The East Carolinian, September 2, 1999







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Online Survey
Do you want enrollment to
increase of the next 10 years?
Carolinian

Conference USA is up and coming.
Seepg.8
www.tec.ecu.edu
THURSDAY. SEPTEMBER 2.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 80
News
Briefs
Monday is Labor Day. There will be
no classes.
Fall enrollment
exceeds 18,000 students
ECU and West Virginia begin their
1999 seasons with a game at
Charlotte's Ericsson Stadium. The kick-
off is set for 3 p.m.
ECU has completed a study on the
impact of last summer's Hurricane
Bonnie, and has found that the evacua-
tion costs for the storm were more
than $46 million. According to the
study produced by ECU Regional
Development Services and the depart-
ments of sociology and economics, the
businesses in eight coastal counties
suffered the greatest economic impact
from the storm.
The average cost, or loss of revenue
to each of'1,740 firms impacted by the
voluntary evacuation order, was esti-
mated at $17,593. The total evacuation
costs for the businesses were $30.6
million.
A total of 48,102 households evac-
uated during the storm. This number
represents just over 26 percent of all
the coastal households. The cost
incurred by homeowners in leaving
their property and staying elsewhere
was an estimated total of $15.5 mil-
lion, or about $323 per household.
ECU participated at the annual SIG-
GRAPH (Special Interest Group in
Graphics) meeting held in August in Los
Angeles. The ECU representatives from
the Division of Continuing Education
and the School of Medicine demon-
strated educational programs and com-
puter connections to other high schools
and colleges as part of a Virtual Reality
Storytelling Environment program.
msn Hotmail
Redmond, WashMicrosoft shut
down its free Hotmail e-mail system,
which has 40 million accounts, for
about seven hours Monday morning
after discovering the flaw that made
accounts vulnerable to outside access.
The company said the trouble was
fixed by 10 a.m. PDT.
The problem was first reported by
the Swedish newspaper Expreuen,
which said several hackers around the
world had set up web sites offering
unauthorized access to Hotmail's
accounts, by simply typing in a user
name.
It is unclear if anyone was harmed
during the incident.
Freshman
class largest ever
Career Services
offers online tools
Cory Sheeler
NEWS EDITOR
Website helps students
prepare for real world
ECU has set a new enrollment
record this semester with over
18,000 students. r'
The current figure for enroll-
ment is 18,223, eclipsing the pre-
vious record of 17,846 set in 1997.
Of the record-breaking 18,223,
there is also a record number of
freshman.
This year,
3,253 fresh-
man enter
ECU, sur-
passing 1997's
record of
2,935.
According
to Tom
Powell, direc
tor of aclmis
sions, 737 stu
dents ar
coming froi
out of state.
" T h a
shows that ECU has'recognition
coming from the mid-Atlantic
states Powell said. "It's impor:
tant that our university gets more
regional, East Coast recognition
Powell also believes that the
quality of students is increasing.
"The new students' average
GPA from high school is a 3.2 on
an un-weighted scale Powell
said. "That shows that we are get-
ting quality high school students
Vice Chancellor of Academic
Affairs Richard Ringeisen agreed
that students are being drawn to
Greenville because of ECU's rep-
utation.
"We were very pleased with
that kind of increase Ringeisen
said. "One of our goals is to
increase our student body. We had
more students say yes to us. That
has to do with the high quality
that people are perceiving us with.
The director of admissions has
worked very hard at that
Dr. Ronald Speier, dean of stu-
dents, also recognized ECU's
growing reputation.
"My feeling is that it's a recog-
nition that we are doing good
things academically said Speier.
"We have a quality experience for
students who come here
Chancellor Richard Eakin has
set a goal of increasing the student
population by 9,000 students over
the next 10 years.
Vice Chancellor!
of Academic Affairs!
Richard Ringeisen!
confirmed the
increase, but esti-
mates the!
University will!
increase it's enroll-
ment by 7,000-
10,000 students in the next 10
years.
He also went on to say that the
UNC system as a whole is expect-
ing enrollment to increase by
48,000 students, with most of the
increase taking place in the last
five years of that 10-year period.
The question that now arises is
what the University will do with
all of these students.
With freshman forced to live in
make-shift living spaces for a
week while they are placed in
dorms, there has to be a plan to
house all of the new students.
Ringeisen said.
'We would like
to keep the
same ratio we
have now of
people living on
Icampus to peo-
ple living off
Icampus. We
have plans for more housing and
more dining facilities
Layton Getsinger, associate
chancellor of Administration and
Finance, says that such problems
would be paid for through non-
appropriated funds.
"They would have to be paid
for by using a bond issuance or
bank loans Getsinger said. "And
then the University would repay
those loans or bond issuances
through fees charged to students
for living in the residence halls or
SEE ENROLLMENT PAGE 2
Cory Sheeler
NEWS EDITOR

ECU's Career Services is up and
running with it's new website on
the Internet
The hope is that upcoming grad-
uates will take advantage of their
resources and help prepare them-
selves for life after college.
Dr. James Westmoreland, direc-
tor of Career Services, hopes that
the new website will bring more
students into contact with his
office.
"We expect to grow over time as
people become familiar with the
service Westmoreland said.
"People will take the time to do
things when it is real to them
Westmoreland encourages all
undergraduates and graduate stu-
dents who plan on graduating in
December of 1999 or MaySummer
2000, to take advantage of the
office's tools.
Getting started with the center
. is simple. After logging onto their
website at www.ecu.educareer, you
must complete an intakerelease
form that will register you with the
system.
This also gives your permission
for the center to release your infor-
mation to possible employees.
Once registered, students will
be able to access tools such as creat-
ing and publishing your resume
online as well as a database of web-
sites on the World Wide Web where
job listings are published.
Also, this service will allow stu-
dents to make appointments with
companies who will be in
Greenville to give interviews with
potential employees.
All of these services have been
offered at Career Services, but with
the new online format Dr.
Westmoreland hopes students will
become more easily accessible to
them and that students will start
early in planning their future.
"Over time it will help educate
people to understand how impor
tant it is to get started early
Westmoreland said.
Potential employees also find
Westmoreland's service extremely
helpful.
Hamilton Morales, regional
recruiter for Enterprise Rent-A-
Car, has found that schools that use
an online approach get more stu-
dents involved in marketing them-
selves for employers.
"Some other schools use similar
tools Morales said. "It will pro-
vide potential companies interest-
ed in hiring students with a higher
volume of students to pull from and
it will get more companies
involved
SEE CAREER PAGE 2
NAACP hopes to add
members to local chapter
Connor has higfi
aspirationsforgroup
Angela H a r n e
STAFF WRITER
Many filled the tiny room of the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Cultural Center on Tuesday Aug.
31. It was the first meeting of the
year for the NAACP.
The room overflowed with
about 50 members, old and new, as
NAACP President Ramsey Connor
started the meeting with a moment
of silence.
A membership drive will take
place Sept 13-17 from 9 a.m12
p.m. in the front yard of the
Ledonia Wright African-American
Center, which is located in the
Bloxton House.
"I have a lot of aspirations for
this year Connor said.
Membership dues for the NAACP
is $12 a year.
Besides Connor, the NAACP
chapter board members include,
Vice President Kevin Jordan,
Chaplain Chris Owens, Secretary
Jashun Gaddy, Treasurer Charlene
Whitaker, Assistant Treasurer
Davetta Ghist and Historian Jim
McNulty.
The back-to-school NAACP
cookout held Aug. 17, was very
successful.
"Thank you for all that came out
for the cookout We had a good
turnout and it was a great success
Connor said.
The NAACP will be offering a
library tour this Tuesday at 5 p.m.
This group holds many other
SEE NAACP PAGE 2
Joyner to charge for computer print-outs
Decision made for
money to be spent elsewhere
Joyner will cut down on paper watte by charging for computer print-outs
Dunrn ov UJIHIAU KPITH
PHOTO BY WILLIAM KEITH
Terra Steinbf.iser
staff writer
Joyner Library is in the process of
testing a program that will charge
students for printing from the
library's computers.
It is part of their effort to cut
down on paper waste and keep up
with the rising cost of production.
"Five years ago, ECU's library
only had about 40 computer work-
stations and there was no such thing
as the World Wide Web said Gail
Munde, associate director of library
services. "Because we now have
160 public workstations and elec-
tronic access to full-text databases,
the cost of printing has sky-rocket-
ed. The library now sets aside
about $100,000 out of its yearly
budget for printing paper, toner and
printer repair
The new solution, called
Uniprint is designed to monitor
i
printing in much the same way that
copying is overseen. It was original-
ly scheduled to be in full service by
the beginning of this semester.
"We didn't get to finish all of the
testing this summer like we had
planned Munde said. "It should
be up and running before the end
of September though
Jeff Huskamp, associate vice
chancellor of Computing
Information Services, explained
how the new system will work.
"When the system is first imple-
SEE CHAME PAGE 2





2 Tfcmidiy, Senator 2. 1�99
news
Thi East Carolinian
1
agss
campuses
V. South Florida�A University of
i South Florida policy limiting the
karea where people can engage in
�free speech is causing some to exer-
cise their own right to condemn the
� measure.
Four professors in the depart-
�ment of Government and
� International Affairs: Michael
�Gibbons, Kennan Ferguson,
�Cheryl Hall and Steven Johnston,
� released an open letter to the uni-
versity community Wednesday
�bashing USF's new policy, which
�restricts campus speakers to two
�specific areas.
The letter calls the plan uncon-
stitutional and claims the proposal
�goes against the purpose of places
�of higher learning. It also urges the
�university to rethink its position.
A 10-person committee decided
this summer to restrict freedom of
speech to an area west of the
Administration Building and a plot
on the east end of Elm Street
The latter is designed for large
groups and requires a reservation.
Senior Counsel Debra King, one
of nine facultystaff members on
the board, said the letter misinter-
prets the committee's reasoning for
creating a Speakers Square.
The professors' letter claims the
policy is unconstitutional and
unconscionable.
Gibbons said such policies could
also later be used as precedents to
either restrict other Constitutional
rights or increase the regulations of
the freedom of speech.
Laurie Woodward, acting direc-
tor for the Phyllis P. Marshall
Center, said the professors' letter
was off the mark. She said the com-
mittee spent a lot of time examin-
ing and developing the best solu-
tion for the university.
Gibbons said he received
around a dozen e-mails siding with
the professors' position.
The policy was signed this week
by Harold Nixon, Vice President
for Student Affairs. Though it is
now part of USF's regulations, it
goes to President Betty Castor and
groups such as Student
Government and the Faculty
Senate for review. Nixon can then
choose to amend the policy.
King said it is standard for vice
presidents to sign policies before
they are submitted for review.
Nixon did not return the phone
calls made to both his home and
office.
NAACP
continued limn page 1
'events throughout the year, includ-
ing the "Little Willy" Halloween
Jyarty, the "Nubian Pageant" and an
Apollo Night.
j "The Little Willy Halloween
arty will be held in October for the
'local elementary school kids in
"Alendenhall said Connor. "The
"Nubian pageant recognizes
lfrican-American women. The
4ageant will take place in
JJovcmber.
I "Members participate in make-
tip and modeling tryouts, so they
can make the runway and get
judged. Apollo Night will take
elace in October and will consist of
talent show acts, and just like the
pageant, the audience will be the
judge Connor said.
The chapter will also be enter-
ing the Homecoming banner con-
test taking place on Oct. 20.
� The NAACP attends four con-
ferences a year. The first one will
Charge
continued Irnm page I
nicnteel, it will be running on a
�debit card system. But eventually
students will be able to put money
Jn their ECU One Card and pay
Jbr the service that way
The decision to charge students
Jfor printing was not an easy one.
"We decided that we'd like to
spend our money on other things
)n their ECU One Card and pay
Jbr the service that way
J The decision to charge students
Jbr printing was not an easy one.
I "We decided that we'd like to
Ipend our money on other things
for the students other than cover-
ing printing costs Munde said.
?We wanted to extend our hours
from 100 to 116 a week, which
we've now done and we also want-
ed to subscribe by license to more
electronic databases. The library
feels the tradeoff is worth it, even
though it isn't going to make us
very popular
� Students' reactions were mixed.
"There's always going to be just
one more thing they're going to
charge us for said Francie
Carlson, junior. "I'm starting to get
used to it

