The East Carolinian Special Hurricane Recovery Edition, September 28, 1999






CIAL HURRIC.M; RECOVERY EDITION
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 28,1999
Hurricane, flooding devastates area
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4s many as 5,000 students are affected;
ECU offers assistance to keep students in school
Now that the raging tor-
rents of Hurricane Floyd
have given way to blue skies,
students must do what all
survivors do�begin to clean
up and move on. However
many students say they ex-
pect the transition back to
normal college life to be any-
thing but simple.
The tragedy has left uni-
versity officials scrambling to
fend off what they fear might
be a high withdrawal rate. In
the aftermath of the storm,
nearly 5,000 students have
been left homeless, and still
more are reeling from lost
wages and damaged per-
sonal items.
According to Chancellor
Richard Eakin, the university
understands that students
must struggle with finding
new accommodations and
roommates and replacing
lost belongs all while prepar-
ing to return to class on
Wednesday. He said he
hopes the campus commu-
nity can help devastated stu-
dents begin the process with
confidence that their needs
will be met
"My major concerns are
relocating students who
have been displaced by the
flood Eakin said. "I speak
for the entire ECU commu-
nity when I say our hearts go
out to them. We know they
are very upset about their
losses and tears will be shed.
They are deserving of a time
to grieve
To ease the academic bur-
den of the upheaval, the uni-
versity has extended the pe-
riod for withdrawals with 25
percent refunds until Oct. 5.
The drop period has also
been extended until Oct. 15
(Oct. 19 for Weekend Univer-
sity) to allow students to
drop classes without the
drop counting against them.
It is hoped that measures like
these, coupled with the sim-
plicity of the revised aca-
demic calender, will encour
contnuedon.
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the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 28. 1999
The Salvation
Army had 31
mobile kitchens
active in 16
counties as of
last Friday in
North Carolina.
Baptist Men
groups had six
feeding opera-
tions in six
counties, the
Red Cross had
66 mobile
feeding vendors
deployed.
groups tod by the
PmlppiUMtwMba
Owugii Friday at 10 mm. m4 at 2:30 Mi. hi Rmrf 106.
Workers assist students in the Flood Relief Resource
Center in Todd Dining Hall.
Campus resource center established
Counselors from the
CounselingandStudent
Development Center
are available at the Hur-
ricane Relief Service
Center at Sweethearts
for employees and their
families to use.
Counselors will be
available from 10:30
a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
These services will be
available as long as the
Service Center is opera-
tional.
The counselors in
the Center for Counsel-
ing and Student Devel-
opment will work with
employees as long as
needed to help them get
through the crisis and
get back on their feet
A Flood Relief Re-
source Center is opera-
tional in Todd Dining
Hail offering informa-
tion and services to the
ECU community.
The Center is open
10:30 a.m. to 7 p.m
daily. It is open to any
ECU student or staff
member. The phone
number is 328-0394. If
parking nearby is un-
available, use the park-
ing lot located north of
the stadium.
The Center is staffed
to assist students and
staff with a variety of is-
sues including:
� Temporary, long-term
housing options
�Counseling
� Health and safety info.
�Legal consultation
�Academic info.
�FEMAinfo.
� Emergency loan info.
� UnitedWay assistance
�Financial Aid info.
� Student Government
Association loan info.
� Copiers to copy insur-
ance documents, etc.
� Textbook replacement
info, from Student
Stores
ECU students and
staff should bring their
ECU One Card as I.D.
Video taken during the hurricane captures a tree that has fallen on a parked car while onlookers watch from
outside their apartments on the second floor, (photo by Mike Edwards)
Services available to assist recovery
Students, staff offered counseling
Counseling services
are available for ECU
employees and their
families in the after-
math of Hurricane
Floyd.
Here are the counsel-
ing services that have
been arranged:
WESTCAMPUS (SOM)
Counselors from the
Academic Support and
Counseling Center and
the Employees' Assis-
tance Program of PCMH
are available in the Blue
Module of the Family
Practice Center at Brody
for employees and their
families. Therewillbea
counselor available for
drop-in visits, 8 a.m.
until 8 p.m.
Employees can gain
access to the Blue Mod-
ule through the hospital
entrance.
Aaron Child
Student
found
drowned
at bottom
of Hill
ECU Police pulled
a student's body
from the floodwaters
at the bottom of Col-
lege Hill last Wednes-
day.
Aaron Christo-
pher Child, 18, was a
freshman at ECU. An
i autoposy performed
by the state medical
examiner's office
ruled his death an
accidental drown-
ing.
Child had been
missing since ap-
proximately 2 p.m.
Thursday. He was
last seen at the apart-
ment of his brother,
Adam, on 8th Street.
According to his
mother, Tina Child,
he'd been taking a
nap and his wallet
and keys were left in
the apartment.
His mother put
up posters around
town, bought an ad
in The Daily Reflector
and got Aaron's pic-
ture on local news-
casts in an effort to
find her son.
His body was
found around 9 a.m.
Wednesday with the
assistance of the
State Bureau of In-
vestigation and
members of the
Greenville FireRes-
cue Unit.
Child was a
Leland, NC. fresh-
man who had not
declared a major.
lUt-ii-i .Jl Ja.11





Tuesday, September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
A message from the
Chancellor
Dear Students:
Welcome back to ECU after an unexpected,
tragic interruption. The aftermath of Hurricane
Floyd is a sobering wake-up call of the fragility of
our daily lives. I am sure that you join the entire
university family in expressing sympathy to the
family of Aaron Child, a freshman from Leland, NC,
who drowned in the floodwaters of the storm.
Many of you lost a great deal in the flood. The
ECU family is aware of your circumstances and
committed to help you get your lives back to nor-
mal. From the first hours following die devasta-
tion we have made plans to assist you, and into
the next weeks and months we will continue to be
sensitive to your needs because of what this storm
has imposed. The Flood Relief Resource Center in
Sweetheart's Dining Room in Todd Dining Hall has
been established as your one-stop center for ev-
erything from assistance in housing, to counsel-
ing services, academic concerns related to the
storm, financial assistance, and business services.
The hotline number at the center is 328-0394.
Please use this center for your varied needs.
The semester is not lost. We have had a tempo-
rary setback We will all be required to make ad-
justments. A few regular events such as fall break
and the reading day before exams will have to be
canceled. But, proudly, one of the reasons this se-
mester will end on a positive note is the resilience
of the ECU community. And among the great at-
tributes of ECU students is unfailing spirit. There
has never been a more compelling time than now
to let your Pirate Pride show � in your sense of
commitment to your best academic work, your
sense of responsibility in doing whatever you can
to help classmates who are in need, to be patient
in trying circumstances in making the adjustments
this storm has required of all of us, and to show
your sense of humor when laughter can help heal
a wound or bring a smile.
We are all, each one of us, forever touched by
this storm. But we know what it takes to overcome
tragedy and become a success. We count on you
to make it happen!
Sincerely,
:w.i i ; n
IMPORTANT COMMUNITY
Note: some of these numbers may change as locations of services change.
FEMA1-800-426-9029 ECU OUTPATIENT PSYCHIATRY.
(forhearingimpaired)l-800-426-7585 816-2404
EE.M A. DISASTER RELIEF- THIS ECU SCHOOL OF MEDICINE
AREA1-800-638-6620.EXT. 407816-4611
for any person needing medical at-
RED CROSS CENTERS 752-3226 temion816-5080
Next to Denny's752-4455
On Memorial Drive752-1930 DEAF SERVICES. 1-888-988-7746
RED CROSS355-3800 "ECU-HOME328-4663
UNITED WAY551-6204 STUDENT HEALTH CENTER
(available at ECU Relief Resource 328-6841
Cm) RED CROSS PERSON LOCATOR
EMERGENCY FOOD STAMPS355-9037
��41311?,1 MENTAL HEALTH HOTLINE
(May apply at several locations in Pitt 830-6377
County, must bring photo id, proof of
residence, proof of members in house- SHELTER LOCATORS
hold including birthdates, proof of pm. 355.9037
gross income of household members.)
LENOIR 5234528
DEPT OFTRANSPRTATION unnm
jf. 877-368-4948 EDGECOMBE641-7916 or
(To find out about closed roads) 641-7917 or 641-7920
VOLUNTEERING TO HOUSE A RED CROSS SHELTERS
STUDENT328-4663 BETHEL ELEMENTARY
' WELLCOME MIDDLE
ECU FAMILY RELIEF FUND.
1-888-330-6616
TAR RIVER ESTATES830-9494
(Office moved to Wilson Acres Club
House on 1st St.)
STOKES ELEMENTARY
FARMVTLLE MIDDLE
AYDEN ELEMENTARY
AYDEN MIDDLE
Richard R. Eakin, Chancellor
ALUMNIPARENTS WISHING TO AYDEN-GRIFTON HIGH SCHOOL
VOLUNTEER328-0605
STUDENTSWISHINGTOVOLUN- LOCATIONS SERVING MEALS
TEERA328-6432 GUM SWAMP CHURCH
Is serving food to non-shelter resi-
PEOPLE WISHING TO MAKE dents. m Relvoir
DONATIONS328-6650
PROGRESSIVE FREE WILL BAP-
HEALTH DEPARTMENT-OLD HOS- jjst
PITAL 1717 5thST. Located on Cotanche Street in
(Tetanus shots for general public) Greenville. Bishop Davis church
COUNTY EOC 830-2500 and the telephone number is 757-
3565.
NATIONAL GUARD 752-5693 or ��.�
752-3997 or 752-0677 (cell) YORK MEMORIAL A.M.R ZION
Located on Tyson and 3rd Street in
CITY EOC 329-4162 Greenville
DMV - LICENSE SECTION joy SOUP KITCHEN
Li830-3456 Located on Tyson Street in
WNCT-TV LI355-8542 Greenville. Telephone no. is 758-
m 6077
SALVATION ARMY756-3388
COUNCIL ON AGING752-1717 will Deliver and Serve. Telephone
METHADONE .1830-3426 na 756"4869-
sssasesr F-
EMERGENCY ROOM-CMH)
I752-4163
As of Friday,
major disaster
declarations
had been
issued for eight
states, includ-
ing Delaware,
Florida, New
Jersey. New
York. North
Carolina. South
Carolina. Penn-
sylvania and
Virginia in the
wake of Hurri-
cane Floyd.







