The East Carolinian, August 31, 1999






rf
Tuesday
High: 80
Low: 59
Wednesday
High: 81
Low: 67
Online Survey
buld you take out a
- an for a new computer?
Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
TUESDAY. AUGUST 31,1999 . VOLUME 74. ISSUE 59
Don't let stress get you down.
Seepg. 8
News
Briefs
A reception for the "Billingsley 3" exhi-
bition at the Mendenhall Student Center
Gallery will be held from 6 p.m8 p.m. The
public is invited.
ECU and West Virginia begin their 1999
football seasons this Saturday with a
game at Charlotte's Ericsson Stadium. The
kickoff is set for 3 p.m.
- It was announced this week that ECU
was among 29 campuses funded for US
Department of Education "Learning
Anywhere, Anytime" partnerships. The
funding will support the School of Industry
and Technology's On-line Wireless Learning
Internet Solutions (OWLS) project.
OWLS is a $4.6 million project aimed at
development of innovative strategies and
technologies to support distance educa-
tion. Ericsson Wireless Internet Solutions,
based in the Research Triangle Park, is pro-
viding major funding and technology sup-
port for the project. The Department of
Education grant will provide $924,437
over the next three years.
Researchers at the ECU School of
Medicine have discovered differences in
how chronic and acute alcohol consump-
tion affect the sexes. In the studies, funded
by the National Institutes of Health, Dr.
Abdel A. Abdel-Rahman, ECU professor of
pharmacology, found that in female lab
rats, estrogen buffers the negative impact
alcohol has on the cardiovascular system.
Abdel-Rahman and ECU physiology profes-
sor Robert Lust, who assisted in the
research, have more details about what
their research could mean for women,
especially those considering hormone
replacement therapy.
DURHAM - Criticized by feminists in
years past for her unrealistic anatomy.
Barbie's body parts are just right for a
Duke University Medical Center worker
who makes prosthetic for amputees.
Jane Bahor uses plastic knee joints in
Barbie's legs for knuckles in prosthetic fin-
gers. She got the idea three years ago after
working with a patient who also was an
engineering student at N.C. State
University.
Mattel, the company which makes the
popular fashion doll, was so intrigued by
the idea, that it sent Bahor a free bag of
joints.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
Hurricane Dennis puts
campus, students on alert
Information spread
rapidly over Internet
Cory S h f. e i. k r
NEWS EDITOR
As hurricane Dennis bears down
on the east coast, ECU is prepar-
ing to warn students of any
changes in the university's sched-
ule.
ECU's Environmental Health
and Safety office cooperates with
other campus departments to con-
stantly update emergency action
plans based on previous disaster
events.
"In each event we go back and
reassess what we did said Tom
Pohlman, environmental manager
of ECU Environmental Health
and Safety. "What we could have
done better and what might have
helped to try and implement
those changes
Before Dennis started causing
weather problems on Monday, an
alert system e-mail was sent out to
all students through the university
e-mail accounts.
The e-mail warned students to
close all windows, lower all blinds
and not leave cars parked near
trees.
The alert also gave students an
alternate means of keeping up
with any delay or cancellations the
university might incur.
"We've done an awful lot to try
Hunt appoints
new BOT member
Talton takes
place on board
Ashley Roberts
staff writer
Governor Jim Hunt recently
appointed Jim Talton to ECU's
Board of Trustees.
Talton, a member of the
Foundation Board of Directors and
the University Scholars Campaign
Executive Committee, currently
holds many influential positions at
ECU.
"I am very excited to be working
with ECU's Board of Trustees
Talton said. "I hope I will be able to
assist ECU to progress to the next
level
Hunt appoints only four of the
12 board members, while the Board
of Governors appoints the other
eight.
Hunt appointed Talton to
replace former BOT member,
Walter Williams.
Williams resigned from the
BOT on April 20, after he made an
objectionable racial comment dur-
ing a Pirate Club banquet in
Wilmington, NC.
"Jim ' Hunt's involvement in
ECU's Board of Trustees is mini-
mal said Dr. James Smith, execu-
tive assistant to the Chancellor and
associate secretary to the BOT.
"The function of the Board of
Trustees is to help chart the future
and set a course of where we want
to go as a university said Layton
Getsinger, associate vice chancellor
of Administration and Finance.
"I am very pleased about the
learning process of the board. I
have not had a great amount of
exposure, as of yet, since we have
not had our first meeting said
Michael Kelly, who is also new to
the BOT.
"I have been given a good
overview by the board about what
goes on at ECU. The board is a
group that varies in age and experi-
ence. I am looking forward very
much to serving my four year
term Kelly said.
"I deal mainly with student
affairs said Betty Speir, the only
female currently serving on the
BOT. "I have thoroughly enjoyed
working with the board. I am very
excited about working with the
new members of the board and the
many new plans we have in store
for ECU. I am delighted to hear
about our new plans of expansion
for the university and our plans to
obtain more graduate students
The BOT meets five times a
year in Mendenhall Student
Center. They discuss such topics as
building construction and renova-
tions, athletic programs and ques-
tions about academic programs.
Members also consult with
SEE HUNT PACE 4
Financial Aid offers
loans for computers
Students able to borrow
more money for purchase
Angela Harne
staff writer
Student Financial Aid will increase
student loans by $1700 to help stu-
dents purchase a computer.
"As a university, we priced com-
puter systems with basic software,
monitors and color printers on the
web said Rose Mary Stelma,
director of Student Financial Aid.
"We priced systems at Staples,
Office Depot and other regular
businesses, and came up with the
amount of the loan
"The loan basically works the
way purchasing books does�once
you buy it, it's yours Stelma said.
"If a student says 'I want a com-
puter we give them an application
Students can borrow money for new computers.
PHOTO COURTESY WORLD WIDE WEB
and the process begins
Students must apply for the
increase in financial aid. Student
Financial Aid then adds $1700 to
the cost of tuition (room, board and
books), as long as no problems
occur during the application
process.
"We trust that the money will be
used toward a computer system. It
is a one chance deal. If a student
borrows the money as a freshman,
and comes back as a sophomore, no
SEE COMPUTERS PAGE 4
Pirate Underground gets new look
Students have mixed
feelings about artwork
Freshly painted murals are the newest additions to the Pirate Underground.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELER
Carolyn Herold
staff writer
The Pirate Underground in
Mendenhall Student Center has a
new look.
The once white-washed walls
are now covered by a richly detailed
mural. The artwork was done by
Kymia Nawabi, a second semester
freshman art major. Her concentra-
tion is on drawing and painting. She
was selected to do the mural by the
Popular Entertainment Committee
through an ad in The East
Carolinian. She brought in many
samples, and a few made it onto the
walls. The largest frame of the
mural is a copy of a sketch she com-
pleted her senior year in high
school.
The windows painted onto the
walls feature some of the characters
that occur frequendy in her art-
work. Her overall theme for the
mural was multi-cultural expres-
sion.
Nawabi was paid $500 for her
work, and all of her supplies were
paid for.
She started the mural two weeks
after Spring Break, and finished
three weeks into the summer.
This project was 100 percent
student developed and run.
"The whole concept of what we
did down there and what we will
continue to do, is make a student-
focused programming area Pirate
SEE UNDERGROUND PAGE 2





