The East Carolinian, October 5, 1998







Tuesday
High: 74
Low: 48
Wednesday
High: 78
Low: 45
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Are apartments treating
displaced students fairly?
Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
TUESDAY, OCTOBER 5. 1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 65
ECU s airstrikes help
defeat Army
News
Briefs
A panel of people with different
ideas about diversity and race rela-
tionships will gather today to dis-
cuss race relations in North
Carolina. The session is open to the
public and runs from 5 p.m8 p.m.
in the Brody Auditorium at the
ECU School of Medicine. A drama
presentation will precede the dis-
A "Rock the Vote" Voter
Registration Campaign will be con-
ducted this week for students in
ECU residence halls. Sponsored by
University Housing Services, the
campaign is designed to encourage
students to register to vote and to
get involved in their communities.
For additional information, visit
Rock the Vote at http:www.rock-
thevote.org
The ECU Student Union
Cultural Awareness Committee
presents "Ethnic Man a humor-
ous multimedia adventure about
ethnic issues in our world, tonight
at H p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Students may pick up two free
tickets from the Central Ticket
Office with valid ECU ID. All
other tickets $3.
UHS to offer free housing to flooded students
I )octors Vision Center
announced that it will be offering
free non-prescription safety glasses
to the public in an effort to mini-
mize the risk of eye injury during
flood clean-up efforts.
Prescription safety glasses will
be available to the public at a sig-
nificantly discounted price.
Free legal assistance is now
available to help low-income resi-
dents of N.C. answer questions
dealing with insurance claims,
preparing powers of attorney and
replacing deeds and other valuable
documents.
Volunteer members of the
North Carolina Bar Association
Young Lawyers Division will be
available to answer calls and pro-
vide help at 1-80(1-662-7407,
Monday through Friday, from 9
a.m5 p.m.
If you applied for Spring 2000
nursing classes, the notification let-
ters are displayed due to obvious
reasons. Every effort is being made
to mail notification letters by Oct.
15. The deadline to apply for Fall
2000 nursing courses has been
extended" to Dec. 1, 1999.
Applications for Spring 2001 will
not be due until July 1, 2000, as
previously scheduled.
ECU, FEMA, state
construct trailer pad
Phillip Gil us
news editor
University Housing Services is
hoping to give students who lost
their apartments a new lease on life,
literally.
In cooperation with the state
and the Federal Emergency
Management Association (FEMA),
UHS plans to change over 25 acres
into a new temporary housing park
for ECU students.
Located on Dickinson and
Memorial Streets, the University
owns 7.5 acres that were originally
planned to become a warehouse
site. It will now serve as a parking
lot for the trailer park.
On Monday the state was leased
a further 18 acres of high-grade
commercial property by a private
owner, the planned site for the tem-
porary housing.
"The jurisdiction of the proper-
ty will come under the University
said Manny Amaro, director of
UHS. He explained that the state
would hand over the leased land to
ECU.
The University has also been
allocated 220 17x14 fully-furnished
trailers. They will contain three
bedrooms and two bathrooms,
along with with refrigerators and
microwaves. Each trailer will house
four people.
According to Amaro, only 178
units will be used. The additional
trailers will be given to Pitt County
for their use. The county already
boasts two temporary housing sites
for flooded families.
It is hoped that students will be
able to move into the new facilities
by Oct. 22, though that is a tenta-
tive date.
"It won't be a quick operation
Amaro said.
Those students who qualify
under FEMA will receive a vouch-
er and will then sign a lease with
SEE HOUSING PAGE 4
Rivals trade competition for compassion
U. Miami. Fla. students visited the Wright Plaza last Saturday afternoon to distribute collected supplies from their campus. Oonated items included 9.000 bottles of water, clothing and school supplies.
Here. SGA President Cliff Webster exchanges shirts with Jemes Decker, a U. Miami, Fla. student.
PHOTO BY I Mill RICHARDSON
Student volunteers reach out to others
Many reasons cited
for joining program

A S II LEY R O 11 R T S
STAFK WRITER
The Student Volunteer Program
allows one to apply his or her skills,
explore career options, build a
resume and make a difference in
someone else's life.
The volunteer program focuses
on community service and offers
many opportunities for students to
dedicate their time and abilities
toward helping others. .
This program currently serves
86 various health and human ser-
vice agencies. They include the
Boys' and Girls' Club of Pitt
County, Early Intervention
Services of Pitt County, the
Governor's One-on-One Volunteer
A student volunteer helps to bring color into a child's life.
PHOTO BY EMILY RICHAR0S0N
Program and the Adolescent
Substance Abuse Program. These
agencies serve infants, adolescents,
the elderly, college students, the
mentally challenged, the poor and
those stricken with illness and dis-
ease.
The purpose of the university's
volunteer program is to get stu-
dents involved in helping their
community and each other.
"Students understand how
much involvement it takes to have
a program like this work said Judy
Baker, director of the ECU
Volunteer Program. 'The chancel-
lor, the dean and my chairperson
are all behind us. We have to have
people backing us up
The volunteer program, which
began operation in 1990, has been
growing in size. It is mainly funded
by grants.
According to Baker, the reason
ECU students volunteer their time
is so that they can give back to the
community. Students also like how
they feel after they have helped
someone else.
Students are also motivated to
volunteer in order for them to
build a resume.
"Professionals want to see that
you have done something, given
your time and have been
involved Baker said.
In order to volunteer, a student
must contact the agency they are
SEE VOLUNTEER PAGE ?
Benefits available
for flooded staff
Less than 60
percent working
I IKK A STE1NIEISER
ASSISTANT NEWS EDITOR
Residents of North Carolina who
lost their jobs as a result of
Hurricane Floyd and its aftermath
may be eligible for special federal
and state compensation.
"The sooner the paperwork is
done, the sooner these hard-hit
workers will be able to collect
benefits to help them get bad
on their feet
Parker Chesson
ESC chairman
The Disaster Unemployment
Assistance (DUA) Program was
created following President
Clinton's declaration of 66 North
Carolina counties as disaster areas.
According to Glenn Woodard, a
federal coordinating officer, the
program is designed to provide
financial assistance to small busi-
ness owners, self-employed agri-
cultural workers, hourly wage
earners, those injured as a result of
the storm and other types of work-
ers who do not qualify for regular
unemployment benefits.
Parker Chesson, chairman of
the Employment Security
Commission of North Carolina,
urged employers whose workers
were affected by the disaster to
file for unemployment for the
benefit of their employees.
"The sooner the paperwork is
done, the sooner these hard-hit
workers will be able to collect
benefits to help them get back on
their feet Chesson said.
"Employers need to know what
type of help is available to their
employees and how to access it
By submitting a claim, the
employer verifies that the worker
is on the payroll, but worked
fewer than 60 percent of their nor-
mal work hours in that week.
Employers can e-mail, fax or mail
in these claims to the ESC office.
So far, response to the DU
Program has been good.
"We don't have an official and
current count of how many claims
have been filed, simply because
our staff is too busy taking the
claims to keep a running tally
said David Sherrill of the ESC
The federal disaster monies are
apportioned by the state in the
same way as the North Carolina
unemployment program, but is
only available to those workers
who would otherwise be ineligible
for unemployment compensation.
"Employees out of work due to
the disaster may continue to
receive unemployment benefits
for 26 weeks, same as those who
are getting regular unemploy-
ment Sherrill said.
For more information about
SEE DISASTER PAGE 3