the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 28, 1999
An estimated
40.000 to
50.000 cars
have been
damaged by
Hurricane
Floyd's,flood-
waters,
according to
AAA Carolinas
motor club.
NEWS NOTES ?pU MAY HAVE MISSED
Flooding
leaves 5,000
students
homeless
(AP) About 5,000 of
ECU's 18,000 students
need to find a new place
to live after flooding
along the Tar River sub-
merged sections of
Greenville, including a
cluster of student apart-
ments. ,
"This is Third World
stuff said ECU spokes-
man John Purham. "It's
sickening
The university is
looking for vacant
apartments to house
some displaced stu-
dents. They also hope to
find 500 to 1,000 resi-
dents willing to let stu-
dents move into their
homes. j
Hospital uses
ingenuity to
keep water
flowing in
wake of Floyd
(AP) Eastern North
Carolina's largest hospi-
tal has tapped into Us
rehabilitation swim-
ming pool to keep toi-
lets flushing and water
flowing in the aftermath
of Hurricane Floyd.
Fire department wa-
ter trucks are sucking
water in the pool and
circulating it through
the plumbing system at
Pitt County Memorial
Hospital.
"I think a flood is the
worst disaster a hospital
could sustain because it
affects all areas of a hos-
pital and all parts of the
infrastructure the
hospital's Dr. John
Meredith said last
Wednesday.
The Hospital was dis-
connected from the
city's water system on
Tuesday, after nearly a
week of on and off ser-
vice. Flooding has
crippled the city's water
treatment plant. Fire
trucks and water tank-
ers have been bringing
water to the rehab pool
and department
pumper trucks then re-
lay the greenish water
into hospital pipes.
Although the system
has enabled the 731 -bed
hospital to continue op-
erating, the temporary
solution has created its
risks �
Russell Gibbs, senior
administrator of the
hospital's operations
department, estimates
several.hundred thou-
sand gallons of water
since Tuesday morning
have gone into the
80,000 gallon swim-
ming pool - described
as roughly half the size
of an Olympic-size pool
- and then into the
hospital's water system.
Anonymous
donor gives
$10,000 to
help flood
victims
COLUMBIA, S.C.
(AP) A member of a Co-
lumbia church has
given the ECU football
team $10,000 to help
victims of Floyd.
Scenes like this were very common as parking lots ancf-apartment complexes flooded
beyond 100 year flood plain levels (photo by Emily Richardson).
A Facilities Services worker goes up in the air to remove
a downed tree from the roof of the Student Publications
building.
Rev. Joe B. Donaho,
' sbnior Minster at
Eastminster Presbyte-
flah'Church, presented
tHe check last Wednes-
day id ECU coach Steve
Logan.
1 Donaho said the
rrforiey was from a
single donor, who was
ciSrinected to the church
but did not want to be
identified.
Logan said he would
turn the money over to
a ministry in Greenville,
N.C to help students
besides those on the
football team.
Hurricane
will be short-
term boost to
NC economy
(AP) A silver lining
may be hard to see in
the dark cloud hovering
over flood-devastated
eastern North Carolina,
but there is one - a one-
time financial boost for
one of the state's poor-
est regions, economic
experts say.
The preliminary
numbers are staggering,
ssses attributed to
i may exceed Hur-
tle Fran's $6 billion.
' Agricultural losses,
starting with more than
1M 000 dead hogs and 1
million or more dead
poultry, are expected to
exceed $1 billion, more
thlri from Fran in 1996.
While the economic
benefits of rebuilding
after a hurricane may
be short-lived, the per-
ception of eastern
North Carolina as a
dangerous place to con-
duct commerce may be
difficult to shake, ac-
cording to another ex-
pert.
"It's reducing the in-
terest that the rest of the
world has in the area
said William Hall, an
economist at the Uni-
versity of North Caro-
lina at Wilmington.
In the short term,
southeastern North
Carolina probably won't
see the increases in eco-
nomic activity that fol-
lowed recent hurri-
canes, Hall said.
All of the experts
agreed the biggest los-
ers from natural disas-
ters such as hurricanes
are the poor, who live in
dilapidated houses or
mobile homes. Many
don't have flood insur-
ance and will rely on the
government for help.
Thousands of
vehicles left
damaged
(AP) Across the
state's flooded coastal
plain, thousands of
cars, trucks and tractors
lie submerged, in a foul
stew of water, fertilizer,
motor oil and other
contaminants.
As many as 40,000 to
50,000 vehicles have
been damaged by Hur-
ricane Floyd's floodwa-
ters, many belonging to
low-income residents
without adequate insur-
ance to replace them,
AAA Carolinas motor
club estimatedTUesday.
Tom Crosby of AAA
Carolinas warned con-
sumers to be on the
lookout for what he
called "Carolina lem-
ons" starting next
month. That's his less-
than-endearing term
for flood-damaged cars
that could start showing
up starting next month.
"In almost all cases,
people are putting in in-
surance claims he
said. "If the car is to-
taled, then the title is
branded from then on
so that anyone buying
the vehicle knows it is
potentially damaged
However, if the ve-
hicle is not considered a
total loss, the owner
might not disclose it
had been flooded.
"It's a gray area he
said. "Some people say
if they are not specifi-
cally asked if the car was
flooded, they are not
obligated to disclose it
There could be seri-
ous damage to wire har-
nesses, electrical com-
ponents, CV joints and
anti-lock brakes. He of-
fered some solid advice
to shoppers: "Before
you buy any used car or
a new one for sale even
at a ridiculously low
price, bring it to a
trusted mechanic to
check whether it has
been flooded
HHHHBIIHIIMHHBIHflBBBflHMHIMflHMHIflMMBflflMMBBflllMBMMl





Tuesday. September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
NEWS NOTES YOU MAY HAVE MISSED
15 percent of
farms could
be casulties
RALEIGH (AP)
State Agriculture Com-
missioner Jim Graham
estimates up to 7,000 qf
North Carolina's nearly
50,000 farms or about
15 percent could be
put out of business by
Hurricane Floyd's
floodwaters.
While state experts
expect the agricultural
damage total to exceed
$1 billion, so far only 37
counties have submit-
ted damage reports.
The flooding spared
much of the year's to-
bacco crops, most al-
ready harvested before
the storm, but about
half the state's expected
872,000-acre cotton
crop is feared lost, said
Graham. State analysts
say peanut and sweet
potato crops also suf-
fered devastating hits.
$100,000 gift
given by
UNC trustee
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
(AP) UNC-Chapel Hill
officials needed a
Stetson by the time they
passed the hat for Hur-
ricane Floyd relief past
Texas oil tycoon Walter
Davis.
Trustee board mem-
bers at the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill meeting
Thursday decided to
take up a collection to
help flooding victims.
A baseball cap had
about $400 inside be-
fore it got to Davis, who
took out his wallet and
wrote a check for
$100,000.
"Times are pretty
tough said Davis, who
directed the money be
used to help displaced
students at East Caro-
lina University in
Greenville.
Nic Heinke, UNC-
Chapel Hill's student
body president, sug-
gested taking up a col-
lection. Davis' gift
brought the donated to-
tal to $100,407, a stag-
gering amount that
Heinke still had trouble
putting into words
hours later.
"My mind was just a
blank, just, wow
Heinke said. "He
.wanted to give money
to the relief effort and
wanted to know how it
would be used, and this
seemed appropriate.
He's got a big heart
Davis is a regular
university benefactor.
He gave $1 million to-
ward construction of
the Dean Smith Center
and $1.4 million to a
scholarship fund for
students who agree to
teach in poor counties
in the northeastern part
of the state.
ECU Chancellor Ri-
chard Eakin was
shocked when he heard
of Thursday's donation.
The campus has been
closed all week due to
the flooding.
"That is such a gen-
erous act on Mr. Davis'
part Eakin said. "The
students, faculty and
staff who are in such
great need will be very
grateful indeed
��
Utilities
employees
work in flood
for days
n
I!
(AP) Waterlogged
and weary utility work-
ers are being called he-
roes for their weeklong
efforts to keep the power
and water on during the
worst flooding ever to
hit the state.
Since the hurricane
and subsequent flood-
ing by the Tar River,
Greenville, a city'of
56,000, lost electricity
for only 24 hours
The substation that
delivers Greenville Utili-
ties' entire power supply
went out Friday night.
General Manager
Malcolm A Green de-
cided to use a circuit
breaker outside the sta-
tion, keeping the power
on as long as the water
stayed under the main
cables, which carry
230,000 volts.
A utility worker, sta-
tioned in a boat pro-
vided constant reports
on the water level.
Flood waters came
within 2 inches Wednes-
day but then went
down, so the power re-
mained on. The substa-
tion is still under about
9 feet of water, and it is
still working. .
Utility employees
also worked to protect
equipment at the city's
water and wastewater
plants. . ,
Uutility workers, vol-
unteers and jail inmates
frantically stacked
25,000 sandbags to form
a 6-foot waif around
crucial equipment.
The city never shut
off its water system, al-
though clogged filters
led to low pressure that
caused thousands to be
without water. By
Thursday, the system
was close to normal af-
ter the utility finished
cleaning the pipes.
How people
die in
hurricanes
has changed
WASHINGTON (AP)
Before the era of mod-
ern warnings and
evacuations, the wind-
driven waves known as
storm surges were the
greatest killers, killing
thousands of people
along coastlines.
But that has changed
in recent years, hurri-
cane forecaster Ed
Rappaport reports in a
study prepared for pub-
lication later this year.
Floyd is the deadliest
hurricane since Agnes,
27 years ago.
And "it will again be
freshwater flooding that
was the cause of the
majority of the deaths
said Rappaport.
Rappaport esti-
mated that hurricanes
have killed a total of
about 25,000 people,
mostly in storm surges.
Of 415 drownings
blamed on hurricanes
since 1970, a total of
292, or 71 percent, oc-
curred in inland fresh-
water floods, he found.
That's a far cry from
decades earlier when
powerful storms often
caused hundreds of
deaths with storm
surges.
While people uip in-
creasingly aware of the
stfn:i surge danger,
they know less of the
hazard of inland flood-
ing, he said, often wait-
ing too long to react and
driving into danger.
Gayle Day. secretary for the women's basketball team, loath donations at Sams Club, (photo by Emily Richardson)
More than
3.460 National
Guard troops
have been
providing
transportation,
engineering,
security and
other aid.
Approximately
47 aircraft have
been flying
missions to
bring food and
water to shel-
ters and pro-
vide search
and rescue
missions.