2 Ttt�ri�y, mnt 31. 1998
news
The East Carolinia
Scientists benefit
from unique machine
Physicists use
accelerator to study past
CotRiNKV Martin
STAFF �int�
The physics department is using a
tandem Van De Graaf accelerator to
identify artifacts from Blackbeard's
ship, the Queen Anne's Revenge.
When the State Department of
Cultural Resources needed to
examine 50 artifacts from what sci-
entists believe to be the Queen
Anne's Revenge, they called the ECU
department of physics. The depart-
ment's accelerator happens to be
the only one of its kind in the state.
J A piece of copper from beneath
the barrel of a cannon from the ship
was the first artifact to be tested.
I While the physicists cannot
prove that the artifact is from
Blackbeard's ship, which sank in
Dr. Larry Toburen explains the logistics of the accelerator.
PHOTO COURTESY ECU NEWS BUREAU
1718, the accelerator did allow
them to learn what went into the
making of the metal itself.
The process works in multiple
steps. First, the artifact is placed in
a vacuum container. It is then blast-
ed with a beam of accelerated pro-
tons which cause the atoms in the
various elements of the metal to fly
off in a scattering of x-rays. These
x-rays then help scientists to deter-
mine which elements are present.
SEE MACHINE PAGE 4
No more painful healing
NC State�Soon we may not have
id suffer the excruciating pain that
comes with peeling off a bandage.
NC State scientists have developed
�i new wound dressing that can
improve the healing process with
inner layers that actually biode-
The dressing protects the
wound from infection and pre-
vents further injury.
grade and become part of the
healed skin.
The new three-layered dressing,
developed by NCSU textile
researchers, increases the healing
rate and protects the wound from
bacteria and other infections.
Some members of the research
team presented their discoveries at
the 218th American Chemical
Society's national meeting Monday
in New Orleans. Researchers
include former master's student
Allison London Brown and profes-
sors Bhupender Gupta, Sam
Hudson and Alan Tonelli.
According to Hudson, a NCSU
textile professor who has done
research on the topic for more than
12 years, the innermost layers of the
bandage are metabolized by the
body. These layers are composed of
chitosen, which is a natural fiber
extracted from shellfish and
refined. The anti-fungal compound
is commonly used in medical fields.
The new dressing incorporates
layers of chitosen and synthetic
polymers under a gauze layer. The
degradation of chitosen is benefi-
cial to the growth of skin cells.
The chitosen film protects the
wound from bacteria but allows
moisture to pass through, according
to Gupta, NCSU textile professor.
Regular bandages are made of
cotton fibers, which do not break
down and therefore cannot assist in
the formation of new tissue. In the
new dressing, only the outermost
layer need be removed and discard-
ed, as the inner layers biodegrade
and become part of the healed skin.
SEE BANDAGE PACE 4
Underground
continued from page I
Underground said J. Marshall,
assistant director of Student
Activities.
The mural adds a personal flare
to the billiard room.
"If they bands that come to
play here, and those that come to
listen) have to be inside, we should
spice it up�A club atmosphere
Something appealing that would
draw you in said Patrick
Edwards, Popular Entertainment
Committee head. "She did a great
job
The mural has received mixed
reviews from students.
"When it first started, it looked
okay, but now there is just too
much in here said Mick Smith,
junior. "It looks good, but just clut-
ters up the walls
"I think it's pretty good. A little
dark, but nice, kinda depressing
said Ashley Avery, junior. "Perfect
for when you are playing pool, and
your friend is losing
Nawabi loves her artwork.
"Art is my life said Nawabi.
She uses painting as therapeutic
means, a direct link from her emo-
tions to the paper.
"F may not have entered the
contest at all if it weren't for my
friend said Nawabi, "She showed
me the contest
Nawabi had only been attend-
ing ECU for only a few weeks
before entering the contest.
This miter an be contacted
chemUSstudentitedis.ecu.edu.
i i
Hunt
continued from page 1
Chancellor Eakin about any sug-
gestions any of them may have
towards the improvement of ECU.
The newest members of the
BOT include Mr. Thomas A.
Bayliss, Mr. Michael Kelly, Mr.
Stephen D. Showfety, Mr. James
�-R. Talton and Mr. Clifford W.
Webster, Jr.
This mm an be unacted
August 25
5:22 p.m. � Laireny � A student reported that an unknown person
took his bike from the rack east of GCB.
9:22 p.m. � Auto Collision � Two students were involved in an auto
collision at Chamberlain Pigford Court, east of White Hall. No
injuries were sustained.
9:55 p.m. � Harassing Phone Calls � A student reported that she and
her roommate had received several harassing phone calls from
a male making sexual references.
August 26
2:15 a.m. � Driving While Intoxicated, Failure to Surrender License SS
Possession of Fictitious License � A non-student was
arrested for DW1, failure to surrender license and possession
of a fictitious license.
12:30 p.m. � Auto Accident � A student and a staff member were
involved in an auto accident. No injuries were sustained.
8:15 p.m. � Possession of Weapon; Possession of Drug Paraphernalia �
A student was issued a state citation and a campus appearance
ticket for possessing a weapon (butterfly knife) on campus. He
was also cited for possession of marijuana.
8:18 p. m. � Breaking & Entering and iMirenyfrom a Motor Vehicle �
A student reported that unknown subject(s) entered her
vehicle and took various items.
August 27
2:12 a.m. � Driving While Intoxicated St Failure to Stop for Red Light�
A non-student was arrested for DWI after an officer observed her
fail to stop for a red light.
2:25 a.m. � DWI, Provisional Licensee Qt Failure to Use Headlights � A
non-student was arrested for DWI and provisional licensee after
an officer observed him driving on 3rd St. without headlights.
2:49 a.m. �Intoxicated Subject�k student was issued a CAT for using
alcoholic beverages, violating ECU policy & vomiting in a
motor vehicle. Subject was released to roommate.
Pick os up every Tuesday a�4 Thursday.
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Tin Em Carolinian
news
Tutiiiy. �� 31. HOT 3
East Carolinians
The last ip
of a socially
conscious society
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Would you like to get paid to
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Well, Expressions is hiring
We are looking for someone
who can design and organize
a website for our magazine
If you have experience and
you are willing to work with a
winning team, please stop by
and pick up an application
today. Email us at
expressions@studentmedia.ecu.edu
We are located across from The
East Carolinian on the 2nd
floor of Student Publications
Building.
Telephone: 252-328-6927
lam
ECUCLUBLACROSSE
Team Meeting Wednesday Sept. 1, 1899
9:00 PM in room SOS of the Rec. Center
Games and tournament planned for the fall a�on.
Information: Steven Carmo: BcarmoSOexcite.com
Advances in HIV treatment
PITTSBURGH (AP)-Oniy a
handful of medical centers around the
world are willing to transplant organs in
HIV-positive patients a controversial
procedure both in terms of medical
success and societal acceptance.
But surgeons at an international
liver transplantation conference Friday
said much of that could change as
aggressive new therapies like the. so-
called AIDS "cocktail" allow people
infected with HIV to live longer.
"As far as I'm concerned, they're all
patients said transplant surgeon Dr.
Nigel Heaton of King's College
Hospital in London, where four HIV
patients have been given transplants.
"I don't believe in social reasons for
exclusion
What he does want is data-hard
numbers that will prove or disprove the
theory that transplants can help people
infected with HIV
Key to HIV transplants is finding
patients who are heakhy enough to
qualify and are willing to take care of
their new organs once they get them.
Another key is controlling hepatitis
C, which is often found in HIV patients
and invariably reinfects the new liver
once it has been transplanted.
At this point, there is very little data
on transplantation tor patients infected
with HIV, the virus which causes
AIDS, and no papers have been pub-
lished, experts said. Only recendy have
a select few surgeons performed the
procedure knowingly, although there is
some historical data from before
patients were checked for HIV infec-
tions.
"People think we're crazy for doing
it said Dr. John Fung head of the
University of Pittsburgh Medical
C inters transplant center.
But early indications show that liver
transplantation is effective in reversing
the complications of end-stage organ
failure in some HIV-positive patients,
Fung said.
He presented findings at the con-
ference on four HIV patients who
underwent the procedure between
September 1997 and March 1999.
In all the cases, the liver transplants
reversed the distinguishing characteris-
tics of chronic liver failure, including
fluid retention, muscle wasting, fatigue
and jaundice. HIV traces remained
undetectable with patients who contin-
ued the drug combination with pro-
tease inhibitor and none developed
opportunistic infections, Fung said
Got Something tto say?
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eastcarolinian
Bring all letters to
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is located on the 2nd Floor of
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NO SELLING
NO TELEMARKETING
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Research Triangle Institute is
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FALL WELCOME RECEPTION
WELCOME BACK
September 1, 1999 from 5-7 pm
Mendenhall Student Center, Great Room 2
Please call Student Leadership Development Programs even
if you are not able to attend, so that we can update our ODK
mailing list.
328-4796
i





4 TWrtty, An�l 31. 1999
news
Tht East Carolinian
Machine
comimtd Iron piga 2
ECU physicists have noticed
that the shipwreck artifact con-
tained a high amount of arsenic,
while the Native American cop-
per tested at the lab contains no
arsenic
Dr. Larry Toburen, director of
the Physics Accelerator
Laboratory, said that while the
machine has not been able to pos-
itively identify the ship as
Blackbeard's, the information
might be useful to historians who
have researched the making of
metal in Europe and other places.
The tandem accelerator is used
for more than tracing pirates,
though.
It is also used by many other
people in the University. A geolo-
gy graduate student used the
machine to look at mineral sam-
ples. The School of Medicine
uses it to examine the trace ele-
ments in the blood of cancer
patients. Biologists study the ele-
ments in fish bones and archaeol-
ogists continue to look at copper
and pottery shards from prehis-
toric Native American sites.
"We still use it to do basic
physics research said Toburen.
"But over the last three years we
have begun to develop the analyt-
ic type of studies that contribute
to the research in a number of
other departments
"And besides Toburen said,
"from my point of view, it is inter-
esting to find ways to apply
physics to other disciplines
Ihs writer can be contacted
amiAtudentnieifa.iicu.edu.
Bandage
continued Irom page 7
The dressing protects the
wound from infection and pre-
vents further injury. If the bandage
is removed often, as most are, the
fibers become embedded in the
wound.
Another advantage of this
biodegradable wound dressing is
that the film is clear, which allows
the wound to be observed without
having to remove the bandage,
according to Hudson. The dress-
ing gan reduce pain and lessen
scarring.
Computers
continued from page I
money will be given Stelma
said. "Most often students have
borrowed all the aid possible. If
this occurs, a student may apply
for an alternative loan through
Citibank. There are drawbacks,
higher interest rates and required
co-signers, but it's possible
Last year a committee met to
consider whether or not students
should be required to have their
own personal computer.
They decided to delay the
decision and allow students to
buy, rent or lease a computer sys-
tem of their choice with the1700
loan.
This computer, bought on bor-
rowed money, would put an
undergraduate through four years
of college.
"It is a one-time thing, unless
you borrow the money as a fresh-
man, complete college, take some
years off and come back for grad-
uate school; then a student may
apply again. We understand that
an old computer would have to be
updated Stelma said. Students
agreed that such a program would
be beneficial to them.
"I think it's a good idea
because some kids don't have
money to get a new computer and
it would help a lot said Keoshia
Butler, freshman.
"It's cool, and I would do it if I
were in a financial burden said
Jessica Holland. I
Students interested may get
applications from the Student
Financial Aid office located by
die campus post office.
This wntef can be contacted
ihamteitudentinedia.ecu.edu.
Education secretary warns
of Y2K effects on student aid
(U-WIRE) WASHINGTON�
Education Secretary Richard Riley
said many colleges and universities
are not ready for the expected Year
2000 computer crisis and that stu-
dent-aid delivery may be affected
unless improvements are made.
Because older computer systems
are programmed to only read two
digits for the year, many computers
will be set back to 1900 at the turn
of the millennium. Experts are
undecided whether this worldwide
problem will have disastrous or
minor effects on life in January.
The secretary said 40 percent of
college respondents do not expect
to have their mission-critical sys-
tems, computer systems which are
necessary for student aid alloca-
tions, in place until October. He
also said he was disappointed that
only iZ percent of schools respond-
ed to the survey. Riley said a fol-
low-up survey will be sent directly
to the schools' chief officers.
Terry Hartle, senior vice presi-
dent of the American Council on
Education, said he believes the
computer problem will not have as
much of an impact as Riley fears.
He said the survey in which the
education department released
only used a very small sample and
said the results may be flawed
because the survey was distributed
in the summer. But, he said the
issue of fixing computers on college
campuses is complex.
The Department of Education
received high marks recently from
a Congressional subcommittee
reviewing the government's pre-
paredness for the Y2K computer
problem. According to Riley,
because student aid programs rely
on data partnerships with the col-
leges and universities it serves, it
cannot be sure information flow
will not be affected.
In fact, the Education
Department's inspector general
said colleges and universities were
at "high risk" of being unprepared
for delivery of student-aid informa-
tion. Riley said only 22 of the more
than 5,800 schools have tested their
student-aid programs against the
department's software.
Become a member.
Launch your
organization into cyberspace.
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu
FBI admits to improper
tactics in Waco incident
WASHINGTON (AP)�Prompted
by the latest furor over federal law
enforcement's conduct during the
final, fateful hours in the 1993
standoff with the Branch
Davidians, Congress is scurrying to
review years-old hearing records
and organize a fresh round of
inquiries.
Congressional ire was raised
with the EBI's admission this week,
after years of claims to the contrary,
that a 'very limited number' of
incendiary tear gas grenades were
lobbed near the Davidians' com-
pound outside Waco, Texas, in the
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public smiiv i (his puhlii .tlion "
hours before the wooden structure
erupted in flames. The acknowl-
edgment came on the heels of a
newspaper report challenging the
earlier statements.
Senate Judiciary Committee
Chairman Orrin Hatch, R-lltah,
who pronounced the credibility of
Attorney General Janet Reno's
Justice Department at 'an all-time
low is moving towards hearings as
well. And House Judiciary
Committee staffers are wading
through testimony from the 10 days
of nationally televised House hear-
ings in 1995 to determine if new
inquiries are warranted.
A clearly frustrated Reno, who
had earlier assured Congress that
only non-burning tear gas was used
during the April 19, 1993, assault,
ordered up a probe of her own.
Reno, who has been a favorite
target of congressional Republicans
over her handling of issues ranging
from Whitewater and Democratic
campaign fund-raising abuses to
the appointment of independent
counsels, will face the hot seat
again. Burton said he will summon
Reno to testify.