"It's annoying, but I can under-
stand why they need to do it said
Jon Hegy, sophomore. "I just wish
ehere was some other way to cover
rhe costs without charging us poor
students
; The library, however, will get
none of the money made from
printing.
; "It all goes to Rapid Copy, the
people who manage all of the
eppiers Munde said. "They're
going to start managing and main-
tain the library's printers as well.
All the library gets out of it is relief
from printing costs
I Contrary to popular belief, the
library receives no money from the
student computing fee, which is
part of every student's tuition, to
hielp with their printing costs. This
is another reason why the library is
implementing Uniprint.
; "I wish we didn't have to charge
students to print, but this really is
the most fair way to do it. After all,
this library is open to the public as
well, and they've been getting free
pointing too Munde said.
take place Sept 30 through Oct. 2
at UNC-Charlotte. During the con-
ferences, board members attend
and discuss the campus issues they
feel are important.
Due to last year's racial outburst
by a staff member, the NAACP,
along with other minority groups on
campus, have formed a minority
coalition. The coalition will target
faculty discrimination.
"I think it's a strong, well devel-
oped organization, said Jacqueline
Owens, freshman. "I hope that a lot
of freshman join because it will give
us something to do, along with
meeting a lot of new people and
learning about their different back-
grounds. I can't wait to become a
member
After background information
and future events were discussed,
Chaplin Chris Owens closed the
meeting with a prayer.
"I think that ECU'S chapter of
the NAACP is very well-organized
and in-tunc to dealing with minori-
ty issues and all those who wish to
participate said Ernest Daily,
freshman. "I am very proud to be a
future member, once I pay my $12
membership fee
"I'm looking forward to joining
it's a nice organization that I want
to learn more about" said Angela
Mclvin, freshman.
The NAACP was formed in
1909 and came to ECU in 1981 to
help eliminate segregation. The
NAACP gradually expanded and
by 1985 consisted of 40 members.
"In 1997 Darryl Umstcad reor-
ganized the chapter and its been
going strong ever since Connor
said. "We strongly believe in affir-
mative action and welcome any
new members
Meetings take place every
Tuesday at 6 p.m. in the Ledonia
Wright African-American Center
located across from the Student
Union.
This write can be contacted
at Bhame@stukntmedia.ecu.edu.
Career
continued Irom page I
One student found Career
Services extremely helpful, espe-
cially in building his resume.
"Career Services helped me get
my resume to the point where I felt
comfortable presenting it to compa-
nies said Joe Donlevy, senior. "I
think it's important for students to
at least see what they have to offer.
Morales has always found
Queer Services at ECU to benefit
him as well as students that have
dealt with it.
"I think they have done a great
job so far without having the online
resources up until now Morales
said. 'They have a great staff and
with this new system, it will give
students no excuse not to be pre-
pared for life after college
"Career .Services helped me get
my resume to the point where I felt
comfortable presenting it to compa-
nies said Joe Donlevy, senior. "I
think it's important for students to
resources up until now Morales
said. "They have a great staff and
with this new system, it will give
students no excuse not to be pre-
pared for life after college
Enrollment
coiiiimieil Irom page I
using the dining halls
Because the bond issue failed to
get passed this summer by the state
legislature, there is concern that
there may be no bond money to
pay for such projects.
"It's going to effect all the uni-
versities in the North Carolina sys-
tem if (the bond doesn't pass.
There are 48,000 students coming
at us, ready or not Getsinger said.
"If they don't pass the bonds,
the powers that be will have to
answer to the people. And if it goes
to a voter referendum, the people
will have to answer to themselves
While some students feel a big-
ger student body would enhance
the University, others are afraid a
bad situation will only get worse.
"I hate it said Jason Mathews,
senior. "While driving on campus,
I've already almost hit three peo-
ple. And the dorms are already
overcrowded
Freshman Julia Allard is afraid
the small college atmosphere may
be taken away with the addition of
more students.
"I think it's bad because I like
smaller classroom settings Allard
said. "It will be more of tin institu-
tionalized environment"
One student also felt (here were
a few things that need to be
changed about campus before the
University can think about expand-
ing.
, "It's goodJaid Paige Orrock,
freshman. "We will be a big school
Fall 1999
Total students enrolled:
18,223
Total number of freshman:
3,253
Total number of women:
10,785
Total number of men:
7,438
Fall 1998
Total students enrolled:
17,799
Total number of freshman:
2,819
Total number of women:
10,559
Total number of men:
7,240
sition it will go through after
adding approximately 9,000 new
students.
"When things grow, they have
to adjust Mills said. "Things have
been growing here for s� while and
they have done a good job adjust-
ing. It's still a good school so it
should be fine
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4 Ttwtttoy. Wwrtw 2. 1899
news
Thi East Ctroliniin
SwC?l Iv
August 29
12KB .mUno Violation; Littering� student was issued a campus
appearance ticket for littering and possessing alcohol in the
Ion on Reade Street.
2:16 a.m.�-Alcohol Violation�?ow students were given CATs after
being observed north of Speight Building trying to conceal
alcoholic beverages.
Sweet Dreams
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Large selection of videos, magazines and novelties.
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AREAT:
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919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
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12:19 p.m.
-Malicious Mischief�An officer discovered a bench, trash
can, bike rack and sculpture turned over between Jarvis
& Jenkins Art Buildings. There was no damage.
5
2:45 p.m.�Larceny�A student reported someone stole a license plate
from his vehicle while parked in the lot at the corner of 5th
& Reade Street. At a later time Greenville officers arrested
a subject displaying the stolen plates.
3:41 p.m.�Assault by Pointing Firearm &Anto Accident� non-student
was struck at a stop sign while exiting the parking lot south
of Belk Hall onto College Hill Drive. He was fleeing from
a subject who had pointed a handgun at him on the Belk
� basketball court. Subject has not been located.
August 30

12:04 a.m.�Trespass Warning�A student reported that four unescorted
males were on the fifth floor of Greene Hall. They each
were issued trespass warnings.
6:29 p.m.�Auto Accident�Na ECU Transit van and a truck were
involved in an accident at the intersection of 10th Street &
Charles Boulevard.
August 31
1:45 a.m.�Harassing Phone Calls�A student reported to Greenville
Police that she was receiving harassing phone calls in her
residence hall room. She was transferred to ECU Police
Department where the situation was handled.
1:28 a.m.�Rnpe OccurrdOff-Campus�A student was detained by an
ECU officer because he fit a description of a suspect in a
rape incident that had occurred off campus earlier. His
story was verified and subject was released.
Brown & Brown
ATTORNEYS AT LAW
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Experience the Differenceyou can makei
r


