NS. N
D. Caltjtobert at 329-0266.
FEMAl'E ROOMMATE needed 10
miles ftSm Greenville $200 per month
plus 12 utilities. Pets ok, fenced in
backyard. Call 757-3365.
MF TO sublease at Player's Club
$260mo. 12 utilities. Call Carla
at 353-5056.
ROOMMATE WANTED: for spacious
2 bedroom apartment. Cannon Court
Apartments $220 month plus 12 util-
ities, phone 561-7754. leave a mes-
sage. �
mt
MALE (CHRISTIAN) to share a four
bedroorjjapt. at Player's Club with 3
student. $260.00 321-8184 leave a
messaga.
FOR SALE
AAAl SPRING Break Specials! Baha-
mas Pfrfy Cruise 5 days $279! In-
cludes" Tflost meals! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City. Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
FREE BABY BOOM BOX EARN
$1200! FUNDRAISER FOR STUD-
ENT GROUPS Cr ORGANIZATIONS.
EARN UP TO $4 PER MASTER-
CARD APP. CALL FOR INFO OR
VISIT OUR WEBSITE. QUALIFIED
CALLERS RECEIVE A FREE BABY
BOOM BOX. 1-800-932-O528 EXT.
119 OR EXT. 125 WWW.OCMCON-
CEPTS.COM
BROWSE ICPT.COM Win a Free trip
for Springbreak 2000. All destina-
tions offered. Trip participants. Stud-
ent Orgs & Campus Sales Reps want-
ed. Fabulous parties, hotels & prices.
For reservations or rep registration Call
Inter-Campus Programs 800-327-6013.
EARN FREE Trips and Cash Spring
Break 2000. Cancun. Jamaica. For 10
years Class Travel International (CTI)
has distinguished itself as the most re-
liable student event and marketing or-
ganization in North America. Motivat-
ed reps can go on Spring Break FREE
and earn over10.000! Contact us to-
day for details! 800328-1509
www.classtravelintl.com
WEB PAGE Developer. Needed to up-
grade existing web page. Good oppro-
tunity to gain experience and earn
some bucks working with congenial
local family business. Call Dr. Gowen
at 752-4086.
FRATERNITIES SORORITIES and
Student Groups: Earn $1,000-2.000
with easy CIS Fund Raiser event. No
sales required. Fund Raiser days are
filling up so call today. Contact Pon @
1-888-522-4350.
$$MANAGE a business on your cam-
pus$$ Versity.com, an Internet note-
taking company is looking for an en-
trepreneurial student to run business
on your campus. Manage students,
make tons of money, excellent oppor-
tunity! Apply on-line at www.versi-
ty.com contact jobs�versity.com or
call 734-483-1600 ext. 888
PART TIME jobs available. Joan's
Fashion, a local women's clothing store
is now filling part-time positions. Ap-
plicants must be available for Tuesday
afternoons. Thursday mornings and
or Thursday afternoons. The positions
are for between 7 and 20 hours per
week, depending on your schedule
and on business needs. The pay is
commensurate with your experience
and job performance and is supple-
mented by an employee discount. Ap-
ply in person to Store Manager. Joan's
Fashions, 423 S. Evans St Greenville
(Uptown Greenville).
SPRING BREAK reps needed to
promote campus trips. Earntravel
free! No cost. We train you. You work
on your own time. 1-800-367-1252 or
www.springbreakdirect.com
NEEDfor your Team. Club, Fratern-
ity, Sorority? Earn $1000-$2000
with easy 3 hour Fund Raiser event.
Groups love it because there's no sales
required. Dates are filling up so call
today. 1-888-522-4350.
GREEK PERSONALS
SAGE HUNIHAN: Good Luck on your
big weekl you have made us all proud
as ECU'S Homecoming chairl Love,
Panhellenic Council.
DELTA ZETA would like to thank
Lambda Chi for the social last Thurs-
day. Everyone looked great in their PJ's.
WE HOPE to see everyone at the
Spaghetti dinner tonight. Love Delta
Zeta.