SPANISH MISSION
REVIVAL HOME
415 E Third St. Ayden, NC
� 3,700 sq. ft.
� 9 miles from Greenville,
PCMC, & ECU
� 18 miles from Kinston
� 4 bedrooms
� 2 baths
� 610 acres
� 1910 circa
� In designated
historic district
Sydney P. Britt
P.O. Box 9848
Greensboro, NC 27429
336-275-0881
Something Free From ECU!
Tree Planner! w
Yes its true, as an ECU student
SSoTnTZes to add to vour you are entitled to a free planner
THE CLUE BOOK!
�ALL ECU
Clue Book:
Organizations
must
ggSSS Clue Books are available at
�Get a clue (Organization Fair) is Mendenhall Student Center and
on 9899, 10:30-1:00 Q. . -
�HOMECOMING Registration OlUaent btOreS
Deadline: September 17
This valuable information was brought to you by Student
Leadership Development Programs at 109 Mendenhall
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Call 328-1554
Campus Mentors
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fldnnd Will 3 nUmm6r: 566 Olir WeDSltC fOr OOtdilS. Deadline for online entry is 101599. Mail-in entries must be postmarked by 101599. No
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to: The eCampus.com Wanna Win a Hummer? Rules, co Marden-Kane Dept RF, 36 Maple Place, Manhasset, NY 11030. Requests received after 103199 will not be fulfilled.
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opinion
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During tho spring
and aurrvTiar
Pirate Lhxtergromxi
paid Kymin Now
9600 to pata a mural
wtth this theme of
rnuttcuRurai expres-
sion In the area of the
room wliere the
bands perform.
I
OPINION!
.RYAN
KENNEMUR
ouwiew
The new murals in the Pirate Underground area of Mcndenhall are the
subject of controversy, but we at TEC believe that ECU's students should
be encouraged to display their talents as much as possible.
Since the Pirate Underground, now in its third year running, has found
a permanent home in the Mcndenhall billiards room, students have been
able to sec great bands for free in a smoke-free, alcohol-free environment
So why not spruce up the billiards room with home-grown artwork as well?
During the spring and summer semester, the Pirate Underground paid
Kymia Nawabi $500 to paint a mural with the theme of multi-cultural
expression in the area of the room where the bands perform.
It's the best way to complement the student-run program, which usual-
ly draws an enthusiastic crowd. And, it adds an atmosphere to the room that
most students can appreciate.
The project also gave an ECU art student the chance to build her port-
folio, while detracting from the institutional monotony of the room's once-
whitewashed walls.
Student artwork is a good investment for the University, and benefits
both the artist and the patron with a quality piece of art that both can be
proud of. Even if you don't like the Pirate Underground murals, you can
appreciate the creativity that went into them. Besides, they're great con-
versation pieces.
The Pirate Underground is a wonderful venue for student bands and
solo artists who want to perform, but it still has yet to break into the down-
town scene. It is, however, a great place to meet new friends, take a load
off and shoot some pool, all the while supporting a student-run organiza-
tion.
Check out the Pirate Underground at least once this semester, if only to
lookat the new murals. Show your fellow students that you care about what
they're doing for your school. You might like what you sec.
The next Pirate Underground presentation will be the Mike Plume
Band, Saturday, Sept. 11, at 10 p.m. Call Information at 328-4763 for
details. Admission is free to students.
Chat rooms are strange addiction

OL�motto: one flat rate for
an all-nigfit busy signal�is
lowly tilling us lite a family
nuclear factory worters pic-
keting under power lines.
Addiction. Possibly the harshest
fiord in the English language, with
me exception of gritty. Addiction is
running rampant over our great
f�mpus, whether it be alcohol,
nicotine or the most heinous of all
4 America Online!
1 AOL�motto: one flat rate for
a)n all-night busy signal�is slowly
killing us like a family of nuclear
factory workers picnicking under
power lines. I know what you are
probably thinking. You're saying to
yourself, "hmph! I can stop any-
djne I want to You are lying to
yourself. Like many others, you
wjll use up that free trial month
afrly to turn around and sign on for
another free month by means of a
�afferent credit card.
j Now don't be put off by the fact
ijiat I know about the conniving
scheme that you have devised Just
tafawcr me this: why bother? What
da people see in AOL? I aimed on
for my free trial month once and
only thing I even remotely
! about it was the e-mail. Other
than that, I saw nothing of value.
Then, a friend of mine came to
me and said, "Ryan, chatting is
where it's at You can meet so many
interesting people, and they never
have to know that you are a geek
And so, I signed onto my
account, my arms open to the good
people of Coolville. I clicked on the
space marked People Connection,
and there I was in a chat room filled
with interesting people.
Since this was my first chatting
experience, I decided to just watch
for a few minutes to get a feel for it.
It occurred to me that each one of
these people must have signed
onto their accounts with hopes that
it will soothe the massive head
wound they are obviously suffering
from. The only thing these people
could say was "hey everybody" and
"this room sux. C-ya
Figuring that I was in the
Lobotomy Room, I decided to go
into a specialty room. They were all
full for the most part, so I sifted
through and found a room called
High Priests. I entered and was
immediately involved in a heated
argument over the Trinity.
Tempers were flaring, then all of a
sudden, a guy called Venom223
entered the room with the standard
question. "AgeSex?"
Most people ignored the guy,
but one kind-hearted soul named
SisMaric replied and said "24, K"
Venom223 replied with, and I
quote, "Let's get it on SisMaric
replied with "Sorry, I'm a nun
Venom223, not taking the hint,
replied with "Hey SisMaric, let's
go to a private room
As I have said before, this was
my first time in a chat room.
However, I do not need a cyber-
dictionary to figure out what a pri-
vate room is for. It's the Internet
stud's Motel 6, which, in conjunc-
tion with the optional vibrating
keyboard, I'm sure can provide for
a highly erotic rendezvous.
SisMaric left the room at once,
again foiling Venom223's plan to
fulfill his dream of hooking up with
a young and attractive nymphoma-
niac nua It was then that I knew
that chat rooms were not for me. I
feel that they are silly and decep-
tive, not to mention highly unorga-
nized. I have no clue as to why peo-
ple would want to spend countless
hours talking to these people, many
of whom are probably not even the
gender that they claim to be.
And so, I propose that all AOL
users take one day out of their
week to stay away from their com-
puters. Go outside and play. Climb
a tree. Do whatever you want, just
don't go near AOL. While you arc
all outside, maybe I can finally get
through to check my e-mail.
This writer can be reached
it RliewHjmir8iuiaBiiliiiedii.ecu.edu
OPINION I
LETTER TO
Vending machines leave student short changed
;lha,
aflmtct
m tract
2Jkeb
I have heard many complaints
the University's decision to
Pepsi I do in fact like
better, but that isn't my
The purpose of this letter is
if something can be done
at feast getting the satellite
vending machines stocked! By
satellite, I mean those machines
outside the Student Stores, which I
have repeatedly inserted dollar bills
into, just to find that my only selec-
tion to choose from is diet or water,
and of course, there is no way to get
your money back once it goes in.
This has become so much of a
problem that I usually just walk to
the student store to buy a drink out
of fear that I will end up drinking
diet, caffeine-free Orange Crush, or
something, if I go to a machine!
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Gun control debate rages on
Gun controls, restrictions and
laws are topics that never seetn
to filter out of the media or
political arena.
Gun controls, restrictions and
laws are topics that never seem to
filter out of the media or political
arena. It is such a sensitive topic and
is becoming more so in light of the
recent tragedies that took place in
the Colorado and Georgia schools.
Everyone agrees that those inci-
dents were absolutely horrible, and
that the homicide and accidental
gun death rates in the United
States, compared among other
countries that have tougher restric-
tions, is much higher.
Tragic deaths and higher rates
are undeniable to both sides of the
issue. Those wanting more exten-
sive and comprehensive restrictions
assert that these new policies will
lower death tolls, and reduce gener-
al violence in America. Those
opposing any new governmental
controls deny that this proposed
effect will occur, while reminding
lawmakers of American's right to
bear arms. To properly address the
issue, three questions have to be
answered in deciding an
approach�if any, to this never end-
ing debate on gun control.
First question: Is it possible to
ban or further restrict the possession
or use of guns? The second amend-
ment in the Bill of Rights clearly
makes the provision to "bear arms
Yes, this right was written in a dif-
ferent time, but nonetheless, it is
still explicitly there. Altering and
bending the Constitution to suit
interest groups and public outcry is
a very dangerous practice.
Restricting gun possession even
further is where the bulk of the
debate lies, though. This brings the
issue to the second question.
If legal restrictions are enacted,
is it really possible to change the
societal view and handling of guns
now? Even if strict gun control laws
are made, there enforcement would
prove to be near impossible which
would almost have a reverse effect
Think about prohibition for a
minute. Admittedly, countries like
Canada and England, who basically
prohibit gun possession, have very
low crime incidents involving guns,
but their whole society has never
been exposed to the ability and
atmosphere without those laws.
Legislative bodies can make new
laws, but they can't make people
feel, think, believe and thus behave
differently just by passing restric-
tive policies. Thinking that laws
alone will change behavior
overnight is unrealistic.
Thirdly, would new laws really
curb violence in the schools and on
the streets, since these problems are
the ones that fuel the gun issue's
fire? If it were for some reason, pos-
sible for legal and societal changes
to occur, this would neither stop
psychotic little children from shoot-
ing guns in schools, nor would it
stop gangs and drug dealers from
shooting each other, as well as inno-
cent bystanders. It is insane to
believe that "normal" children
commit violent acts just because
guns exist. If that were the case,
then there would be a multitude of
school shootings, and this may be
news to some, but drug dealers do
not mind breaking the law. Thus, a
law limiting or banning ownership
of guns because of people who
would break the law regardless is
ridiculous, and would ultimately
prove to be ineffective.
Whether or not gun control
restrictions should be made masks
the real point; those restrictions will
not remedy the problem. It's too
late. Despite the legal obstacles,
society is already locked into a cer-
tain mode that laws can't realistical-
ly alter.
This writer can be reached
at msuNivan@studentmedia.ecu.edu
OPINION!
LETTER TO
EDITOR
I just want to express my disap-
pointment for the fact that the
ECU baseball and softball teams
were not awarded championship
rings for winning their respective
titles. These two teams displayed
true athleticism this past season,
and deserve much more than a ring.
According to the grapevine, nei-
ther team will be receiving a cham-
pionship ring for their dedication,
hard work and true Pirate aggres-
sion. Instead, each team will have
to go on knowing that their own
athletic department does not sup-
port them as much as they should.
Whatever happened to giving cred-
it where credit is due?
The baseball team was national-
ly ranked week after week, and
after winning the Colonial Athletic
Association conference tourna-
ment, traveled to Baton Rouge, as
the number one seed. They then
defeated former national champion
Louisiana State University in the
NCAA regionals. The softball team
did exactly the same by winning
the Big South Tourney title and
achieving automatic berth in the
NCAA tournament
I surely think that these Pirates
need this unfortunately buried trea-
sure�championship rings for a job
well done!
Kimberiy Sugg
OPINION!
LETTER TO
EDITOR
Sachs gives voice to minority opinion
I am a junior at ECU. I read your
paper all the time, and I just want-
ed to comment on how pleased I
am to see Chris Sach's article on
organized religion.
It is nice to know that you don't
have to be in the 'majority' to pub-
lish an article in your paper. I thor-
oughly enjoyed reading it I never
thought that a Southern university
like this one would ever publish an
article like this, and it is very pleas-
ing to me that your paper let the
minority' state an opinion like this
one. All last year I wanted so badly
to write and article like the one
Chris wrote, but I never thought
that in a million years it would be
allowed in the paper. I am glad that
I was wrong.
Melanie Alexander
BRAIN-
Sports teams deserve more credit
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TWICE WEEKLY NEWSPAPER
The East Carolinian
Pick us up Tuesdays and Thursdays for news and information
about campus issues and activities.
STUDENT RADIO STATION
WZMB 91.3 FM
Pick us up 24-hours a day for a wide variety of music including
alternative, jazz, metal, rap and more.
MINOR
MAGAZINE
Expressions
Pick us up four times during the Fall and Spring terms for discus-
sion of the problems and issues facing ECU'S minorities.
LITERARY ARTS MAGAZINE
Rebel
Pick us up annually in the late Spring to view a showcase of cam-
pus literary and artistic creations.
Pirates Covel
A P ART M E NT Btyfc
f r
$100 off
Deposit
Call
Today
hone: 752-9995
But With Parents In
Mind!
Limited access.
?Monitored alarm
systems in each unit
with panic buttons in
each bedroom.
Well lighted grounds
and parking lots.
Free roommate
matching.
�Individual leases.
Every bedroom is a
master suite.
Fully furnished.
On ECU Bus Route.
� � � �
Efrafe nWpifW ThBkh wmUm
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
there is Still Limited Availability!
Designed and Built For Students
�Computer center equipped with the latest
software, hardware, printers & internet access.
�Equipped Fitness Center.
�Clubhouse wbig screen TV
�Swimming Pool WLarge Deck.
�Washer and Dryer in each unit.
�Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
�Kitchens featuring microwave, dishwasher,
self-cleaning oven disposal,
refrigeratorice maker
�FREE Cable television includes HBO
�Two phone jacks in all bedrooms
�Plus Basketball, Tennis & Sand Volleyball!
i I
Brand New!
Surprisingly
Affordable at
$375 per room
(includes utilities)
Now Pre-leasing
for August 1999
11
You can have it all in the Fall!
�����������������
3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
V