wopinu
; Has anyone
noticed a decli
! common courte
I Last year, i
; bumped into so
deal. The peo
gized and that
; There were nc
! and rude looks,
tesy. Not anymc
been overwheli
; aggression, wh
; opposite of tin
; know and love.
! this expansion :
; summed up in i
) those damn Van
Think about
are Yankees bt
they say is in rj
�i and they pron
OPINH
! Yes, there is r;
' There is racism
! Whenever then
i different group
i will find racism.
n I've only bee
H
for two years, an
j time, I have see
j! seen things take
! n't have and vie
has ECU change
ed, or does it ap
ii ing? My respom
ii key to changing,
� and the key to n
' ter is to first rea
edge that there a
that ECU has a
first step, acknoi
J of the damaging
" out to me when
Ijhere at the Un
overprotective o
.i faculty members
ii point that even
tion or to state ar
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Chancellor Eakiri
seems to be pleased with ECU'h growirtj
student body to the
point where h�
plans to increase
ECU by 9.000 stu
dents in the next 10
� y��rs. :
i, OPINION I
PATRICK
MCMAHON
ouview
I lave you ever noticed during your daily stroll around campus that you see
the same folks every day? Perhaps it is because you have a similar class sched-
ule with those students whom you see frequently. Still, when it goes on for
four years straight, you begin to realize ECU is a pretty small place.
Compared to certain surrounding universities like as NO State and UNC-
Ohapel Mill, we are.
From fall semester 1998 to fall semester 1 W�, ECl I has increased by 424 stu-
dents. Though it seems like a small number, consider this: It's 424 more people
who will lie competing for a metered parking spot on campus. It's also 424 more
people who you will be sharing crowded computer labs with, and so on.
Chancellor Eakin seems to be pleased with ECU's growing student body
to the point where he plans to increase ECl' by 9,000 students in the next 10
years. There is optimism in such an increase, considering it will no doubt
boost ECU's national recognition�more students means more press, and
more press means more money.
I lowever, an increase in ECU's population could become quite a nuisance
if we do not have the proper resources to accommodate the increase. Questions
abound such as, "Will we have enough housing?" and "Will there le sufficient
parking?" (Ilass space is also a major concern that ultimately raises the question
as to whether or not we will lie getting a new science complex after all.
If ECU seems small to you now, pray that you graduate within the next
10 years. Or, maybe you plan to stick around to see the chancellor's plan be
carried out. Regardless, even if an increase in the student body eventually
proves to be an asset to the University as a whole, it is crucial for ECl1 to
begin preparing in advance. Adding all of this weight too soon may cause the
boat to start sinking.
Damn Yankees invade campus
OPINION
CHRIS
SACHS
How to avoid getting bum-rushed
Has anyone other than myself
noticed a decline in the level of
common courtesy here on campus?
Last year, if you accidentally
bumped into someone it was no big
deal. The people at fault apolo-
gized and that was the end of it.
There were no crinkled up faces
and rude looks, just common cour-
tesy. Not anymore. The campus has
been overwhelmed by a force of
aggression, which is a complete
opposite of the ECU I came to
know and love. I have a theory on
this expansion of idiocy that can be
summed up in three simple words:
those damn Yankees.
Think about it. You can tell they
are Yankees because every word
they say is in rapid-fire progression
and they pronounce "cat" and
OPINION
"heart" like "ket" and "bet" (insert
stereotypical Yankee pronuncia-
tion.) Maybe up north (lower case
spelling) they are used to a profane,
high speed lifestyle, but here in the
South (upper case spelling) we like
our days laid back and relaxed.
Yankees love their hockey and
"grinders" (called hoagies here in
the South) while we love our col-
lege sports, Moon-Pies and
Cheerwine (soda, not alcohol.)
All name calling aside, the flood
of "northerners" who have oh-so-
graciously migrated South has pret-
ty much disrupted our natural,
Southern way of existence. For one,
try to drive around town with these
people. For instance, 45 mph in
Yankee terms60 mph, or a red stop
light in Yankee termsfloor it, the
other cars will stop.
Honestly, I have nothing against
people from the North as long as
they come down here and demon-
strate respect for their fellow peo-
ple. Mostly, it's hard to tell if some-
one is a Yankee until they open
their mouth. So here is the Idiot's
Guide for Yankee Survival in the
South: (I) Don't open your mouth
in public. (2) Be courteous to
EVERYONE. (3) You are not bet-
ter than anyone else, so don't act
like it. The final, and most impor-
tant lesson of them all, (4) AIN'T is
a real word and we use it often, so
get used t() 't-
This writer can be contacted at
pmcmahon@sludentmedia.ecu.edu
I enjoy going downtown as much
as the rest of the school, drinking
myself blind and creating bar tabs
as high as the sky. One of the
things I love most about down-
town Greenville are the characters
that walk the sidewalks asking for
spare change. These guys are
great. I do think most people take
their begging too seriously and see
it as some awful social problem.
Net it's not. It is actually what
everyone should see it as�pure
entertainment.
Asking for change has turned
into an art form for your modern-
day street transient. These people
have evolved techniques that can
get the best of any warm-hearted
dope easily buffaloed by their con-
vincing story.
I had a guy in A. once sell me
a map of all the cool places to visit,
saying the money would go to a
home for abused children. Little
dill I know the first restaurant I
visited had a huge rack filled with
these maps. I was duped, yes I
was. But 1 take comfort in the fact
that I helped the drunken public
by keeping social workers and AA
in business.
In New York the street
denizens get on the subway just
before it leaves and proceed to
loudly announce some fake name
and rant and rave about the money
they need for their gay cousin's
roommate's brother who is in dire
need of a colon transplant. Once
the announcement is made, the
begging telethon begins.
As the years go by, 1 have
noticed that street urchins are get-
ting lazier and lazier. I actually
once saw a guy in Washington
IXC. who sat on the stoop of a
building with a can tied to the end
of a pole and proceeded to swing
his can at the passersby, fishing for
money! Talk about one lazy
human being. I lowever, that
image was not sad in any way; it
was extremely funny.
I lere in Greenville the same guys
mosey up and down the streets
every night pestering students for
spare change, cigarettes, booze and
even sex. And year after year, new,
naive students give them change,
cigarettes, booze and some proba-
bly do give sex.
When I was a teenager in
Buffalo, N.Y my friends and I
used to make the beggars do hand-
stands, push-ups and cartwheels to
get our change. We made them
earn it! I say it is time to bring my
tradition here to Greenville. I now
call for all students to make the
street leeches do a bit of work for
their keep. It helps by making
them so embarrassed they're
forced to go look for jobs, and it
provides us students with good,
wholesome entertainment to
watch.
If you feel that it would be too
cruel, then make them wash and
wax your ear while you are in the
bar getting blind. You can drive
home in a nice clean car. Pay them
to beat the hell out of the guy who
spilled his drink on your girlfriend.
Or better yet, you can pay them to
carry you home on their shoulders
when you are too drunk to even
crawl. (Just give them a map
before you begin drinking.)
My point is is that there are many
useful ways these people could
work for their change. You just,
have to be creative. And if you are j
as broke as I usually am, and you
can't spare any change at all, then .
go to Lowe's and buy a large bag of
metal washers. They sound just
like quarters and the bums will
never know the difference. (This
works great for church collection
plates, too.)
Have a good time downtown and
remember that these people want
our change and we need their
entertainment. I will see you all
there, and if you need to borrow
any washers I've got plenty to j
spare.
This writer can be contacted
at csachs@studentmedia ecu.edu
LETTER TO
EDITOR
University takes steps towards new era
True organized religion does not exist
j Yes, there is racism on campus.
'� 'There is racism among the land.
! Whenever there is a mixture of
i different groups of people, you
i will find racism.
I've only been at the university
1 for two years, and in that period of
j time, I have seen quite a lot. I've
; seen things take place that should-
I! n't have and vice versa. If asked,
! has ECl' changed since I graduat-
ed, or does it appear to be chang-
ii ing? My response would be "the
ii key to changing, the key to fixing
' and the key to making things bet-
; ter is to first realize and acknowl-
; edge that there are problems. I say
!that ECU has already taken the
j first step, acknowledgement. One
of the damaging things that stood
" out to me when Lbegan working
1 here at the University was how
ij overprotective of the school the
i faculty members, are. It was at a
point that even to give a sugges-
�; tion or to state an opinion in oppo-
sition to the way things were done
called for a punishment, and a bad
label was placed on you.
Today versus yesterday, I see
managerial staff willing to take the
time to listen. It appears that the
University may be at the begin-
ning point of trying to develop the
negatives into positives.
Managerial staff is allowing space
for the development of different
forums. They are welcoming stu-
dents' input whereas in the past
very little to nothing was done to
promote student interest. 'There
have been two well-deserved pro-
motions: Dr. Carrie Moore, Vice
Chancellor of Student Life and
Ms.Taffye Benson Clayton,
Special Assistant to the Chancellor
for Special AssignmentHO
Officer. Promotion of qualified
blacks has been a sore eye and a
problem within the University
throughout the years. Ms.
Clayton's interim replacement is a
graduate of ECl It has been a
concern for many black graduates
from the University that they are
never totally admitted into the
family at ECU. Families do not
abandon family. In other words,
the vast majority of black gradu-
ates are very seldom hired for
employment upon graduating.
Hopefully, this will become a
problem of the past.
As a staff member of the uni-
versity I say "continue to push
ECU, continue to strive, continue
to listen and hear what your stu-
dent body has to say. It appears
that you have made some
progress, but the distance you
have to go is way farther than the
distance you have come. It is our
job collectively to strive to pro-
mote unity. When this happens,
great is the reward!
Barbara Willoughby
I agree with the many fine points
relating to the banning of organized
religion. I lowever, the term "orga-
nized" is a misnomer. There is no
organized religion. Each one of the
hundreds of religions have dissenters;
for no one individual believes exactly
as another.
For one reason or other, we enjoy
differing opinions about almost
everything. Many are led to believe
these differences were developed in
some laboratory by a supernatural
being somewhere in a place called
Heaven. Others believe each tiny
snow flake, crystallized element or
strand of DNA is due to the mysteri-
ous powers if Nature, as exists on this
fragile place called Karth, and per-
haps other places similar to Earth.
Many folks don't know, don't care
and are far better off not worrying
about it. There are the religious�the
dcfinitely's, the non-religious�the
definitely not's, and those who aren't
sure what they are�the maybe s.
Unfortunately, the term religious
often equates in the minds of some as
the good or those without fault.
Often, however, it is very much the
opposite, as in the case of those indi-
viduals of the cloth who are caught
with their fingers in the till, their
hands on each other or their pants
around their ankles�as sometimes
happens to the rest of us mortals.
Prisons are full of religious people.
Unfortunately, it is against a federal
statute for the government to break
down the prison populations into
specific preferences, but there have
been several studies done by inde-
pendent sources. The results will
amaze many, disappoint some, and
enrage others. The fewest group of
prisoners are actually Humanists,
Unitarians, and atheists�mostly
made up of the maybe s and the def-
initely not's. I can understand, actual-
ly, why these numbers are quite low.
If you listen carefully to many overiy-
religious people (those that can't wait
to get to I leaven and tell the rest of
us all about why we need to pack our
bags as well), you will find that often,
they care little about the Earth
because they feel this is just a vaca-
tion�a stopover on the way to some-
where else. Many of the rest of us,
who feel that this is Heaven�or
Hell�depending on your professors
and a few other factors, believe this is
the end. We want to protect the Earth
and make it a better place for those
who will replace us after we're push-
ing up shnibbery.
I do not fault those who call them-
selves one group or another, but I do
protest those who shake their sym-
bols at others in order to degrade
them�whether they be female,
poor, homosexual or of another reli-
gion. It is unfortunate that some
always attempt to make you believe
the way they do, and give you grief
when you resist. Therefore, I usually
find myself more comfortable around
Humanists or I 'nitarian I :ni versa lists,
because they serve humanity and
serve the living rather than the dead.
'They tend to accept each person's
individuality because they realize
that we are all in this together.
Yes, I quite agree with Everett
Knox that God is not sitting in a far
off sky, but here on this earth, reflect-
ed in the trees, the rocks and you and
I.
This writer can be reached at
edwardsm@studentmedia ecu edu

L
�l� -
. jim








KBHBsSR-SpBwfflHBsSeBPHW
comics
Th� East Carolinian
6 Thursday Sintiwbir 2. 1999
4 SEATS LEFT
BY JASON LATOUR
4 SEATS LEFT
BY JASON LATOUR
MAMA'S BY-PRODUCT
BY JEREMY FALLS
BRAIN-VOMIT
AMNESIA-QhtP
BY STEWART SINEATH
HOW T fHt DVWf.
: ���
iamFmiES�
�Choose 3 types of exercise:
bike, strength training, runwalk, stahmaster
swim, aerobics, precor, row, nordic track
�Complete SSO minutes of exercise for each
mode you choose above.
�Check in at fitness desk before & after workout
�Maximum of 30 minutes counted per day.
�Accumulate 660 minutes and Win!
�Sign up at fitness desk Sept 1. - Sept. 10
YOU EXERCISE
YOU WIN!
���EXERCISE & WIN A T-SHIRT"
7 Thursday. Sapti
facts about
Espresso and
started in Italy a
beans have a lulli
vpT than regular
tbat are used a
blended from !
Indonesian beans
According to
the concept for
espresso-based di
ustorners quickly
Espresso: Esp
cial Espresso Roa
intense flavor, as
than regular cofl
alone in a demit;
for a speciality dr
Espresso Co
espresso topped
1
Espresso fV
espresso topped
1
cA
Caffe Latte: 1
ers. The base is a
the drink is built
Finally, a layer ol
on the top.
Caffe Mocha:
espresso and stei
also blended inti
often topped wit
cocoa powder.
Cappuccino:
Latte, a Cappucci
of espresso. Ths
amount of stearm
is more foamed n
Caffe Amei
espresso is coml
water to make a
PHOTOS COURTESY
� � ' i . � . � "�� � �





The East Carolinian
I X fHi &11.
tout
I
�"���
7 Thursday. September 2, 1999
features
The East CmMiM
Fas
facts about coffee culture
I
; Espresso and espresso-based drinks
started in Italy at coffee bars. Espresso
beans have a fuller and more intense fla-
vor than regular coffee, and the beans
tbat are used at Starbucks Cafe are
blended from South American and
Indonesian beans.
According to Starbucks Cafe, when
the concept for serving espresso and
espresso-based drinks came to America,
ustomers quickly picked up on the trend.
Espresso: Espresso is made from spe-
cial Espresso Roast beans. It has a more
intense flavor, as well as caffeine dose,
than regular coffee. It is either served
alone in a demitasse or used as a base
for a speciality drink.
Espresso Con Panna: One shot of
espresso topped with whipped cream.
Espresso Macciato: A shot of
espresso topped with foamed milk.
The
Caffe Latte: This drink has three lay-
ers. The base is a shot of cappuccino, and
the drink is built up by steamed milk.
Finally, a layer of foamed milk is poured
on the top.
Caffe Mocha: It begins with a shot of
espresso and steamed milk. Chocolate is
also blended into this drink, and it is
often topped with whipped cream and
cocoa powder.
Cappuccino: Similar to the Caffe
Latte, a Cappuccino uses the same shot
of espresso. The difference is, that the
amount of steamed milk is less, and there
is more foamed milk.
Caffe Americano: One shot of
espresso is combined with enough hot
water to make a full cup of rich coffee.
PHOTOS COURTESY Of THE WOBLO WIOE WEB
Societal images create
unrealistic pressures
Individuals strive for
unattainable perfection
Nl. M. I1MY
SSISMT l-KTI RKS KUITDH
"Gain more muscle mass "No
restricted dieting "No dangerous
drugs "Lose the weight naturally
in 30 days In this day and age,
more products are appearing on the
market claiming to improve the
appearance of all individuals.
Instead of being happy with
what we see in the mirror some
sources say that there are an
increasing number of people who
suffer from eating disorders in an
attempt to fulfill unreasonable
body expectations.
"I think people shouldn't con-
centrate on the weight on their
scales, but on how they feel about
themselves and what type of phys-
ical condition they're in said
I leather Zophy, director of health
education at Student Health
Services. "The weight on the scale
doesn't indicate how fit you are
According to The Seat! Umgiitige
of Eating Disorders, by Peggy
Claudes, more than eight million
people in the I'nited States suffer
from eating disorders. These types
of illnesses rate the highest mortal-
ity rate of any psychological dis-
ease. Most of these victims are
struggling with the two most com-
mon disorders, anorexia and bulim-
ia.
"About 20-25 percent of college
women suffer from eating disor-
ders said Dr. Jane Ross, staff psy-
chologist, Student Health Services.
Anorexia is a disorder in which
an individual obsesses about the
way he or she looks and tries to
control the perceived self-image by
not eating.
According to Student Health
Services (SI IS), some of anorexia's
symptoms include refusal to main-
tain normal body weight, display-
ing intense fear of fat and a distort-
ed sense of body image.
"Typically, people who are
anorexic are perfectionists,
quiet, introverted, very intelli-
gent Zophy said. "There's a
whole prototype that fits the
typical anorexia behavior
A person diagnosed
with bulimia�or the
bingepurge syndrome�
may overeat and then
induce vomiting before
the food is digested.
"It's an emotional
issue where an individ-
ual will engage in the
purge activity once a
week, usually ending in
an addictive act
Zophy said.
Some of the long-term
consequences of bulimia
include dental problems,
dehydration, ulcers, extreme
fatigue, a combination
which can be potentially
life-threatening.
The number of women
who suffer from eating disor-
ders is still higher, however
an alarming percentage of those
diagnosed with eating disorders
are men.
"About five percent of college
men suffer from eating disorders
Ross said. "It has gone up from one
percent
Another alternative compulsive
dieters are turning to is dietary
supplements. These products have
always been available to the public,
but recently supplements such as
Mctabolife and Slender Weigh
have been marketed aggressively,
enticing people to gain their ideal
weight in a short amount of time.
According to the Mctabolife
.website, more than $1 million
worth of Mctabolife 356 is sold
every day and several publications
(although none were mentioned)
listed it as the most popular dietary
supplement on the market. This
herbal supplement claims to curb
appetite, increase metabolism and
urges you to eat healthy food since
it "works better with food
According to Slender Weigh,
the supplement allows you to eat
the foods you enjoy, and is all nat-
ural. Opinions on the topic of diet
supplementary pills vary among
students.
"I believe pills are useful to
those who are truly overweight,
and are trying to obtain a reason-
able goal of weight loss said Lissa
�Griffin, senior.
"I think diet pills are over the
top said April Petty, senior. "I
don't think it's healthy
Aside from the traditional
scapegoats, media and society,
some may place the blame on the
SEE BOO. PAGE a
Weight Chart: Woman
1 leightFrame size
Medium
4'10"109-121
4'U"111-123
5'0"113-126
5'1"115-129
5'2"118-132
5'3"121-135
5'4"124-138
5'5"127-141
56"130-144
57"133-147
5'8"136-150
5'9"139-153
5'10"142-156
5'11"145-159
6'0"148-162
courtesy of the ECU School
of Medicine
. ?.TOB�
Height
5'2"
5'3"
5'4"
5'5"
5'6"
5'7"
5'8"
D V
5'10"
5'H"
6'0"
Frame size
Medium
131-141
133-143
135-145
137-148
139-151
142-154
145-157
148-160
151-163
154-166
157-170
6V160-174
6-2"164-178
6'3"167-182
6'4"171-187
courtesy of the ECU School
of Medicine
Students attempt to
evade loan collectors
Student Loan Office
cites numerous excuses
li K I N !�' RIXXKI.
STU I- W H I I K H
Everyone knows that in the pursuit
of higher learning, knowledge
doesn't come for free. Whether it's
by grants or loans, a check from
mom and dad or slaving over a job
yourself, the bottom line is that it
all has to be paid for somehow.
Student loans offer a chance for
people to go to school who might
not otherwise be able to'attend.
Almost half of college students
receive some form of financial aid,
and the percentage of undergradu-
ate students who borrowed from
federal loan programs during the
academic year has increased by 11
percent in recent years.
According to the US
Department of Education, the
average college student will owe
more than $11,000 by their senior
year. However, there are some bor-
rowers who ignore the constant
bills to repay the big bucks.
Officials in the office of
Financial Aid say only five percent
of students offer excuses on why
they cannot pay back their loans.
"Sometimes loans are the stu-
dent's only option said Rose
Stelma director of Student
Financial Aid at ECU "This year
we will loan $35-$4() million to stu-
dents. The problem is the unavail-
ability of grants
"We get a lot of excuses said
Lisa Warren, receptionist at the
Student Loans Office. "We've
been told that they never got their
mail for some reason, or that they
couldn't get to their mailbox to
mail off their payment because of
an earthquake that was 300 miles
away
While Financial Aid makes the
loans, it is up to the Student Loans
Office to collect repayment. This
office at ECU deals with a variety
of payment methods.
There are many loans offered to
ECU students, the largest being
the Perkins Loan. Some students
are eligible to relieve the Sarah E.
Clement Emergency Loan. This
loan is designed to help students
while they are waiting for their reg-
ular financial aid to come in. The
Emergency Loan is valid for a peri-
od of 60 days, and is repaid from
the student's financial aid check
when it arrives.
Some students try everything to
avoid repayment. Some of the
excuses given to the Student
Loans Office vary, ranging from
almost believable to downright
laughable.
Larger loans, such as the
Stafford Loan, are handled by the
College Foundation Inc. in
Raleigh. They, too, receive numer-
ous false excuses regarding delin-
" We've been told that they
never got their mail for some
reason, or that they couldn 7
get to their mailbox to mail off
their payment because of an
earthquake thatwas 300 miles
away
Lisa Warren
Reccpnonist. Studem Financial Aid Oltice
quent payments.
"We mainly get the excuse that
they had a car or a credit card pay-
ment and they couldn't afford to
pay us said Ellen Mathis of the
College Foundation. "Some stu-
dents tell us that they thought it
was a grant, or that they did not get
a job in their field and that it
shouldn't have to be paid back
This miter can be contacted at
btrinelle&stuientmedia. ecu. edu
Yoga classes decrease stress
Ancient practice
increases health
II ROOK K I'll IIS
SI I I HI I l-H
Stress: an established part of col-
lege life. If you're already wor-
ried about your microbiology test
Friday, along with the $400 worth
of textbooks you just bought and
you still haven't decided what to
wear to your neighbor's keg party
this weekend, stop worrying
because you are not alone.
Stress will undoubtedly be a
frequent visitor during your time
at ECU, but, if you learn how to
manage it in a fun, healthy man-
ner, your life could be made dras-
tically simpler.
Students can come up with
some of the most interesting
ways to deal with stress, some of
which are not very productive
and may only contribute to more
headaches. (FYI: Setting fire to
the General Classroom Building,
intentionally crashing the library
computer system, or offing your
roommate to get a 4.0 are NOT
acceptable ways to handle stress-
ful situations.) Before you do
something drastic, keep in mind
the Student Recreation Center
has come up with a more produc-
tive, relaxing way to help stu-
dents cope with daily frustra-
tions.
As a response to student and
community interest, the SRC is
offering yoga classes again this
year.
"Often, students push them-
selves very hard mentally, physi-
cally and emotionally said
Debbie Niswander, yoga instruc-
tor at the SRC. "These classes
help teach them to let some of
that tension go, and how to con-
trol stress when it arises
Basically, through learning,
breathing and stretching exercis-
es, participants learn to pay atten-
tion to their bodies, and to take
time for themselves.
"This helps your general well-
being, as well as your overall out-
look Niswander said.
Student feedback has been
very positive. Senior Courtney
Bennett participated in the class-
es last year and plans to attend
again this semester.
"I feel much more relaxed and
less tense when I finish a class
Bennett said. "The passes are
inexpensive and the instruction
is good, even if you have never
done yoga before
The SRC is also encouraged
by the success they have had in
the past.
"There has been continued
interest over the last one to two
years, and classes have consis-
tently been full said Kari
Brown, assistant director of
Fitness and Lifestyle
SEE YOGA PAGE 9






TIM Eut Carolinian
features
Thursday, September 2, 1999 8
New King and Queen reign supreme
Residence hall students
compete for crown
V. K I ( A S I K K N
STAFF Wm IKK.
There's no better way to kick off
residence hall life than with an
illustration of what ECU stands
for: Everybody Carries an
Umbrella. Lust Thursday's King
and Queen of the Halls competi-
tion went on amidst the drizzling
rain, allowing Tyler Hall to take
back the crown as Queen of the
Halls and Garrett to break Scott
Hall's four-year winning streak.
"King and Queen of the Halls
is a program designed by
Recreational, Housing and Dining
Services to build teamwork among
the halls and the residents of those
halls said Todd King, marketing
coordinator for Student
Recreational Services.
This is one of five residence-
oriented events promoted by the
Recreation, Housing and Dining
Services that will be held this
year.
Nearly 1,000 residents gath-
ered at the bottom of College Hill
to compete for the title of King
and Queen of the Halls. Slay-
Umstead walked away with the
crown jewels after defeating
Aycock in the co-ed residence hall
showdown. The queen's crown
returned to Tyler after Greene
broke their winning streak lust
year, while Garrett swept away the
competition and stole the king's
crown from Scott.
Among the events at the com-
petition were tricycle races, pota-
to-sack races and the grand finale
ELTORO
Barber & Style
men's hair
styling shoppe
Slain
Glass
Irfrn
�tnHMj
Will Ragui Cupai
Eastgale Plaza Mall
752-3318
Appt. Or Walk In
'
You drank.
You danced.
You had se
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
9 Thursday,
Artwork for King and Queen of the Halls is displayed in front of Scott Residence Hall.
photo by BILL KEITH
event: tug-of-war. Tug-of-war is
critical to the event every year
because determines the champion
in an unusual fashion, making it
possible for either of the two lead-
"Kitig and Queen of the Halls
is a program designed fry
Recreational, Housing and
Dining Services to build team-
work among the halls and the
residents of those halls
Todd King
Marketing Coorrlinaioi loi Sludeni Recreational
Services
ing teams to win, regardless of
how far ahead or behind it is in
point standing.
The event is a positive way to
bring on-campus residents togeth-
er. Meeting new people is essen-
tial to college students, especially
first-year residents.
"It was good because I was able
to meet more people from . my
dorm suid Brigette Hull, fresh-
man.
All of the events are intended
to promote the positive spirit of
on-campus living.
"I thought it was a lot of fun
because it was different than any-
thing I've ever participated in
suid Ann Swinson, freshmun. "I
also met a lot of new people
This writer can be contacted at
esikesQstudentmedia. ecu. edu
s
xwe mi.
Check out the
Homecoming link
& wtviv.sga.edM.eci4
�fci�iw�vi
Homecoming 1999
I "PiteUed SvuHfUtf mta the MiUeiurium"