LAMBDA CHI - Wanna shag? The
social was a blast! Can't wait to shag
with you guys again. Love. Zeta Tau
Alpha,
DELTA CHI. we had a great time at
the social on Thursday. Can't wait to
get together again! Love, Alpha Delta
Pi
JESSICA THANK you for all your hard
work with pledge of the year. Couldn't
have done it without you! Love Brigitte.
THE SISTERS and new members of
Alpha Phi would like to congratulate
Jessica Wearne and Kristina Davis on
doing a terrific job in Rookie of the
year. We're proud of you.
SIGMA NU- We had a great time at
the social, we'll have to do it again.
Thanks. Love Alpha Phi.
CONGRATULATIONS TO the Zeta
volleyball team on your playoff win!
Love, your sisters
THE ZETA Tau Alpha big sisters love
our Littles!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE SISTERS and new members of
Delta Zeta would like to congratulate
Lauren and Katie on winning 1st and
2nd place in pledge of the year! We
love you.
THANK YoXToelta Sigma Phi for the
social last Friday. We ail had a good
time. Love the sisters of Delta Zeta.
TO ALL new members who partici-
pated in pledge of the year, you all did
an excellent job representing your so-
rorities! Love Brigitte.
OTHER
SPRING BREAK 2000
Free Trips, Free Drinks,
Jumuicu, Cancun, Florida, Uarhudos, Buhunus
lluok now fur Free MvuK & 2 Krec Trips
Hook In December I7ln for l.mu'si Knit's
1-800-426-7710
www.sunsplashtours.com
PIRATE CHASE 5k runwalk. The an-
nual Pirate Chase is Backl It's a fun
runwalk event that will be held No-
vember 7th at 2pm starting at the Pi-
rate Club Building. Registration Dead-
line is Nov.2. 5pm in the Student Re-
creation Center main office or the day
event. Pre-registered cost is $5mem-
$10non-mem. Day of event registra-
tion , the cost is $8mem-$15non-
mem. For more information please
contact 328-6387.
GAMMA BETA Phi will meet Thurs-
day. October 21st at 5pm in GC 1031.
Last day for dues! http:
www.ecu.eduorggbp
PIRATE CHASE 5k runwalk. The an-
nual Pirate Chase is back! It's a fun
runwalk event that will be held No-
vember 7th at 2pm starting at the Pi-
rate Club bldg. Registration Deadline
is Nov.2. 5pm in the Student Recrea-
tion Center main office or the day of
event. Pre-registered cost is $5mem
$10non-mem. Day of event registra-
tion, the cost is $8mem-$15non-
mem. For more fhformation please call
328-6387.
FITTING IN and Finding Hope: Adult
grads and seniors share their stories.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is now offering this
workshop on Wednesday October 20
from noon-1, at the Wright Building
Room 312. Contact the Center at 328-
6661 if you are interested.
ADVANCED CUMBING Session. In-
crease your knowledge of climbing skill
at the SRC wall. Set your own pace
and decide what you want to learn .
Classes in movement, route choice,
lead climbing, anchor systems and eth-
ics are all just a few of the possibili-
ties. Sessions are on Tuesday nights
Oct.26-Nov.30, 7pm-8pm. Cost is
$15mem-$25non-meme and the
Registration Deadline is Oct. 19. For
more information please call 328-6387.
CHOOSING A Major and a Career:
One session workshop that helps you
explore your interests, values, abilities
and personality and how those blend
with different types of occupations.
The Center for Counseling and Stud-
ent Development is offering the follow-
ing workshops on Thursday October
2, 3:30-5. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
HOW WOULD you score? Take a
mock MCAT or DAT Sun. Oct.24. 1-
5pm. GCB 1031 $5 fee. You must reg-
ister by Tues. Oct. 19th. To register
send email to ek0430@mail.ecu.edu
Co-sponsored by Alpha Epsilon Delta.
The Pre-medical Honors Society.