8 THtiday. A.�l31. 1999
Fast
Facts
Celebrities speak out
on opposite sex:
"I like two types of men: domestic
and imported
-Mao West
"I like men to behave like men-
strong end childish
-Francoise Sagan
"My notion of a wife at 40 is that
a man should be able to change
her, like a bank note, to two 20s.
-Warren Beatty
"I dress for women and undress
for men
-Angie Dickinson
"I don't think it's in the nature of
any man to be monogamous. Men
are propelled by genetically
ordained impulses over which they
have no control to distribute their
seed into as many females es pos-
sible
-Marlon Brando
.
"I never hated a man enough to
give him his diamonds back
-Zsa Zsa Gabor
"I love the way men smell. I love
the way they taste, their texture,
the way they're built
-Marilu Henner
"I love the male body; it's better
designed than the male mind
-Andrea Newman
"I require three things in a man:
he must be handsome, ruthless
and stupid
-Dorothy Parker
"Feminism is just a way for ugly
women to get into the mainstream
of America
-Rush Limbaugh
"Effeminate men intrigue me more
than anything in the world. I see
them as my alter egos. I feel very
drawn to them. I think like a guy.
but I'm feminine. So I relate to
feminine men �
-Madonna
"I only speak Scottish to turn
Women on or to pick them up.
That's so cheap, but it does
work
-John Barrowman
"God gave us a penis and a brain,
tut only enough blood to run one
at a time
-Robin Williams
photos courtesy of the world wide web
Till East Carolinian
T Till East Cirolinia
Stress overwhelms students
Healthy Iking reduces
tension, daily pressures
MlCIIAKI. KlHlAKIIS
ST AFP WKITKK
Stress, that feeling that pressures
people to get things done on time,
also rushes students through their
lives and experiences.
As students gradually settle down
into the college groove, they begin
noticing things about their minds
and bodies that perhaps they haven't
noticed before. There is an empti-
ness that is sometimes caused from
the separation from one's parents,
friends and familiar surroundings as
well as an inner voice of discontent
brought about by the unfamiliar
locale, strange Faces, new rules and
regulations, and most of all sched-
ules.
As students meet new friends and
become acquainted with their new
neighborhood, many of these
uncomfortable feelings dissipate and
they learn to relax. Before they know
it, students actually begin to enjoy
the new freedoms of being indepen-
dent. From time to time, there will
be feelings of the need to pull your
hair out, yell at somebody, "pop a
pill or throw a roommate's stereo
across the room because of stress.
There are many kinds of stress,
such as that which occurs from a loss
of a parent, friend or pet, but there is
a particular type of stress found in
the college atmosphere. This mon-
ster comes from all sides�brain
drain, bad relationships, bills, dorm
life, alcohol, cigarettes, illegal dnigs,
STDs, neighbors, poor diet, lack of
Pr
��aseS"
If
parking and roommates; the list is
endless. For the most part, students
manage to plow through these
dilemmas with little difficulty.
Occasionally, several of these stres-
sors accumulate beyond control, and
a person "loses it"
Numerous books and articles
have been written on how to handle
stress. One such article appeared
recently in ParadeMagazine entitled
"Let Goof Stress It begins witht
the realization that no matter whef
you are or where you are, stress is
a part of life.
L.W. Winik defines stress asl
"the body's reaction to a perceived
threat. Adrenaline and hormones are'
released, and the nervous system is
activated, sharpening the senses.
Simultaneously, pulse rises, i
muscles tense, and the.
immune system
shuts down
The article gives
10 ways to overcome
stress:
I.) Plan ahead,
ask questions if
unsure of direc-
tions, deadlines,
expectations oi
responsibilities.
2.) Avoid
gossip and!
negative peo-
ple.
3.) Seek out people who are
cheerful and who can provide
encouragement and a pep talk.
4.) Set priorities and esrablish rou-
tines.
5.) Focus and refocus your objec-
tives and goals.
6.) Understand that your job is not
you, and learn to separate your job or
your hectic
schedule from
your life.
7.) Reward
your accom-
plishments but
don't go over-
board.
9.) Set aside time to play.
10.) Change your scenery.
"People who can't relieve daily
stress may experience fatigue, upset
stomach or frequent headaches
Winik said.
"Long-term stress, however, is
aeven more dangerous leading to
tmily breakdowns, chronic
health problems high
blood pressure, memory
loss, accidents and
written about the very basis of good
emotional, spiritual and mental
health which starts with a good atti-
tude. It's improbable, if not impossi-
ble, for a person to maintain a good
attitude if they torture their body
with the wrong input, such as too
many toxins like fatty foods, alcohol,
tobacco, sugar and salt.
Smoking does not aid the body in
any way. If a person doesn't smoke,
they shouldn't start It makes a per-
son look 30 when they're 20; it
makes them stink, causes lung can-
cer and numerous other physical
problems, and creates a tremendous
amount of stress in the body.
A person should drink plenty of
unchlorinated water, and get at least a
t moderate amount of exercise each
j day.
The more exercise a person gets,
on the average, the happier and more
relaxed they feel.
According to a 1997 study from the
Journal of Health Education, a smok-
ing male who does not exercise has
nearly a 40 percent chance of dying in
mid-life.
Another tip to controlling stress is
to "learn to differentiate what you can
control in your life and what you can-
not according to Dr. Betty Staub of
the ECU Health Promotions Office.
Learn to ignore the everyday irrita-
tions. As Far as what one person can
control, everyone should learn how to
recognize these irritations and deal
with them.
The first sentence of M. Scott
Peck's book, The Road Less Traveled,
begins, "Life is tough The most suc-
cessful athletes, actors and other pro-
fessionals have learned to use stress
successfully. Learn to change bad rou-
tines before they become bad habits.
Eat well, exercise, smile and be
happy.
This writer can be contacted at med
wards@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Student take a break between classes to relax.
PHOTO IT WILLIAM KEITH
8.) Get
enough sleep�
siestas aren't
just for
Mexicans nor
naps for cats.
Comedic hypnotist
entertains students
La Rosa bring
humor to campus
Brian I'kIzki.i.k
STAFP WRITKI
Hypnotist Dan La Rosa performed
for students in Hendrix Theater on
Wednesday night
La Rosa uses a combination of
comedy and the power of hypnosis
to put on a show that few will soon
forget After placing a few volun-
teers from the audience into a
trance-like state, he proceeded to
have them disco dance on stage, as
well as later convincing the volun-
teers they were small children
again. One particular part of the
show that stood out was when La
Rosa had a student scream at the
" am glad to come down to
ECU. I always loot forward
to having some fun
Dan La Rosa
Hypnotist
audience and rap in alanguage that
he did not consciously know.
Dan La Rosa entertains audiences with his hypnotic techniques.
PHOTO BY WILLIAM KEITH
La Rosa began his act in 1986
after witnessing the performance of
another hypnotist. He was interest-
ed but skeptical and began to look
for a way to learn more about it
"I found a yogi from India back
home in Connecticut La Rosa
said. "I took a two-year workshop
with him on how hypnosis can
improve studies
La Rosa has taken his act around
the country, and he has even enter-
tained the armed forces at U.S. mil-
itary bases across Europe.
"It is a grueling schedule La
Rosa said. "That's life on the road
A schedule like this may not be
to some people's liking, but it
seems to suit La Rosa just fine.
- "I love it he said. "Routine
nights turn into interesting nights
Anyone who has seen his show
can attest to it being an interesting
display The laughter and applause
SEE COMEDIAN. PAGE 7
Local groups benefit
from NC Arts Council funds
State programs
receive necessary grants
l! hookic Potts
srup WHI ILK
As part of a state-wide effort to
bring fine arts programs to the pub-
lic, each year the NC Arts Council
awards over $6 million in grants to
local organizations.
These non-profit groups range
from small grassroots organizations
to large programs such as the ECU
Summer Theater. To support the
1999-2000 season, the University
has been awarded almost $12,000
to fund three separate projects.
"The variety of programs that
the NC Arts Council supports
demonstrate the far reaching
effects of public money said
Miriam Sauls, Communications
Director for the NC Arts Council.
"Through the programs at ECU
and others across the state, we are
bringing the arts into the heart of
many communities
ECU has received grants to fund
three projects. The East Carolina
Summer Theater was awarded
$4,000 to support ongoing projects,
and the Writers Reading Series
received $3,000 to support its 1999-
2000 season. In addition, the ECU
Gray Gallery received $5,000 to
support an upcoming exhibit enti-
tled "Pychromatics: An
International Symposium on
Colour in Wood-Fired Ceramics
Each of these groups were
selected from among 552 appli-
cants. In order to be eligible to
receive a grant, they had to demon-
strate that the money was going to
support quality programs that will
benefit the entire community.
Each received money from a differ-
ent anistic category for application.
These categories include literature,
performing arts, folk life, artists in
schools and communities and
music.
"In order to be eligible for the
grants, each organization has to
meet our criteria and then be
approved by a panel which deter-
mines the final award amount
said Nancy Trovillon, NC Arts
NC Museum of Art exhibits local works.
PHOTO IT WILLIAM KEITH
Council Assistant Director, "It real-
ly is a tough selection process
The theater program, which
brings the performing arts to the
SEE GRANTS. PAGE 1
Mil,
C
Lastc
a Cant
Outpost 1
757
� m