I





2 TMid�Y. Octobir 5. 1898
news
Th� East Carolinian
Quarter's Campaign benefits area
Campuses across
state help University
AfKI.A Harm-
STAH ��ITh�
The Quarter's Campaign, a dona-
tion program formed by the
Association of Student
Governments (ASG) across North
Carolina, is collecting money for
ECU.
ECU students returned to class
last Wednesday and tried to get
back into the swing of things in the
midst of lingering waters, fallen
trees, missing sidewalks and strong
sewage fumes. �
Many students returned to thfir'
hometowns untouched, but others
were not so fortunate. As classes
continue, many students are left
without books, paper, pens, clothes
and homes.
However, the horrible misfor-
tune of Floyd has not been ignored.
With the help of the ASG's
Quarter's Campaign, relief has
come from all parts of North
Carolina. Quarter's Campaign's
mission is to encourage students as
possible to donate a quarter to
ECU, which can then be used to
helpflood-stricken students.
"The program has been a huge
success said SGA President Cliff
Webster.
Hundreds of students have sup-
ported the program so far, and
donations have been great.
Students at UNC-Chapel Hill
have collected $1,700, and N.C.
State has raised $2,000.
"The increase of funding will
allow the university to offer flood
students more relief Webster said!
"At the moment we are giving stu-
dents $100, but hopefully soon we
will be able to do more
"It's really generous of the cam-
puses because we need a lot of help
to get everyone back on their feet
it's- a great idea said freshman
Brooke Harrison.
This writer cm be contacted at
awbertsSstudentmedia.ecu.etlu.
House condemns Brooklyn art exhibit
WASHINGTON (AP)�The feud
over the Brooklyn Museum of Art's
provocative "Sensation" exhibit
continued to attract Congress'
attention Monday as the House
approved a nonbinding resolution
calling for federal funds to stop
flowing to the institution.
Republicans argued that taxpay-
ers should not have to pay for
"Catholic-bashing" art some have
deemed vulgar. Some Democrats
countered that the GOP was trying
to censor artistic expression.
The exhibit, which opened
Saturday, features, among other
things, a black Virgin Mary decorat-
ed with body parts and elephant
dung.
"Should Americans that work
40, 50,60 hours a week be forced to
turn over a portion of their pay-
check to something that offends so
many?" said Rep. John Sweeney,
R-N.Y who sponsored the resolu-
tion.
The measure was approved on a
voice vote; the Senate had passed a
similar measure last Wednesday.
Republicans said they were not
arguing that the work should not be
shown, but that it should not
receive tax dollars.
But Democrats said that was
disingenuous. "The issue before us
is censorship. Make no mistake
about it Rep. Maurice Hinchey,
D-N.Y said.
Over the last three years, the
Brooklyn Museum received $1.1
million in federal money. And while
Monday's resolution sparked heat-
ed debate it was purely symbolic.
Republicans are attempting to
attach legislation to federal spend-
ing bills to block funding to the
museum but have been unsuccess-
ful.
House Democrats also accused
Republicans of pushing the resolu-
tion to rally support for New York
City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani, the
exhibit's most vocal critic and a
likely candidate for the Senate.
SEE ART PACE 3
across
m
campuses
' Duke University�A fire broke
out in the basement of the Duke
University Clinic's orange zone on
Sept. 30. Although the flames
were quickly extinguished, more
than 100 employees and patients
;were evacuated for more than an
Stout
J The fire caused no injuries and
tio significant property damage.
"The fire was) immediately
put out by construction workers,
ljut the smoke drifted into other
clinic areas, so the clinic areas
vere evacuated said Charles
Nordan, assistant chief of the
Duke University Police
Department.
Workers were welding a floor
on the ground level of the orange
zone when burning embers
slipped into a wall's chase area,
designed to house pipes, and fell
to the basement, where it ignited
papers, said DUPD Capt. J.L.
Schwab, who was on the scene.
About four fire engines arrived
on the scene in case the fire
spread to other areas of the hospi-
tal.
"We didn't know how big it
was Schwab said. "You don't
want to take a chance with med-
ical facilities
� Harvard University�Winthrop
and Mather Houses (dorms) have
been the victims of homophobic
graffiti five times in the past two
weeks, and in strongly-worded let-
ters. House Masters have
promised to do their best to find
the culprits.
Vandals scrawled homophobic
Messages on Winthrop House
message boards in two separate
incidents over the past several
days, according to Russell Deason,
the House's tutor for bisexual, gay
and lesbian students.
Both Houses have promised to
investigate the incidents and
urged students who know about
the acts to come forward.
Dean of the College Harry R.
jLewis praised the Houses'
Response and said the administra-
tion has resources available to stu-
dents who suffer from the inci-
dents.
House Masters said they were
unaware of any link between the
incidents
Volunteer
continued liom pagB I
interested in serving. The student
should set up an appointment
where they can discuss what type
of service they can offer.
"Volunteering should be a part
of every students' education
Baker said.
Students are encouraged to
work through KCU's volunteer
program because it can provide a
student with organizational skills,
and allows individuals to work in a
large group setting. This program
will wdrk around students' sched-
ules.
"Students at ECU do a lot of
good things Baker said. "You can
always find pictures of a bad stu-
dent in the newspaper, but for
every one of those, I can give you a
picture of 30 students serving for
good. It seems as though people
want to hear the bad and are not
interested in learning about the
good
There are more students volun-
teering this year than ever before.
Each semester 3,500 student vol-
unteers are sent out to many differ-
ent agencies throughout Pitt
County. Baker can see a great dif-
ference this year in the turnout and
enthusiasm of student volunteers.
Maybe you are thinking, why
should I volunteer?
"I think that many students do
it out of the goodness of their
hearts Baker said. "It helps them
gain respect for themselves, build
self-cstccm and feel better about
themselves because of the good
they have done
Some students' majors require
them to volunteer their time.
Examples of such degrees are
those in social work, medical school
and criminal justice.
"I think that it is good that some
students have to volunteer because
of their majors said junior Megan
Williams. "It will help them devel-
op better people skills while help-
ing others
"I do not think that volunteer-
ing should be required said fresh-
man Mandy VanCooney. "Students
should volunteer because they
want to, not because they have to
The volunteer program has a
history of success. This organiza-
tion has been awarded the
President's Award as well as the
Governor's Award.
"When it comes to volunteer-
ing, everybody wins Baker said.
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Disaster
cominiieil 1mm page 1
DUA Programs, call 1-888-8.W-
6284 or visit the ESC web site at
www.csc.state.ne.us.
This writer can be contacted at
news@studentmedia.ecu.edu.
si;c?i
September 30
Hir&Run-A student reported that someone had ran into the side
of her vehicle parked on College Hill Drive. A witness provided that
it was a male bike rider.
Uirreiiy-K faculty member reported that someone stole a comput-
er part from a computer in the Flanagan Building.
Ljirreny-k student reported that someone stole his cellular phone.
He had last seen his phone in the Umstead Hall computer lab.
HnttissingPhoneCiills-K student reported that she had received two
phone calls in her residence hall room in Greene Hall from a subject
identifying himself and carrying conversation as if he knew her.
October I
Alcohol 'ioltition- student was issued a campus appearance ticket
for possession of alcohol, obstruction and delay, violating ECU policy
and refusal to comply when an officer observed her consuming alco-
hol in the substation parking lot at Fourth & Reade Streets.
DWl 8" Provisional Lirensee-k student was arrested for a DWI when
she was stopped at Fourth & Holly Streets for a burned out headlight.
Provisional Littnstt-K student was arrested for provisional licensee
when she was stopped on College Hill Drive for having a front head-
light burned out headlight.
Simple Possession of MarijMiia-Thtee students were issued CATs
for use of marijuana north of Garretr Hall, when an officer smelled
burnt marijuana where he had observed them standing minutes
before.
OH7-A non-student was arrested for DWI when an officer stopped
him for spinning tires at Seventh & Cotanche Streets.
Hmmsing Phone Calls-K student reported that he had received a
phone call in his residence hall room at Jones Hall where an unknown
person was making sexual comments.
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The East Carolinian
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Tuoiday, Octattr 5, 1898 ,
Clinton not surprised by uninsured N Korea B,asts us-on ReP�rt
WASHINGTON (AP) �
President Clinton said Monday no
one should be surprised by an
increase in the number of
Americans who lack health insur-
ance.
"What has happened is exactly
what we said would happen the
president said.
But the president said things
will get better over the next two
years as "significant numbers of
children" receive coverage under a
program enacted by Congress in
1997.
Clinton, in one of the biggest
defeats of his presidency, failed to
persuade Congress in 1994 to enact
the universal health insurance plan
written by his wife, Hillary.
"The first lady and 1 and all the
rest of us were right in 1994 the
president said.
"We told you in 1994 that if this
were voted down, the insurance
companies would continue to drop
people, or employers would,
because of the system we had
He spoke in the Cabinet Room
after remarks about efforts to win
ratification of a global nuclear test
ban treaty.
Clinton also addressed a new
Census Bureau report that 44.3 mil-
lion Americans, one in six, had no
health insurance coverage in 1998.
The survey found that the number
of people without coverage grew by
nearly a million, but overall popula-
tion growth kept the rate about
steady � 16.3 percent in 1998,
compared with 16.1 percent in
1997. In 19, 15.6 percent lacked
coverage.
Jennifer Campbell, author of the
Census report, said health care cov-
erage among children did not
change significantly from 1997 to
1998, with 11.1 million, or 15.4 per-
cent, of the under-18 population
uninsured. Children ages 12 to 17
were slightly more likely to be
without health care coverage than
those under 12 � 16.0 percent,
compared with 15.1 percent.
The president said he expected
congressional passage this year of
legislation by Sens. Jim Jeffords, R-
Vt and Edward M. Kennedy, D-
Mass that will allow people with
disabilities to go into the work force
and keep their federal health insur-
ance. He said lawmakers also
should enact his proposal to allow
Americans as young as 55 to buy
Medicare health insurance.
Clinton also said he was glad
that Vice President Al Gore and for-
mer Sen. Bill Bradley, competitors
for the Democratic presidential
nomination, were discussing com-
peting health care proposals.
"I hope that wc will continue to
see this debated he said.
SEE CUNTON PAGE 4
Downpours cause new flooding,
evacuations in hard-hit area of N.C.
RAl ,E!GI I, N.C. (AP) � Six inch-
es of rain kicked off new flooding
today in an area already devastated
by Hurricane Floyd's inundation,
washing out roads and a spillway.
People were urged to evacuate two
residential areas.
The pouring rain that fell during
the night, cut through roads and
made bridges in Wayne (bounty and
other areas impassable this morning
southeast of Raleigh.
In Goldsboro, 80 percent of the
downtown streets were flooded this
morning by Stony Creek, which
flows through the middle of town,
said National Guard Maj. Dave
Culbreth.
"The city's almost like an
island Culbreth said. "We have
some flooding in town again. We're
almost back to ground zero
Rising water also poured over
the top of the Lake Wackena dam
three miles southeast of Goldsboro
and washed out the spillway, and
National Guardsmen went door to
door urging residents to leave the
Walnut Creek subdivision. Only a
handful of people left.
However, Tom Ditt, spokesman
for the state emergency manage-
ment office, said the wash-out of
the spillway helped relieve pres-
sure that might have caused a fail-
ure of the dam itself.
North of Goldsboro, guardsmen
were sent to tell people living near
Bear Creek Dam they, too, may
need to evacuate as water washed
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over that dam, Culbreth said.
It is the second time in two
weeks that some Walnut ()reek res-
idents have been flooded.
"The residents are survivors
who "pick themselves up and help
each other said Dave Colburn,
resident. "But right now, every-
one's asking themselves "how much
can we take?
After Hurricane Floyd dumped
20 inches of rain on eastern North
Carolina, Goldsboro was nearly cut
off from the outside world by flood-
ing on the Neuse River and its trib-
utaries. That high water had just
receded this week.
SEE RALEIGH PAGE 4
News
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SEOUL, Soyth Korea (AP) �
North Korea on Monday-criticized
the alleged mass killing of civilian
refugees by U.S. soldiers in the
early days of the Korean War and
demanded, that Washington apolo-
gize
It was the first official reaction
from the communist state on last
week's news report on the alleged
killings in No Gun Ri village in
July 1950.
"The truth of history cannot be
distorted and covered said
Pyongyang's Rodong Sinmun, the
main newspaper of the North's rul-
ing Workers' Party of Korea.
It said the U.S. forces commit-
ted massacres not only in No Gun
Ri but also in other areas during the
1950-53 war.
Historians say North Korean
troops committed far more atroci-
ties, summarily executing U.S.
prisoners of war and slaughtering
large numbers of South Korean
civilians.
In its commentary, Rodong crit-
icized the U.S. and South Korean
governments for dismissing repeat-
ed requests for an investigation by
South Koreans who say they sur-
vived the No Chin Ri killings.
Last week, the Associated Press
reported accounts by American
veterans and South Korean vil-
lagers who said they saw U.S. sol-
diers kill up to 400 civilians under a
railroad bridge at No Gun Ri,
South Korea.
The news agency also found
once-classified documents showing
SEE KOREA PAGE 4
The following candidates will be on the ballot for tomorrow's SGA elections:
FRESHMAN CLASS PRESIDENT:
Chris Harton
Rcgina Kinscy
Bill Luton
Kim Skinner
Keith Tingley
FRESHMAN CLASS VICE PRESIDENT:
Scan Cullen
Rcgina Kinscy
Michael Miliotc
Monica Palumbo
Jeremy Street
.ASS PRESIDENT
SOPHOMORE C
David Bucci
Sadie Cox
Michael F. Orr
SOPHOMORE CLASS VICE PRESIDENT
Whitney Bishop
Larry D Hudson
Jennie Lamont
JUNIOR CLASS PRESIDENT
Andre D. Frederick
Christy Lynch
Jayme B. Stokes
JUNIOR CLASS VICE PRESIDENT:
Sarah Evans
Leigh S. Hancock
Jennifer Stein
SENIOR CLASS PRESIDENT:
Mark D. Morgan
Robert II. Smith
SENIOR CLASS VICE PRESIDENT:
Jeffrey T Leonard
Robert J. Smith
1-800-COLLECT
PRESENTS A
SPECIAL ADVANCE SCREENING
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FREE MOVIE POSTERS
Wednesday, October 6
10:00 PM
Hendrix Theatre
Pick Up FREE passes
Ticket Booth
Mendenhall Student Center
Presented By
Student Union - Rims Committee
HOCJUt
www.1800COLLECT.com
WWW.PREVIEWTHEATER.com
ADMISSION POLICY - Doors will open at 9:45 p.m.
Persons with Sneak Preview Passes will be seated until
10:15 p.m. At that time, if any seats remain, persons
without passes will be admitted.
.





4 Unit. Dttrtw i. 1999
Thi East Carolinian
Raleigh
coMinuad lion paga 3
"We were getting ready to pull
out, and then this came along
Culbreth said.
The setback came after feeble
signs of recovery began to emerge
Monday in eastern North Carolina.
After an unprecedented six-day
layoff, the flue-cured tobacco mar-
kets rebounded with generally
higher prices to cheer farmers,
many of whom had little else to
praise.
More than 39,000 North
Carolina residents have registered
for state and federal assistance so
far since Floyd's devastation. The
Federal Emergency Management
Agency said it has approved more
than $3.8 million in direct aid to
hurricane victims in the state.
Preliminary estimates show
Floyd caused $70.2 million in
housing damage in eastern North
Carolina, with more than 3,000
homes destroyed or heavily dam-
aged.
At least 47 people died in North
Carolina when the hurricane flood-
ed parts of an 18,000-square-mile
area. An estimated 2,100 people
remain in shelters.
Officials estimate agricultural
losses due to Floyd will exceed $1
billion, and many eastern North
Carolina farmers may decide it's
time to try something else.
"The reports that we're putting
out estimate that fully 15 percent
of the growers affected by these
floods will probably go ahead and
get out of the business said Jim
Knight, a spokesman for the state
Department of Agriculture.
Environmentalists have sug-
gested the state should impose
restrictions that could remove ani-
mal waste lagoons, as well as
municipal sewage plants, from
flood-prone areas.
But farm advocates say that
would he complicated and expen-
sive.
"It's easy to say you're going to
move people said Ann Cohen of
the North Carolina Farm Bureau.
"The question is, do they own land
to move to?"
Federal agriculture officials
have been told that farmers need
direct assistance, not loans. Most
already are carrying all the debt
Korea
continued liom page 3
that U.S. commanders ordered
their troops to shoot civilians as a
defense against disguised enemy
soldiers.
After the AP report, the U.S.
and South Korean governments
promised thorough investigations
into the No Gun Ri killings.
"The U.S. imperialists should
clearly see the situation and make
an official apology for their murder-
ous crimes against the South
Korean people Rodong said.
North Korea also repeated its
demand that Washington withdraw
37,000 U.S. troops from South
Korea. North Korea says the U.S.
military presence raises tension on
the divided Korean peninsula.
The United States says the U.S.
troops are in South Korea to deter
threats from the communist North.
The two Koreas are still technically
at war because no peace treaty was
signed at the end of the Korean
War. Their border is the world's
most heavily armed.
Meanwhile, officials from
National Intelligence Service, con-
ducted a preliminary field investi-
gation Monday, interviewing No
Gun Ri survivors and visiting the
bridge.
It marked the first time any-
South Korean government officials
questioned the No Ciun Ri sur-
vivors.
No Gun Ri remained a hot issue
in the National Assembly, where
legislators criticized the govern-
ment for dismissing earlier sur-
vivors' claims.
The survivors have said they do
not want communist support in
their campaign to win compensa-
tion and an apology from
Washington.
MATH� POWER
Algebra Geometry Calculus.
Call 1-800-97NACME.
Housing
conlinued I riant page I
the University. In�-the end, stu-
dents will be receiving free hous-
ing.
"Students just need to call the
Housing office and present their
FEMA control number Amaro
said.
Those students who were flood-
ed out of their apartments need to
register with FEMA, which can be
contacted at 1-800-462-9029. Then
call ECU-HOME (328-4663) and
they will ask for your FEMA con-
trol number in order to receive the
housing.
Other services that will be
offered are transportation, mail ser-
vices and vending services.
The land is already being
cleared now and the next two
weeks will be busy. Water and
sewer services will need to be
installed, along with fire hydrants,
electricity, an utility grid and a
series of gravel walkways.
The site will remained leased to
the University until June 11.
"It's a temporary option only
Amaro said.
This mitei can be contacted at
news0studentmeJia.ecuedu.
NACMi
Clinton
continued from page 3
"I know politics when I see it, "
Rep. Eliot Engel, D-N.Y. said.
"This is all about who will be the
next senator from the state of New
York-
Giuliani is trying to cut off city
funding to the museum because of
the institution's refusal to remove
the exhibit's more controversial
pieces. If Giuliani decides to run
for the Senate his likely opponent
will be First Lady Hillary Rodham
Clinton. Mrs. Clinton has said
while she personally finds the
exhibit offensive, she supports the
museum's right to show it.
NOW OPEN
IV.