the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday. September 28, 1999
More than $243
million in crop
damage and
$90 million in
farm structural
damage had
been reported
in 23 North
Carolina coun-
ties as of last
Friday.
Deserving students may get
assistance from FEMA
Washington - Indi-
viduals, families, farm-
ers and businesses may
be eligible for federal as-
sistance if they live or
own a business in a
county declared a major
disaster area by Presi-
dent Bill Clinton.
This includes Pitt
and most of 65 other
counties in North Caro-
lina.
The flooding of Hur-
ricane Floyd has caused
many states to be de-
clared federal disaster
areas. For residents in
those areas, one tele-
phone call starts the
process.
To apply for disaster
assistance, call a special
toll free telephone num-
ber. The number is 1-
800-462-9029. The
number for speech and
hearing impaired indi-
viduals is: 1-800-462-
7585.
Specially trained op-
erators at one of FEMA's
National Processing
Service Centers process
the applications and
provide information re-
garding programs avail-
able and phone num-
bers for local offices
handling related disas-
ter programs.
The phone interview
is the beginning of the
application process. No
decision is made about
eligibility for one type of
aid or other at this point
Callers receive infor-
mation and applica-
tions - not goods or cash
- based on these inter-
views.
However, the infor-
mation provided by the
applicant allows the
various agencies to
make the necessary de-
cisions.
The application pro-
cess can be speeded up
if the following informa-
tion readily available:
�Name
� Current and pre-disas-
ter address (if appropri-
ate)
� Proof of residency
� Current telephone
numbers
TO APPLY FOR ASSIS-
TANCE, CALL 1-800-
462-9029.
SPEECH & HEARING
IMPAIRED CALL
1-800-462-7585.
HAVE THE FOLLOWING
READILY AVAILABLE:
CURRENT AND PRE-
DBASTER ADDRESS
(IF APPROPRIATE)
PROOF OF RESDENCY
AGE; POLICY NO. &
� Insurance coverage;
policy number(s) and
agent's name
Applicants are also
urged to contact their
insurance company and
file necessary claims.
NOTE: Government
assistance does not
cover damage or losses
already covered by pri-
vate insurance.
Federal disaster aid
does not guarantee total
recovery from all disas-
ter losses.
Assistance is limited
to assisting in returning
damaged or lost prop-
erty to its pre-disaster
condition or to meeting
necessary expenses and
serious needs through
the following programs.
Here is some brief in-
formation about federal
disaster assistance:
TEMPORARY HOUSING
ASSISTANCE
The Temporary
Housing Assistance Pro-
gram assures that
people whose homes
are damaged by disas-
ters have a safe place to
live until repairs can be
completed.
The type of assis-
tance provided is deter-
mined by FEMA, based
on criteria which as-
sures that the option
chosen is appropriate to
the individual's need
arid can be delivered
quickly. The basic forms
of temporary housing
are'rental assistance
and essential home re-
pair.
This assistance is
provide if the applicant's
own insurance will not
provide for temporary
housing assistance.
DISASTER LOANS
The Small Business
Administration (SBA)
can make federally-sub-
sidised loans to repair or
replace homes, per-
sonal property or busi-
nesses which sustained
damages not covered by
insurance. For many
persons this loan pro-
gram is the primary
form of disaster assis-
tance they receive.
INDIVIDUAL & FAMILY
GRANTS
This program, ad-
ministered by the state
but underwritten with
75 percent FEMA fund-
ing, can provide grants
to meet disaster-related
serious needs and nec-
essary expenses not
provided for by other
programs, insurance or
other means.
Based on guidelines
provided by the Small
Business Administra-
tion, FEMA makes the
determination as to
whether the applicant
needs to apply for a loan
from SBA or if they are
automatically referred
to the grant program.
Among needs that
can be met with grant
funds are housing re-
pairs, home cleaning
and sanitation, neces-
sary household items,
replacement of tools of
the applicant's trade,
clothing, transporta-
tionand medical and
dental expenses.
Other possible assis-
tance includes crisis
counseling, disaster un-
employment assistance,
and IRS tax relief.
For more informa-
tion go to this website:
http:www. fema.gov
nwz99asst919.htm
Faculty, staff given
leave prpvisions
FROM THE OFFICE OF STEWART MTXON,
Due to the severity of the storm and the ex-
tensive flooding that occurred, the University
has been granted the use of emergency leave
for this closure. Employees will NOT have to
use personal leave or make up time for the time
.period beginning at 2 PM Sept. 15, and runs
through the end of work on Sunday, Sept 26.
These provisions apply to all permanent em-
ployees, temporary employees and student em
ployees who reasonably could have reported to
work but were unable to do so because the Uni-
versity was dosed. Temporary and student em-
ployees should be paid for the normal hours
they would have worked had there been no
emergency. t.
If such employees were not scheduled to
work during this closure, those employees
should NOT be paid.
Departments should charge leave to those
employees who were away from the university
on approved leave. Department representa-
tives may use discretion when making this de-
termination. The hurricane and the flooding
could have altered employee plans. If an em-
ployee changed his or her personal plans and
was available to work during all or part of the
closure, then the department may pay the em-
ployee for that time without reducing the
employee's leave balance.
In general, any employee who is able to re-
turn to work without endangering his or her
personal safety should do so. Ifbona fide flood-
ing or hazardous road conditions prevent em-
ployees from returning to work on Monday, it
may be possible to extend the emergency leave
provisions only for such circumstances. We will
consider each of these requests individually
based on documented road conditions. Any
employee who can report to work beginning
Monday, Sept. 27,1999, but elects to attend to
personal matters will need to charge the ab-
sence to available leave or make up the absence
during the coming work week.
A number of SPA employees were deemed
critical by departmental managers and super-
visors and were asked to report to work while
the university was closed. These critical em-
ployees will, in addition to normal pay benefits,
receive a special pay allocation that is reflective
of the extraordinary individual efforts ex-
pended. Representatives from the Department
of Human Resources will be working with de-
partmental representatives to process these re-
quests as soon as possible. We will provide ad-
ditional information to the department repre-
sentatives and employees regarding the calcu-
lation of the pay benefit at a later date.
A number of EPA employees also were in-
volved in the effort to make the university op-
erational These employees are salaried, thus
the special pay provisions do not apply to them
However, we are looking at the possibility of ex-
tending special leave provisions to these em-
ployees to compensate them for the time they
were required to work during this crisis.
Ifyou have any questions regarding this mat-
ter, please call 328-4009.
��� ��





Tuesday, September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
IMPORTANT RECORDS LOST DUE TO FLOODING -
A CHECKLIST FOR ECU STUDENTS
- j
Thousands of students were forced to abandon their apartments and
homes due to the tragic and extensive flooding that affected all of East-
ern North Carolina. In some cases, people lost many or all of their per-
sonal belongings. While many students are understandably preoccupied
looking for a place to live, there also are some issues to consider in re-
gard to important records that may have been lost in the flood. Below
are some suggestions that may be helpful.
i
CHANGE OF ADDRESS
(1) Once your new address and phone number is established, com-
municate that information to the registrar's office at ECU. The Univer-
sity needs accurate address and phone information for each of its stu-
dents and for the University student locator service. i
(2) Contact any of the businesses, some of which are listed below,
which may need to know your new address. .� '
(3) Consider filling out a change of address form at the Post Office
so mail will be forwarded to your new address.
(4) If you anticipate that your address may change several times dur-
ing the remainder of the school year, consider getting a mailbox address
at the Post Office. You could share one with a friend. Or, have all your
mail sent to a family member who's address is likely to be permanent for
the remainder of the school year. f
ECU ONE CARD, THECLUE BOOK, AND THE UNDERGRADUATE (l,
OR GRADUATE CATALOG
Inquire at the Flood Relief Resource Center at Sweethearts in the Todd
Dining Hall. Someone there will be able to assist you.
CHECKBOOK AND RECENT BANK STATEMENTS
Ask our bank for a new checkbook with a sequence of check numbers
that starts after the range of check numbers most recently used. Ask the
bank if they can reproduce, preferably free of charge, some of your re-
cent bank statements so they are available for reconciling your checking
account.
CREDIT CARDS
If any of your credit cards were lost contact the issuer and ask them to
send you a new one.
UTiUTYBRIS
There may be unpaid utility bills, such as electric, cable, gas, phone,
etc related to your flooded former residence. Check the date that the
bill stops at. Is it the date that your apartment was flooded? Or, does it
extend beyond that date? Check with the respective utility company and
determine what you owe.f the amount does not appear reasonable, then
communicate your concern to the utility company.
ECU -RELATED RECORDS
Some students may have lost their copy of records concerning their
matriculation at ECU, such as receiving credit for a course, etc. Dupli-
cates of these records should be in the registrar's system at ECU or in the
folder kept with your faculty advisor. So, you should not need to worry
about this. It would be difficult for the University to generate new copies
of these items. Instead, when you meet with your advisor during pre-
registration this fall just confirm that everything is in order according to
your best recollection.
Submitted by Douglas K. Schneider, Ph.D CPA,
Associate Professor of Accounting
Funds being
sought to provide
financial aid
Those who need
emergency funding in
the wake of Hurricane
Floyd may find some re-
lief from the Office of
Student Financial Aid
and special university-
provided loans, and
grants.
An anonymous do-
nor has given $10,000
which is being distrib-
uted in $100 increments
to students who have
lost their homes. This
$100 grant does not
have to be paid back
and students can take
advantage of it by visit-
ing the Flood Relief Re-
source Center. �
However, according
to to Dan Bishop, uni-
versity comptroller,
there might be address
checks to ensure that
the money is being
given out to students
who are truly in need.
The university will be
working closely with
students affected by the
flood in order to find
additional sources of fi-
nancial assistance, ac-
cording to Rosemary
Stelma, director of Stu-
dent Financial Aid.
Students who have
already received finan-
cial aid this semester
and those who don't
may apply for federal
and university grant and
loan monies.
"We are trying to
identify any funds that
the university may have
that can be converted
into short-term loans
Stelma said. "What we're
looking for is long-term,
increased, loan eligibil-
ity. We're also looking at
short-term, emergency
loans that would have to
be paid back maybe at
the end of the semester,
maybe into the next se-
mester
Applications for fed-
eral financial aid can be
filed electronically in
the financial aid office.
Students will have an
answer about their eligi-
bility in about 72 hours.
But the money can take
up to six weeks to arrive.
For this reason, the
university is accepting
donations and organi-
zations such as the Stu-
dent Government Asso-
ciation are working to
make quick emergency
funds available.
The SGA executive
council approved
$20,000 to fund student
loans which will be al-
lotted in increments of
$50-$200 depending on
need. This will be a six-
month loan to be repaid
by March 31,1999. The
loans will carry sur-
charges from $2-$5.
"We are doing this to
help students in the
short term said Cliff
Webster, SGA president.
"Hopefully it will be
available to help stu-
dents get back on their
feet"
Students in need
help must first contact
the Federal Emergency
Management Agency
(FEMA) and complete
an application.
"There will be a pro-
cess for applying for
those funds just like ap-
plying for FEMA funds,
said Dorothy Mueller,
dean of Undergraduate
Studies. "They should
first call the-FEMA num-
ber and go through the
FEMA process of getting
money that way. These
are things that can get
you going until financial
aid money comes in
Students who have
lost wages or whose par-
ents have been affected
may be eligible for addi-
tional special grants.
"We're looking at stu-
dents who are going to
be negatively impacted
with their income, or
their parents income
Stelma saidThis helps
with parents who have
lost businesses or
whose farms will no
longer be as valuable
because of the polluted
water that's on them or,
if there's a loss of em-
continued on page 10
,JvaVaw-1�iiiAl�Saia8fc�fe





the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday, September 28. 1999
Dozens of
r
corporations
have donated
to the relief
effort, includ-
ing Lowe's,
R.J. Reynolds.
AT&T. CP&L.
Belk, and
Winn Dixie.
Student Stores, UBE
replace lost bobks
Hurricane Floyd has
left university officials
struggling to ensure not
only the continuance of
classes, but also many
students' enrollment at
ECU.
Because numerous
students have been
doubly bit by the storm,
losing both home and
school supplies such as
textbooks and book
bags.UBE and the ECU
Student Stores are
partnering to supply
students with loaner
books until the end of
the semester. University
officials hope gestures
like this one will make it
easier for students to re-
coup and complete this
semester.
"We're asking stu-
dents to come to the
Flood Relief Resource
Center, and we will re-
serve the books for
them said Wanda
Scarborough, director
of ECU Student Stores.
Students who have
lost their books should
visit the Student Stores
table at the Flood Relief
Resource Center in Todd
Dining Hall. Each per-
son applying for loaner
books must fill out an
application noting
which location (UBE or
Student Stores) they
purchased their books.
A representative from
the Student Stores will
then pull up their
schedule for verifica-
tion, order the books
through that organiza-
tion and call the student
when their materials
have arrived. The books
must be returned at the
end of the semester or
records will be tagged.
According to
Scarborough, there are a
small t . number of
supplemental school
supplies such as book
bags, notebooks and
pencils available to
flood victims for free.
Also, the Student Stores
is in the process of con-
tacting vendors for spe-
cialty supplies, such as
art tools, to solicit dona-
tions of those items.
"We're trying to get
any vendors to come
through with some art
supplies that they can
help us out with, we
have several vendors
who have called and of-
fered to help us out with
various things
Scarborough said. "We
will have, and UBE will
have, whatever the ven-
dors send in, including
free T-shirts for those
who have lost all their
clothing
The stump of a tree across the street from the
Chancellor's house on 6th Street stands as a grim
reminder of the devistation of Hurrican Floyd
J( REVISED FALL SEMESTER 1999 CALENDAR
; i Changes show in boldface type
(Aottial class days: 13 Mondays. 14 Tuesdays. 18 Wadnasdays, 14
Thursdays, 13 Fridays, and 13 Saturdays. Effective class days: 14
Mondays, 14 Tuesdays, 15 Wadnasdays, 14 Thursdays, 14 Fridays,
13 Saturdays.)
Weekend University classes: Friday 6:30-10:00 p.m Saturday
' 8:00-11:30 a.m 11:45 a.m3:15 p.m and 3:304:30 p.m.)
Aug. 18, Wednesday
� i
Aug. 20, Friday
Aug. 24, Tuesday
I �
Aug. 25, Wednesday
Classes begin; late rej
changes
stration; schedule
�i f i .
Weekend University classes begin
Last day for late registration and schedule
changes (drop and add)
Last day for schedule changes (add only); Last
day for Weekend University schedule changes
(drop and add)
Sept. J, Wednesday Last day to apply for graduation in Dec.
Sept. 3, Friday
Sept. 6, Monday
Oct. 15 Friday
Oct. 16, Saturday
Oct. 19, Tuesday
Nov. 8, Monday
Nov. 17, Wednesday
Nov. 24, Wednesday
Nov. 25-28
Nov. 29, Monday
Nov. 30, Tuesday
Dec 9, Thursday
Deci 10, Friday
Dec. 11, Saturday
Dec. 17-18
Dec. 18, Saturday
6:30 p.m. Weekend University Labor Day holi-
day begins (no classes) ,
Labor Day holiday (no classes)
Last day for undergraduate students to drop
term-length couraea or withdraw from
school without grades. Block courses may
be dropped only during the first 40 of
their regularly scheduled claaa meetings.
Last day for submission of grade replace-
ment requests.
Claaaaa meet; Friday makeup day (claaaea
which meet on Friday will meet on this day)
NO Fall break
Last day for undergraduate students to drop
a Weekend University class or to withdraw
from school without grades.
Early registration for spring semester 2000 be-
gins
Last day to remove incompletes given during
spring andor summer session 1999
Claaaaa meet; Monday makaup day (classas
which meet on Mondays will meet on this
day)
Thanksgiving braak Thursday - Sunday
8:00 a.m. classes resume; Last day for graduate
students to drop courses without grades
Last day to submit thesis to Graduate School
for completion of degree in this term
Claaaea end (NO Reading day)
Regular exams begin; Weekend University
classes meet
Commencement; Weekend University classes
end
Weekend University examsFriday- Saturday
6:00 p.m. Exams for fall semester close; last day
to submit appeals for readmission for Spring
semester
�-