Tin Eaat Carolinian
features
TmUtv. Auimt 31, 1991 8
it Carolinian
its
: a person gets,
ppier and more
' study from the
cation, a smok-
ot exercise has
nice of dying in
rolling stress is
re what you can
I what you can-
Betty Staub of
notions Office,
everyday irrita-
ne person can
Id leam how to
dons and deal
: of M. Scott
4Less Traveled,
'The most suc-
and other pro-
d to use1 stress
:hange bad rou-
ne bad habits,
smile and be
contacted at med-
aecu.edu
t
libits local works.
MM KEITH
irector. "It real-
n process
"gram, which
ing arts to the
, PAGE 7
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Last chance to register to win
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unds
natics: Anr
mposium onr
ed Ceramics
groups were2
ng 552 appli
be eligible toO
had to demon�'
:y was going toC
grams that will('
e community.
:y from a differ
for application.4
:lude literature,
C life, artists in1
munities and1
eligible for the-
ization has tor
and then beHI
:l which deter�
vard amount
lion, NC ArtsI.
Art professor, family exhibits work in gallery
Closing reception to
take place this evening
Nina M. Dhy
SSIST.N I KRATI �KS Ml mm
The Student Union Visual Arts
Committee kicks off another
eventful year with a new art exhib-
it located in the Mendenhall
Student Center Gallery.
(Billingsley )3 features the works of
ECU associate professor and head
of the sculpture department, Carl
Billingsley, his wife, Catherine and
their son, Benjamin.
"The Visual Arts Committee
liked the idea of a family of artists
working together said Lee
I loward, chairperson of VAC. "It is
a positive disposition to promote. It
also shows a diversity of the art)
media
Each member of the Billingsley
family contributed pieces from
their respective concentrations.
"We're all pretty focused on our
own primary means of expression
said Carl Billingsley.
Professor Billingsley's concen-
tration resides in sculpting and cast-
ing; Catherine is primarily a
weaver, focusing a lot on pattern
and color, their son Benjamin char-
acterizes himself as a painter.
Although three different medi-
ums are exhibited in (Billingsley).V
these artists have managed to com-
bine them into a beautiful show.
"We thought the colors in.the
weavings would go well with
(Ben's) paintings Catherine
Billingsley said. "Carl filled in the
spaces with his pieces on the
pedestals
One piece that immediately
catches the eye in the gallery is
Catherine's "Twist and Shout
Color" weaving.
"I worked on 'Twist and Shout
Color' for several months
Catherine Billingsley said. "(The
piece) is based on the Fibonacci
number system, where each unit is
the sum of the two previous units.
It creates a pleasing quality when
you look at the patterns
Catherine Billingsley is also
working on another idea called
"Name Draft" which incorporates
different types of codes into her
weaving.
(Billingsley)3 is displayed in Mendenhall's Gallery
PHOTO ST WILLIAM KEITH
"I will take a name or a phrase,
apply the appropriate number to
the letter and develop a distinctive
pattern from that system
Catherine Billingsley said. "The
messages are encoded into the
weavings and it has significance for
each person
"With the coding process, each
name and phrase will result in a
unique pattern Carl
Billingsley said.
An example of a
name draft is in
Catherine's work
entitled "Self
Portrait which is
composed of her
name. This piece can
be viewed at the
Gallery.
Tonight, from 6
p.m8 p.m the
gallery will have its
closing reception of
the exhibit.
"This is our first
reception of the
year said Howard
Billingsley. "There
will be a nice spread
of food, and the artists
will be there to speak
with interested parties
Also, for any art collectors out
there, some pieces in the
(Billingsley)3 exhibit are for sale. If
interested, contact either Carl
Billingsley at the art department or
Lee Howard with the Visual Arts
Committee.
This writer can be contacted at
ndry@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Comedian
coniiniied Itom page li
were nearly deafening as La
Rosa's volunteers unknowingly
entertained the audience. La
Rosa did not degrade the people
on-stage as some hypnotists tend
to do, yet here there was nothing
that could have hidden the red
faces of the volunteers after La
Rosa informed them of their on-
stage actions at the end of the
show.
La Rosa's travels take him
from town to town, and the audi-
ence is different each time.
Sometimes he comes across pre-
vious attendants of his show.
"Sometimes I meet people
from Connecticut that I have
hypnotized before La Rosa
said.
"I am glad to come down to
ECU La Rosa said. "I always
look forward to having some
fun
This writer can be contacted at
blrizzelle@studentmedia. ecu. edu
Put the money
you save on this account
into CDs.
WACHOVIA CO
lMhcd.
COUNT
Wachovia Bank, N A Is a member FDIC. Accounts subject to approval. Wachovia Bank, N.A. imposes a fee for the use of non-WachovIa ATMs.
Grants
coniiniied liom page 6
community of Greenville through-
out the summer, was especially for-
tunate to receive this grant.
"We use this money to bring to
campus and the community theater
productions which otherwise the
public might not have opportunity
to experience said John Shearin,
head of the department of theater
and dance. "Support such as this
keeps our program going
This is not the first time that the
university has received money
from the council. Awards made
yearly continue to support the arts
at ECU and around the state. This
year, the amount available
increased by $2 million as the
General Assembly voted to allot a
one-time increase to the council.
This increase allowed the arts
council to distribute funds to over
1,300 community organizations and
groups state-wide.
This writer can be contacted at
bpottsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
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Greenville, N.C. 27834





10 Tmday, Auaim 31. 1999
features
The East Carolinian
Na:v Kavk Whkki.kk
STVKK WIITKa
Seeing through freshman's eyes
ft � � � loud, but you have to figure that
UnfCCTSlty Tfl(lK6S everyone just got to college and
� - � . they are excited too. I didn't know
ttS ftrSt tmpmStOnS my roommate before I got here.
but it was not as big of a hassle as I
thought it would be. We really hit it
off
The difference in college and
high school classes is considerable,
not only in difficulty and length,
but in flexibility.
"Well I'm taking 16 hours this
semester English, geography and a
lot of music classes Cobb said. "I
really like the 50 minute classes
instead of the hour and a half ones
we had in high school. It is also
great to be able to make your own
schedule with breaks in between
classes
Part of the freshman experience
is also the communal eating estab-
lishments and other campus activi-
ties.
"Todd is great Cobb said. "I
can eat as much as I want almost
whenever I wantlThe Student
Recreation Center is cool, too. It's a
good place to go and you don't
have to pay for it
Whether or not our freshman
experience was what we expected
it to be or not, we can only hope
that future freshmen at ECU have
as good of a time as Lucian has had
so far.
Lucian Cobb is a freshman music
major, with a concentration in jazz
studies, and in a candid interview
he shared his experiences so far as
a rookie Pirate.
Cobb is from Havelock, NC, so
Greenville isn't too far from home.
"The first thing I noticed about
Greenville and the University is
that the people are a lot nicer than
in other places Cobb said. "I felt
like I was a part of the University
right away. I'll be walking to class
and people I don't even know say
'hi to me
Not only is moving to a different
town part of the freshman experi-
ence, Cobb also had to move into a
dorm, which is an experience all in
itself.
"Moving in went off without a
hitch Cobb said. "It was really
simple and the staff was very help-
ful. I do wish the freshman parking
lot was not so far away, though!
"I really like that the communi-
ty service office is right downstairs
in my dorm and the computer lab
is right there too. It can be kind of
This writer can be contacted at
nwheelerSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
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Brown & Brown
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for more information, all
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or visit our website at
www.hrblock.oomtax
AA EEOMFDV
ELTORO
Barber & Style
men's hair
styling shoppe
Pirate
Special
$700
Beat the
clock!
7
Style and Gut
Stain
jlass
liToi
Eastgate Plaza Mali
752-3318
Appt. Or Walk In
;
Order any pizza with one topping any time
between 6 p.m. and 9 p.m. on any Tuesday in August,
and the time you order is the price you pay!
Price not valid with any other offer.
Central Greenville & ECU
758-6660
1201 Charles Blvd.
LARGE ONE!
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5ft99 5-799
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(k Valid at participating atom only. Not valid with
any othar offar. Pricsa may vary. Customer
pays sales tax when applicable Delivery
areas limited to ensure safa driving.
Cash value i20t.
01999 Domino's Plus. Inc.
Campus sMe only. Limited time otter. BC1
MEDIUM PIZZA WITH CHEESE AND
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DELIVERED! WHAT A DEAL!
Valid at participating store only. Not valid with
any other otter. Prices may very. Customer
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NEWMAN CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
LOCATION: 953 E. 10TH ST. (BOTTOM OF COLLEGE HILL AT EAST END OF CAMPUS)
12th Annual Back to School
OPEN HOUSE
& PIG PICKIIM
Wednesday, September 1999,4:00pm-7:00pm
When
o2
luo
M
�1
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
WELCOME
ACK!
MASS SCHEDULE:
Sun: 11 :30am and 8:30pm
Wed: 5:3 0pm
ALL MASSES ARE AT THE CENTER
Campus IVIinistei
w
m
You are invited to ECU Presbyterian Campus Ministry
at First Presbyterian Church
;i�
ECU PCM meets regularly on Tuesday
nights at First Presbyterian Church
from 6 until 8 p.m. for a FREE
home-cooked meal and a program.
Open to ALL ECU students.
Hope to see you there!
�iiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
Street
First Presbyterian
Church
10th Street
bit
4j V
I
w
For further information contact Ellen Crawford True, Presbyterian Campus Minister-
ellencrawfordtrue@yahoo.com or 7581985
Till Ent Cirol
Penn State Mo
Noles
tain State mow
ftP Poll after de
Wildcats 41-7 in
Saturday. Arizon
he country. The
.0. 1 Florida St
joints in the pol
lefaated Louisia
Tallahassee on S
Miami Blows A
The Miami Hurrii
the Meadowland
lefaated the Nini
luckeyes 23-12 i
I lassie. Miami qt
Kelly was 17-251
;
I arnhardt Wins
I ale Earnhardt wi
I eadache Powder
1 inn. Saturday. Ei
r ice leader, Terry
f nal lap to win.
Sosa Hits No. 54
Sammy Sosa hit h
Sunday as the Chii
out the Dodgers 6-
Stadium. Chicago i
Farnsworth got thi
� :
Hampton Wins 17
Houston Pitcher, M
hjs17th gsme as tl
defeated the Florid)
Houston, Sunday. T
back-to back home i
gfme up on the Cin
life NL Central.
oods Wins NEC
r er Woods won tt
Invitational despite
aVer-71 on the final
Hid off a lete char(
M ckleson to win th
PHOTOS COURTEST OF TH