Iff
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina fr�
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Introducing IHOP's New Rooty Roundup.
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So we cooked up the Rooty Tooty Two and Super Rooty. A full line of
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WE'RE LOOKING FOR A
Do you know someone who performed
heroically during Hurricane Floyd and its
aftermath? If so, help us recognize himher.
Go to our web site (tec.ecu.edu).and click
on the "HEROES" button. Fill out the short
form about your hero.
r
We'll publish a list of Hurricane Heroes
later this month in The East Carolinian.
eastcarolinian
SERVING THE ECU COMMUNITY TUESDAYS AND THURSDAYS
we "�,

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Checlc&wtm
mvwsga.ecw
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Pirates Swutgutg into tfo MUtennumf'
ON-UNE VOTtHQ
AtnulabU beginningcu.wv. on
Tuesday October 12
continuing until 5 fy.m.
Thursday October 14"
Student Desktop is where,you, am vote.
Please, bookmark this site, before, voting.
Sag Hunikan, Chair
ECU SgA MoHUCOHUtUj CoHutdtUe,
iendeHhaM Student Center tuoomZZZ
reewtiU, NC 27$SS
tZ23&2319
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East Carolinian
that will be
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rvices.
ready being
he next two
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need to be
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MKI.ISS Massi Man.iijmrj Frjltor
I'liii.r.it' (iii.h s Nwrsfditor Stki'IIks Sciikwim Spoils Editor
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In the past, stu-
dent-voter turnout
has; txon disappoint-
ing. We at TEC chal-
l;nct� rll tuctents to
pause during their
tliiy WodtiosKlay and
stop by any of the
oonvontanrt voting
locations at the
Wrihf Place.
Joyner Library.
Mendanhall Sttidont
Center and Todd
Dining Hall from 9
a.m. - 6 p.m. Five
minutes of your
time can transform
into four better
years of your life.
ourvew
Have you ever encountered a problem at ECU and did not know where to
turn? Whether it be a frustrating professor, troubling roommate or academ-
ic troubles, there is an organization that can help
The Student Government Association (SGA) will hold rhi-ir elections for
class officers tomorrow and all ECU students have a voice it in. Whether you
are a freshman or a senior, a pre-med major or undecided, everyone can play
an active role in ECU s future. With one swipe of an ECU One Card and a
couple of check marks, one can change the course of the university.
Our SGA and it does belong to us all, meets weekly each semester and
decides matters of university policies, student tuition, finances and campus
organizations. The class officers who will be elected tomorrow will act as
SOA representatives this semester and meet in various committees. They
then will vote on various measures brought forth by the committees.
These SOA representatives are not paid nor receive any sort of reimburse-
ment. So show these dedicated men and women your support on
Wednesday and go out to the polls.
In the past, student-voter turnout has been disappointing. We at TEC chal-
lenge all students to pause during their day Wednesday and stop by any of
the convenient voting locations at the Wright Place, Joyner Library,
Mendcnhall Student Center and Ibdd I )ining I lall from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. Five
minutes of your time can transform into four better years of your life.
OPINION!
.
CHRIS
SACHS
Application process invites discrimination
is so simple: There is no jus-
tifiable reason why a person s
name, gender, race, age or reli-
gion should be on any applica-
tion or test.
There is a problem that affects
the entire country and has contin-
ued to do so for decades. That
problem is discrimination. The
callusecl thumb of discrimination
has been flicking the Zippo of big-
otry for as long as anyone can
remember, and it's time to end it
once and for all. But that's an
unrealistic objective and I am a
realist.
I have come up with a plan that
I think will do more for equality
than most of the laws passed in
the last 25 years. I have devised a
plan to end all discrimination from
every application and testing
process that takes place in this
country every day, and that plan is
anonymity.
It is so simple: There is no jus-
tifiable reason why a person's
name, gender, race, age or religion
should be on any application or
test. The only reason those things
are on applications and such in the
first place is for record keeping
and and statistical studies.
Think about it: Why should
someone need to know these per-
sonal things until after the person
has been judged on their merit?
These items are only for newspa-
pers, magazines, sociological
research and government bean
counters who want to compare
how many of whom is doing what
in relation to others.
But the general public, as stu-
pid as they are, doesn't see that
this data is doing more harm than
good, and that others really don't
need it.
Let's look at an example, shall
we? Let's say that Mrs. White and
Mrs. Black are both applying to a
university. Now the new "Chris
Sachs Application Form" is used
and all the review committee
member sees on the application is
their test scores, extracurricular
activities, written composition,
past grades, letters of recommen-
dation and a few other goodies.
The person reviewing has no
clue of her name and there is no
age: If she is too young or old she
will not be taken into considera-
tion. No race will be listed: Why
does the reviewer need to know
that? What difference should it
make? There is no gender to be
seen. Should that make a differ-
ence? Nope. And religion is
absent, because everyone has
their own beliefs and it's no one
else's business.
So there you have it: a level
playing field. Person A has no
advantage over Person B unless
one has been more productive in
their educational career and was
more convincing on their written
essay. And those have nothing to
do with race or gender or anything
else; it has to do with who is more
qualified for the position. There is
no need for dumb quotas and
there will be no complaining
about the process being unfair.
This system works great for job
applications, lease agreements,
bank loans, juries, etc.
Now this system is not fool
proof. What about the interview?
People have to meet the applicant
in most cases, people will say.
Everyone will eventually have to
confront some
Na.iskinheadKKK member that
will never change their views, but
at least you will have gotten fur-
ther than you would have normal-
ly. You got your foot in the door
before they had a chance to close
it in the first place That is a huge
leap in the right direction.
But for any process where an
interview is not required, only
qualification will determine the
outcome, not quotas. This will
also eliminate ethnic groups that
want to cry discrimination as a cop
out when they don't get their way.
I low can one claim bigotry when
the person reviewing the applica-
tion has no earthly idea about your
external qualities, age or beliefs?
Many of you may be screaming
that this idea makes us all num-
bers and takes away our individu-
ality. Not true. You are still the
same person you will always be,
but you will just be anonymous for
the paperwork process that initial-
ly seeks to categorize and discrim-
inate. Once the approval or denial
decision is made, the rest of the
information will be released.
Believe me, they will eventually
find out who and what you are, but
by then it's too late for them to
deny you�they already accepted
you. And if they don't like what
they see, well then screw 'em.
I think the new system ought
to be government-mandated and
placed into law. It should be
enacted overnight and sweep the
country in a manner of a few
months. It will be a Shockwave of
equality that will rock this country
forward in the name of peace and
equality. It will happen so fast the
ignorant will not know what hit
them. So, write your congressman
and demand the "Chris Sachs
Application Form Bill" be passed.
Your children will thank you.
This writer can be contacted at
csachsr@studentmedia.ecu.edu
z&K-Ms.
opinioni
RYAN
KENNEMUR
Mass media disturbs, inspires
Thank God for all these
Dawsou 's Creek ripoffs on tele-
vision this season now I can
get my fun-loving, pretty white
people with sexual gratification
problems fix any day of the
week.
I lello my peoples! I hope that
everybody is okay and living well. I
wasn't really hurt by the big storm,
thanks for asking. Since I'm sure
everyone is tired of talking about it,
lets change the subject altogether.
And since there aren't any stand-
out topics to rant about, I'm just
going to let you in on a few of my
recent thoughts.
1) Thank God for all these
Dawson's Creek ripoffs on televi-
sion this season now I can get my
fun-loving, pretty white people
with sexual gratification problems
fix any day of the week.
2) I believe that the people who
have a problem with the ruling for
Instant Replay in football just need
OPINION
to realize that yes, he was out of
bounds when he caught that one.
Mm being a fan does not change
anything.
) O'eez, I'm hungry. And Randy
(Juaid's portrayal of the animated
KFC Colonel just makes me yearn
for a Tender Roast sandwich. And
since I'm in between phone ser-
vices, maybe I should do like that
chnad that married Courtney Cox
says and dial 1-oOO-CALL-ATT
and dial down the middle. Choad.
4) And while we're on the topic
of television commercials, lets talk
about the new Gap campaign of
nondescript models singing old
eighties music standbys. Ever
notice how they pretty much bark
orders at you at the conclusion of
the commercial? The latest is
"everyone in leather Ayn Rand
would have a field day with that
one. 'They might as well have the
cool guy from class teaching the
class dork how to be cool, "She's All
'That" style. 5) Professional
wrestling is not fake. It's rehearsed.
6) Another thing that bugs me
lately is the fact that big corpora-
tions are now basing how much
money they donate to various char-
ities based on the how football play-
ers perform that day. I was listening
to the Panthers game on the radio
on the way home one day and John
Kasay was just about to kick a field
goal. All of the sudden, the radio
said, "If he makes this one,
RayCom will donate $500 to aid in
the fight against muscular dystro-
phy Well, isn't that generous?
Know what happened? Kasay
kicked it wide left, and the fight
against muscular dystrophy contin-
ued, completely unaided by
RayCom. I might be a little mean at J
times, but I'd never have the gutsj
to say, "Sorry little Joey. Flutie did-
n't get that fourth touchdown, so
there will be no bone marrow trans-
plant for you this week. But cheer
up! The Make A Wish Foundation
is here to make your wtslv come
true, provided that .your wish
involves a Nintendo 64, or going to!
a real life Charlotte I lorriets game �
Well, that's about all for now. I
hope I haven't offended anybody,
but if I did, accept my most sincere
apologies. No really. Unless you're
that guy that Courtney Cox mar-
ried. Choad.
-�
This writer can be contacted at
rkennemut@studentmedia.ecti.edu
MARVELLE
SULLIVAN
US treats symptoms of drug problem, not causes
$166 million is quite a large sum
of money. To be sure, our govern-
ment is using it wisely, right? Are
they appropriating the money for
flood relief? No. Is the money
being used for farm aid. since East
Coast farmers are now financially
devastated because of flooding and
wind? No. The money has to be
used for education because of the
United States' ridiculously low-
teaching salaries and underfunded
scholastic programs. Yet, that is not
where the money is going either.
The United States government
is spending $166 million to combat
the production and exportation of
drugs in Colombia. 'This is
absolutely the most insane and
infuriating, way to spend taxpayer
money. Not only is the United
States funneling money into for-
eign countries, but they are also
doing so in a very illogical manner.
First, to blame a foreign country
for our supposed "problem"�
which has decreased dramatically
since the 1980s is ludicrous. Yes,
Colombia is the chief exporter of
heroin and cocaine, and they are
just supplying a demand�not cre-
ating one.
'This method of combating drug
use epitomizes the warped mental-
ity and approach the government
takes. They treat the symptoms
rather than the cause itself. If the
money was spent on prevention
and rehabilitation, then going to a
foreign country where we do not
belong anyway would not be neces-
sary. Curbing demand is the only
way to assure a true and lasting
decrease in drug use. Curbing the
supply, which is what is being
attempted now only achieves small
ami temporary decrease goals.
Second, even if spending the
money is logical, the way it is being
used is absolutely not. It is a shame
and a disgrace that the government
believes spraying random
Colombian poppy fields, training
an anti-narcotic battalion and arrest-
ing drug traffickers is really going to
make a dent in production.
The Colombian drug lords in
response have already found new
fields, trained a better guerrilla
army and hired new pushers. The
drug rrade is as permeated in their
modern economic, cultural and
political systems as Microsoft, fast
food and lobbyists are to ours. Fen
if it was the United States' job to
curb Colombian production, obvi-
ously we don't possess enough
sense or wherewithal to accomplish
the task.
Third, and perhaps most impor-
tantly, it is not the United States'
job to police the world and extend
our ethnocentric values whenever
and wherever we deem it necessary.
Colombia is not asking that we lead
aerial campaigns on their land. We
certainly would find it appalling if
another country behaved this way
on our territory.
The Colombia attack is just
another example of governmental
waste. 'This isn't an isolationist ser-
mon, but the United States has too
many domestic needs to waste time
and effort on something that will
inevitably end in shattered dreams
for the hope of an end to
Colombian drug production and
exportation.
This writer can be contacted at
msullivan@studentmedia.ecu.edu
BjBf
�M