ttk "W�F "M " �- � �� � '
Tuesday, September 28. 1999
the east Carolinian
vvww.tec.ecu.edu
(Hi
. - :
i
. � f
l
Housing assistance
available in different forms
A message from the
SGA president
Dear Student Pirates:
Welcome home. As we prepare to open classes
on Wednesday, I want to assure each of you that
you, as students, have been whole-heart ily thought
of throughout the entire hurricane during the past
two weeks.
:iuli
I have never seen an administration, such as
ours, that have thought and continue to think
about our students first and foremost. Your safety,
health, and academic careers have been the focal
point of most of the conversations that our admin-
istration has had over the past two weeks; with all
student interests being the top priority.
The next few days, weeks and months are go-
ing to be tough, but as an ECU student, you must
remember why you are here, and that is your edu-
cation. If nothing else, this tragic incident will
make you a stronger person; it has already im-
pacted my personal life in ways that i would have
never thought. When I took the office to represent
each of you, I took it whole-heartily. When some-
thing like this happens, I take it personally. I have
thought of nothing but you, the students, over the
past two weeks.
As the flood waters
begin to ebb and the
roads to the emerald city
become passable once
again, thousands of stu-
dents are returning to
campus.
' However, foras many
jas 5,000 students there,
is one essential prob-
lem�they have no
home left to which to
return.
Several large, stti-
dent-populated apart-
ment complexes, in-
cludingTar River Estates
and Wyndham Circle,
were devastated when
the swollen Tar River
poured over its banks
and rose to a record
29.72-foot crest.
Thursday afternoon
saw students navigating
the waterways�for-
merly streets and park-
ing lots� in canoes,
desperately attempting
to salvage what they
could before the flood
overtook their homes.
Students in campus
residence halls were
evacuated the Saturday
after the storm. Those
' Swho had no way out of
town slept in the hail-
, ways of Jones Hall, the
only dorm with electric-
ity. Loss of water service
midweek forced officials
to find alternative hous-
ing for those left on
, campus including
sendingsome of the stu-
dents by bus to stay at
NC State. ' t i
According to univer-
'� shy officials, there are
currently resources
available to help stu-
dents who lost their
homes in the flood.
Manny Amaro, direc-
tor of University Hous-
ing, said his department
is taking on a dual role
in the aftermath of the
hurricane by offering
assistance not only to
students who are
housed on campus, but
to those off-campus stu-
dents who were dis-
placed by Floyd.
To combat the huge
loss of student resi-
dences, the housing
staff is partnering with
families in the commu-
nity to provide both
short-term (until the
student finds other ac-
commodations) and
long-term (the remain-
der of the semester)
housing options in he
homesof volunteers.
A list of families who
have volunteered to of-
fer this service is avail-
able at the Flood Relief
Resource Center inTodd
Dining Hall. The list
gives details about how
to contact the family
and the terms of their
offer.
The university is
working with FEMA to
have trailers placed on a
university-owned plot
of land off of Dickinson
Avenue. If the deal is
completed, this could
mean some students
will be able to get
vouchers to obtain free
housing since it is based
on income and need.
Students wishing to
find an apartment may
consult the list in the
back of this issue, or
pick up a copy at the
Flood Relief Resource
Center.
I'd like to take this opportunity to say that if at
any time, throughout this ordeal and this semes-
ter, you have any concerns or need any help with
anything, please feel free to contact my office. The
SGA Executive Council, including myself, is here
to help you. We are YOUR representation for our
campus.
Again, it is great to see so many familiar faces
back on campus. Let's show our administration,
faculty, staff, friends, family and the state, what
strength, we as part of the ECU family, has! Good
Luck!
Transit changes announced
With Pirate Pride,
Cliff Webster
Student Body President
Student Government Association
328-4726 (office) 551-3769 (home)
THE GREENVILLE WATER SUPPLY HAS
BEEN TESTED AND IS UNCONTAMINATED.
YOU DO NOT NEED TO TAKE ANY PRE-
CAUTIONS. THE WATER IS FINE TO DRINK.
ECU Student Transit
Authority has an-
nounced that on Tues-
day, September 28, there
will be a special on-
campus shutde running
beginning at 9 a.m. and
continuing until mid-
night. This shutde will
serve the Freshman
parking lots at Allied
Health, the Commuter
parking lots at Minges,
Mendenhall Student
Center, Christenbury
Gym and the top of Col-
lege Hill. The shuttle
will run continuously on
a 15-20 minute cycle.
All bus operations
will resume with the fol-
lowing schedule modifi-
cations starting Wed-
nesday morning:
RED Route: The Red
Route will no longer
serve the Allied Health
Complex (Belk and
Irons Buildings).
Persons traveling be-
tween the West Campus
Medical Complex and
the Allied Health Com-
plex should use the Red
Route between Men-
denhall Student Center
and West Campus and
the Gold Route between
Mendenhall Student
Center and the Allied
Health Complex.
Transfers can be
made at Mendenhall at
20 minutes after the
hour and 10 minutes
before the hour be-
tween 7:20 a.m. and 6
p.m.
BLUE Route: The
Blue Route will include
the Red Cross and Salva-
tion Army Hurricane
Relief Distribution Cen-
ters as long as there is a
need.
Please inform the
driver of your destina-
tion as you board the
bus. The Blue Route
runs Monday - Friday
from 1 p.m. until 9 p.m
Saturday from 9 a.m.
until 6 p.m. and Sunday
from 1 p.m. until 6 p.m.
BROWN Route: The
Brown Route will serve
it's entire route to the
extent that the roads are
opened to through traf-
fic. Please arrive at bus
stops early as the route
will be shortened for a
period of time due to
road closures and
cleanup efforts.
Anyone with ques-
tions regarding bus ser-
vice and schedules is
encouraged to contact
us: Scott Afford, Transit
Advisor (328-0254),
Dean Wheeler, Transit
Manager (328-4724) or
check the Recorded In-
formation Line (BUS 1)
at 328-2871.
in)





10
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday. September 28. 1999 I
North Carolina
Department of
Transportation
officials said
last week that
an estimated
total of 1,000
roads were
closed due to
the flooding
from
Hurricane
Floyd.
City limits access
to flooded homes
No person will be al-
lowed access to areas
which have been
flooded until the City of
Greenville has in-
spected structures
within the area to deter-
mine whether they may
be safely entered, ac-
cording to a news re-
lease issued by the city
on Friday.
Restricted areas are
indicated by barricades,
crime scene tapes,
posted notices, or an or-
der of a law enforce-
ment officer.
The city has orga-
nized 10 inspection
teams to conduct these
inspections.
Each inspection
team will consist of 3
members of the Inspec-
tions Division, the Po-
lice Department, and
the Fire Department
The teams will start
the inspections in areas
where the flood waters
have receded suffi-
ciently to allow the in-
spections to be con-
ducted safely. Addi-
tional areas will be in-
spected as they become
accessible.
These inspections
started last Saturday,
and it is hoped that they
will be completed
within 10 days.
Owners and occu-
pants of structures
within areas which have
been flooded may assist
the inspections by pro
vidinga key to the struc-
tures for use by the
teams.
Keys may be deliv-
ered to the Office of the
City Clerk located at City
Hall during normal
business hours. If a key
is not available, then
entry will be gained by
an alternative method.
Upon completion of
the inspections within
an area and a determi-
nation that the area may
be entered safety by the
public, access to the ar-
eas will be allowed.
Any structure deter-
mined to be unsafe after
inspection will be af-
fixed with a notice of the
dangerous character of
the structure in a con-
spicuous place on the
exterior wall of the
structure.
Prior to commenc-
ing any repair to a struc-
ture, the Inspections Di-
vision should be con-
tacted in order to secure
any necessary permits.
Questions can be di-
rected to the city offi-
cials at 329-4161.
FLOOD SAFETY INFORMATION
Here are some flood safety precautions from The American Red Cross:
DO HOT Ml THROUGH FLOWWG WATHL
Drowning is the number one cause of flood deaths, mostly during flash
floods. Currents can be deceptive; six inches of moving water can knock
you off your feet. Use a pole or stick to ensure that the ground is still
there before you go through an area where the water is not flowing.
DO NOT MUVE THROUGH A FLOODED AREA.
More people drown in their cars than anywhere else. Don't drive
around road barriers; the road or bridge may be washed out
STAY AWAY FROM POWER UNES AND ELECTRICAL WIRES.
The number two flood killer after drowning is electrocution. Electri-
cal current can travel through water. Report downed power lines to your
utility company or emergency management office.
TURN OFF YOUR ELECTRICITY WHEN YOU RETURN HOME.
Follow the instructions in Step 2. Some appliances, such as television
sets, keep electrical charges even after they have been unplugged. Don't
use appliances or motors that have gotten wet unless they have been
itaken apart, cleaned, and dried.
WATCH FOR ANHAALS, ESPECI ALLY MAKES.
Small animals that have been flooded out of their homes may seek
shelter in yours. Use a pole or stick to poke and turn items over and scare
away small animals.
LOOK BEFORE YOU STEP.
After a flood, the ground and floors are covered with debris including
broken bottles and nails. Floors and stairs that have been covered with
mud can be very slippery.
BE ALERT FOR GAS LEAKS.
Use a flashlight to inspect for damage. Don't smoke or use candles,
lanterns, or open flames unless you know the gas has been turned off
and the area has been aired out
CLEAN EVERYTHING THAT GOT WET.
Flood waters have picked up sewage and chemicals from roads, farms,
factories, and storage buildings. Spoiled food and flooded cosmetics and
medicines are health hazards. When in doubt, throw the
TAKE GOOD CARE OF YOURSELF.
Recovering from a flpod is a big job. It is tough on both the body and
the spirit. And the effects a disaster has on you and your family may last
a long time.
ECU provides assistance
in keeping students in school
continued from page 1
age students to perse-
vere until the end of the
semester.
However, officials
urge students to speak
with both their profes-
sors and advisors before
deciding to drop classes
or withdraw from
school.
"We are advising stu-
dents to meet with their
faculty and just gener-
ally assess how we're go-
ing to finish the semes-
ter in each respective
course said Gene
Owens, assistant dean
of Undergraduate Stud-
ies.
"The faculty will be
encouraged to be as un-
derstanding as they can
while maintaining aca-
demic integrity. We
want to involve the fac-
ulty, we want students
involved with their aca-
demic advisors.
"We have extended
the drop period for two
weeks, we want them to
have that time to totally
assess what's going on
and where they stand in
the whole picture of
things. We want stu-
dents to have the oppor-
tunity to complete at the
least, part of the semes-
ter successfully
Students who would
like to drop classes or
withdraw from school
can do so by visiting the
registrar's office in
Whichard from 9 a.m5
p.m. or by going to the
Flood Relief Resource
Center at Sweetheart's
in Todd Dining Hall
from 10:30 a.m7 p.m.
"We are making ev-
ery resource available so
they can relocate and
have assistance so they
know the university is
continuing to care for
their needs Eakin said.
"We must continue,
we can not let this natu-
ral disaster stop the
progress of our stu-
dents'education
Financial help offered
continued from page 7
ployment. Some of those students will be able
to do what is called a 'professional judgment'
and increase their grant eligibility
Stelma and Mueller said they want students
to know that university officials are trying to
be as supportive and understanding as pos-
sible. According to Stelma, part of that encour-
agement means recognizing in advance how
difficult it might be for some students to main-
tain high grades in the coming months.
"We are going to do every single thing we
can within the letter of the law to be as flexible
and reasonable in the interpretation of aca-
demic records in terms of retaining financial
aid for the 2000-2001 semester�in terms of
money, in terms of where kids are with their
financial aid situations and how their aca-
demic situations impact their financial aid eli-
gibility Stelma said. "We're going to work on
a policy saying 'if you didn't do so hot, we'll take
that into consideration That's not to encour-
age people to fail their classes, but to say 'I
know where you are, I understand