Ths East Carolinian
i
A

I
s
1 1
1
1 � i ;
i i
i
III (I
:slt
Mil
mister,
MPUS)
r 90l
Eo3
is3
iiu8 tilO
� � -bt3
Ml
pmi 1
991
Tilt Eait Carolinian
SPORTSm
Briefs
Penn State Moves up on the
Nolit
tain State moved up to No. 2 in the
M� Poll after defeating the Arizona
Wildcats 41-7 in Happy Valley en
Saturday. Arizona was ranked Sth in
the country. The Nhtany Lions trail
io. 1 Florida State by only eight
mints in the poll. The Seminoles
lefeated Louisiana Tech 41-7 in
Tallahassee on Saturday.
sports
Tuesday. Anamt 31, 1999 11
Pirate baseball implements changes
Miami Blows Away Buckeyes
The Miami Hurricanes stormed into
the Meadowlands on Sunday and
lefeated the Ninth ranked Ohio State
luckeyes 23-12 in the Kickoff
tlassic. Miami quarterback Kenny
Kelly was 17-25 for 245 yards.
i

t
I arnhardt Wins at Bristol
I ale Earnhardt won the Goody's
I eadache Powder 500 in Bristol
1 inn. Saturday. Earnhardt pushed
r ice leader, Terry Labonte, in the
f nal lap to win.
Sosa Hits No. 54. Cubs Win
Sammy Sosa hit his 54th home run
Sunday as the Chicago Cubs shut
out the Dodgers 6-0 at Dodger
Stadium. Chicago rookie, Kyle
Farnsworth got the win.
�, ��? r�
"? 'v
Hampton Wins 17th
Houston Pitcher, Mike Hampton won
hjs17th game es the Houston Astros
defeated the Florida Merlins 2-1 in
Houston, Sundey. The Astros used
back-to back home runs to stay one
gflme up on the Cincinnati Reds in
i NL Central.
tt Dods Wins NEC
r er Woods won the NEC
InVitational despite shooting a 1-
Ner-71 on the final round. Woods
laid off a late cherge by Phil
M ckleson to win the event.
PHOTOS COURTESY Of THE WORID WIDE WE6
that the addition of these three solid
w e players and are glad to get them
back in eastern North Carolina
LeClair said. " All of them can
play a role for us and we will hope-
fully figure out how much in the
fall. I think McCullough has some
valuable experience playing ion
' the SEC last year and Hyde was in
the ACC with Clemson, so we
want to see where that will take
us. We are looking forward to to
seeing what these three additions
can help us do
Along with the numerous play-
er additions coaching additions
will also bring new style to the
team.
Kevin McMullan, former assis-
tant coach at St. John's University
for the past three years, has recent-
ly been named the new assistant
coach for the Pirates.
McMullan replaces Todd
Raleigh who was assistant coach
for one year before leaving to take
the head coaching position for
was the head baseball coach as
well as the strength and condition-
ing coordinator for Indiana
University in Pennsylvania. With
that job, he was in charge of man-
aging funding matters as well as
scheduling many other events and
procedures.
Before taking any college
coaching position, McMullan was
among one of the top players in
the New York Yankees farm team
organization, in 1992 he was
named the Pioneer league Most
Valuable Offensive Player, and
was on the all star team in 1990.
Joining McMullan, is Tommy
Eason, a former ECU standout
who has been helping with the
Pirates for the past two years as a
graduate assistant coach. Eason
has been promoted to a full-time
coaching position.
Eason has been focusing main-
ly on the pitching staff during last
years season. With his expertise,
the Pirates had a 4.10 ERA15th
Baseball has been good to me, I have been good to baseball
FILE PHOTO
Recruiting, coaching
additions announced
I K IK K DaWVOT
ASSISTANT KI'OMTS KIIITI
Upon completing one of the most
challenging and successful seasons
in ECU baseball, head coach
Keith LeClair has set his eyes on
many new additions which will
take over where last year's team
left off.
LeClair and the Pirates have
signed 14 student athletes to its
2000 recruiting class. Among
them, there are 10 pitchers and
four position players. LeClair
hopes that these players will be
able to make an immediate impact
for the team and possibly help to
build the future of the team.
I think we certainly identified
our needs, which were mainly on
the pitching staff, and addressed
those concerns by bringing in
some good, talented young arms,
LeClair said. I think there are a lot
of quality kids in this class and
some real talent. As a class I think
they have a bright future and can
help get this program to the level
want to be at every year.
Not stopping at just a strong
and talented freshmen class, the
Pirates have also received three
other student athletes that have
transferred to ECU and are
expected to play during the 2000
season.
Justin Hyde, a senior transfer
from Clemson, Clayton
McCullough, a sophomore trans-
fer from Vanderbilt, prep standout
at J.H. Rose High in Greenville
and Kieran Mattison, a sophomore
transfer from the college of
Charleston will all join up to play
in the 2000 season.
"We are excited about about
Western Carolina University.
McMullan will be overseeing the
the recruiting duties as well as
working with the outfielders and
looking to improve hitting per-
centages for the Pirates.
"Kevin is certainly regarded as
one of the best
recruiters in the
Northeast region
and is extremely
hard working
LeClair said. "He
comes from a good
program and has had much
success recruiting there. He
also has head coaching
experience and will
make an outstanding
addition to our staff.
We are excited to have
him joining us as he-
knows the caliber of play-
er that we are looking for an
can help us go and get it"
Prior to St. John's, McMullan
in the nation), one of many honors
that the Pirates achieved with
Eason as well as the 46-16 record
and the CAA title.
"I really feel that with what
Tommy has done for this program,
I think it is only fitting that we get
him on staff full time LeClair
said. "Eason has devoted more
time to this program than just
about anyone and now he is get- j
ting rewarded for it He is terrif-
ic with
the ath-
e t e s
and he
knows
t h e
game.
He is a
great addition
to the staff
This Writer can be contacted at
pdawyvtSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
Football team prepares
for season opener
Bob Smith talks, fans listen
This broadcaster
calls'em as he sees'em
Practices
focus on problems
S TKI'IIK Sell HA MM
SHUTS KIIITOB
In five days, the most anticipated
season of Pirate football will begin.
ECU's date with West Virginia
in Ericsson Stadium will open the
1999 campaign with a stiff chal-
lenge. The Pirates have been
preparing for the Mountaineers
since the opening of camp in early
August. In the past few days, the
level of intensity has increased as
the game nears.
"I told the kids today, if we keep
getting better, we'll be OK said
Steve Logan, head coach. "We
can't lighten off or go downhill. I'm
pleased with the way the kids are
Derek Helms gears up for West Virginia.
FILE PHOTO
working
As game time approaches, the
focus of the practices moves away
from conditioning and basic drills
and begins to focus on specific
problems posed by West Virginia
using drills with the scout team.
"Our defense has got to work
hard because West Virginia has
got one hell of a quarterback, Marc
Bulger said senior Norris
McCleary, defensive tackle. "He's
going to be really hard to contain
It is also a time for some of the
players who were injured in the
early practices to return. .
The trio of injured linebackers
are almost back to full strength.
Senior Jeff Kerr and sophomore
Pernell Griffin returned to practice
last week. Meanwhile, junior Eric
Reyes continues to sit out due to a
calf injury.
"Everybody wants everybody to
get healthy. The whole team has
got nicks and bruises, but that's
football though McCleary said.
By playing West Virginia, the
Pirates continue their tradition of
tough opposition in their season
openers. In the 90s, ECU has
opened against teams such as
SEE FOOTBALL . PAGE I?
Rya Downkv
STAFF tllTEl
Many times, fans feel as if they
have no say in what happens during
the game and for the most part,
they are right but for one fan this
wish has come true.
The man known as the student
voice of the Pirates, Bob Smith, for
the last three years, has broadcasted
for the Pirates home games on the
250 watt student radio station
WZMB. Students find his game
broadcasts entertaining because
Smith calls the game the way
everybody in the stands sees it
"It's really refreshing to hear
somebody who gives an honest por-
trayal of what is going on during the
game said Richard Chadwell, an
ECU junior.
"Many Students listen to the
games on headphones while at
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium watching

the game. They say they enjoy the
all-out broadcast of the game
The thing that makes Smith's
broadcasts so different from the
other game broadcast provided by
the Pirate Sports Network is that
Smith holds no punches. While
many times established broadcast-
ers will soften mistakes made by
the team they are covering, Smith
gets right to the point.
"I don't sugar coat anything that
happens during a game. The thing
that our listeners enjoy is that I call
WZMB sportscasters tell it like it is.
FILE PHOTO
the game the way I see it and don't
worry about being to tough on peo-
ple Smith said.
When Smith first got started
with the broadcast at WZMB, it was
SEE TALK . PAGE 12





12 TtorttT, Af 3t. H�l
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Bulgpr looking for some personal gain this season
rVtORGANTOWN, W.Vfc. (AP)�
Billboards along state highways
remind motorists who drives the
West Virginia football team.
"On the Marc reads one.
"Must see QB says another.
Marc Bulger is definitely the
pilot for the Mountaineers' quest
for a fifth-straight bowl trip. And
the low-key Bulger, not one to put
himself before his team, acknowl-
edges he is looking for a bit of per-
sonal satisfaction this year.
Having been overshadowed by
Syracuse's Donovan McNabb his
entire career, Bulger has a chance
to overtake the departed McNabb
in career Big East passing yards,
adding to his 21 school records.
"That will probably be more spe-
cial, because West Virginia hasn't
been really known for its passing
M much said Bulger.
Bulger needs 2,747 yards to
reak McNabb's record of 8,389 set
ast season. Bulger has averaged
5,656 yards in each of the past two
easons and has three veteran
eceivers back to help.
More difficult, but still possible,
will be reaching McNabb's Big
Stist record of 77 touchdowns,
lulgcr needs 36, an average of
nore than three per game. But
with the loss of tailback Amos
Zereouc to the NFL, Bulger fig-
ures to be throwing a lot more this
season.
"He's definitely the best quar-
terback this school's ever seen
said center John Come, dismissing
such Mountaineer legends as
Major Harris and Jeff Hostetler. "I
mean ever. Forget anybody else.
Marc's the best. And that's all there
is to it"
"He's just got great composure.
He's not a rah-rah guy said Conte,
one of five new starters on the
offensive line this season, "I think
that's a big asset. When he speaks,
people listen to him
Coach Don Nehlen figures
Bulger has a good chance to reach
the records.
"Number one, we've given him
the opportunity to smash them
said Coach Nehlen, "If we hadn't
played the kind of football we
have, he wouldn't break them. And
number two, he has the ability to
break them. If I ran option football
with Marc Bulger, that would be
kind of stupid. He's an accurate
passer
Bulger also has the confidence
of his receivers. "I think the system
really helped him out said Pat
Greene. "Before there were only
two receivers. Now, we've got
three receivers, four receivers. The
tailback coming out of the back-
field. We've got so many different
weapons and different angles to
come at you with that it's hard to
defend them. And Marc's a good
quarterback. He's smart enough to
take advantage of that. It's hard for
defenses to pick up on that
Bulger has had hurdles every
year. "In high school, I wasn't
known he said. "I had two or
three offers. That was it. Then,
when I got here, I was too small.
Then my freshman year, I think it
was my back that was hurt. Then it
turned into my inexperience. Now
this year, it will be the loss of
everyone. It's .always going to be
something
Bulger agrees his experience
will be important to the
Mountaineers.
"I think I've learned a lot he
said. "Last year I was surrounded
by so many seniors, that I pretty
much considered myself a senior
last year. Hopefully this year I can
improve ever more. I'll have to,
because we're going to be pretty
young
Talk
continued from page II
tew territory.
"When we started doing our stu-
lenc broadcast of the game, there
lad not been a student broadcast of
botball at any public university in
Jorth Carolina in 50 years. We did,
hough, meet a student broadcast
cam from Wake Forest, but they
re a private school Smith said.
So in that way. Smith is a real
lioneer in the area. Smith relates to
lie student perspective during the
ames, even sitting in an unaircon-
Itioned area of the stadium among
the students while wearing a suit.
"It gets hot out there, but I want
to maintain a certain level of pro-
fessionalism. I want to look like a
broadcaster not a sloppy college
kid Smith said.
Students have really caught on
to his style.
"As a football fan, I love the fact
that he (Smith) will tell you when
he thinks a bad play has been
called, that way I know I am not
screaming at my screen all alone
said Spawn Lightfoot an ECU
pirates fan.
This Writer can be contacted at
RDowney8studentmedia.ecu.edu
Football
conlinued from page tl
Syracuse, Virginia Tech, Tennessee
and West Virginia. Under Logan,
the Pirates are 1-7 in these games.
Despite their lackluster track
record in season openers, the
Pirates remain optimistic.
"It's going really good, said
junior Jamie Wilson, running back.
"We've learned a lot and every-
body's coming together strong
This Writer can be contacted at
SportsSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
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I �3'