AAA! CANCUN a Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air. ho-
tel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of 6
small businesses recognized for out-
standing ethics! springbreaktravel.com
1-800-678-6386
LOOKING FOR 20 guys and gals for
local radio station phone promotion.
Earn $6 plus bonus per hour. Full and
part time, morning, day and evening
hours available. Near campus location
at 323 West 10th St. Suite 107 (in-
side Wilcar Executive Center) just
down the street from McDonalds and
Krispy Kreme. Apply ASAP in person
only 10am through 6pm (no calls
please).
BILLABONG 43 Full suit shoulder zip
perfect condition150. Rockford Fos-
gate 8 inch speakers in truck boxes
$100. Call Jason at 752-4714.
1997 SA1UHN jok CDplayer Au-
tomat well maintained service regu-
larly 11.564 great deal! Monthly pay-
ments $250 compared to dealers price
$15,500 757-1569.
FOR SALE 1994 Honda Accord LX ex-
cellent condition only 55k miles. Call
353-2826 for more information.
PERSON(S) WITH pick-up truck to
gather and remove yard debris. $10
hr. Please call 321-2422.
ENTERTAINERS NEEDED dancers
needed. Make over $1500 weekly.
Must have transportation, phone and
be DRUG FREE. Call 758-2737 for more
information.
A 1975 Volkswagen Beetle in excel-
lent condition. 2000 miles on a rebuilt
engine y new carburetor. Alterna-
tor, oil pjmj) and fuel pump. New Du-
pont emron paint job in Red. All new
interior, headliner. seats, carpet, dash
and windows. All seals through out
the car are new. Brakes, tires wheel
cylinders, master cylinders. Heater
works, with new exhausts new wind-
shield motor and all electrical has been
reworked. A must see. Asking
3.500.00 with complete folder of Parts
warranty. Call 328-3209 ask for Pete
if no answer leave message.
FREE TRIPS and Cash Spring Break
2000. StudentCity.com is looking for
Highly Motivated Students to promote
Spring Break 2000! Organize a small
group and travel FREE! Top campus
reps can earn Free Trips and over
$ 10,000! Choose Cancun, Jamaica or
Nassau! Book Trips on-line log in and
win Free Stuff. Sign Up now on line
www.studentcity.com or 1-800-293-
1443.
NIGHT FRONT DESK CLERK NEED-
ED 10:30PM TO 3:30AM. ECONOMY
INN APPLY IN PERSON. COMPUTER
SKILL AN ASSET WILL TRAIN. REF-
ERENCES. RESUMES WELCOME.
CALL 754-8047.
THE DISTINGUISHED Ladies of the
Alpha Kappa Alpha sorority cordially
invite you to the first East Carolina Hair
Show. Hair Expo '99 will give you the
opportunity to view the hottest styles
around, receive tips on how to main-
tain styles, and expose you to the best
of the best in salons and stylists. It
will be held on October 19 @7:30pm
in the Mendenhall Student Center So-
cial Room. Cost-FREE.
ACADEMIC MOTIVATION: Thursday
at 3:30. October 13. The Center for
Counseling and Student Development
is offering the following workshop. If
you are interested in this program, con-
tact the center at 328-6661.
MERCHANTS MILL Pond. Come en-
joy the beauty of this northern State
Park and experience an easy day of
paddling in and among the cypress on
Oct.30. Wildlife are abundant so bring
your camera. It's a great Saturday trip.
The cost is $20mem-$30non-mem
and the Registration Deadline is
Oct.20. 5pm. For more information
please call 328-6387.
CAREER ALERT: All General College
students interested in a career com-
bining business and healthcare may
schedule an appointment with an ad-
visor in the Health Information Man-
agement Department during the week
of November 1-November 5. Call Mrs.
Brown (328-4436) or Mr. Bell (328-
4468) for a pre-registration advisement
appointment.
VOLUNTEERS THAT can knit or cro-
chet hats are needed by the Leo W.
Jenkins Cancer Center's "Hat's with
Hugs" program. In this program vol-
unteers make hats and donate then
to cancer patients who have lost their
hair. Crochet and knitting novices are
welcome to come learn how to make
hats. Yarn donations are also welcome.