1999
Tuesday. September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
11
Be careful returning to flood-1 �
damaged homes, apartments
Cleaning up a flood
ravaged home - one of
the first steps toward
recovery - can be a dif-
ficult and disheartening
task. It can also be dan-
gerous.
The Federal Emer-
gency Management
sme porch roofs and
overhangs still have all
their supports. If you
see damage, a building
inspector or contractor
should check the build-
ing before you enter
If you suspect a gas
leak or smell gas, leave
Agency warns residents your home immediately
of those areas flooded and call the gas com
by Hurricane Floyd to
be especially careful
when returning to their
homes.
"We urge residents
returning to their
homes to be particu-
larly careful said
FEMA Director James
Lee Witt. "While it's
good to be home and to
be able to begin clean-
up, it's vital to know
what risks are posed in
a flood-damaged
home
Homeowners
should assume that
anything touched by
floodwater is contami-
nated.
Mud left by floodwa-
ter can contain chemi-
cals from sources as
varied as your garden
chemicals to a
neighbor's propane
tank to the oven cleaner
you stored in the
kitchen.
n addition, homes
with flood damage may
have damp areas where
molds, mildews and
other fungal organisms
thrive. And there are
dangers of electrical
shock and a possibility
ofinjuringyourselfwith
hidden sharp objects.
There is always a
danger of structural in-
stability, too, after a
flood.
Before going in,
carefully check to make
pany from a neighbor's
house.
Enter the home care-
fully. If the door sticks at
the top, it could mean
your ceiling is ready to
fall.
If you force the door
open, wait outside the
doorway in case debris
falls. Check the ceiling
for signs of sagging.
Wind, rain, or deep
flooding may wet plas-
ter or wallboard. It is
very heavy and danger-
ous if it falls.
Once you are certain
the house is safe to be
This will eliminate
fungal problems and
their inherent dangers.
Follow directions on
containers and take par-
ticularly note of warn-
ings.
Remove as much
mud as possible. Plan to
disinfect the basen. ;nt
at a later date. Once
you've checked the wa-
ter system for leaks,
hose down the inside of
the house and its con-
tents. It's best to use an
attachment that sprays
soap to wash and rinse
the walls, floors, furni-
ture, sockets, electrical
boxes and other major
items that got muddy.
Remove heating and
cooling registers and
ducts, then hose the
ducts to prevent con-
tamination from blow-
ing through the ducts at
a later date.
After hosing duct
FLOOD SURVIVAL STRATEGIES
Signs of stress
� Sleeplessness
� Loss of Appetite or over eating
� Irritability
� Overreacting to friends and family
� Rapid Heartbeat
�Sweating
Ways to take care of yourserf
� Exercise regularly
� Keep regular sleep hours
� Use relaxation exercises before bedtime:
music, muscle relaxation
� Keep lighting low before bedtime
� Be sure to eat regular meals through univer-
sity dining or other sources
� Eat balanced meals, don't forget fruit and
vegetables
� Avoid sweets, alcohol and other mood alter-
ing substances
� Talk to people about thoughts and feelings
� Pay attention to level of stress, take breaks
� Ask for help or resources when you need it
� Find others to ,talk with
� Express feelings through writing or physical
activity
Provided by the Center for Counseling and Student
Development
in, make sure the elec- work, wash with a disin-
tricity is turned off. Un- fectant or sanitizer that
plug appliances and
lamps, remove light
bulbs and remove the
cover plates of wall
switches and outlets
that got wet.
If local building in-
spection code allows
you to disconnect wir-
ing from switches and
outlets, do so and throw
away the switches and
outlets. If your building
inspector says that you
cannot disconnect the
wiring, pull them for-
ward, away from the
wall, and leave them
connected.
A combination of
household bleach and
soap or detergent can
be used to wash down
walls, floors and other
contaminated areas.
is phenolic or pine-oil
based. If ducts are in
slab or otherwise inac-
cessible, have them
cleaned professionally.
Don't let floodwater
sit for long. Use a mop,
squeegee or wetdry
vacuum cleaner to re-
move standing water.
Always wash your hands
with soap and clean wa-
Help children
deal with disaster
Children who expe-
rience an initial trau-
matic event before they
are 11 years old are
three times more likely
to develop psychologi-
cal symptoms than
those who experience
their first trauma as a
teenager or later.
But children are able
ter after working in the � to cope better with a
i - f traumatic event if par-
ents, friends, family,
teachers and other
adults support and help
them.
For more informa-
tion, a joint publication,
of the Federal Emer-
gency Management
Agency (FEMA) and the
American Red Cross is
available. For a free copy
of "Repairing Your
Flooded Home call
FEMA Publications at 1 -
800-480-2520.
DRY OUT AND RELAX
Tonight (Sept. 28) in Mendenhall enjoy free bowling and billiards
from 5 until 11 p.m. Two free movies will be shown in Hendrix Theatre:
Waking Ned Devine (PG) at 7 p.m. andA Civil Action (PG-13) at 9 p.m.
Play F-L-O-Y-D B-I-N-G-0 at 8 p.m. in the Pirate Underground and
win Hurricane Cash vouchers.
The Student Recreation Center will be open today from 11 a.m. un-
til 11:30 p.m. for students to exercise and release some stress. The cen-
ter will resume normal operating hours on Wednesday, Sept. 29.
THINGS YOU CAM DO
1. Talk with the chil-
dren about how they are
feeling and listen with-
out judgment. Let them
know they can have
own feelings, which
might be different than
others. It's OK.
2. Let the children
take their time to figure
things out and to have
their feelings. Don't
rush them or pretend
that they don't think or
feel as they do.
3. Help them learn to
use words that express
their feelings, such as
happy, sad, angry, mad
and scared. Just be sure
the words fit their feel-
ings - not yours.
4. Stay together as a
family as much as pos-
sible.
5. Go back to former
routines or develop new
ones. Maintain a regular
schedule for the chil-
dren.
6. Reassure the chil-
dren that the disaster
was not their fault in
any way.
7. Let them have
some control, such as
choosing what outfit to
wear or what meal to
have for dinner.
8. Help your children
know that others love
them and care about
them by visiting, talking
on the phone or writing
to family members,
friends and neighbors.
10. Encourage the
children to give or send
pictures they have
drawn or things they
have written.
11. Help your chil-
dren regain faith in the
future by helping them
develop plans for activi-
ties that will take place
later?
mi ' � �
�HHHHHMiM