E EAST CAROLINIAN
ermits
For Details
'�
m
5INGLES OR
ANKS
O
r
Thi Eitt Carolinian
sports
Blocked punts cost Longhorns victory
i �
AUSTIN, Texas (AP)�There is
life in North Carolina State
University after Terry Holt. It's
just on the other side of the ball.
North Carolina State continued
its year of early-season upsets
Saturday night, using three
blocked punts and a stingy sec-
ond-half defense to pull out a Zi-
20 victory over No. 17 Texas in
the Black Coaches Association
Classic.
Terrence Holt, younger brother of
the departed All-American wide
receiver, blocked two punts that
were converted into touchdowns
for North Carolina State.
"I've never been associated with
a game in which we've won in this
fashion, with so many blocked
punts said NC State coach Mike
O'Cain. "It wasn't very pretty,
which is typical of a first game. It
had a magical ending.
"We emphasize blocking punts
and it paid off O'Cain said.
With the Wolfpack trailing 20-15
with 3:32 left, Holt sprinted in
from the right side to get a piece
of Ryan Long's punt at the Texas
48. Eric Leak, who blocked a
punt in the first half that led to a
safety, picked up the loose ball
and ran it in for the go-ahead
touchdown.
Quarterback Jamie Barnette
found Chris Coleman in the cor-
ner of the end zone for the 2-
point conversion and 23-20 lead.
"We had pressure from the out-
side, and I just took the right
angle and got to the ball Holt
said. "We knew that special teams
was going to win it
They had to. North Carolina
State's offense struggled all night.
Barnette, the ACC total offense
leader in 1998, was constantly
harassed by Texas pass rushers
and finished 9-of-26 for 65 yards
with one interception. The
Wolfpack gained only 171 yards.
Texas drove to midfield looking
for a possible tying field goal, but
came up short when quarterback
Major Applewhite was stuffed on
fourth-and-inches.
Texas played its first game in four
years without Division I-A career
rushing leader Ricky Williams.
Applewhite passed for 316 yards
and one touchdown and ran for
one score.
The Texas running game was a
pale comparison to a year ago,
however. Texas gained just 56
yards on 36 attempts. Backup tail-
back Victor Ike led the
Longhorns with 48 yards on. 12
carries.
"The only stats that mean any-
thing are the kicking game and
turnovers. It's a devastating loss
for our kids said Texas coach
Mack Brown. "You can't have
three blocked punts for 16 points
and win a ball game
NC State pulled off its third early-
season upset, in as many years,
after victories over Syracuse in
1997 and Florida State in 1998. It
also was NC State coach Mike
O'Cain's first victory over Brown.
O'Cain was 0-5 against Brown's
.North Carolina teams.
Despite its recent fortunes in big
early-season games, NC State
very nearly was victimized by its
own mistakes.
Texas changed consecutive
Wolfpack turnovers into a 10-0
first quarter lead, on a 2-yard run
by Applewhite and a 48-yard field
goal by Kris Stockton.
NC State shook off those mis-
takes on its next possession. Ray'
Robinson capped an 80-yard drive
when he broke outside for a 25-
yard touchdown run to make k
10-7.
The Wolfpack pulled to 10-9
when Leak recorded NC State's
first blocked punt. The ball rolled
31 yards to the end zone but three
NC State players couldn't pick k
up before the ball rolled over the
back line for a safety.
NC State made up for that mis-
take when Holt blocked a punt'
that Tony Scott returned 25 yards'
for a touchdown to pull the,
Wolfpack within 17-15 in the'
fourth quarter.
M.
let LOWE'S � help make your dorm feel more like HOME!
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MOTE: I need the following items:
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Air Conditioner
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Cleaning Supplies
Closet Organizers
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"1
I
I
LOWE'S
OF GREENVILLE
355-5211
OFF TO
STUDENTS
WITH THIS
AD THROUGH
9-07-99
i
ssj
H&R Block Tax Course Starts in September
Thousands of people are learning
the skill of income tax preparation
from H&R Block and are earning
money as income tax preparers.
H&R Block, the world's largest tax
preparation service, is offering an
income tax course starting the
week of September 6, with morning,
afternoon, and evening classes
available. Classes will be ottered at
area locations.
During the 11-week course, in addi-
tion to learning the nuts and bolts of
tax preparation, you will receive clear
explanation of the recent tax laws to
your advantage. You'll receive this
information from some of the finest.
most experienced tax preparation
Greenville 756-1209
Rocky Mount 442-1535
Code- Itf
instructors in the country. And you'll
have the opportunity to expand or
enhance your job-related skills.
H&R Block designed this course to
suit people who want to increase their
tax knowledge and to save money on
taxes, or who are looking for a second
career or seasonal employment. It is
perfect for students or retirees
seeking part-time earnings.
Qualified course graduates may be
offered job interviews for positions
with Block. Many accept employ-
ment with Block because of the flex-
ible hours available. However. Block
is under no obligation to offer
employment, nor arc graduates
under any obligation to accept
employment with H&R Block.
Washington 976-0497
Williamston 792-7014
One low course fee includes all test-
books, supplies and tax forms neces-
sary for completion of the course.
Certificates and 6.6 continuing edu-
cation units will be awarded upon
successful completion of the
Registration forms and s brochure
for the income tax course may be
obtained by contacting H&R Block.
For more information,
call 1-800-TAX-2000
or visit our Web site at
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( jimpletinn of the course n neither an
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AA i:i:omI7da'
H&R Block
elW9 Il&R Hloek lax .Services lac
Hendrix Films
p-a&lWFr
Pirate
Underground
presents the
mie plum0, tatd
wun
� The New Thriller
from the Director of
'Tim hist Seduction
ROILN DERS
Wednesday, Sept. 1 @ 7:30 pm & Thursday, Sept. 2 @ 10 pm
A law school student (Matt Damon) loses his tuition money and
everything else he has saved in a high stakes poker game.
Learning his lesson (he thinks), he vows to his girl friend (Mol
Gretchen) to give up playing forever. That lasts until his best
friend (Edward Norton), a notorious card shark, is released from
prison and drags him back into the circuit to pay debts he has
incurred to a Russian mobster (John Malkovich). John Turturro
also appears as a career poker player and Martin Landau plays a
law professor who understands his student's need to be
something other than what is dictated to him.
LIVE
September 11th,
Sat. 10p.m.@the
MSC Brick Yard
I When word reaches two
elderly best friends that
someone in their tiny Irish
village has won the national
lottery, they go to great lengths
to find the winner so they can
share the wealth. When they
discover the "lucky" winner,
Ned Devine, they find he has
died of shock upon discovering
his win. Not wanting the
money to go to waste, the
village enters a pact to pretend
Ned is still alive by having
another man pose as him, and
then to divide the money
between them.
Wednesday, Sept. 8 @ 7:30 pm & Thursday, Sept. 9 @ 10 pm
For a good time call the ECU Student
Union Hotline at 252.328.e004 or visit
our web site at
wnrVW.ecu.edustudentunion.
For additional information contact the
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27858-4353
or call 252.328.4788,
toll free 1.800.ECU.ARTS, or TDD
252.328.4736,8:30 a.m. - 6 p.m
Monday - Friday. Individuals who
require accommodations under ADA
should contact the Department for
Disability Support Services at
252.328.4802 forty-eight hours prior
to the start of the program.
1ST
-mk
PhatTuesday
"(Billingsley)3" Closing Reception
7-8pm MSC Gallery
Wicked Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: Rounders
7:30pm Hendrix
Thrilling Thursday
Mercury Cinema: Rounders
10pmHendrix
Labor Day Weekend!
Art Exhibit: "Labor of Love"
works by Jim Nicholson
MSC Gallery-95-930
tVrcJredWednesday
Mercury Cinema: waking Ned Devine
7:30pm Hendrix
Thrilling Thursday
Mercury Cinema: Waking Ned Devine
IQpm Hendrix
'Saturday!
Pirate Underground presents the
Mike Plume Band (Roots Rock)
10pmMSC Brick yard
I





14 Tmtdty, Auggit 31, 1898
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Graf looks at life without tennis
NEW YORK (AP) Steffi Graf
came back to the V.ii. Open wear-
ing pumps instead of sneakers, a
sleek navy blue dress instead of
tennis whites, and a carefree smile
that revealed how comfortable she
is with her decision to retire.
These may be a time when Graf
will miss the game so much that she
wilt change her mind, lace up again
and grab her rackets.
"Right now she said Saturday
on the eve of the tournament she
won five times, "walking away"
seems extremely easy. I don't
know if that's going to be the
case in a few months
It seems so easy, she said,
because she has no regrets. She has
been playing professionally more
than half her life, from 13 to 30.
Her 22nd Grand Slam singles
title, the French Open in June, was
her most emotional and satisfying,
completing a journey back from
injuries and illnesses that nearly
ended her career before she was
ready to quit. She goes out now on
her own terms and unquestionably
as one of the game's greatest play-
ers ever.
"I feel pretty happy about leav-
ing it right now Graf said, two
weeks after announcing she would
skip the Open and retire from the
tour. "I know I'm going to miss the
competitiveness, without a doubt.
The working out. It's different
being on a bike or a StairMaster
instead of being able to run around
and be upset if you miss a shot or
be happy if you win it. But right
now, I'm not missing it. It may
sound a little strange, knowing me,
but in a way a lot of pressure has
gone and it feels good
Graf spoke at the National
Tennis Center on a beautiful, warm
afternoon after Pete Sampras,
Andre Agassi, Martina Hingis and
Serena Williams and others playful-
ly participated in the annual Arthur
Ashe Kids' Day.
A sellout crowd of 20,883 helped
raise more than $500,000 for chari-
ties, including $400,000 that will go
to the National Junior Tennis
League to help programs aimed at
inner city kids.
WANHD
We have an immediate opening for two student
assistants in the newspaper office. These students
would assist the secretary for 10-15 hours a week in
the day-to-day functions of the newspaper.
Come by our office in the Student Publications Building
across from Mendenhall and Joyner to complete an
application or call 328-6366 for more information.
the 1 � �
eastcarolmian
It's experience you'll never forget.
Interested
the
a
lifetime?
The ECU Student Media can offer you experience which will not only
help you get a job, but will help you succeed in life.
Learn how you can join the staff of The East Carolinian, Expressions
magazine, WZMB 91.3 FM, Rebel magazine or our web media by
attending one of the interest meetings listed below:
WZMBThurs. Aug. 265 p.m.Mendenhall 221
The East CarolinianTues. Aug. 313 p.m.Mendenhall Social Rm.
Web MediaTues. Aug. 314 p.m.Student Publications Bldg.
ExpressionsWed. Sept. 13 p.m.Mendenhall 212
RebelWed. Sept. 14 p.m.Mendenhall 212
WZMBThurs. Sept. 25 p.m.Mendenhall Social Rm.
For questions or more information, call 328-6009
ECU Student Media
East Carolina University Students
Want to make your mark at ECU?
Serve as an East Carolina
University Student Representative
on a committee here at ECU!
Parking and Traffic Committee
Admissions and Recruitment Committee
Calendar Committee
Career Education Committee
Course Drop Appeals Committee
Teaching Effectiveness Committee
Student Scholarships, Fellowships,
and Financial Aid Committee
Student Transit Board
Writing Across the Curriculum Committee
Faculty Computer Committee
Libraries Committee
Student Advising and Retention Committee
University Curriculum Committee
and many more!
Contact Cliff Webster, Student Body President today:
328-4718 (office) or cww0304@mail.ecu.edu (email)
Experience the Differenceyou can make!