Application deadline:
Friday Sept 17,1999
Spm in Room 109
Mendenhatl Student Center
i
i&4?Float
Banner
KingQueen
Candidate
Sage Hunihan, Chair
ECU SGA Homecoming Committee
Mendenhatt Student Center Room 222
Greenville, NC27858
2523282319
2523282305 fax
ntvwjga.eeu.edu

BRADFORD CREEK GOLF CLUB
SEPTEMBER WEEKLY SPECIAL
MONDXTHRlIjftJRSDAY
4950 OLD PACT0LUSRD,
GREENVILLE NC
jTJ (252) 757-7745
Bradford Creek
M
Gneem
comii
;
; TheGreenv
. soon be s
'� events that I
!l aware of.
Another
Writers' Rea
j North Caro
Sept. 22,
5-Coleman w
Writer" prog
Baal's
Begtaurant & Pizzeria
1675 E. Firetower Rd.
(In Front of Carmike 12 Cinema)
Weekly Specials
Monday Pitchers
$5.50
Miller Lite, Budweiser, Mich Lite
$6.50
Newcastle, Killian's, Bass
Thursty Thursday
$1.25 Domestic Bottles
$2.25 Import Bottles
Friday
Wine Specials Martini Specials $3.75
Cabernet $2.00 Iceberg, Chocolate
Merlot $2.00 Italian, Martini Joe
Chianti $3.00 Mikey Finn, Elegant
9imdaY TAt
12 Price Appetizers After 5pm
15 Off Food
y Current Student ID
Not Valid w Any Other Coupons or Specials
. . �
V

. �
J!
u.





lenibar 2. 1999 8
'
2
ft?Wtof.q .
0003
9 Thursday, September 2, 1999
features
Museum hosts art exhibits, musical talents
LUB
IJL�
f-7745
Greenville's cultural
coming attractions
Kkica Sikks
si vv KIITtl
;
The Greenville Museum of An will
soon be sponsoring interesting
events that few around the city are
aware of.
Another popular program is the
Writers' Reading Series of Eastern
North Carolina. On Wednesday,
Sept. 22, Lorraine Johnson-
Coleman will hold a "Meet the
Writer" program at 3 p.m. followed
by a reading of her work at 7 p.m.
This event is free and open to the
public.
Museum exhibitions on display
for the months of September and
October include works by artists
Jane Filer, Robert Irwin and Kate
Museum exhibitions on dis-
play will include works by
artists Jane Filer, Robert
Irwin and Kate Murphy.
Murphy.
On Sept. 9, The Greenville
Museum of Art Guild will host the
GM A opening reception featur-
ing works by Filer, Irwin and
Murphy.
On Oct. 6 and 7, there will
be a trip to Richmond, Va. to
the Virginia Museum of Arts to
view "The Splendor of Egypt"
Tickets to the event will cost
$20.50 (accommodations not
included).
On Nov. 19, the 1999 Fine Arts
Ball will be held at Rock Springs
Center in Greenville. Among the
events included in the occasion will
be a silent auction which will dis-
play everything from artwork to
ECU-NCSU game tickets. Carroll
Dashiell's jazz ensemble and Billy
Scott and the Prophets will provide
musical entertainment for the spec-

Additions were made to GMA exhibit.
PHOTO BT BILL KEITH
tators and participants at the event.
For more information on
upcoming events at the Greenville
Museum of Art call 758-1946.
This writer can be contacted at
esikesBstudentmedia. ecu. edu
what's
happening
YOGA
coniinued Ifom pile 7
Enhancement Programs. Many
people involved in the classes
like the weekly schedule, which
requires less of a time commit-
ment.
Not only do students in the
yoga class feel better, they are
actually improving their overall
health.
"Being less stressed helps you
focus and regroup; it also lowers
blood pressure and heart rate,
and increases concentration and
balance coordihation said
Brown.
For those with physical chal-
lenges such as arthritis, asthma,
chronic fatigue, muscle pain or
extreme burnout, an alternative
class is offered. The stretches in
this class will be very gentle and
relaxing, focusing in on the spe-
cial needs of its participants.
These classes will begin on
Sept. 20 and are held from 12:10
p.ml p.m. every Monday.
If less stress and more relax-
ation sound like something you
might need, especially later in
the semester when finals get you
down, you should take advantage
of the sign-ups going on now.
The entire campus and com-
munity are invited to attend the
regular classes. The cost is $15 for
SRC members and $25 for non-
members. The classes run for two
six-week terms, from Sept. 8-Oct.
14, and Oct. 26-Dec. 9.
This writer can be contacted it
bpottsestudentmedia.ecu.edu
BODY
continued liom page 7
opposite sex as to why people,
especially women, may take
these extreme measures.
"The majority of the pressure
is not from guys said James
Strickland, junior. "But it is the
product of the female psyche for
the sake of competition of other
women. They're just using men
as the scapegoat"
Experts say weight loss is a
process, not something that can hap-
pen immediately.
"(People) didn't put the weight
on in a day, so you won't lose it in a
day said Kari Brown, assistant
director of Fitness and Lifestyle
Enhancement Programs.
According to Brown, to achieve
your ideal look, one should eat
healthy foods, exercise consistently
and manage eating habits.
"Weight loss is difficult and will
take time, but it's safer to take 20
minutes for a power walk, instead of
eight pills each day Brown said.
Students may seek help if they
believe they have an eating disorder.
"We do therapy support groups
for those with eating disorders at
Mental Health Services and the
Center for Counseling and Student
Development" Ross said.
Dr. Ross, along with Dr. Valerie
Kissler from the counseling center
collaborate on the group sessions. If
interested in attending a session,
contact Dr. Ross at 328-6795 or Dr.
Kissler at 328-6661.
This writer can be contacted at
ndryestuaantmedia.ecu.edu
i
Don't.
www.cl u bhouse.ecu.ed u
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Tin Eut Ciralinim
Sports
�EEEfR'izrS ,�
�l)nderwoorJ shows up in Miami
After leaving Vikings camp, retir-
'ing from football, signing with
ttte signing with the Dolphins and
"avoiding Dolphins camp, troubled
jjefensive lineman, Demetrius
Underwood finally showed up in
'south Florida. Tuesday, he prac-
ticed for only the second time
since he was drafted in April.
PM,
"Rafter out
'two-time defending U.S. Open
, .champion, Patrick Rafter retired
�f(om his first round match with
frenchman Cedric Pioline. The
"Australian injured his shoulder
and had to quit after taking the
first two sets.
'Holyfield-Lewis rematch set
IBF and WBA Heavyweight cham-
pion. Evander Holyfield and WBC
champ Lennox Lewis will meet
again on November 13, 1999 in
Las Vegas. The fight will be each
fighter's first since they battled
to a controversial draw in March.