b Tuesday. Ottobir 5, 1999
How to recover
belongings after
theflood
FURNITURE
"Solid
wood furni-
ture usually
can be
repaired and
cleaned, but
wood veneer often separates and
warps.
Hose off all of the debris on fur-
niture outside. Take the back off in
order to allow air to circulate. Do
not place wood furniture directly in
the sun; it may cause warping. Let
it dry slowly in a well-ventilated
place. Wood alcohol or turpentine
applied with a cotton ball may
remove white mildew spots on
wood.
�All&�
u p h o 1 -4brnr ,jW
stered fur-n i t u r eyp
soaks up contaminants from flood
waters and should be thrown out. If
the piece is an antique or especial-
ly valuable, throw out the fabric,
padding and cushions. The frame
may be saved.
Mattresses, box springs and
pillows that have been submerged
in the flood waters should be
thrown out. It will be difficult to dis-
infect both inside and out.
; CLOTHING
Sort wet items as soon as pos-
sible to keep colors from running
�together. Sort out clothing that
jshould be dry-cleaned.
; Air-dry clothes that need to be
Jlry-cleaned and get to the cleaners
as soon as possible. Dry cleaning
solvents also disinfect.
0 n c e
dry, shake
and brush
garments to
remove as
much soil as
possible.
: F o r
Washable items, rinse items sever-
al times in cold water. If heavily
spoiled, soak overnight in cold
water and detergent. Hot water is
hot recommended as it may set
Stains.
: 'Machine wash as soon as pos
sible in the hottest water safe for
clothes using the highest water
level and longest wash cycle. Do
hot crowd washer. Use one and a
half times the recommended
amount of detergent and disinfec-
tant. Household liquid chlorine
bleach, if safe for fabric, is the best
disinfectant. Alternatives are pine
oil disinfectants (Pine-Sol) and phe-
nolic disinfectants (Lestoil or
Lysol).
: KITCHEN
UTENSILS
� Wood, plas-
tic, rubber uten-
sils, cutting
boards, dishes and serving dishes
with any cracks, chips or scoring
should be be thrown away
� Pots and pans that have han-
dles and knobs that are glued or
screwed on must be carefully sani-
tized.

WASHING AND SANITIZING
� KITCHEN UTENSILS
; 'Thoroughly wash everything in
hot water using a strong detergent
solution. Use a stiff brush to get
into all of the corners. Take off all
handles and scrub all parts
vjrell.Rinse in clean, hot water.
I

� PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
Chef Neil Perkins cooks for students
England's finest
visits Greenville
Scsw Wkioiit
? K.VII �KS Moron
Standing behind a stainless steel
table. Chef Neil Perkins slices a
steak effortlessly and precisely. On
the burner behind him, the sauce
simmers at the perfect tempera-
ture. The International Guest Chef
has come to ECU, and he is cook-
ing up something delicious for the
students.
"This is the sixth annual
International Guest Chef Series
said Amy Hartman, marketing man-
ager for ECU Dining Services. "17
chefs arc selected to visit 17 differ-
ent Aramark accounts, and this year,
ECU was chosen. It is the first year
that this has been featured at ECU,
and it is a great honor to be picked
Chef Perkins, the International
Guest Chef from England, Gordon
Skoog, the production manager and
Chef Perkins slices and dices to perfection as he prepares his speciality dish.
the executive pastry chef, display-
cooked for the customers at Todd
and Mendenhall Dining Halls. The
main dish consisted of pan-fired
Sirloin steak, confit of shallots and
garlic widi sauce Bordelaise.
"Pan-fired steak is very popular
in England Perkins said.
PHOTO BY EMILY RICHARDSON
"My favorite dish to prepare is
braised oxtail, probably because I
like to cat it so much Perkins said.
"I have been a chef for 16 years, and
my favorite part of the job is die
cooking
'Currently, Perkins is a chef at the
National Police Training Center in
Bramshill, England. Here, they train
police officers from all over the
world, so he is used to preparing
food for a group with a variety of dif-
ferent tastes. He lives there with his
wife, Anne, and their two children.
"Anne is a very good cook
Perkins said. "When she makes
breakfast, we have eggs, bacon,
sausage, tomatoes and baked
beans
His interests in becoming a chef
were sparked after reading some
books by Robin Carrie, a French
gourmet cook.
"The Bordelaise that I am
preparing is based on a French
dish Perkins said. "It is a variation
on a classic dish because when you
are cooking for this many people,
you cannot have all the parts of the
dish separately, like you would in a
traditional dish
This is Perkins first trip to
America, and one of the things that
he has noticed is Americans' love for
football.
"They all watch football, and it
helps me sleep Perkins said.
Gordon Skoog, the executive
catering chef from Sweden, is
preparing a dish tonight as well.
"My favorite types of food are
Northern Italian cuisine and
Northern European cuisine Skogg
said.
I le has been here for one year,
and he has been a chef for 47 years.
SEE GOURMET. PAGE B
Students cope with aftermath of Floyd
Coumelors assist
campus community
Nix M. Oky
IHIlaTWT FKATI IIS EDITOR
On the surface, it's another typical
fall day in Eastern North Carolina.
Sun-kissed leaves harbor a red-and-
gold hue while the air captures a
c(x�l breeze. Students fill the cam-
pus, talking animatedly with one
another about impossible assign-
ments due and previous weekend
excursions. Local businesses arc up
and running, serving their patrons
with a variety of goods. With all of
these people going about their daily
activities, it's hard to believe we are
still trying to cope and recover from
the destruction caused by
Hurricane Floyd.
"I must say students are (uitc
resilient said Dr. Lynn Roeder,
director of the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development.
As each day goes by, students
attempt to go on and rebuild what
Floyd destroyed.
According to Roeder, the main
concern currently facing students is
filling their basic needs of housing.
food and clothing.
"We're anticipating that once the
basic needs are met, things will
begin to sink in Roeder said. "This
should be in a couple of weeks
Last week, it was estimated that
over 100 members of the ECU com-
munity attended sessions at the
Counseling Center and approxi-
mately 50 percent of the patients
seen at Mental I lealth involved
flood-related situations.
"Mental Health and the
(ounseling (Center is working close-
ly together in order to get students
the assistance they need in the right
place said Dr. Jane Ross, staff psy-
chologist at Student I lealth. Mental
I lealth Division.
Over the last couple of weeks,
the Counseling Center and Mental
Health have offered assistance to
students, as well as staff and faculty
through a variety of avenues, such as
individual and group counseling ses-
sions, tables set up at the Flood
Resource Center and offering rou-
tine around-the-clock contacts to a
mental health professional.
"Students can call at anytime to
contact one of us Ross said. "Just
contact the ECU police and they
will inform students who the on-call
counselor is
Once the initial needs are ful-
filled, counselors see other issues
arising for students.
Students talk with others who have experienced the same loss due to the hurricane.
riinillS BY EMILY RICHARDSON
"Things may not impact people-
right away Roeder said. "One of our
concerns is students getting re-trau-
matized going back into their apart-
ment and actually seeing what used
to be their living space
According to Roeder. students
are trying to get reconnected to their
lives prior to,the hurricane.
"Some staff have saiil the day
when classes resumed, they hail full
attendance Roeder said. "This is
another sign that students want to
get on with a normal life
Students have been affected in
different ways and are dealing with
the situation as best they can.
"It was so emotional to see the
Tar River reach the roofs of apart-
ments said junior Julie Wilson.
"The hardest thing was seeing one
of my friends permanently leave
Greenville because the flood left her
with nothing
"I wouldn't say coping is the word
to use said senior April Petty. "I am
basically in limbo-l no longer think
of things in long term, but from
moment to moment. I think it'll all
sink in once I have a place to stay
Counselors offer suggestions off
how to begin getting one's life back
together.
"We offer flood support groups
Roeder said. "It gives students, staff
and faculty a chance to talk about
the situation with others dealing
with the same issue
"Practice good mental health
Ross said. "Eat well, sleep, exerciser
Excessive use of drugs and alcohol
will not get us through the situation
According to Roeder and Ross, it
will take some time to get back to
the way it used to be, so patience is
key.
"We as a community are going to
feel the ripple effects of the storm
for some time to come Ross said.
"We've all been through this disj
aster and have leen directly o
indirectly affected by it Rocde
said. "We may not feel the same and
will need to have patience to geij
back to normal
This miter can be contacted at
ndrygstudentmedia. ecu. etfu
Facilities services, campus police combine forces
Organizations
protect university
Si s.x Wrkjiit
H- I I Kks Kill KIR
Throughout the fierce wind and
pounding rain of I lurricanc Floyd,
Facilities Services and the ECU
police department worked around
the clock to maintain the campus
and protect the students and staff.
The steam plant, a division of
Facilities Sen ices, is a vital compo-
nent to ECU. It provides hot water
and heat for the entire campus.
During Floyd, the steam plant was
maintained by as small group of
individuals; Dennis Rey, the steam
plant supervisor, Andre' Carmon,
Dale Kingsland, Robert Newell and
Steven Boseman.
"We tried to keep the steam
going as long as we could Rey said.
They realized if the steam went
out, the campus would have a new
list of problems to add to the diffi-
culties the storm was already caus-
ing. Lack of drinkable water, itic-
obstacles pre-
sented by evac-
uation and food
shortages are
just a few that
faced this busy
crew.
The steam
plant also assist-
ed in other
capacities on
campus during
the hurricane.
"We could
go places that
others couldn't
go because our
vehicles are
higher than other vehicles Rey
said. "We carried kerosene over to
Mendenhall for fuel, and we built
blocks and barricades so no one
would get injured
When Floyd hit, the campus
was deserted.
"We were the only ones here
beside the E( AI police Rey said.
Safety is an important element of both the Floyd and the post-Floyd campus.
PHOTOS BY EMILY RICHARDSON
In conjunction with the police
department, the team from
Facilities Services helped to pre-
vent accidents which could have
occurred if it were not for their ded-
ication and hard work.
Many officers from the ECU
police department were busy dur-
ing the hurricane maintaining the
security of the
campus by con-
s t a n t I y
patrolling the
area.
"Some offi-
cers worked
25-30 hour
shifts during
the hurricane
said Lt.
L a F r a n c e
Davis. "We
made sure that
the campus
was safe from
ItHiters
The police
department also rescued people
from the storm with the assistance
of Greenville Fire and Rescue.
SEE FORCES, PAGE 8
Numbers