The group will meet on Tuesday. Nov.9
from noon to 1pm in the Surgical Con-
ference Rm on the 2nd floor of the
cancer center. For more information,
call 816-7867
ECU'S 8TH AnnualTechnology Expo-
sition will be held in the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room on October 28.
1999 from 10am-3pm. Look for pre-
senters and topics in the October 26th
issue.
TIME MANAGEMENT: The Center
for Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering the following work-
shop on Wednesday October 20. 3:30.
If you are interested, please contact
the Center at 328-6661.
MUST SALE 2 year old brother worct
processor with monitor and printer
$100 firm, call Paula at 754-0926.
1993 TOYOTA Celica ST Burgundy, ex-
cellent condition, 75 K miles, CD play-
er stereo, sunroof and spoiler, automat-
ic ac. Call Kim 830-3691.
SERVICES
DID YOU FAIL your biology test? Tu-
toring a,�ailable for all sections of BIOL
1050, J100, 1200. $8hr. Call 758-
7729. Ask for Jennifer.
: LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
eiUOUU SKY SPORTS
(919)496-2224
ACT NOW1J3ET THE BEST SPRING
BREAK PRICES! SOUTH PADRE, CAN-
CUN, JAMAICA BAHAMAS, ACAPUL-
CO, FLORIDA & MARDIGRAS. REPS
NEEDED. TRAVEL FREE, EARN $$$.
GROUP DISCOUNTS FOR 6 800-
838-8203 WWW.LEISURE-
TOURSCOM
STUDENTS, LOOKING FOR A
GREAT JOB ON CAMPUS?
CAMPUS DINING IS RECRUITING
CASHIERS, GRILL COOKS, DISHWASH-
ERS, AND WAITSTAFF. ENJOY FREE
MEALS AND CONVENIENT SCHEDUL-
ING AROUND YOUR CLASSES. MUST
BE FRIENDLY AND DEPENDABLE. IF
THIS IS YOU, BRING COMPLETE WORK
HISTORY & APPLY AT MENDENHALL
STUDENT CTR-ECU FROM 9AM-4-PM
M-F. COMPETITIVE PAY & BENEFITS!
NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE.
EOE MFDV. j
NfcED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
Is It � "kiiltt I. a i i � i v�iitiihMil unwind
in I kI lipiu li ilktne.li.il Mirs HUmi iiiNiiu
S" SHliinir iuitiiMl.isMl.iiUv,i,iii.il.�ki!ki KhUw
lllllH t,iU.VI i'j��'l1Ullilnii)Mlii.b,irul illitium
UK Ml rsit)k- lltlll'i,lll lvlillul'411.11 24 III
i mini Dnwiikui (Ik �ftiifcihouihM i.iuinilk
EARN UP TO $1000
This Semester
By Posting Your
Lecture Notes Online
Register on-line now:
@ www.Studv24-7.com
(888) 728-7247
FREE CLASS NOTES!
STUDY24-7.com
YOGA: TREAT yourself to the relaxa-
tion you deserve ! Enjoy this gentle
yoga class of relaxation, deep breath-
ing and stretching. Beginner Yoga:
Nov.3-Dec.15 Wednesdays 4pm-
5:15pm. Registration Deadline is Nov.2
or Nov.4- Dec. 16 Thursdays 5:30pm-
6:45. Registration Deadline is Nov.3.
Advanced Beginner Yoga: Nov.2-Dec.7
Tuesdays 5:30pm-6:45pm. The Regis-
tration Deadline is Nov. 1. The cost for
all of these classes is15mem-$25
non-mem. For more information please
call 328-6387
TAI CHI. the art of maintaining body
and mind, relaxation and self-defense.
This class strengthens the heart and
increases muscle tone. It improves cir-
culation, concentration, peace of mind,
balance, weight loss and coordination,
the session runs Tues. and Thurs
Oct.26-Dec.9, 12:05pm-12:50pm in
the SRC 238. The cost is $20mem-
$30non-mem. registration begins
Oct. 18. For more information please
call 328-6387.