$M '
I
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It OH wur-PW-wnn 3��
fcl � jii�ygf� '���� uwn�uvt
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I.
"Jones out for track season
Marion Jones has been sidelined
fpr the remainder of the 1999
european track season. Jones
was forced out of the World
Championships in Spain by back
spasms. Jones was injured in the
finals of the 200 meters, an
event she was favored to win.
�2
JVilliams cleared to play
aints rookie runningback, Ricky
jjfilliams has been cleared to play
13 the season operner on
eptember, 12. The Heisman win-
mr injured his ankle in a presea-
iJpn game against the Miami
Jblphins.
rwros cooRiesr or the wom.0 wide win
11 Thursd
Thursday, S�pt�mhir 2. 1899 10
Season opener
will cost students
ESPN deal makes
few happy, some irate
n
PRTBR Dawvot
ASSISTANT SPORTS KIIHIIK
As the Pirates gear up for the
much-anticipated season opener
against West Virginia, fans are
looking towards many exciting
events going on in the area.
One complaint some students
have had is the charge the students
must pay for tickets. In many
cases, this would not be seen as a
problem since the game is being
played at Charlotte's Ericsson
Stadium. Unfortunately, because
ESPN paid in excess of $1 million
for the rights to telecast the game,
some students have expressed
concern that students should not
have to pay for tickets since the
game is considered a home game
for ECU.
"I understand that it is expen-
sive for this game to be put on, but
students should not have to pay
since we already pay in university
fees, not to mention all the money
we just received for ESPN to show
the game said senior Julie
Gorman.
Associate Athletic Director
Henry V'anSant said the money
ECU received for the game from
ESPN has been used to help ben-
efit areas of the athletics program
which otherwise might not have
been helped. Some of the money
has gone towards renovations of
the track for the track-and-field
team, as well as for the new light-
ing system for the baseball team
installed this summer.
"The money enabled us to do
those two projects V'anSant said.
"It's been a good help to the over-
all athletic program
The majority of the money
received from ticket sales are
to be used for other pur-
poses such as mainte-
nance procedures and
general use of Ericsson
Stadium.
In any case, when a
facility as big as
Ericsson is in use, some
portion of ticket sales
are going to return to
the stadium for other
purposes including
lighting for the stadium
and payment for all
employees involved
with the game.
Additionally, neccesities such as
insurance all add up and must be
paid for through the sale of tickets.
West Virginia and ECU chose to
play the Charlotte game as
opposed to one of the two home
stadiums since the distance
between Ericsson is nearly a half-
way point, thus allowing for more-
fans from both universities to
attend the game.
"(ECU versus West Virginia is
an attractive match-up, an attrac-
tive event to bring to Charlotte
Reilly said.
"It's a pretty short trip for West
Virginia people V'anSant said.
"There should be a good crowd
there from both teams
ECU' is no stranger to Ericsson
Stadium, which can hold a crowd
of 73,250. The Pirates played on
that same field Nov. 30, 1996,
when they crushed NC State with
a final score of 50-29.
Uptow
209 1
X
C-USA still not among elite
New teams, more bowl
opportunities kick off
Stkpiirn Sen it a mm
sl'OKTs KIMTOH
Conference USA football is consid-
ered by many to be a college back-
water and a conference of misfits
and has-beens where teams that
couldn't find their way into one of
the major conferences or whose
conference ties were severed are
members.
I lousum used to be in the pow-
erful Southwestern Conference,
until the conference dissolved in
1995. Army remained independent
until they joined the league in
1998. University of Alabama at
Birmingham only recently entered
Division 1-A.
Coming into 1999, Conference
USA has the trappings of a major
conference. They have three bowl
tie-ins, a team coming off of an
undefeated season (Tulane) and a
bona fide Heisman contender,
Louisville's Chris Redman. Still,
they lack national recognition and a
bellwether program.
"It's developing said Steve
Logan, head coach. "What we've
got to do is, out of the conference
start getting victories. If we do that,
then that's the true sign. I don't
"What we've got to do is,
out of the conference start
getting victories.
Steve Logan
ECU Football Coach
think we did very well last year, but
this year we've got a lot of opportu-
nities
Last year, they had those oppor-
tunities. Southern Miss got blown
out by Penn State and Texas A&M.
ECU lost 38-3 to Virginia Tech in
Blacksburg. Kentucky scored 68
points in a win over Louisville.
Cincinnati lost to both Syracuse
and Miami.
Getting opportunities has not
been a problem for C-USA, but
making the most of them has been.
"I think we're all-right said
Jamie Wilson, junior. "We're play-
ing other good out-of-conference
teams. So sooner or later, maybe
next year, I think we'll make our
mark
This season sees another crop of
big name opponents for C-USA
teams. Cincinnati will host Ron
Dayne and Wisconsin. Southern
Miss will face Big 12 powerhouses
Texas A&M and Nebraska. The
Pirates will face Miami and West
Virginia.
The lack of a national power in
the conference has kept C-USA
from gaining college football legiti-
macy. Though the conference has
expanded over the last few seasons,
a powerhouse program has not
emerged.
The latest round of expansion
brings UAB in the conference. In
SEE USA. RUE 12
OPINION!
STEPHEN
SCHRAMM
ICIi
Sho
Pirates to face
tough challenge
Mountaineers'
experience will be vital
St i: I'II KS Sciir M i
SWIM'S kih'i cm
ECl' has never shied away from
tough openers in the past. This sea-
son will be no different, as the
Pirates take on Big East power,
West Virginia.
The Mountaineers finished 8-4
in 1998, with a loss to Missouri in
the Insight.com Bowl.
The 1999 West Virginia squad,
while young in the trenches, will
have loads of talent in the skill posi-
tions. An experienced signal caller,
dangerous wideotits and one of the
nation's best secondaries will make
the Mountaineers a talented team,
that will be a test for the Pirates.
In his 20th season as head coach,
Don Nehlen welcomes back senior
quarterback Marc Bulger. Bulger
threw for 3,607 yards and 31 touch-
downs last season. Entering 1999,
Bulger is 2,747 yards away from
Donovan McNabb's Big East
record for career passing yards. To
complicate matters for the Parates,
three receivers, Khori Ivy, Antonio
Brown, and Pat Green, return for
the Mountaineers, giving Bulger
pleny of options for the high-pow-
ered passing game. For WVU, the
passing game may be the only
option, as a young offensive line
and an inexperienced tailback
could lead to an anemic rushing
attack. The Mountaineers' career
rushing leader, Amos Zereoue, is
now in the NFL. Five starters from
the offensive line are gone.
Redshirt freshman Avon Cobournc,
will try to replace Zereoue, while
five new starters will be broken in
on the offensive line.
The story is slightly better for
SEE TEAM . RUE 17

!





ir 2. 1698 10
1 Thuridiy, Stpt�mb�r 2, 1998
iports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ace
mge
;s back senior
ulger. Bulger
and 31 touch-
ntering 1999,
Is away from
s Big East
iing yards. To
ir the Parates,
i Ivy, Antonio
:n, return for
;iving Bulger
he high-pow-
or WVU, the
be the only
offensive line
ced tailback
emic rushing
ineers' career
s Zereoue, is
: starters from
are gone,
on Cobourne,
ereoue, while
be broken in
tly better for
IK I?
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rf 12 PRICE
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Hear Live Music in Greenville
-Greenville Times
Uptown Greenville
209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
THUR 2ND
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New entrance on 5th St
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Rec center offers
cross-traning program
Triple Threat
available to students
Si sawk Milks KKVlcll
SKMim ailltl
For anyone in search of motivation
to get in gym and get in shape
ECU'S Recreational Services has
the answer.
The Rec Center is offering a
new program called Triple Threat
which challenges students to work
out for 660 minutes over the next
month and a half.
"This is a fitness incentive pro-
gram that encourages consistent
exercise over month and a half
said Kari Brown, Recreational
Services fitness director.
The program is designed to
encourage cross training by having
students participate in three differ-
ent types of exercise they choose
including biking, swimming, aero-
bics and strength training.
"There is this sort of mentality
out there with fitness where people
come in and work out for an hour
or so then leave said Sam Combs,
Recreational Services group fitness
coordinator. "It is usually the same
exercise every day
By repeating the same exercises
every day there is a chance of risk
to overused body.
"I see a problem with this that is
two-fold Combs said. "People
tend to get bored and burn out
when they stop seeing results. Also
there is a lot of stress on the same
joints so they set themselves up for
problems with the knees or ankles
or lower back
Cross training helps to take
stress off certain joints as different
exercises affect different parts of
the body.
"By cross training you are get-
ting off joints that you stress all the
time Combs said.
Although the program is just
beginning, students are aware of it
and like the idea.
"I think it will get me to do more
Students work out at the Rec Center
FILE PHOTO
exercises and give me a variety in
my training since I usually just
run said Maryann I lume, a sopho-
more exercise physiology major. "It
will get me to work different mus-
cles
Triple Threat allows students to
choose three different exercises
and sets a goal of 220 minutes per
exercise.
"Students who participate will
complete 220 minutes of each exer-
cise they choose Brown said, "if
will be a total of 660 minutes of
exercise between September 1 and
October 15 'A
The program is set up so tbut
only 30 minutes a day in one of dpe
three chosen exercises will count
toward the total time so that' it
encourages people to visit the gym
everyday. '
"It is not a race. We do not want
people to finish in one week'
Brown said. "The maximum time
is 30 minutes per day that counts
toward the program in one exer-
cise. The idea is to get people to
come back
Registration began yesterday
but students can continue to sign
up at the fitness desk, in the weight
room, until September 10.
Each day that students exercise
they must check in at the fitness
desk and specify which of the three
chosen exercises they will com-
plete that day. After finishing the
workout students can check out at
the fitness desk to gain credit for
the program.
Students who successfully cona-
plete the 660 minutes by October
15 will receive u free tee shirt. t'
"This is a great program to keep
people motivated and to keep them
coming back and even to help thorn
get started with a program Brown
said. "With cross training we hope
to get people interested in other
activities and it is a great way to
work other muscles
This Writer can be contacted at
smilenkevihSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
Women's soccer team experiences loss
Pirates dealt first
cotiferetice loss
T I I- K VS1 I I- H s
� SO'OR IV V H I I I. K
The women's soccer team suffered
a tough five-to-one loss from 10th
nationally-ranked College of
William and Mary on Tuesday.
"It was a tough game for the
team tonight said first-year I lead
Coach Rob Donnenwirth.
ECU started the game strongly
taking a one-to-nothing lead off a
goal from Amanda Duffy with an
assist from Erin Cann in the 25:00
minute. The goal was Duffy's first
of the year.
"We started off well and were
confident and knew we could
win said Jill Davis, senior defend-
er. "After the first goal, we let down
and they stepped up�that's what
made the difference in the game
After taking the lead, the lady
Pirates "backed off' according to
Donnenwirth. Senior All-American
Missy Wycinsky quickly tied the
game up in the 30:00 minute with
an assist from Jordan Krieger. This
was one of Krieger's three assists on
the evening.
Toward the end of the half
sophomore Avery Willis, with an
assist from Wycinsky, put the Tribe
on top.
"The team played well the first
half but after William and Mary
scored, we just let down said
Kelly Gray, sophomore midfielder.
The second half was dominated
by the Tribe offensively with a ten
to two shot on goal ratio in favor of
the Tribe.
The third goal from William and
Mary didn't come until the 52:39
minute with a goal by Franny
Swajkoski off an assist from
Krieger.
"After the third goal the girls
stepped up their game
Donnenwirth said.
William and Mary went on to
score two more goals toward the
end of the second half. One goal
from Emily Davis came off another
Krieger assist and another goal
from Wycinsky was assisted by
Willis. C,
According to Donnenwirth, jhe
team was very disappointed wjth
the loss, but took a lot away frorri'it.
"The girls are going to have"to
work on team defense and commu-
nication ,i'
Donnenwirth said, adding that
this was the first time in about two
years that the girls had played at
William and Mary's astro-turf field,
which caused problems as well.
"We learned not to let down so
easily and to have more confi-
dence Gray said.
"We were really disappointed
because it was a tough loss and we
know we could do better said
Amy Horton, senior goalkeeper.
"We learned that we need to start
out strong and maintain
The lady Pirates will return ,to
action on Sept. 5 at 12 p.m. against
Bowling Green University 3n
Athens, Ga.
ThisWriter can be contacted'at
tvmuasSstuiMiiitmediaMai.edu
in
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
953 FAST 101" 11 STREET (ATTHE FOOT OF COLLECT, HILL DRIVE)
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
757-1991
Welcome Students!
Mass Schedule:
� Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
� Wed: 5:30pm
� All Masses are at the Center
Go Ahead Greenville
Stir Me Up!
Fresh cooked food, tn
under the direc tion i l
KMART PLAZA-ALL YOU CAN
LUNCH STIR-FRY BUFFET
DINNER STIR-FRY BUFFET
$1.00 OFF DINNER AND SUNDAY
STIR-FRY BUFFET PRICED
STUDENT II
You can also order fi
for our dire:
We look forward to seeing you!
For more information about programs sponsored by the Newman �
call or visit the center daily between 8:30am and 9pm.
I i. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain mu Campus Minister
756-1169