gallons of drinking water sold
by Kroger since Sept. 16.
or more students
lost their homes
to Floyd.
n tractor-trailer loads of
water donated by Kroger to
"� the American Red Cross.
2500
or more peo-
ple aided by
the Relief
� Centerat
Todd.
k days of school missed
F by ECU students
� because of Floyd.
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features
Tui�d�y, Octtfetr S, 1111 7
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becoming a chef
:i reading some
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ecause when you
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�T. PAGE 8
yd
the flood left her
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pril Petty. "I am
I no longer think
term, but from
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a place to stay
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their homes
oyd.
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Local wrestling group brings Christianity to ring
,��
k
BROOKFORD, NC (AP) � And
Ciod said, "Let's get ready to rum-
ble
Every week at the Brookford
Community Center, the powers of
wrestling and religion are com-
bined for family entertainment.
Heading the shows is former pro
wrestler and founder of Exodus
Wrestling Alliance, "Gorgeous"
George South.
Although there are no exact
prayer services at the show, mes-
sages of faith are brought to the
audience in the form of Christian-
themed comic strip pamphlets.
"During intermission I'll
bring (the pamphlets) to the little
kids and you'll even see that the
outfit I wear has (John) 3:16 on the
back of it. So, I'm spreading a mes-
sage but I'm not really opening my
mouth South said.
Fans are opening their mouths,
though. The audience ranges in
age from young children to senior
citizens, each cheering on the
matches of the amateur wrestlers
who hope to make it into the rings
of the World Wrestling Federation
and other pro-level arenas.
"What they are doing is offering
an alternative form of professional
wrestling said fellow fan, the Rev.
David Ridenhour of Saint Paul's
Lutheran Church in Newton.
"There's good guys and bad
guys and they hit each other with
Meet Ihe People
� Name: Brooke Allen
� Hobbies: Writing
� Major: Nursing
� Hometown: Greensboro
� Goal in Life: To become a
nurse.
chain, but there's no profanity,
there's no obscenity, like you see
on the WWF where there are
wrestlers named Mr. Ass and chil-
dren go out and buy little action fig-
ures of them
Scottie "Superbrar" McKeever,
a new resident of Hickory who
moved from West Virginia to work
with and train under South, said,
"As far as what the people see, it's
just wrestling, but it's not like what
you see on TV. We don't go out
and cuss the people or shoot them
the bird
"As in pro wrestling, the shows
are more-and-less scripted battles
inside the ring he said.
Added fellow wrestler Mark
"Sweet Dreamz" Howard, "It's
basically old school wrestling,
which is what people really want to
see now
The wrestling matches are mix-
tures of singles and doubles. A nor-
mal night will feature about 2 hours
with four match-ups. Fans can't
seem to get enough, attendance
started out at 25 -people and has
risen to as high as 75.
The EWA travels to Statesville
and Concord, putting on different
shows during the week. At each
site, different wrestlers will appear,
depending on the athlete's sched-
ules. Additionally, the group visits
churches, putting on Christian-
themed shows.
McKeever said South goes to
the church shows with the normal
three match set-ups, but also gives
testimonials professing his faith in
Ciod. Additionally, other wrestlers
will speak, as will local ministers
from the area.
"It's really based on what they
(the church host) want McKeever
said. I le did say the group runs into
IRIINVIUI, NC
Monday Night Football
$4.00 Bud Lt. Pitchers
$0.99 Stadium Dogs
AT J, NEW APPETIZERS
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some controversies. A youth minis-
ter invited the group to an Atlanta
church, but at the last moment the
main minister vetoed the perfor-
mance. "In some places, they like
the idea and in some places they
are kind of skeptical
As for any controversies
between Christianity's stance on
pacifism and the violence associat-
ed with wrestling. South dismisses
it.
"The churches love it because it
attracts kids that you wouldn't get
to church any other way South
said. "I don't just do it for show
My relationship with the Lord is
meaningful 24 hours a day. liven if
I collected trash during the week, I
would still be sharing my message
with people
As for the graphic violence and
profanity he said is rampant in pro-
fessional wrestling, South said, "I
don't comprehend how people can
think that has anything to do with
wrestling
On the possible conflict, Rev.
Ridenhour said, "In pro-wrestling,
you have the age-old, cosmic strug-
gle between good and evil and my
hat is off to (ieorge, because I think
that it's in this alliance that you see-
that struggle
I le continued, "if you were to
take this stuff seriously, I think
there would be a conflict between
religion and this. Hut. with this, I
think, the fans and everybody here,
even the wrestlers themselves,
don't try to take it as on the level
During the breaks, Wilkic's chil-
dren and others wrestled with each
and asked the athletes for their
autographs.
"That's what wrestling's all
about Rick Wilkic said.
aNOTCH
above the
j)DRM
Dr. Michael Brown's dedication
to helping others is emphasized
by his belief that the understand-
ing of psychology can affect peo-
ple's lives.
"Psychology as a major can
help people look and think about
solving problems and the causes
of problems said Michael
Brown, assistant professor and
director of the School of
Psychology Graduate Program.
"It's a systematic way to look at
the mechanics for solving prob-
lems at. work, in the neighbor-
hood or in the community
Brown believes that everyone
should have at least some under-
standing of psychology.
"Psychology is important
because it can answer a wide vari-
ety of questions regarding how
you think about things that you
take for granted Brown said. "It
helps us understand people's
development arid how we can
create a good environment
After graduate school. Brown
worked at a community men talk
health center in Virginia.Therc
he helped people with chronic
mental illness and directed pro-
grams aimed at preventing men-
tal retardation.
"Psychology has helped me to
appreciate the differences in peo-
ple Brown said. "But difference
is not a bad thing. It's helped me
to keep an open mind.
Sometimes that's a struggle
"From the beginning, I've
wanted to work with people and
families Brown said. "It fits
with my personality because I'm
more of an extrovert and enjoy
Name
Dr, M'uJuul
BfVWH
Deportment
Psychology
working with, and being around
people. I am a good listener for
students
Since he has been at ECU,
Brown has participated in
research on defining die profes-
sional roles of school psycholo-
gists, and assessment and inter-
vention for children with behav-
ioral problems.
"I've researched how school
psychologists spend time on the
job, their satisfaction and intern-
ship training for them Brown
said. "I found that school psy-
chologists are generally satisfied
with their jobs.
"Most of their time is spent
evaluating and diagnosing kids
with learning and behavioral
problems. They also spend time
counseling and consulting, such
as working with teachers'in the
classroom or helping parents
understand their child
Brown earned his undergradu-
ate degree in biology, his masters
in marriage and family counseling
and his Ph.D in psychology all
from Virginia Tech. He did his
internship at Reading Hospital
and Medical Center in
Pennsylvania where he served as
a staff psychologist for three
years.
Brown has a positive outlook
concerning ECU and education
as a whole.
"This university is a place
where people can get a good edu-
cation and learn a lot Brown
said. "And I encourage students
to get to know their professors.
One of the roles of a professor is
to be a mentor to people
w(otwkf�is�t hb,aw We Are Committed To Serving You R
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SBSBSSr558 E3 5 1-800-853-3033







8TuMd�y. Octobir 5. 199S
features
Till East Carolinian
Neiman Marcus lists land
conservation as choice holiday gift
DALLAS (AP)As Steve
y Magncs draped a $450,000,000 181-
carat diamond necklace over the
I bare shoulders and neck of model
5 Kris Lezetc, the Neiman Marcus
executive predicted the piece will
practically sell itself. " �
m "I'm sure we're going to sell it.
It's unique. In fact, if we had to
make two of them, we probablv
could winked Magnes, the vice
president of precious jewelry for
the luxury retailer.
The briolette necklace is just
,one of many extravagant items in
j Neiman's Christmas catalog, which
was unveiled Monday at the com-
pany's flagship Dallas store. The
l.V4-page book is a veritable Santa's
list for those wealthy enough to
avoid the riffraff at Nordstrom.
Discerning shoppers can pluck
one of 50 fully equipped 2001
BMW X5 sport-utility vehicles for
$57,995�the vehicles usually sell
out-or create a home arcade with a
$,0(X) Venturer S2ei road simula-
tor. An 1822 manuscript of
Clement C. Moore's "The Night
Before Christmas" can be had for
$795,000.
What new Internet tycoon
wouldn't want a $35.25 million
Boeing business jet? If those stock
options haven't been exercised yet,
it can be leased for 100 hours a year
for $5.9 million.
The catalog dates to 1915 and
has become a publicity-generating
harbinger of the upcoming season.
It also serves to raise money for
charity-some purchases generate
donations to organizations such as
UNICEF, Habitat for Humanity
and the Susan G. Komen Breast
Cancer Foundation.
Neiman continued its practice
of suggesting the perfect his and
hers gifts, and sought to break away
from such mundane past offerings
as airplanes, dirigibles, submarines
and mummy cases.
This year's his and hers: a
$200,000 gift to The Nature
Conservancy and a $35 donation to
save one acre of rain forest.
For shoppers on a budget, the
catalog has a variety of offerings
under $1,000, ranging from Manolo
Blahnik ladies pumps ($815) and a
Donna Karan New York strapless
tube dress ($780) to a nylon golf
bag ($860) and a battery-powered
children's sports car ($475).
If even those offerings are too
pricey, there's always the book
itself for $6.50. Dreaming about the
goodies is free.
Watch for TECs
latest publicatioa

FORCES
cominued lioin page 6
"We helped get people out of
("the water said Chief Robert
I Younce. "On Saturday, we ran to
j check the roads to be sure that stu-
dents were able to leave safely
i Although there were many peo-
� t'ple working hard to help those in
�heed, the students and staff were
Jjhot the only ones touched by the
! storm and the destruction it left
behind.
"I had never experienced flood-
ing like that before Younce said,
i "It was very traumatic trying to
i work with some of the young peo-
l pie. The tragedy of the death of
; that young man touched us all
The men and women ho were
working hard before, during and
after the storm brought this univer-
sity and its community through
successfully.
"You could not have had a bet-
ter team in place during the hurri-
cane Younce said. "Without folks
like that, the campus could not
have been brought back to opera-
tional status so quickly after the
storm
Be part of an
EXCITING INTERNET COMPANY
This writer can be contacted at
leatures&studentmedia. ecu. edu
GOURMET
cominued from page 6
lie enjoys cooking for ECU and
in Greenville.
"There are no severe winters
here, the people are fantastic and
it is a beautiful university Skogg
said.
Thanks to the three profes-
sional chefs who all have a passion
for preparing excellent food, the
students at ECU had a delicious
and unique meal when the
International Guest Chef Scries
came to I'XU.
This writer can be contacted at
featuresSstudentmedia ecu. edu
Copy
Editors
Needed
� Must have excellent grammar ,V editing skills
1 English majors preferred
' ly at the second floor of Sludenl Publications
Building or call 328-6366
l!i
line I � �
eastcarolinian
NEEDED:
CAMPUS OPERATIONS MANAGER
Earn great money
Excellent resume builder
Flexible schedule
Gain Management and
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apply online at www.versity.com
email your resume to: jobs@versity.com
fax your resume to: 734483-8460
or call: 877VERSITY ext.888 (837-7489)
4 SEAT
4SEA1
T CAN'T m
-WEt CALL "1
CHINESE FC
THIS STUFI
HoRftgL
ECU VS. NC STATE
STUDENT TICKET PICK UP
WHO: ECU STUDENTS (with a One Card)
WHAT: ECU vs. NC STATE FOOTBALL GAME
STUDENTTICKETPICKUP
WHERE: WILLIAMS ARENA AT MINGES COLISEUM
TICKET OFFICE
WHEN: BEGINNING OCTOBER 11th THRU OCTOBER 13th, 7:30AM-4:00PM
FOR AS LONG AS TICKETS LAST
ATHLETIC TICKET OFFICE: 328-4500
ECU students may bring their One Card to the Athletic Ticket Office at Minges Coliseum to pick up one ticket for the
ECU vs. NC State game on November 20,1999. ECU students have the option to purchase one additional guest
ticket at the regular ticket price ($30.00). Tickets are available on a first come, first serve Dasis. Group tickets
may be picked up with the proper student identification cards. Special preference will not De given to groups.
� �





East Carolinian
comics
IPANY
AGER
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�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenccom
��.��
For once, it's not just black and white
Tue Oct. 5, 1999 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students may pick up two free tickets
from the Central Ticket Office when valid ECU
ID is presented. All other tickets - $3.00.
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Tlw tut Carolinian
SpomsM
WBriefs j
New York wins NL
wild card
Last night in Cincinnatti, the Mets
won the winner-take-all playoff to dter-
mine which team would go on to the NL
playoffs
New York's Edgardo Alfonzo hit a two
run homer in the first inning to take the
lead. The Mets never looked back as they
rallied 5-0 over the Reds
Atlanta, Arizona and Houston also
made the NL playoffs as division champs.
On the AL side, New York. Cleveland, Texas
and Boston will do battle.
The playoffs begin tonight.
sports
11 Tuaiday,
Tuesday. October 6, 1999 10
Hurricanes blow past Bruins
Even with the absence of Keith
Primeau. Carolina's top scorer last year,
the Hurricanes managed a 3-1 opening
game victory over the Boston Bruins.
Boston was 9-0-3 in the past 12 opening
games, the longest unbeaten streak in NHL
history.
McGwire wins HR race
In the final game of the year, which
was shortened due to rain, Mark McGwire
and Sammy Sosa each homered. For
McGwire, it was number 65. Sosa's was
his 63rd this season.
Big Mac homered in six of the final
seven games to become the tenth all-time
leading home run hitter. Meanwhile, Sosa
only homered in two of the last 11 games.
The Cardinals open next season wi
the Cubs April 3 at Busch Stadium.
Gordon's new crew
chief is a winner
In the first race without crew chief Ray
Evernham, Jeff Gordon proved he could
still win races. Brian Whitesell, Gordon's
new crew chief, made a last minute gam-
ble not to pit during a caution on the final
15 laps of the NAPA Auto Care 500 in
Martinsville, Va.
"That answers alot of questions,
doesn't it Gordon said. "Brian Whitesell
did a great job. I'm proud of him
PHOTOS COURTESY Of THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Weather affects women's soccer
Pirates win over
ODUJosetoGMU
I I I I V l l li s
S I I I tt It I I I k
The long break due to Hurricane
Floyd affected the outcome of the
women's soccer team win over Old
Dominion I 'niversity and their loss
to George Mason University.
"I was really happy with the
performance since we had only one
practice before the game said
I lead Coach Rob Donncnwirth.
Due to heavy rain, both teams
started out slow. Krin Cann took
advantage of the slow play and
poor field conditions in the loth
minute with a goal off of a slow
pass from Kim Sandhoff. This
marked (Finn's fourth goal of the
season.
"I thought we did well consider-
ing we hadn't practiced for a week
since the hurricane said sopho-
more midfielder Tara Carpenter.
The Lady Pirates expanded
their lead to 2-0 with a goal from
Shana Woodward in the 30th
minute. This was Woodward's first
goal of the year.
"I think we did really well com-
ing off of the break we had said
senior goalkeeper Amy I lorton.
Old Dominion struck back
before the end of the half off a goal
from Melanie McGovern.
"I don't think it was the pretti-
est game but we were able to gut it
out said junior forward Charity
McClure.
ODl! attempted to rally at the
end of the game but the Pirates
proved to be too strong.
Despite picking up the win they
suffered a loss when starting
defender Shana Woodward went
down to a concussion.
"There was a little fatigue
because of the long break
McClure said.
I lorton recorded the complete
game win with one allowed goal
and five saves. Tonya Dedmond
and Alison Kinsler split rime to
record the loss with one save a
Pirates battle George Mason in double overtime.
PHOTO BY EMILV HM.I1II1II5I)N
piece.
"The lay-off hurt us more in the
second game against Cieorge
Masonl Oonnenwirth said,
(ieorge Mason took the early lead
with a goal from Angela l.ombardi
off a pass from Katy Robertson.
"1 feel like everyone played
with a lot of heart and despite the
loss. I'm really proud of the team's
performance McClure said.
Amanda Duffy tied up the game
in the 29th minute with a goal off
an assist from Jennifer Reiley.
(larpenter lifted the Pirates to a 2-1
lead with a goal off of a poor GMU
clearing in the 44th minute.
Duffy added to the lead when
she headed in a Jill Davis free kick.
"I was disappointed
Carpenter said. "We were up 3-1
and we thought we had it and let
go in the last 20 seconds
CMC's Megan Hawkins scored
the game-tying goal with 51 sec-
onds to play to keep the Patriots'
hopes alive. Roth teams battled
through one scoreless overtime,
but the Patriots proved to be a lit-
tle sttonger in the second overtime
when Robcrson scored in the
game-winner off an assist from
I law kins.
"I was very disappointed
I lorton said. "We didn't play poor
but we didn't finish the game as we
started. We just didn't get the job
done
In a losing effort Horton played
the complete game with four goals
allowed and seven saves. Patriots
Kristie Matthews and Naomi
Mines shared time to record the
win. Matthews earned six saves
while allowing two goals while
Hines.Jiad four saves with one
allowed goal.
The Lady Pirates will meet
their next opponent tomorrow as
they compete at the University of
Richmond at 7 p.m. in CAA con-
ference play.
This writer can be contacted at
sportsSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
Miller's kicking advances Pirates to 5-0
Field goals key
to beating Army
S I i:i'iii: Sen k i i
M'liH s OH
For a few short hours on Saturday
afternoon, the people of Eastern
North Carolina were able to forget
about rebuilding from the devasta-
tion left by Floyd and enjoy their
foodall team. The Pirates did not
disappoint as they whipped Army
3.5-14, improving their record to 5-
0.
For the first time in four years
ECU carried a Top 25 ranking into
a game. Saturday, they brought
their No. 19 ranking into Michie
Stadium to face the Army Cadets.
The last time ECU played at
West Point, they defeated the
Cadets 31-25 in 1995. With the
effects of Hurricane Floyd and
their upset over then No. 9, Miami
still on their minds, the situation
this time was very different.
The Pirates got a strong perfor-
mance from redshirt freshman
kicker, Kevin Miller. Miller con-
nected on four field goals including
a career long 52-yarder. ECU has
not had a kicker kick four field
goals in a game since Chad
I lolcomb hit four against Stanford
in the 1995 Liberty Bowl.
"Kevin is very effective said
I lead Coach Steve Logan. "I told
Davidiarrardl not to turn the ball
over when we got into the red zone
because Kevin is so efficient. You
take 12 points off the board and
we're in a break-neck football
game
Coming into the game unde-
feated, and with a C-l'SA show-
down with Southern Miss next
week the Pirates had all the ingre-
dients for a let down versus Army.
The Pirates made sure that would
not happen.
ECU opened the game by mov-
ing the ball into the red zone and
faltering. The Pirates' first drive
ended in a 30-yard field goal by-
Miller.
Miller hit four FG's and three PAT's against Army.
PHOTO BY EMILY RICHARDSON
The Cadets took over and their
first drive was indicative of the way
the afternoon would go for Army.
The vaunted option would not
work against the Pirates quick
defense.
"We seemed very fast
parison to their offense
SEE FOOTBAU PAGE II
in corn-
Logan
OPINION!
STEPHEN
ICHRAMM
Do not
read this column
Didn't you read the headline? If
you're the least bit superstitious
like I am, you're advised to net
read any further. This column is
about something I don't even want
to be talking about, and yet I just
cannot hold back.
During halftone of the
Alabama-Florida game, CBS
showed highlights of ECU's win
over Army. After the highlights
were over and the score was shown,
former Auburn coach Terry
Bowden said how ECU could run
the table and end up just like
Tulane last season.
Before I get too deep in this col-
umn let me say one thing: Being
undefeated is damn hard.
Tennessee went undefeated last
year by the grace of God. The Vols
needed a missed field goal by
Florida and Arkansas quarterback
Clint Stoerner to lay the ball on the
Neyland Stadium turf to notch
their perfect season.
Tulane, a fellow C-USA school
went undefeated in 1998 and
ended up out of any meaningful
bowl considerations. The Green
Wave played a schedule laden with'
cupcakes. They played a C-USA
schedule, but due to a scheduling
quirk they did not play ECU. In
1998, C-USA was a weaker confer-
ence. Their non-conference sched
ule included such bantamweights
as Rutgers, Navy and the never-
dangerous Ragin' Cajuns of
Southwestern Louisiana.
In 1999 C-USA is a better con-
ference. Schools like Cincinnati
and Southern Miss, have had the
huge wins that escaped them in
1998 and have played tough at
places like Ohio State and
Nebraska.
If the Pirates go undefeated
(knock on wood) and follow the
same path as Tulane, as many say
they will, it will be an injustice.
Over a year ago when the 1999
schedule fell into place, the Pirates
could have taken a cue from
Tulane. Tulane's plight proved that
a C-USA schedule was not enough
to get recognition in college foot-
ball. Thus, scheduling games with
West Virginia, South Carolina in
Columbia and N.C. State seemed
like tests tough enough to bring
attention to any program.
West Virginia lost badly to
Maryland and their season has
turned out to be a. bust. The
Gamecocks have yet to win a game
and State has been going downhill
since a win at Texas in the season's
first week. However, unlike
Tulane, the Pirates at least made an
attempt to play tough teams.
If these games don't garner any
serious consideration for the
Pirates in any big time bowls, then
the win over Miami should. If the
gods of college football can over-
look a win over a top 10 team, then'J
what's the use of playing a tough
schedule in the first place? J
Tulane went undefeated in �
1998 and played only one team
from a major conference, Rutgers, J
the doormat of the Big East. ECU J
will have played two teams from
the Big East, West Virginia and j
Miami; two teams from the ACC, j
Duke and N.C. State; and one '
team- from the SEC, South
Carolina.
I realize this is ridiculously pre-
mature, and that the bad karma
kicked up by this column is pretty
intense. The 1998 Tulane squad
was a special team and if ECU can
hold on and go to the Liberty
Bowl, it would be a great way to
end a season. However, if the
Pirates can win out, they should
not be penalized for having "a
weak schedule The truth is that
SEE OPIMIOH PAGE I?
: Harm
firstevett
Ik i
ASMS! AM
The ECU n
teams each fit
at the Ca
Invitational on
was the Pi
Hurricane Floi
"I felt go.
accomplished
pur first race in
only started i
past Wednesd;
Klepack.
"Stu Will ha
men's side as c
Mance also h
Hurric
RALEIGH-
Hurricanes ge
Rutherford mai
to sign All-Stai
Wednesday. H
offer will lure i
return for this
but that's tin
Reynolds, one
"It's not like
in here Rey
team's offer. "It
hoped for
The latest of
You
V
Fort
Thousands of
the skill of in
from ll&R Bl
money as incoi
ll&R Block. I
preparation sc
income tax
week of Oetot
afternoon, an
available. Class
area locations.
During the 11-
tion to learning
tax preparation,
explanation of
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information fro
most experien
Greenville'
Omlc- MS