immum
HM





12
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday. September 28, 1999
LISTING OF AREA APARTMENTS
ALL APARTMENTS ARE IN GREENVILLE UNLESS OTHERWISE I
In the wake of
Floyd, there is
some good
news. Stories
are emerging
of families and
communities
who were not
as damaged as
they could
have been
because of
disaster pre-
vention actions
taken as part
of Project
Impact: Build-
ing Disaster
Resistant
Communities.
Apartment Name and Address
Phone
Monthly Price
Lease
Bedrooms Total Units Furnished Pets Bus Access Distance From ECU
1000 Channel Drive
Winter NC 28590
102-B East Victoria Court
104 Shiloh Drive
109 Paris Street
110 Contentnea Street
114 Fletcher Place
115 &117 Oakdale Drive
1408 Polk Drive
211 North Jarvis Street
212 North Eastern Street
212 North SurnreH Street
215 South Eastern Street
2204-4 Wandsworth Drive
2818 Jackson Drive
304 Latham Drive
402 Alice Drive
404 & 407 Ash Street
411 East 5th Street
605 Griffin Street
638 Huff Road
Winterville.NC 28590
903 Colonial Avenue
Alice Drive Apartments
208, 21 land 301 Alice Dr.
Allenton Estates
1220 and 1224 Allen Road
Beach Street Villas
Beach Street
Belvoir House
Route6Box320-B-8
Breezewood Condo
Arlington Blvd.
Brookhill Townhomes
100 Tobacco Road
Cannon Court
A-1 Luci Drive
Captain's Quarters
301 East 12th Street
Cedar Court
Cedar Creek
2913,2915,2917 Cedar Creek
Cherry Court Apartments
Cherry Court Drive
ColSndale Court
2700 Thackery Road
College Town Row
1103-1209 South Evans St.
Colonial Village
Independence Blvd.
Emma's Place, Phillips Circle
Cotanche St Apartments
700CotancheSt
355-8731
756-6209
355-8731
(919) 736-7076
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8007
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
756-6209
756-6209
756-1234
355-8731
355-8731
355-8731
756-6209
355-8731
355-1313
756-6209
752-1557
355-8731
756-6209
355-8731
756-6209
$650
$395
$295-$305
$275
$675
$450
$625
$750
$625
$875
$750
$3O0-$375
$500
$190
$485
$400to$500
$340
$475
$950
$250 no appliances
$535
$535
$700
$475
$1,200 wutilities,cable
$450 to $600
$430
$310
$400
$335 and $410
$295 to $415
$550 to $575
$430
$310
$285
1yr.
lyr,
lyr.
lyr.
lyr,
lyr.
lyr,
lyr,
lyr,
lyr.
lyr.
9 months
lyr,
lyr.
1yr.
ly.
lyr.
lyr.
lyr-
lyr.
lyr
lyr
1yr,
1yr.
1 month
lyr
lyr.
lyr.
1yr.
1yr.
lyr.
lyr
lyr.
lyr.
1yr.
2
12
2
3
2
2
2
3
3
2
12
2
2
2
23
1
2
3
?
1
2
2
2
21
1
1
2
27
2. 7
318
21
21
2 and 320
258
127
28
1224
12126
31
220
238
18
nowfeeno15 miles
nonono8 miles
noyesno1.5 miles
nonoyes3 miles
nowfeeno5 miles
nowfeenoSmites
nowfeeno5 mites
nowfeeyes.5 mile
nowfeeno.5 mile
nowfeeno5 miles
nowfeeno.5 mile
nowfeeno2.5 miles
nowfeeyes4 mites
nonoyes2 miles
nonono8 miles
nowfeeyes10 blocks
nowfeeno1 block
nowfeeyes5 miles
nowfeeno10 miles
no$150 feeno6 miles
nowfeeno3.5 mites
no$150 feeno4 miles
nonono1.5 miles
nowfeeno15 miles
yesnono5 miles
nowfeeno10 miles
nonoyes1 mile
nowfeeno.25 miles
nonono3 miles
no$150 feeno4 miles
nonoyes2 miles
nonono2 mites
no$150 feeno3 blocks
nowfeeno15 miles
nononoAcross st from campus
4'





Tuesday. September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
13
Apartment Name and Address
Phone
Creekside Apartments
2204 Apt. 4 Wandsworth Drive
Cypress Gardens
1401 East 10th Street
Dogwood Hollow
1110 E. 10th St.
Dresend Place
1016 Charles Street
Eastbrook Apts.
204 Eastbrook Dr.
English Village
1010 and 1012 Read Dr.
Fairlane Farms Apts.
1610 Bridle Circle
orest Acres
900 Heath Street
. Fox Hollow Apts
Hollow Drive
Futch House
4888 Old NC 11
Ayden,NC 28513
Gladiolus
1333 E. 10th St.
Greeneway Apartments
75 Clubway Drive
Heritage Village
1909 Boxton Drive
Holly Street Apartments
400 South Holly Street
Jasmine Gardens
1323 East 10th Street
enilworth Townhomes
132 Oakmont Drive
King's Row Apartments
200 G-1 Verdant Street
Monticello Court
500 and 504 Paladin Drive
Oakhaven Townhomes
506 Mattox Road
Paladin West
401,403, and 405 Paladin Dr.
Park Village
3005 and 3017 Adams Btvd
Peony Garden
1323 East 10th Street
Peyton Circle Apartments
Peyton Circle
inebrook Apartments
121 River Bluff Road
Pinehurst Apartments
Mills Road
Winter, NC 28590
Pirate's Cove
3305 East 10th Street
Players Club Apartments
1526 Charles Blvd.
Ridgewood Townhomes
113 Ridge Race
River Oak
206 North Summit Street
355-8007
756-6209
752-8900
756-1234
752-5100
756-6209
355-2198
756-6209
756-6209
355-8731
756-6209
756-6869
355-8731
355-8731
3558731
752-3519
756-6209
355-8731
756-6209
756-6209
756-6209
756-6209
758-4015
355-8731
752-9995
321-7613
355-8731
3558731
Monthly Price
$300 and $385
$345 to $420
$475 to $510
$450
$400 to $500
$325 and $390
$426 to $646
$285 and $345
$510 and $650
$625
$330 to $630
$380
$475
$300 to $42?
� ' :� �'�
$125
$325 and $395
$335 a:K) $365
$295
$360 and $410
$310 and $375
$375
$535 to $650
$285 and $390
$290
$375
$240 per person
$390
$295
Lease Bedrooms; Total Units Furnished Pets Bus Access Distance From ECU
1yr.
1yr.
912 months
1yr.
1yr
lyi
3,6,&12mths.
lyr,
lyr
iyt
1yr.
lyr
1yr.
lyr
lyr
lyr
lyr.
1yr.
Ivr
lyr
lyr.
172
12
2;
2 I
23
i
12
123
12
23
2
123
2
2
?
I
2
land 2
1
I
land 2
land 2
2
2 and 3
912mths land 2
84
45
125
6
180
32
180
10
32
,
lyr
1yr.
1yr.
!Vr
1yr.
�;
2
4
4
2
1
27
128
1
4
18
10
24
30
3
28
32
16
24
120
20
132
144
14
16
no
no
no
no
no
wfee
no
cats
$150 fee
yes
yes
no
yes
no
yes
$150 fee no
no wfee
cats only
no
no
yes
no
yes
cats only
ye
no
no
no
wfee yes
$150 fee
$150 fee
no
$150 fee
no
cats only
yes
$200 fee yes
no
��iiii�
,
yes
no no
no wtee
no wfee

yes
5 miles
4 blocks
.5 mile
2btocks
2 miles
3 miles
3.5 miles
6 blocks
4 miles
15 to 20 miles
4 blocks
4.5 miles
8 miles
2 blocks
4 blocks
8 miles
4 miles
4 miles
5 miles
4 miles
1.5 miles
4 blocks
4 miles
2 miles
15 miles
2 miles
1 mile
10 miles
6 blocks
Floyd
FACTS
The Tar River
running
through the
City of
Greenville
crested at
slightly under
30 feet. That's
17 feet above
the flood stage
of 13 feet.
� k , . .
.





14
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
Tuesday. September 28, 1999
It took nearly
200 employees
and an esti-
mated 20.000
hours in 10
days to get the
campus back
in working
order following
Hurricane Floyd
and the result-
ant flooding.
Apartment Name and AddressPhoneMonthly PriceLeaseBedroomsTotal UnitsFurnishedPetsBusAccessDistance Rom ECU
Rollinwood 40 Rolling Drive355-8731$6001yr.21nonono10 miles
Rownetree Wood 2902 Cedar Creek Road756-6209$525 & $6301yr.2&38noyesno4 miles
Shenandoah Court 1130 Greenville Blvd.756-6209$2751yr.116nonono3.5 miles
Sherwin Court 3100 Sherwin Drive756-6209$325 &$4001yr.216nonono3.5 miles
Shiloh Drive Apartments 111,201. & 301 Shttoh Dr.756-6209$4101yr.216nonono3.5 miles
South Haven Apartments South Square Drive Winter, NC 28590756-6209$346 to $4951yr.1256nonono4 miles
South Square Apartments 703-714 Patton Circle Winterville, NC 28590756-6209$300 to $3861yr.12165noyes(cats only)no4 miles
Apartment Name and AddressPhoneMonthly PriceLeaseBedroomsTotal UnitsFurnishedPetsBusAccessDistance Rom ECU
Summer Place 3208C&3210D Summer R Dr.756-6209$205 & $3451yr.1218nonono3 miles
Summerfield Gardens 703, 705 & 805 Reed Drive756-6209$300 &$3751yr.1249nocats onlyno3 miles
Tanglewood Apartments 125 Avery Street756-6209$2651yr116yesnono4 blocks
Third Street Apartments 800 East 3rd Street355-8731$295-$4001yr.1,23noyesno2 blocks
Tower Village Tower Place758-1234$320-$3951yr.1,224nonono5 miles
Treybrooke Apartments 701 Treybrooke Circle830-0661$535 to $610 (grad & med only)6,12 mths1,2360yes&nonoyes5 miles
Twin Oaks Townhomes 102 David Drive355-8731$475-$6251yr.2,312nonono5 miles
University Apartments 2901 East 5th Street758-7436$325 & $3501yr.247nonoyes1 mile
Upton Court 2701 Thackery Road3558731$515-$6251yrZ33noyesno8 miles
Washington Street Apts. 1225 Soutn Washington St.355-8731$475-$5501yr.2,3I 4nonono8 miles
Wedgewood Arms Apts. Administration Building355-6302$4601yr2100nonoyes1.5 miles
Williamston House 2278 Bear Grass Road Williamston, NC 27892355-8731$6001yr.31nowfeeno30 miles
Wdmarden Apts. 1005 Elm Street756-6209$285 & $300lyr.112yesnono3 blocks
Wteon Acres Apartments 1806 East first Street752-0277$525 & $7001yr.2,3146no$300 feeyes4blocks
Windy Ridge Townhomes 102 David Drive355-8731$6251yr.32nowfeeno5 miles
Wsrjul Vista 601 East 11th Street355-8731$4251yr.28nonegotiableyes1 block
WoooTawn Apartments 122 South WbodlawnAve.355-8731$3251yr.14noyesno3 blocks
Wyndham Cirde756-1234$525-$560 I ! 1 ' f M � ! � � j K51yr.238nonono . 11.5 mites
. . -imntrl
MM