LIFEGUARD TRAINING! BECOME
American Red Cross Lifeguard certi-
fied through this program on Oct.26-
Nov.20. CPR is included with this
course. Class meets 6pm-9pm on
Tues Thurs and Sat. and the cost is
$110mem-$130non-mem. Registra-
tion Deadline is Oct.22. Refined swim-
ming skills are necessary and the par-
ticipant must be at least 15 years of
age. For more information please call
328-6387.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CUSSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
The East Carolinian
ads9studentmedia.ecu.ecro
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ARE YOU A STUDENT
FLOOD VICTIM WHO HAS
ALREADY APPLIED TO
FEMA BECAUSE YOU HAD
TO VACATE YOUR
APARTMENT?
If so, please call University Housing Services
at ECU-HOME (328-4663). We will be happy
to give this information to the FEMA office
so that they can expedite assisting you with
your housing needs. FEMA and the State of
North Carolina is currently working to de-
velop a mobile home park to assist you with
your needs.
If you are a displaced student who
has not yet applied to FEMA,
please call 1 -800-462-9029.
!
NEED A JOB?
YOU'RE LOOKING IN THE RIGHT PLACEj:
THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
NEED A DATE?
V
Try our campus calendar at
clubhouse.ecu.edu.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5P each
.$4.001
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5C each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a �;
business must be prepaid unless credit has been jj
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets (
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue





2rtr A
0�- 19iJ S 8 par
At the Delta Zeta
house- 801 East 5th st.
$4.00 Adv.
$5.00 @ Door
All proceeds will benefit
FLOOD RELIEF
Need a massage?!
The E.C.U. Physical Therapy Club is sponsoring a
night off massages. All you have to do is purchase
a ticket! iin-ii iiiiririiif
When: Wednesday, October 20th, 1999 5:00 p.m 9:00 p.m.
Where: ECU Balk Health Sciences Building on the corner of
Charles Blvd. and Greenville Blvd.
HOW MUCH ARE TICKETS:
ONLY $3.00 for Wmin. and you can get up to 30 min
TO PURCHASE TICKETS:
Ask any FT student you see! We will also be selling tickets around campus
(in front of bookstore and at Belk. OR, you can get a ticket AT THE DOOR
for $4.00 for 10min!l)
So come on, bring your friends and relax
with a Great Massage
ECU COMMUNITY FORUM
(Part of ECU ON)
"Hurricanes, Floods, Urbanization, Health"
� All students, staff, faculty, and administrators are invited
� Please feel free to attend all or pan of the forum
� A series of short presentations with plenty of time for questions and discussion will
attempt to dispel many of the misconceptions about hurricanes, floods, and their effects.
Friday, October 22,1999
2:30-5:30, Howell 103
Time Speaker
2:30-2:35 Stephen Culver (Geology)
The Physical JJcBim
2:35-2:55 Paul Gares (Geography)
2:55-3:15 Richard Spruill (Geology)
3:15-3:35 Questions and Answers
The Human Influence
3:35-3:55 Stan Riggs (Geology)
3:55-4:05 Questions and Answers
impact of Flooding
4:05-4:25 David Knowles (Biology)
Topic
Introduction
Water on the Land
Floods and Predictions of Floods
Human Modification of Drainage
Systems
Impact of Floods on Our Living
Environment
4:25-1:45 Barney Kane (Environmental Health) Health and Floods
4:45-5:05 Questions and Answers
5:05-5:25 Open Discussiun
5:25-5:30 Al Delia Closing Remarks
(Regional Development Institute)
. REMEMBER, ITMAY NOT BE 500 YEARS UNTIL
THE NEXT 500 YEAR FLOOD"

The May Museum and Park
Seeks an Energetic Individual
to Serve as Education Curator.
The position will be for one year. The position will be
three-quarter time (approximately 30 hours per week).