I
I Tuiidiy. Octo.it 6. 1888
5, 1888
10
N!
not
column
he headline? If
bit superstitious
advised to not
This column is
don't even want
it, and yet 1 just
:ime of the
game, CBS
i of ECU's wm
the highlights
score was shown,
coach Terry
ECU could rofi
id up just like
deep in this cof-
ne thing: Being
damn hard.
undefeated last
�fGod.TheVojs
I field goal by
isas quarterback
ly the ball on the
i turf to notch
IL
f C-USA school
in 1998 antf
any meaningful
ris. The Green
�dulc laden with'
layed a C-USA'
to a scheduling
t play ECU. IH
i weaker confer-
nference scried
bantamweights
and the never-
l' Cajuns of
isiana.
is a better con-
like Cincinnati
. have had the
leaped them in
layed tough at
io State and
go undefeated
and follow the
le, as many say
an injustice,
when the 1999
lace, the Pirates
) a cue from
iglit proved that
was not enough
in college foot-
ing games with
Ith Carolina in
L State seemed
lough to bring
igram.
lost badly to
;ir season has
A. bust. The
t to win a game
going downhill
in the season's
.ever, unlike
it least made an
;h teams,
on't garner any
tion for the
lie bowls, then
i should. If the
tball can over-
) 10 team, then'j
laying a tough j
place? J
mdefeated in j
mly one team
ence, Rutgers, J
�ig East. ECU J
m teams from I
t Virginia and J
rorn the ACC,
rate; and one '
SEC, South 1
iiculously pre-
ie bad karma
Inmn is pretty
Tulane squad
rid if ECU can
� the Liberty
i great way to
ivever, if the
, they should
or having "a
e truth is that
USE I?
Cross Country
teams finish third
sports
Tki Eitl Carolinian
: Harriers compete in
first event since Floyd
TKI) lit) WARD
SSISTW I SIMIR I S KDITOa
The ECU men's and women's
teams each finished a strong third
at the Campbell European
Invitational on Saturday. The meet
was the Pirate's first since
Hurricane Floyd.
"I felt good about what we
accomplished considering it was
our first race in three weeks and we
only started practicing again this
past Wednesday said Coach Len
Klepack.
"Stu Will had a good race on the
men's side as did Brian Beil. Jamie
Mance also had his best outing
since coming buck from an injury
two years ago. The women finished
strong as well, with freshman Kay
Livick leading us and having her
best race yet
Liberty University won the
men's eight team race with 26
points. Host Campbell finished
second with 49 points. ECU had 66
points, and fourth place Costal
Carolina ended up with 75.
Will placed ninth overall on the
five mile course in a time of 26:24.
Brian Beil finished 12th in 26:44.
Tom Cull, Ryan Bennett and Jamie
Mance crossed the line 14th, 15th
and loth.
In the women's race, Campbell
finished first with only 20 points.
Liberty was second with 50. Third
place ECU rounded out the
Division I group with 67 points.
Freshman Kay Livick was the
top Pirate finisher in 19:20 on the 5-
kilometcr course. Livick placed 7th
overall. Becky Testa was 12th in
20:13 with Fran Lattie a close 13th.
Abby Hayes and Lauren Chadwick
placed 16th and 19th overall.
"I think overall, as a team, we
had a pretty good race Livick
said. "The hurricane put responsi-
bilities on ourselves. We were still
mentally there as a team, but we
had to practice on our own
The Pirates' next event will be
the state championships Oct. 16 in
Charlotte. ECU men's team won
the event last year and are looking
to do the same this year.
"I don't see any reason why
we're not in contention to win it
again said Assistant Coach Jeremy
Lozito.
This writer can be contacted et
thoward8studentmedia.ecu.edu
Hurricanes await All-Star center to accept proposal
RALEIGH�(AP) Carolina
Hurricanes general manager Jim
Rutherford made a last-ditch effort
to sign All-Star Keith Primeau on
Wednesday. He hopes his latest
offer will lure the team captain to
return for this weekend's opener,
but that's unlikely, says Todd
Reynolds, one of Primeau's agents.
"It's not like there is a real carrot
in here Reynolds said of the
team's offer. "It is not what we had
hoped for
The latest offer by Rutherford is
a shorter-term, two-year deal for the
6-foot-5, 220-pound center. Before
Wednesday's offer, the Hurricanes
had a five-year, $20 million deal on
the table.
Primeau, 27, who led the team
with 30 goals last season, and agents
Don and Todd Reynolds arc seek-
ing $5 million a season.
Rutherford said the new offer
still puts Primeau in the $4 million-
a-year category and includes incen-
tives close to $500,000. Primeau
would also have an opportunity to
come back to the bargaining table
in two years.
"This gives him an opportunity
to have a couple of big years and
put up some bigger numbers to
where he could come back to us or
go to an arbitrator to say I'm worth
the kind of money he has been ask-
ing for Rutherford said� "It does-
n't tie his hands for as long as our
five-year proposal
However, Reynolds said late
SEE HURRICANE! PAGE 17
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Craig Curtis named Assistant Athletic Director
Wellman promoted
to AD of Marketing
Tkii How mid
assistwt sroms Klin ill
Craig Curtis has been named
Assistant Athletics Director for
Operations and Equipment at East
Carolina.
"We are extremely pleased to
have Craig joining our staff said
Mike I lamrick, director of athlet-
ics. "He has done an outstanding
job in his position at Houston and
we arc excited to add someone of
his caliber to our athletics pro-
gram
Curtis, a native of Arlington, Va
received his bachelor's degree in
sports administration from the
University of South Carolina. The
past two years, Curtis served as
director of football operations at the
University of Houston.
Prior to his stay in Houston, he
was the director of marketing and
promotions at Troy State
University in Alabama.
While there, he also served as
the game day coordinator for foot-
ball, basketball and baseball, and as
tournament director for several
Mid-Continent Conference
Championships.
Curtis also served as director of
ticket sales and marketing at the
University of Tennessee-
Chattanooga, and as a coach and
teacher at Brookville High School
in Lynchburg, Va.
"I am very excited about com-
ing to East Carolina Cunis said.
"I've always regarded the program
here as a highly successful, highly
visible one, and I feel fortunate to
be a part of it"
In another move, Angie
Wellman, ECU's director of
Marketing, was promoted to
Assistant Athletics Director for
Marketing.
SEE CURTIS RUE 12
Football
continued Irnni page 10
said. "Once it became a pitch game
for them, I felt very comfortable
that we could run them down
After a three and out. Army was
forced to punt. ECU's Keith
Stokes, fielded the punt and
backpedaled. Stokes got some
blockers and took off. Stokes ran to
the end zone for an apparent score.
However, an illegal block nullified
the run and the Pirates took over on
their side of the field.
The Pirates moved the ball and
when Miller connected on his sec-
ond field goal, this one from the 29,
the Pirates went up 6-0.
The Pirates took over after
another Army punt, and drove
downfield going up 9-0 on Miller's
52-yarder.
Miller's kick was ECU's longest
since Holcomb connected on a 52-
yardcr versus Miami in 19. The
kick was the third longest in school
history.
Midway through the second
quarter. Army took over and failed
to move the ball. The Cadets punt-
ed and ECU took over in their own
territory. After a Stokes' reception
moved the ball to the ECU 38,
Garrard hit Amie Powell for a 62-
yard touchdown pass. Garrard, after
being hit as he threw while Powell
caught the pass, broke a few tackles
and raced in for the score. After
Miller hit the PAT, the Pirates were
up 16-0.
Army got the ball and moved
across midfield for the first time in
the game. The Pirates blocked the
Cadets 45-yard field goal attempt
and recovered the ball on their own
2-yard line. The Pirates were able
to move the ball off of their own
goal line and punt. The half
expired shortly thereafter with the
Pirates up 16-0.
After Army's ripening drive fal-
tered, the Pirates drove downfield
and Miller connected on his founh
field goal of the day.
The third quarter saw the
Pirates and Cadets exchange pos-
sessions without scoring. Army
finally broke into the scoring-col-
umn with a touchdown early in the
fourth quarter to make the score 19-
7.
After the Cadets and Pirates
exchanged punts, Army got the ball
at their own 40-yard line. Army
quarterback Joe Gerena dropped
back to throw when defensive end
Kevin Ward slammed into him.
The ball popped loose and Norris
McCleary recovered, rumbling 40
yards for the score to put ECU on
top 26-7. The Cadets would score
again on a Gerena run and the
Pirates would score again when
Marcellus Harris returned an
onside kick for a touchdown to
make the final score 33-14.
This writer can be contacted at
sports8studentmedia.ecu.edu
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12 Tm��ay. Octobir 5, 1999
sports
The East Carolinian
Hurricanes
continued Irom page II
Wednesday night that the offer
averages $3.5 million a year�or $1
�� million less over two years�and
they're not interested.
"The term interests us�yeah
; we can go back to the table in two
J years�but not at these numbers
J Reynolds said. "We're ii the wrong
; stratosphere here
I Rutherford said the nine-year
� NHL veteran and his agents have
� until Friday to accept the proposal.
I The Hurricanes, the defending
j Southeast Division champions,
; start their season Saturday night in
r
r
r

www.attic-nightclub.com
1YTIC
rUpt�A752-7303i
GreenvilleXX 1
209 E. 5th St.
Boston.
"If it is not accepted by then, we
just have to realize that he's not
going to be with us to start the sea-
son and probably for a long, long
time�maybe even the whole
year Rutherford said. "We feel
very strong about our position and
we have to go forward
Primeau, a restricted free agent,
balked at the five-year deal because
it would have taken him one year
past when he could have filed for
unrestricted free agency.
Teams can match offers given to
unrestricted free agents or receive
draft picks as compensation, while
unrestricted free agents can shop
on the open market.
The latest offer by the
Hurricanes also drops any fines for
missing training camp.
"We could have taken that posi-
tion, but we didn't Rutherford
said. .
If Primeau accepts the offer,
he'll be in the lineup against the
Bruins, Rutherford said.
"Physically and mentally, he's
saying he's ready to go and I'm sure
he has worked very hard, but I
don't think anybody who has
missed a training camp in any pro-
fessional sports is ready to go
Rutherford said. "But if he agrees
to a contract, he'll be in the lineup
and be the captain of our team
Saturday night
Curtis
continued liom'pane 10
Wellman, an Illinois native and
graduate of Illinois Wesleyan,
came to East Carolina after work-
ing with the Indianapolis Colts in
corporate and group sales. Prior to
that, she served as the network
coordinator and account manager
for Internatio 1 Sports Properties
in Winston-Salem, NC.
This writer can be contacted at
thomrd&studentmedia. ecu. edu
Opi
NC Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 01 at KU end Top tOO
College Ban In the nation by
Playboy magazine October 1997
Slemoial Qtaadi:
HoHtLf Motto
tw Armv i� Kiis
Hell's Bells'is ACDC
ZOSO is Led Zeppelin
Maynard Ferguson
and his Big Bop
hloveau Jazz Band
www.livewireonline.com
The special
Hurricane Floyd
recovery edition
of The
it still available
at various places
around campus
including
Mendenhall,
Student Rec.
(enter, Student
Stores and Todd
Dining Hall.
union
continued Irom page 10
putting up a winning record against
the 1999 schedule is worthy of
praise. Running the table would be
worthy of something more.
This writer can be contacted at
sports8studentmedia.ecu.edu
lessons of Success
and Survival for
Adult Students1
� Meets every other Wednesday
��'�'� Next session October 6
� "Honing Your Academic Skills"
� Noon-lp.m.
. - 312 Wright Hall
� Attend as often as you like
For students over 24 who want to meet other adults
and succeed at ECU
Graduate'students are welcome Bring a lunch and a friend
call 8881 or fS68i for more information.
Peter A. Jordan
Paranormal Expert & Investigator
Mon Oct. 11, 1999 8:00 p.m. Hendrix Theatre
ECU Students may pick up two free tickets
from the Central Ticket Office when valid ECU
ID is presented. All other tickets - $3.00.
Individuals requiring accomodations under The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) should notify the university at least two weeks
prior to the date of the event. Write the Department for Disability Support Services, A-117, Brewster Building, or call 252-328-4802.
t :