28. 1999
ce From ECU
Tuesday. September 28, 1999
the east Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
15
10 miles
4 miles

3.5 miles
3.5 miles
3.5 miles�
4 miles

4 miles
ce From ECU
3 miles
3 miles
4 blocks
2 blocks
5 miles
5 miles
5 miles
1 mile.
8 miles
8 miles

5niles
30 miles
3 blocks
4 blocks
5 miles
1 block
3 blocks
.5 miles


i-�



Post-disaster health precautions must be taken

At this time, the only
immunization that is
being recommended by
the ECU School of
Medicine, Dept. of In-
fectious Disease, and
the State Health Dept. is
a Tetanus Booster. The
booster is being recom-
mended for those per-
sons that have not been
vaccinated in the past
5-10 years, have an
open or healing wound,
and have been exposed
to flood waters. If you
have been inside or
have not come in con-
tact with floodwater,
you do not need this
vaccine.
Tetanus shots are
available at the Student
Health Center FREE.
Hepatitis A is a viral
infection that affects
the liver causing flu like
symptoms including
nausea and vomiting;
fever, body aches, and
sometimes a yellowing
of the skin called jaun-
dice. Hepatitis A is
transmitted through
eating ordrinking water
or food contaminated
by human waste. The
symptoms of Hepatitis
A occur between 15 and
45 days after ingesting
contaminated food or
water. The infection
usually goes away with-
out major medical in-
tervention and does not
cause any long term
problems.
At present there is no
indication for wide-
spread immunization
against Hepatitis A. If
cases of Hepatitis A de-
velop, an immunization
campaign will be insti-
tuted.
If you feel you have
an unusually high-risk
exposure to contami-
nated food, water, or
human waste or have
any of the signs or
symptoms listed above,
go to the Student Health
Center for evaluation.
Hepatitis B is also a
viral infection that af-
fects the liver causing
similar symptoms to
Hepatitis A. Hepatitis B
is transmitted by body
fluids. There is minimal
risk of contracting
Hepatitis B from expo-
sure to flood waters. At
this time there is no in-
dication for widespread
immunization against
Hepatitis B.


GASTROINTESTINAL
ILLNESSES
Diarrhea is occa-
sionally encountered
after a flood. Eating
spoiled or poorly refrig-
erated foods as well as
drinking bacteria con-
taminated water may
cause diarrhea. Dehy-
dration from loss of
body fluids can be a se-
rious complication of
diarrhea. Most simple
diarrhea will resolve
without treatment Self-
treatment of simple di-
arrhea lasting 3 days or
less consists of drinking
dear liquids for 24 hours
followed by a bland diet
and Imodium AD taken
as directed on the pack-
age. Diet and self-care
instructions may be ob-
tained from the Student
Health Center.
If the diarrhea is
bloody, lasts more than
3 days, is associated
with nausea and vomit-
ing, or fever, come to the
Student Health Center
or see youT private
medical provider for
evaluation.
Nausea and vomit-
ing, like diarrhea, may
be caused by ingesting
contaminated or
spoiled food. Nausea
and vomiting may
sometimes be con-
trolled by taking over
the counter anti-nausea
medicines such as
Dramamine. Ice chips
and clear liquids may
also be helpful. If you
have uncontrolled nau-
sea or vomiting come to
the Student Health Cen-
ter or see your private
health care provider for
evaluation.
SKIN INFECTIONS
All skin wounds ex-
posed to flood waters
are prone to infection.
Signs of infection are:
1) Pink or red color
around the wound
2 Warmth of the skin
at the site of the wound
3) Yellow drainage
from the wound
4) Odor coming from
the wound
If you have any of the
above signs of wound
infection, come to the
Student Health
Center or see your
private health care pro-
vider for evaluation.
As the floodwater re-
cedes, mud will be left in
its place. While the mud
may seem fun to play
around in, it harbors
glass, metal and other
sham objects; snakes,
flies and mosquitoes; a
wide variety of rash
causing bacteria, and
possibly hazardous
chemicals (pesticides,
gas, and oil). These
rashes may be painful,
itch, ooze and leave un-
attractive scaring. Obvi-
ously, it is best to stay
out of the mud; but if
you must be exposed,
wear protective gear
and wash with an anti-
bacterial soap as soon as
possible. If you develop
a rash, come to the Stu-
dent Health Center or
see your private health
care provider for evalu-
ation.
INFECTIOUS DISEASES ARE RARE
FOLLOWING FLOODS!
The Student Health Center will be open 8
5 p.m. beginning Monday, Sept. 27,1999.
2) Bathing
3)Washing clothes -
keep to a minimum to
avoid adding more wa-
ter to the system
To make water safe
for all uses:
1) Use bottled water
2) Boil water 3-5
minutes
3) Add 1 tablespoon
of household bleach to
5 gallons of water (16
of the water as well as
underwater. These
snakes have been
flooded out of their
habitat and are fright-
ened and aggressive.
Snakebites can become
a far too common prob-
lem after a flood. It is
best not to walk through
standing water or mud
but if you must use a
long stick to push in
drops or 12 capful per ' front of you to clear the
1 gallon) and allow the way. Also use a stick to
water to sit 30 minutes
before using.


INSECT PRECAUTIONS
Mosquitoes are com-
mon pests after floods.
While contracting dis-
ease from mosquito
bites is unlikely, infec-
tions can occur from
scratching these itching
bites. It is important to
protect yourself from
these biting pests by
wearing a repellant
(20 DEET for adults
and 10 DEET for small
children) throughout
the day. Mosquitoes are
more prone to bite at
dusk and after dark, so
it is very important to
protect yourself during
these hours. Also, wear-
ing long sleeve shirts
and pants may be help-
ful. Keep screens on
open windows and
doors.
WATER SAFETY
Until further notice,
city water is considered
contaminated and
should not be used for
the following:
1) Drinking
2) Cooking
3) Brushing teeth
4) Washing infants or
small children
Water can be used for
the following:
1) Washing dishes as
long as the dishes are al-
lowed to dry before us-
ing

turn over objects and
push debris out of the
way.
If you receive snake-
bite, do:
1) Have someone
take you to the local
hospital or call 911
2) Take the snake
with you if possible
3) Remain calm
4) Keep the bitten
arealimb still
5) If you are more
than 30 minutes away
from a hospital a loose
constricting band (ap-
ply above the bite) may
be applied to slow the
flow of venom but not
cut off circulation
If you receive snake-
bite, do not:
1) Make cuts and at-
tempt to suck out the
venom
2) Apply ice or heat
3) Apply a tourniquet
4) Elevate the bitten
limb
5) Try to kill the snake
yourself.

There are three very
poisonous snakes found
in Eastern North Caro-
lina, Rattlesnakes, Cop-
perheads, and Water
Moccasins. Rattle-
snakes and Copper-
heads bite while swim-
ming on top of the wa-
ter but Moccasins are
able to bite while on top
SAFETY
1) Be cautious around
downed wires
2) Avoid riding jet skis
and boats
3) Avoid standing water
and mud
4) Avoid drinking Alco-
hol that might alter you
judgement
5) Volunteershare
6) Stay out of cleanup
areas unless you are
North Carolina
state officials
estimated last
Friday that
more than
30,000 homes
were flooded in
the aftermath
of Hurricane
Floyd � at least
1.600 of them
beyond repair.
TSVWrVA-llitoWiifftniyi





.
,
NOMINATE A
HURRICANE HERO
We've established a place on
our website (tec.ecu.edu) where
you can nominate a Hurricane
Hero - someone who you believe
responded with courage and de-
termination in fighting the
effects of flooding in Greenville.
Click on the HERO button and
complete the form. We'll print a list
of heroes in a later edition of The
East Carolinian.
TELL US YOUR
STORY
We want to know how Hurricane
Floyd affected your life. We've
created a place on our website
(tec.ecu.edu) where you can tell
us about your Floyd feelings
and experiences.
Click on the TALES button and
complete the form. We'll print
some of the stories we receive
in later editions of
The East Carolinian.
SUBMIT A FREE
CLASSIFIED

We're offering one free
classified ad in one of the two
editions of The East Carolinian
to be published next week
(Sept. 28 & 30) to all students.
Use this opportunity to send
a personal message to others
on campus.
You can submit your classified
by clicking on the ADS button on
our website (tec.ecu.edu) and
completing the form or by coming
by The East Carolinian office.
1 free ad per student.
Lodk for additional
hurricane coverage,
.
including coverage
of the nationally-
ranked Pirates
defeat of the Miami
-
�?��
Hurricanes, in our

Thursday edition.
.
eastcarolinian
COVERING THE CAMPUS EVERY TUESDAY AND
THURSDAY


Title
The East Carolinian Special Hurricane Recovery Edition, September 28, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 28, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1357
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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