Responsibilities include developing, coordinating and
implementing curriculum related school (K-12), family,
outreach and public programs resulting in innovative
learning experience. The programming should
enhance the mission of the museum.
Ideal candidates should be in their third or fourth year
of college studying history education, museum studies
or elementary education with preferences given those
seeking an advanced degree.
Salary and hours are negotiable. Please submit a Town of
Farmville application between October 12 through
October 26,1999. Applications are available at Town HalJ,
200 North Main Street, Farmville, NC Town Hall's operat-
ing hours are Monday through Thursday from 7:30 AM -
5:30 PM and on Friday from 8:00 AM -12 Noon. The
Town of Farmville is an equal opportunity employer and
does not discriminate against the handicapped.
s
World Cwisiisik
COME CELEBRATE PIRATE PRIDE
IN STYLE
GO PIRATES!
FANS COME TO THE NEW CHRISTINNE'S AND
CELEBRATE AFTER THE GAME!
CASUAL DRESS CODE
COMPLIMENTARY CRAB DIP FOR EACH TABLE
NEWLY RENOVATED
CALL 355-9500 FOR RESERVATIONS
DON'T WAIT, BEAT THE LINES, MAKE RESERVATIONS NOW!
For a good time call the ECU Student Union Hotline at: 252.328.6004
67th Annual HOMECOMING Week!
OCTOBER 18 THRU 23
N I
WARDED
HT
to ECU Students
valid ONECARP only
sUDfy,
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October 24 6pm @ the Pirate Underground i . J
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MENDENHALL
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new rock
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For additional information contact the: Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East
Carolina University, Greenville, NC27858-4353,
or call 252.328.4788, toll free 1.800.ECUjiRTS, or
VTTY252.328.4736,8:30 a.m. - 6p.m Monday -
Friday. Individuals toho require accommodations
under ADA should contact the Department for
Disability Support Services at 252.328.4802forty-
eight hours prior to the start of the program.
MERCURY CINEMA
Wed. @ 7:30 p.m. & Thur. at 10:00 p.m.
fit)
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DELICIOUSLY COMPLEX ENTERTAINMENT!
Dark, Dangerous And A Great Deal Of Wicket) Fin
Mega Monday
'A3 Art, Academics, & Athletics"
sponsored by the ECU Art Education Guild
MSC Gallery 1018 thru 1029
PhatTuesday
Comedian Cary Long 8pm Hendrix
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A Smart 'Jo mm, IK Dum
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PitrhedPerMrmances
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Lock,
Stock
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�l auu.li Out loud,
Wicked Wednesday
Banner Contest 12pm MSC Brickyard
Candidate Reception 8pmMSC Great Room
l) lust Mil' Mil. II l
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Sinl am Ion r.omplfv
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llll'l!
Thirsty Thursday
Swing Dance Lessons 3-5pmMSC Social Rm
Skit Night 7 - 11pmMSC Brickyard
Fabulous Friday
Fall on the Mall wThe Rutabaga Brothers
& The Lemon Sisters (Swing)
3-8pm MSC Brickyard
PIRATEFEST 8-9pm MSC Brickyard
Wednesday, October 27 @ 7:30pm
Cary Long
Tuesday, Octobeftlr9
8pm @ Hendrix
ECU Students may pick up two free
tickets from the Central Ticket Office
when velid ECU ID ia presented.
All other tickets are S3.00
Sensational Saturday
Parade 9:45am Wahl-Coates Elem.
Tulane Greene Wave VS. ECU Pirates
4pmFicklen Stadium
King and Queen Coronation
Halftime Ficklen Stadium
Super Sunday
Bingo Night 6pmPirate Underground
Wicked Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: Lock, Stock, & Two
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www.tec.e
SOCCER i
Amy Horto
opponents;
ECU plas
Wave for Ho
kick-off begii
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the Homecorr
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stands near L"
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an ECU visitir
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2 p.m. today ii
brary. The use
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and other info
science journc
more informat
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Maritime hi
guest speaker
Joyner Library
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 19, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 19, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2813
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/58874
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