Tfct East CareliaiM
Thursday. September 2, 1998 12
Team
continued Irom page 10
the Mountaineers on the other side
jof the ball. A young defensive line
gwith three new starters will be
backed up by a solid linebacking
'corps, and one of the nation's elite
'�defensive backfields.
Cornerbacks Nate Terry, Perio
'Bustein and Scooter Davis return.
as do safeties Jerry Porter and Gary
Thompkins. The West Virginia
secondary is rated among the best
in the nation by many.
To beat the Pirates, West
Virginia will look to use the passing
attack to open up the Pirate
defense If they are able to pass
effectively, they could create some
breathing room for their running
attack.
For the Pirates.it will be
extremely important to contain
Bulger and the passing game, mak-
ing West Virginia nin the ball.
If the Pirates can keep the
Mountaineers grounded and move
the ball well, Charlotte could be
painted Purple once again.
This Writer can bi contacted at
sports8studentmedia.ecu.edu
Usa
continued Irom page 10
1998, Army became a member and
in 1997, ECU joined. Next year.
South Florida will begin league
play in only their second year of
Division 1-A play.
Another change in C-USA is the
third bowl tie-in. The first place
team will go to the Liberty Bowl to
face the champion of the Mountain
West Conference. The second
place team will travel to Boise,
Idaho, for the Humanitarian bowl
and now, the third place team will
go to the Mobile Alabama Bowl.
C-USA has had most of their
games broadcast on the regional
Fox Sports Network, giving the
conference much needed exposure.
However, C-USA still sits in the
shadows of the college game. To
get out, Jamie'Wilson has a simple
solution.
"Win games against big teams.
It's as simple as that
This Writer can be contacted at
sports@studentmedia.ecu.edu
?W Garden of Eden
ECU's favorite nursery
Decorate your dorm or apart-
ment cheap with us!
DeautiPul ao " hanin baskets onlyQ.ffl
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But to keep recycling
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SILVER fl
BULLET VOllS
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. 'ATouchOf Class"
756-6278
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
EM & SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
band 5 Wa W�l of Grecmilli. ao IM AIl (Mind AM Stnka k UmI
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MASKS. FINS, SNORKEL, BOOTS, GLOVES,
BAG PLUS FREE DIVE LICENSE PLATE
Retail S284.85
BLUE REGION SCUBA
26 Carolina East Center
Greenville, NC
321-2670
AND SAVE g;
from recycled materials, and 2
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world to all of us
II For a free brochure, write "
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Buy Recycled. Environmental
Defense Fund, 2S7 Park Ave.
South. New York, NY 10010,
or call l-800-CALL-EDF.
fawuRnmeffSk
presents
Cheeseburgers
Medium






ibir 2. 1999 12
Oth St.
rigs Ford
ampus
9-5
CYCLED.
'UBS
The Eait Carolinian
FOR RENT
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 706 East First Street,
near campus. 768-6696.
HOUSE FOR rent 1211 Cotanche
Street, three bedrooms, one bath,
central hear, window air condition-
ing. $660 per month. Call 363-4003.
Fenced back yard.
TOWNHOUSE - 3 BEDROOMS, 2
12 baths near ECU. WD hook-up.
lots of storage. 762-1899 M-F day.
561-2203 pager night.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 7 room house 3 blocks from
campus. Clean and responsible a
must. Huge bedroom. $260month
12 utilities. Must not mind smok-
ing or cats. Call 561-7591.
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom apt. at Tow-
er Village. Firetower Road until No-
vember. Move in Sept. 10. pay de-
posit $326. No rent till October.
Quinn, 363-4163.
ECU AREA two three bedroom
houses available immediately. One
$500. wd. window ac. Other
$630, wd. central ac. dishwasher.
fenced yard. Pets OKI Call 830-9502.
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath duplex, wash-
erdryer hookup, nice front yard. 4th
Street, walking distance to campus.
Call Grey. 353-2314.
TAKE OVER lease, rent is $200 per
month and 14 of utilities and
phone. Large 5 bedroom house, 2
bath. Call Paul at 329-8666.
ONE BEDROOM apartment. Take
over lease, available now. Rent is
$310 per month. Apartment at Vil-
lage Green on 10th Street. Call 754-
0917.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
GREAT LOCATION to downtown
and campus. Need one roommate
now. $186.00 plus 13 phone and
utilities a month to live in spacious 3
bedroom. Call 752-8737.
NEED FEMALE non-smoking room-
mate for 4 bedroom house. $215
monthly 14 utilities. On ECU bus
route. Call 752-0281.
FOR SALE
2 YEAR old Whisper Writer word
processor, like new with monitor and
printer. $100 firm. Call Paula at 754-
0926.
FIVE TICKETS to ECU vs. West Vir-
ginia game on Saturday: $20 each.
Call 355-3541 for information. Seats
on 11th row, upper deck.
FOR SALE, GT Tequesta mountain
bike. Equipped with Shimano STX
components and Rock Shox. Only
one year old. Excellent condition.
$300. Call 561-7349.
PRAXIS I Cliffnotes book $5. Praxis
I big pink book $10. ONKYO 5-disc
CD player wremote $150.00.
Pioneer Dolby digital CD laserdisc
karaoke player wremote micro-
phone $150. Comic books $50. Call
John 757-0610.
MOTORCYCLE, '82 Honda
CB650cc good condition, new bat-
tery, tires and other extras. Great
bike for beginners. Call 752-4242
and leave message! Asking only
$1000.00
1992 HONDA Civic, new tires. CD
player. 6-speed. $3900. 353-8324.
1990 BRONCO II. good deal, tape
deckradio, power lockswindow.
Runs well. 366-6160.
AAAI SPRING Break Specials! Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 5 days $279! In-
cludes most mealsl Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City. Day-
tona. South Beach, Florida $1291
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
AAAI CANCUN 8 Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air.
hotel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of
6 small businesses recognized for
outstanding ethics) springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
199S HONDA Civic EX. excellent
condition, fully loaded, power sun-
roof, CD changer, new tires, call 413-
0330. ask for Dennis or Tracy.
$12.500 OBO.
LAST CHANCE: Student desk,
slightly uses, one drawer handle
missing. Great for studying or small
apartment. $60 or best offer. Call
752-5899. leave message.
SERVICES
BELLY DANCE for fun and fitness.
Great exercise for women of all ages!
Classes start mid September. Call
Donna Whitley 355-5150.
SOME ASSEMBLY required, holes
in the wall, odd jobs, repair work,
painting, low rates, save that depos-
it and call 757-8781. leave message.
HELP WANTED
CHRISTIAN NURSERY workers
needed Sunday mornings 9:15-
12:15. Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church, 510 S. Washington St. Ap-
ply at church office. Office hours 8
a.m12noon and 1:30-5 p.m.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
11 a.m2 p.m. Flexible work sched-
ule. For more information contact
Jim Sakell or Ronald Barrett at Cy-
press Glen Retirement Community,
830-0713.
MALE AND FEMALE GYMNASTICS
TEACHERS WANTED CALL ROSES
GYMNASTICS AT 321-7264 FOR JOB
OPPORTUNITIES
TENNIS INSTRUCTORS. Must be
at least 4.0 player, must be available
weeknights and weekends. 756-
6262, Henry Hostetler.
LOSERS WANTED! Need or want
to lose weight? Hottest guaranteed
diet in USAI Call 1-888-870-5032.
LOOKING FOR 20 guys and gals
for local radio station phone promo-
tion. Earn $6 plus bonus per hour.
Full and part time, morning, day and
evening hours available. Near cam-
pus location at 223 West 10th Street
Suite 107 (inside Wilcar Executive
Center) just down the street from
McDonalds and Krispy Kreme. Apply
ASAP in person only 10a.m. through
6p.m. (no calls please).
BUSY MOTHER of four needs help
3-5 days a week. Carpool. run er-
rands, babysit. Good paygood
children. Call 353-2627.
LOOKING FOR A job? The ECU Tel-
efund is hiring studenvsfor the Fall of
1999 to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212.
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
is looking tor m JeWPHnftkiW to load vans and
unload trailer for the am shift noun 303am to 8am.
$7.50hour tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2410
United Drive inear the aquatics center) Greenville
WE'LL PAY YOU TO HAVE
EXCITING WEEKENDS.
The Army Reserve will give you weekend excitement like
you've never had before, and you can earn more than $18,000
while you're enjoying yourself during a standard enlistment
Think about it On a part-time basis, usually one weekend a
month plus two weeks' Annual Training, you could earn good
pay, have a good time, make good friends and even be entitled
to good benefits and opportunities to get money for education.
You'll also be getting hands-on training in a skill that will
last you a lifetime.
Army Reserve knows how to make weekends inter-
esting. Are you interested?
Think about it Then think about us. Then call:
756-9695
BE ALL YOU CAN BL
ARMY RESERVE
classifieds
HELP WANTED
FUN a- free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me. I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available (I've pho-
tographed dozens of ECU girls).
Please send a note, phone number
and a picture (if available - it will be
returned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413
Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC 27893 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail me at
hronjak0simflex.com
YOUTH IN-UNE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicant must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18. in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. Applications will be
taken until the positions are filled.
For more information, please call
Judd Crumpler, Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4550 after 2PM.
CONSTRUCTION MANAGE-
MENT, industrial engineer or similar
major needed for part-time to full-
time work. Must be able to use drill,
etc. Will work with your schedule.
Call 756-8470 for appt.
ELEMENTARY ED major to keep 4
yr. old Monday and Wednesday af-
ternoons. Send resume to 3807
Sterling Trace Drive. Wirrterville. NC
28590. Own transportation required.
Fax number 353-8902.
SPRING BREAK 2000 with STS -
Join America's 1 Student Tour Op-
erator to Jamaica, Mexico. Bahamas.
Cruises, and Florida. Now hiring on-
campus reps. Call 1-800-648-4849
or visit online 9 www.ststravel.com
LOOKING FOR a hard working, de-
pendable person for a flight line po-
sition. Duties include cleaning and
moving airplanes. Aviation experi-
ence preferred but not required. 15-
25 hrsweek. Some weekends.
$6.50hr start. Apply in person at
Dillon's Aviation. 1105 N. Memorial
Drive. Pitt-Greenville Airport.
FREE BABY Boom Box Earn
$12001 Fundraiser for student
groups & organizations. Earn up
to $4 per MasterCard app. Call
for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a free
baby boom box. 1-8O0-932-0528
ext. 119 or ext. 125 www.ocm-
concepts.com
BABYSITTER NEEDED for Tues-
days or Thursdays all day for my 3
and 6-year olds. Must have referenc-
es. No smokers, please. Call 355-
7876.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Applicants must be
available for Tuesday afternoons.
Thursday mornings andor Thursday
afternoons. The positions are for bet-
ween 7 and 20 hours per week, de-
pending on your schedule and on
business needs. The jobs are within
walking distance of ECU and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager. Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street.
Greenville (Uptown Greenville).
$26 PER Hour. Direct sales reps
needed Now! Market credit card
appl. Person-to-person. Commissions
avg. $250-500wk. 1-800-651-2832.
EARN $60.00 to $100.00 per hour
modeling and dancing for local adult
entertainment agency. No experi-
ence required. Flexible work hours.
Discretion and confidentiality as-
sured. 830-0494.
TEACHER NEEDED full-time to
teach 2 year olds class. Must have
experience. Also hiring substitutes.
Call Harmony Child Care. 756-6229.
HELP WANTED: hiring part-time
kitchen, dish, and wait staff. Apply at
Basil's Restaurant. 1675 E. Firetower
Rd.
HELP WANTED
ONLINE INFORMATION Services
is looking for 3 parttime telephone
collectors to work evenings from 6
p.m. to 9 p.m. and every other Satur-
day from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Call Brian
Franey at 767-2130 or Andi Cullums
at 754-1615.
PERSONALS
THE CARD POST Report 334
V Inn. While still needing a solid day
to invest studying at the law library
'the legal limbo' of the appeal of
'warning of trespass' issued
12999 at ECU I will update the
status of the 'warning of trespass'
issued last fall at UNC Chapel Hill.
Recognizing the need to go to the
streets of Chapel Hill to explore the
status of the 'forum' at UNC I in-
quired of the Shipley Hill Police De-
partment where and how one could
do so. Several hours after the Chap-
el Hill Police Department stopped
and checked my 'credentials and
said OK and went onthe UNC cam-
pus police stopped and issued me a
'warning of trespass a ban of entire
campus. They verbally explained
that I had 96 hours to appeal. This
information was inclusive on citation
presented. In comparison the offic-
er issuing the 'warning of trespass'
at ECU upon my stating "I would ap-
peal said'one could not appeal a
warning of trespass There was no
appeal information on the citation.
After fact finding via ECU Police De-
partment's Standard Operating Pro-
ceduresthe understanding found is
that the issuing officer should pres-
ent appeal information both verbally
and written and that one has 10
days240 hours to appeal. Back to
Chapel Hill. After much effort I was
able to speak with the appeal officer
by phone. Addressed that I had
checked with the Chapel Hill Police
Department prior to going to Chapel
Hill and they had checked me after
I got there. To cut to the chase of
what I recognized as a bogus 'warn-
ing of trespass' I asked 'As the basis
of the 'warning of trespass' is a com-
pliant that I was trespassingwhere
could one who coming to take my
place in addressing this mat-
terstand? The reply was "He could-
n't answerand not to call back until
I heard from him Ten days later.af-
ter several hungered dollars of my
time and money received a fax
stating "the ben was lifted and rea-
son was the officer made a technical
error Need to check back and ex-
plore what the 'technical error' was.
Prosper n Live Long 27533-0587
Tom Drew
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS BOB on pin-
ning Melissa. We can't wait to show
you how proud we are. The brothers
of Phi Kappa Psi
THANKS. ALPHA Phi. for allowing
us to host rush at your house. Con-
grats to the Xi pledge class. Live
ever, die never. Phi Kappa Psi
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAM.
After just three years in
the Army, your college loan
could be a thing of the past
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebt-
edness by one-third or
$1,500, whichever amount
is greater, up to a $65,000
limit.
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first of
many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the
whole story from your
Army Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE
www.goarmy.com
13 Thursday Ststtsibsr 2, 19S9
GREEK PERSONALS ANNOUNCEMENTS
meet Thursday. Sept. 2, at 6
p.m. In GC 1031. For more info:
www.acM.eduorggbp
THETA CHI - We had fun pushing
your new members' buttons. We
wish them the best of luck with
pledging. Love. Alpha Phi
CONGRATULATIONS NEW mem-
bers on your pinning. We love our
new members. Love, the sisters of
Alpha Omicron Pi
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma would like
to congratulate and welcome the
members of the Xi pledge class: Kim
Barbour. Kelly Boyette. Tracy Carr,
Jennifer Chavers. Andrea Collins.
Lindsey Dishman, Kristie Hriso. Beth
Issacson. Leslie Jeter. Alyson Mar-
guesat. Ashley Misenheimer, Erin
Mitchell. Samm Morris. Bobbie Nor-
ris. Dana Peele. Kim Powell. Casey
Pritchard. Autumn Proctor. Sunshina
Shavers. Yolanda Stancil. Caryn
Wedding. Brooke Willis. Megan
Woolheater, and Sheri Worters.
OTHER
FREE KITTENS to good homes.
Four. cute, long-haired kittens now
four weeks old. Call Amy at 551-
1022.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
FIRST DANCE of the year) Septem-
ber Contra Dance music by Contradi-
tion; caller Brian Hayes. Free begin-
ners lessons: 7-7:30 p.m. Dance:
7:30-10:30 p.m. Location: Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts. downtown.
Students $3.00. public $5-6. ECU
Folk and Country Dancers. Come
alone or bring a friend! 328-0237.
NEED A
JOB
YOU'RE LOOKING
IN THE RIGHT
PLACE!
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbatt of
Community Christian Church wW be
hosting a Singles Fellowship on Fri-
day, Sept. 3 at 7 p.m. Guest speaker
will be Pastor Shirley Nicholson from
Abundant Life Community Christian
Church in Silver Spring. MD. The fel-
lowship will be held at Community
Christian Academy. 2009 Pactolus
Road. Greenville. All adult single
women and men ere invited to at-
tend. Singles Fellowship is designed
to minister to the needs of the un-
married so they may learn to live
saved, single, and successful lives as
Christians. For info, call 661-9143.
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 10 8:00 p.nrs
Erev Rosh Hashana Saturday Sep-
tember 11 9:00 a.m. Rosh Hashana
1st Day Sunday September 12 9:00
a.m. Rosh Hashana 2nd Day Tashlich
And Ma'ariv 6:30 p.m. Call 830-1138
for place 6760 (1999) High Holy
Days Congregation Bayt Shalom.
ECU 1ST Year commuters don's
want to miss ECU Road Rules-Mis
sion 3 The Romantic Road Trip r
Attend Tuesday. Sept. 7 from 4-S
p.m. or Wednesday, Sept. 8 from 7
8 p.m. in 212 MendenhaH. Learn dm
big tips and ways to maintain aj
healthy relationship. Call 6881 for
more information.f
FRIDAY SEPTEMBER 17 8:00 p.m
Erev Shabbat Shuva Saturday Sep-J
tember 18 10:00 a.m. Shabbat Shu-J
va Sunday September 19 6:00 p.m.i
Kol Nidre Monday September 20
9:00 p.m. Yom Kippur 6:30 p.m
MinchaNe'ila Scedule of Services
for Congregation Bayt Shalom Cad
830-1138 for more information. J
1
STRAIGHT BUT not narrow? Join BJ
Glad every Wednesday in the Pirate)
Underground at 7:30 pm.
w
THE REAL Crisis Center is recruiting
community people to become volun
teer crisis counselors. We need com.
munity people for daytime and nightj
time shifts We need your experience
esl Your achievements in everyday
situations can be useful to others!
We will be offering a training course
beginning Sept. 13. For more info
call 758-HELP.j
ADVANCED CLIMBING session (
will be held on Tuesdays. September
Oct. 12 from 7-8 p.m. Please register
one week prior to session . Cost is
$15 for members and $25 for non-
members.
g
�:
eEast
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5� each
.
:�
STUDENT UNE AD RATE$2.00 .
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5f each

Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian �
reserves the right to refuse fhis rate for any ad deemed to be �
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above fine rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given, No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
.4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
We reserve the right to change a deadline for holi-
days or as necessitated by other considerations.
)






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save this page save this page save this page save this page save this page
tips for off campus living
Did you know?
Lin rights! Lverv house and
housing code, rhe
,ni(i rodent proof! You
and ventilation.
1 repair and be
Be smart! lverv house and apartment in Greenville is required
to have a noke detector! And every public hall and stairwell in
uses, and condos musi have adequate lighting at all
times ii doois. rhink about your personal safety!
By choosing to live off campus you
face challenges and responsibilities
different from residence hall students.
Besides being an ECU student you are
a citizen of the City of Greenville. Here
are a few lifestyle issues to consider.
WE CAN HELP il you have questions!
Housing Conditions (Greenville ne
Public Safet and (rime Prevention
rtash Collodion (Greenville Public Works Di
Housing Discrimination (GreenvilleCommunity Relations).
Don't Know Who lo Call? I Greenville Public Information)
Common Courtesies
By living off campus you have become part of a larger
community than the umbrella provided by the University.
You will be interacting with more people who have less in common.
Therefore, attitudes of tolerance, respect, and consideration are very
important. Some of your new neighbors will be students, like you.
Others may be families with young children or teens. There may be
some senior citizens living on your street or in your apartment
building. All of these people with different lifestyles have to get
along.
329-4110 City Ordinances havior of
830-3937 all "ordinances"
329-4522 that mayapph
329-4110
830-3937
329-4522
Free Resources
A Place of Your Own - A Guiri for Off-famnus Livinc
gives Information about leasing a place to live, City ordinances, parkins
and alternative transportation, how to conned with the communit
and a quick reference of City and ECU phone numbers. This booklet I
available at no cost from the Office of Adult and Commuter Studer
Services, 210 Whichard Building or by calling 328-6881.
A Citizen's Handbook - Is a comprehensive listing of city services
(like trash collection), plus local government information. This booklet
is available at no cost from the Office of Public Information in City Hall,
201 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive or by calling 329-4434.
The City Page - is an advertisement in The Daily Reflector every
Sunday, which publicizes current city business, Council Agendas, Public
Notices and Hearings, events, recreation programs, and changes in
city-provided services.
The Government Access Channel - watch local
government programming on cable television channel 9.
Greenville Office of Public Information
If you would like any of the booklets described above or have questions
regarding the Greenville community, please call us at 329-4434.
Pets and Animals
I ew things can make a pla e feel like home more than
a pet. there are many places locally where you can adopt a
cat or dog. However, Greenville is a very transient city with
many people moving in and out during the year. Too
frequently pels are abandoned by their departing owners. It
is wise io consider the responsibility involved in having a
pet. I nderstand the cost and the care involved when you
adopt an animal. Please considei and plan appropriately what
vou will do with a pel If vou cannot lake il with you when you
329-4494
329-4434 Games, Bikes, and Bl
To protect pedestrians, drivers, and people's cars, the city requests
that basketball, frisbee, and similar sports not be played in the street.
The City of Greenville has plenty of parks and open spaces to throw a frisbee,
play basketball (or soccer, or football), bike, skateboard or rollerblade. There's
a place right next to the main campus to play bocce, shuffleboard, or tennis. You
can jog on the greenway or play roller hockey at the "extreme" skate park.
Parties
You are responsible for the actions of your guests. II things go beyond
your control, you are still at ountablc. Remember lings. It's illegal to sell
alcohol without a permit. ihlnkim ;st the
cost of your party, ohol to, or
purchase alcohol for, anyone un reenville.
uwanl n'deorloudn n the Police
artmeni before fees on
public lioht-ol � n $100 a
clay fines.
If you're planning a party don't let it grow to something you can't manage.
Tell your neighbors when you are having the party and give them your phone
number so they can call you directly if there's a problem.
Parking and Alternatives
We all want to park ��� om or place of business.
But it simply cannol happen! I hborhoods are not extended
parking lots and parking in those areas is strii d! fhis is your lair warning
- II YOU VIOLATE II If CITY PARKING Rl ! MCI I MAY BE TICKETED
OR roWED. rhe c iiv is not requin ilng or a lickel before your
vehicle is towed. You cannot park on vn. fhat too is a violation and
will cost you $
You are encouraged to get an ECU parking sticker and use the ECU transit
system. This bus service is free when you show your student ID. The City of
Greenville offers the "Bikes 2 Bus" program at a minimal charge. You ride your
bike to the bus stop, load your bike on the racks mounted on the front of each
GREAT bus, ride to the stop closest to your destination, then use your bike to
navigate around campus.
WE CAN HELP if you have questions!
Greenville Recreation and Parks329-4567
Greenville Police - Non-emergency329-4317
GREAT Bus System329-4532
ECU Parking (www.ecu.eduparkina)328-6294
ECU Transit (www.dubhouse.ecu.edu)328-4724
WE CAN HELP i! questions!
I Conn
529-4387
756-1268
Access Information on the web
ECU Adult & Commuter Student Services @www.ecu.edustudenWfeacss
City of Greenville @ www.state.nc.us.sreenvllle
This advertisement Is sponsored by the Community Connection Network, the ECU Division of Student Ufe, and the Oty of Greenvlle.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 2, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 02, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1353
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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