The East Carolinian
i2
FOR RENT
ONE BEDROOM apartment. Take
over lease, available now. Rent is
$310 per month. Apartment at Vil-
lage Green on 10th Street. Call 764-
0917.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 758-6596.
PRIVATE LARGE Bedroom in Pri-
vate Home with Private Full bath,
colored T.V air condition, refrigera-
tor and fully furnished. No drinking,
no smoking- 2 girls preferred. Will
wave security deposit until avail-
able.$400 covers everything.Call
746-3522.
TiWBfi
:urity Dei
p
Security Deposit
with presenutlon of trite coupon, otfw
expires 1211W not valid wjtti any othr i
coupon
-WESLEY COMMON SOUTH; 1 or 2 bed
rooms, t bath, range, refrigerator, treei
w�ter��rar, washamryar hookups, laun-i
dry facilities, 5 blocks Irom campus, ECU
bua aarvlces.
COMPLETELY RENOVATED UNrrS AVAILABLE
- All Properties hava 24 hr. emergency
malntainance- Call 758-1921
p. M
Qogefrioot
&�T? ittttUfeW � ����J
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROMMMATE NEEDED Brand new
two bedroom, 2 12 bath duplex
within walking distance to school. If
interested call 329-8971 or 752-8649
As soon as possible
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted to
share two bedroom, two bath apart-
ment. Kingston Apartments. Club-
house, pool, cable included. Call
758-6344 for more info.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share brand new 2-bdrm. apartment
A.S.A.P. Eastgate Village. For more
info, please call 561-8464.
MF ROOMMATE wanted. Four
bedroom, two bath and a great loca-
tion. $220 per month. 412-1201.
ROOMMATE WANTED $225 own
room plus 12 utilities, safe second
floor flood proof. 5 minutes walk
from ECU. Call 752-4391 11-12
pmnight. Voicemail (917) 886-
8599
LOOKING FOR clean smoker to
share beautiful 3 bdrm house with 2
theatre students, a Labrador and a
cat. WD $225. Call 695-0358.
FOR SALE
2 NICE fold out couches for sale.
Asking 100 dollars each or best
offer. Call 752-9038. Great condition
and hardly used.
AAAI SPRING Break Specialsl Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 5 days $2791 In-
cludes most meals! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City, Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
EXTREME POWER Plus Herbal Die-
tary Supplement. Control Hunger. In-
crease Stamina. Add Endurance. Re-
duce Sugar Cravings. Increase men-
tal alertness. Increase energy level
30 capsules only $13.00 call 758-
7119.
1990 MAZDA PROTEGE well main-
tained, ac, amfm cassette, 5 speed,
great car for anyone! $2500 neg.
412-5366 ask for Jen. i.
SERVICES
LOSERS WANTED! Need or want
to lose weight? Hottest guaranteed
diet in USA! Call 1-888-870-5032.
DANCERS EXOTIC Legal lap danc-
ing $1000-$1500week. First in the
state. Show up ready 8pm. Sid's
Showgirls. Goldsboro
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
MMlHUSKYSPtPTS
(919)496-2224
D.J. FOR HIRE
FOR ALL FUNCTIONS & CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
FOR SALE
AAAI CANCUN & Jamaica
SpringBreak Specialsl 7 nights, air,
hotel, meals, drinks from $3991 1 of
6 small businesses recognized for
outstanding ethics! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
ONKYO HOME Stereo System with
Surround Sound. Includes five
speakers, amp, six disk CD changer,
dual cassette deck, and tuner. Pur-
chased last year, mint condition. Paid
$1200 asking $700. Includes five
year warranty from Circuit City. Call
353-0519.
'96 TOYOTA Corolla. Tan 4-Door. 6-
sp $5900. Good condition. Call Ju-
lie 758-7729.
FOR SALE: '97 Honda Prelude V-tec
power everything, sunroof. CD play-
er spoiler. 40K miles. Call Carrie
252-246-0757. Leave message.
HARDWOOD COMPUTER table.
$125 or B.O. 412-1201.
1997 SATURN 38k CDplayer Au-
tomatic well maintained service
regularly 11.564 great deal! Monthly
payments $250 compared to dealers
price $15,500 757-1569.
BELLY DANCE for fun and fitness.
Great exercise for women of all ages!
Classes start mid September. Call
Donna Whitley 356-5150.
NEED A Computer for Classes? Call
Shawn at Custom Computer and let
him build you what you need and
want. Free setup and delivery. 752-
4335.
SSMANAGE a business on your
campus$$ Versity.com. an Internet
note-taking company is looking for
an entrepreneurial student to run
business on your campus. Manage
students, make tons of money, excel-
lent opportunity! Apply on-line at
www.versity.com contact jobsOvers-
ity.com or call 734-483-1600 ext.
888
HELP WANTED
SZECHAUN GARDEN needs part
time waitstaff. No phone calls, come
after 2pm in person only. 909 South
Evans. Greenville NC 27834 (10th &
Evans).
THE WINTERVILLE Recreation
Dept. is looking for Soccer Coach-
esReferees for its Soccer Programs.
The games are on Tuesday and
Thursday nights at 6 p.m. and 7 p.m.
If you coach in the first game then
you will referee the second and if
play the second then you will referee
the first game. CoachesReferees
will be paid. For more information
call 756-2221. ext. 6.
ner
7 Ws. per week
� Minimum GPA 2.0
Mush be highly moti-
vateid & responsible
erience in
press &
hop
HELP WANTED
EARN FREE Trips and Cash Spring
Break 2000. Cancun. Jamaica. For
10 years Class Travel International
(CTI) has distinquished itself as the
most reliable student event and mar-
keting organization in North Ameri-
ca. Motivated reps can go on Spring
Break FREE and earn over $10,000!
Contact us today for details!
800328-1509 www classtravel-
intl.com
SPRING BREAK reps needed to
promote campus trips. Earntravel
free! No cost. We train you. You work
on your own time. 1-800-367-1262
or www.springbreakdirect.com
CHILOCARE M-F. 2-5 pm. 5$hr.
for additional info call Janet or Steve
Porter 756-8523.
TOP DOLLAR for Top Nanny 7-3
Monday-Friday. Must be articulate,
warm, and enjoy a happy three year
old. Available immediately. 321-
8658.
FRATERNITIES SORORITIES and
Student Groups: Earn $1,000-2.000
with easy CIS Fund Raiser event. No
sales required. Fund Raiser days are
filling up so call today. Contact Ron
� 1-888-522-4350.
HARD WORKING. DEPENDABLE
STUDENTS WANTED MATTRESS
PLUS IS NOW HIRING DELIVERY
PERSONNEL. APPLY IN PERSON
606 E. ARLINGTON BLVD NEXT
DOOR TO CUBBIES. NO CALLS
PLEASE!
PHARMACY TECHNICIAN to
function in innovative community
practice serving patients needs, as-
sisting in patient care, filling pre-
scriptions. Must possess excellent
people skills, superb telephone eti-
quette, and ability to multi-task un-
der pressure. Positive attitude, wil-
lingness to work at any task, a yearn-
ing to tackle new responsibilities,
and cooperation with co-workers
definitely a must. No nights and
Sundays. Send resume to 615-B
South Memorial Drive. Greenville.
NC 27834. Exp. a must.
HOME HEALTH Care Helper need-
ed for elderly lady. Part-time, morn-
ing hours. $7.50 perhour, pre-tax.
Call 321-7730 leave message.
EARN $60.00 to $100.00 per hour
modeling and dancing for local adult
entertainment agency. No experi-
ence required. Flexible work hours.
Discretion and confidentiality as-
sured. 830-0494.
FREE TRIPS and Cash Spring
Break 2000. StudentCity.com is
looking for Highly Motivated Stud-
ents to promote Spring Break 2000!
Organize a small group and travel
FREE! Top campus reps can earn
Free Trips and over $10,000!
Choose Cancun, Jamaica or Nassau!
Book Trips on-line log in and win
Free Stuff. Sign Up now on line
www.studentcity.com or 1-800-293-
1443.
WORK AT Home. People needed to
help raise funds for Fire Depart-
ments and Rescue Squads. Make
up to $10 per hour plus bonuses.
Must have personal computer. For
info, call 1-800-253-2638.
FREE BABY Boom Box Earn
$12001 Fundraiser for student
groups & organizations. Earn up
to $4 par MasterCard app. Call
for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a free
baby boom box. 1-800-932-0528
ext. 119 or ext. 125 www.ocm-
concepts.com
ACT NOW! GET THE BEST
SPRING BREAK PRICESI SOUTH
PADRE, CANCUN, JAMAICA, BA-
HAMAS, ACAPULCO, FLORIDA &
MARDIGRAS. REPS NEEDED.
TRAVEL FREE, EARN $$$. GROUP
DISCOUNTS FOR 6 800-838-
8203 WWW.LEISURE-
TOURS.COM
TRADER KATE'S has full time and
part time seasonal positions open
now! Work with the best in Green-
ville's most exciting home decor and
gift store. Applicants must be willing
to work nights and weekends. Ap-
plicants chosen will be neat, person-
able, and highly motivated. Apply in
person. 714 East Greenville Blvd.
252-355-5283.
FRATERNITIES. SORORITIES and
student groups: Earn $1000-2000
with easy CIS Fund Raiser event. No
sales required. Fund Raiser days are
filling up. so call today. Contact Ron
a 1-888-522-4350.
YEAR 2000 internships "Don't
get a summer Job run a sum-
mer business" www.tuition-
paintera.com emeil: tui-
palnfbeWeouth.net 353-4831.
HELP WANTED
GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMI
BROWSE ICPT.COM Win a Free
trip for Springbreak 2000. AH desti-
nations offered. Trip participants.
Student Orgs 8 Campus Sales Reps
wanted. Fabulous parties, hotels &
prices. For reservations or rep regis-
tration Call Inter-Campus Programs
800-327-6013.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post 340. Ope Inn. To
address the mental healthsuicide
crisis, .is to recognize the need to
study all philosophies & religions. A
study with a school of philosophy in
of which 'open discussion meetings
wereare it's primary objectivewas
a most fortunate experience in un-
derstanding the 'forum The meet-
ings bean with a few minutes of in-
troduction of basics of it's 'Life' phi-
losophya few personal experienc-
es .& then 'open discussionany&
all questions of LIFE are wel-
comed& answered. If answers are
not researched & recognized at next
.open discussion' meeting. Should
no answer be availablethe 'blank'
duly recognized. Prosper n' Live
Long. Tom Drew.
THE CARD Post Report 339. Wade
Inn. From the ships anchored in the
Sea of LovevisitorsKnowing the
please'n of all who came before
swim to the Isle of Wuv's shore.
And before leaventradition not to
breacha handful of sand from their
former landis cast upon the
beachincreasing Wuv's reach!
T.K.D.
THE CARD Post. Report 338. Staid
Inn. The Card Post began (898) a
series addressing 'capital punish-
ment' that presently is integral to the
present series addressing the men-
tal health suicide crisis. Recogniz-
ing a crisis within a crisis is to recog-
nize the flaws in democracy & edu-
cation due to the absence of appro-
priate 'forums' for both. As rec-
ognized in Report 294. 2A "that it
would be a sound decision of the
government to stay all executions till
the matter of a fully functioning pub-
lic address stem essential to a dem-
ocratic governmentwas fully ex-
plored as readdressed in Report
319 & forwarded to the Governor's
Affair's Office this report will be for-
warded to express concern that con-
tinuing research is presenting added
validity to the need to stay all execu-
tions. Prosper n' Live Long. Tom
Drew.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS ON your big
win. Way to go Pirates! Love XI
pledge class of Gamma Sigma Sig-
ma.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
ANYONE WITH Flood or recovery
pictures is asked to bring them to Dr.
Harold Stone of the Planning Depart-
ment in the Rawl Annex. The pic-
tures will be used for a study of the
flooding and recovery effort.328-
1271.
BEAUTIFUL YEAR old male tiger
striped cat. He is very loving and is
low maintenance since he is an in-
dooroutdoor cat. Please open your
arms to this animal in need of an im-
mediate home. Leave message 931-
1023.
ELECT STEIN Junior Class Vice
President. If you want a better cam-
pus for everyone then vote on Wed-
nesday October 6th. Jenny Stein Ju-
nior Class Vice President.
THE EXERCISE and sport science
motor and physical fitness compet-
ency test is scheduled as follows:
Minges Coliseum (Williams Arena) at
9 am on Friday. October 15. 1999. A
passing score is required of all stud-
ents prior to declaring Exercise and
Sport Science major. Students must
bring ECU student I.D. If any ques-
tions call 3281998.
FEEUNG LIKE the oldest in your
class and wanting to succeed aca-
demically? Attend "Lessons for Suc-
cess 8 Survival as an Adult Student"
Wednesday, October 6 from noon-
1pm in 312 Wright and hone you
academic skills. Call 6881 or
6661 for more information.
A JOB?
YOU'RE LOOKING
IN THE RIGHT
PLACE!
The East Carolinian
classifieds

ARE YOU A STUDENT
FLOOD VICTIM WHO
HAS ALREADY APPUED
TO KM BECAUSE YOU
HAD TO VACATE YOUR
If so, please call
University Housing Services
at ECU-HOME (328-4663).
We will be happy to give this
information to the FEMA
office so that they can expe-
dite assisting you with your
housing needs. FEMA and
the State of North Carolina is
currently working to develop
a mobile home park to assist
you with your needs.
If you are a displaced
student who has not
yet applied to FEMA
please call 1-800-
462-9029.

ji
l
Advertise in
the East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related,
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE . . .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
� M
I





Dress Casual for Church
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The past 3 weeks in Greenville has been
an unusual and unique time for students,
faculty and staff.
While Hurricane Floyd and its flooding has
caused massive damage to many homes and
disrupted many lives, it has also shown us
something about ourselves and our university.
ECU and its people have responded in
astounding and exceptional ways,
including the Pirate football team who fought
from a deficit to defeat the nationally-ranked
Miami Hurricanes.
I We wanted to provide you with something to
remember this extraordinary time and these
remarkable people.
Wrapped around this issue of The East
Carolinian is a commemorative poster.


Title
The East Carolinian, October 5, 1998
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 05, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.2812
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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