HE EAST CAROLINIAN
ng
f
ot only
issions
iaby
Rm.
is Bldg.
Rm.
s
LJ?
ve
ei
t
15 Tuesday. August 31. 1999
FOR RENT
ONE BEDROOM apartment. Take
over lease, available now. Rent is
$310 per month. Apartment at Vil-
lage Green on 10th Street. Call 754-
0917.
TOWNHOUSE � 3 BEDROOMS, 2
12 baths near ECU. W0 hook-up.
lots of storage. 752-1899 M-F day.
561-2203 pager night.
HOUSE FOR rent 1211 Cotanche
Street, three bedrooms, one bath,
central hear, window air condition-
ing. $550 per month. Call 3534003.
Fenced back yard.
TAKE OVER lease, rent is $200 per
month and 14 of utilities and
phone. Large 5 bedroom house. 2
bath. Call Paul at 329-8666.
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom apt. at Tow-
er Village. Firetower Road until No-
vember. Move in Sept. 10, pay de-
posit $325. No rent till October.
Quinn, 353-4153.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 758-6596.
TOWNHOUSE FOR rent. 2 BR. 1
12 bath. $475mo $475 deposit.
Williamsburg Manor off Hooker Rd.
Small pets OK. Info, call days 931-
1317. evenings 355-0741.
ECU AREA two three bedroom
houses available immediately. One
$500. wd. window ac. Other
$630. wd. central ac. dishwasher,
fenced yard. Pets OK! Call 830-9502.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share brand new 2-bdrm. apartment
A.S.A.P. Eastgate Village. For more
info, please call 561-8464.
NEED FEMALE non-smoking room-
mate for 4 bedroom house. $215
monthly 14 utilities. On ECU bus
toute. Call 752-0281.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house in quiet residential
area one mile from campus. Must be
clean. $235 month plus 13 utili-
ties. 752-2116
FOR SALE
1990 BRONCO II, good deal, tape
deckradio, power lockswindow.
Runs well. 355-5150.
i�
HUGE 280 sq.ft. bedroom with pri-
vate entrance available in vintage
home for a responsible and tidy fe-
male upperclassman. Washerdryer,
3 blocks from campus. Private bath-
room available; must provide own
window ac. Must not mind smoking
and cats. $250, 12 utilities. Serious
inquiries only. 561-7591.
AAAI CANCUN & Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air.
hotel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of
6 small businesses recognized for
outstanding ethics! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
TREK 970 with Manitou Shawn
Palmer Fork 80mm Travel. Shimano
DXLX components, new IRC tires,
seatposl V-brakes. Rapid-Fire shift-
less and brake levers. $350 OBO.
758-1888.
MOTORCYCLE, '82 Honda
CB650cc good condition, new bat-
tery, tires and other extras. Great
bike for beginners. Call 752-4242
and leave message! Asking only
$1000.00
FOR SALE, GT Tequesta mountain
liike. Equipped with Shimano STX
Components and Rock Shox. Only
one year old. Excellent condition.
$300. Call 561-7349.
1992 HONDA Civic, new tires. CD
flayer. 6-speed. $3900. 353-8324.
NEW OLYMPIC weights and bench.
Beseler Eularger. 758-6099
AAAI SPRINC Break Specials! Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 6 days $2791 In-
cludes most mealsl Awesome
(waches. nightlifel Panama City, Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
ipringbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
j$386
LAST CHANCE: Student desk,
lightly uses, one drawer handle
missing. Great for studying or small
apartment. $60 or best offer. Call
752-5899. leave message.
i
fOR SALE: Entertainment center.
Excellent condition, used one year.
Best offer. Call 758-4796.
SOME ASSEMBLY required, holes
in the wall, odd jobs, repair work,
painting, low rates, save that depos-
it and call 757-8781, leave message.
ELEMENTARY ED major to keep 4
yr. old Monday and Wednesday af-
ternoons. Send resume to 3807
Sterling Trace Drive, Winterville, NC
28590. Own transportation required.
Fax number 353-8902.
EARN $60.00 to $100.00 per hour
modeling and dancing for local adult
entertainment agency. No experi-
ence required. Flexible work hours.
Discretion and confidentiality as-
sured. 830-0494.
TENNIS INSTRUCTORS. Must be
at least 4.0 player, must be available
weeknights and weekends. 756-
6262. Henry Hostetler.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY workers
needed Sunday mornings 9:15-
12:15. Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church. 510 S. Washington St. Ap-
ply at church office. Office hours 8
a.m12noon and 1:30-5 p.m.
WANTED: STUDENT for after
school care for an 8 year-old. Need-
ed M-F 3-6 p.m. Will require trans-
portation. If interested call after 5.
756-6981: daytime 355-6423.
$25-1- PER Hour. Direct sales reps
needed Now! Market credit card
appl. Person-to-person. Commissions
avg. $25O-500wk. 1-800-651-2832.
CONSTRUCTION MANAGE-
MENT, industrial engineer or similar
major needed for part-time to full-
time work. Must be able to use drill,
etc. Will work with your schedule.
Call 756-8470 for appt.
SPRING BREAK 2000 with STS -
Join America's 1 Student Tour Op-
erator to Jamaica. Mexico. Bahamas,
Cruises, and Florida. Now hiring on-
campus reps. Call 1-800-648-4849
or visit online 9 www.ststravel.com
COMPUTER SCIENCE student
needed for new computer software
company. Basic computer skills a
must. Flexible hrs. 20hrs.wk. Call
756-8715. leave message.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
11 a.m2 p.m. Flexible work sched-
ule. For more information contact
Jim Sakell or Ronald Barrett at Cy-
press Glen Retirement Community.
830-0713.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
Is looking for mvMX.VWa& to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours Mihm to 8am.
S7.5u7hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunities in operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications an be filled out at 2410
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
GIVE US TIME
TO REPAY
YOUR LOAN.
After just three years
in the Army, your college
loan could be a thing of the
past.
Under the Army's Loan
Repayment program, each
year you serve on active
duty reduces your indebted-
ness by one-third or $1,500,
whichever amount is
greater, up to a $65,000
limit
This offer applies to
Perkins Loans, Stafford
Loans and certain other
federally insured loans
which are not in default
And this is just the first
of many benefits the Army
will give you. Get the whole
story from your Army
Recruiter.
756-9695
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE:
www.goarmy.com
classifieds
FOR SALE
2 YEAR old Whisper Writer word
processor, like new with monitor and
printer. $100 firm. Call Paula at 754-
0926.
FOR SALE: sleeper sofa, good con-
dition, blue with plaid print. Need to
get rid of ASAP. $60 or best offer.
329-1391
1995 HONDA Civic EX. excellent
condition, fully loaded, power sun-
roof, CD changer, new tires, call 413-
0330, ask for Dennis or Tracy.
$12,500 OBO.
HELP WANTED
HELP WANTED
LOOKING FOR a hard working, de-
pendable person for a flight line po-
sition. Duties include cleaning and
moving airplanes. Aviation experi-
ence preferred but not required. 15-
25 hrsweek. Some weekends.
$6.50hr start. Apply in person at
Dillon's Aviation. 1106 N. Memorial
Drive, Pitt-Greenville Airport.
TEACHER NEEDED full-time to
teach 2 year olds class. Must have
experience. Also hiring substitutes.
Call Harmony Child Care, 766-6229.
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Thursdays (no morning classes,
please), for two young children. No
smokers, please. Must have refer-
ences. Call 355-7876.
PART-TIME JOBS AVAILABLE.
Joan's Fashions, a local Women's
Clothing Store, is now filling part-
time positions. Applicants must be
available for Tuesday afternoons.
Thursday mornings andor Thursday
afternoons. The positions are for bet-
ween 7 and 20 hours per week, de-
pending on your schedule and on
business needs. The jobs are within
walking distance of ECU and the
hours are flexible. Pay is commensu-
rate with your experience and job
performance and is supplemented
by an employee discount. Apply in
person to Store Manager. Joan's
Fashions. 423 S. Evans Street.
Greenville (Uptown Greenville).
MOTHER'S HELPER needed for 4
children. Includes housecleaning.
cooking & babysitting. Requires ex-
cellent references with reliable trans-
portation. Mondays, Tuesdays &or
Thursdays for full days. Call 321-
1379.
FREE BABY Boom Box Earn
$12001 Fundraiser for student
groups & organizations. Earn up
to $4 par MasterCard app. Call
for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a free
baby boom box. 1-800-932-0528
axt. 119 or ext. 125 www.ocm-
concepta.com
ONLINE INFORMATION Services
is looking for 3 parttime telephone
collectors to work evenings from 5
p.m. to 9 p.m. and every other Satur-
day from 8 a.m. to 12 p.m. Call Brian
Franey at 757-2130 or Andi Cullums
at 754-1616.
LOSERS WANTED! Need or want
to lose weight? Hottest guaranteed
diet in USA! Call 1-888-870-5032.
MALE AND FEMALE GYMNASTICS
TEACHERS WANTED CALL ROSE'S
GYMNASTICS AT 321-7264 FOR JOB
OPPORTUNITIES.
HELP WANTED: hiring part-time
kitchen, dish, and wait staff. Apply at
Basil's Restaurant. 1675 E. Firetower
Rd.
LOOKINO FOR 20 guys and gals
for local radio station phone promo-
tion. Earn $6 plus bonus per hour.
Full and part time, morning, day and
evening hours available. Near cam-
pus location at 223 West 10th Street
Suite 107 (inside Wilcar Executive
Center) just down the street from
McDonalds and Krispy Kreme. Apply
ASAP in person only 10a.m. through
6p.m. (no calls please).
SSSSSTUTORS NEEDEDSSSSS
Looking for some extra money (best
pay on campus!) and a way to im-
prove academically? Become a tutor
for the Office of Student Develop-
ment-Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any level (0001-
5999) in all subject areas. Under-
graduate students are paid six dol-
lars an hour ($6) and graduate stud-
ents are paid seven dollars an hour
($7). If this sounds like the job for
you. join us for an orientation meet-
ings in Ward Sports Medicine Build-
ing (behind Minges Coliseum) on
either 824 at 6 p.m 825 at 3 p.m.
or 830 at 5 p.m. Questions? Need
more information? Contact Isha Wil-
liams at 328-4691 for further infor-
mation.
LOOKING FOR A job? The ECU Tel-
efund is hiring studentsfor the Fall of
1999 to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212.
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicant must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$6.16 per hour. Applications will be
taken until the positions are filled.
For more information, please call
Judd Crumpler. Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4560 after 2PM.
SERVICES
FUN ft free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me. I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available (I've pho-
tographed dozens of ECU girls).
Please send a note, phone number
and a picture (if available - it will be
returned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413
Pinehurst Dr Wilson, NC 27893 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail me at
hronjakOsimflex.com
GREEK PERSONALS
GAMMA BETA Phi Society will
moot Thursday, Sept. 2, at 5
p.m. In GC 1031. For more info:
www.acu.aduorggbp
CONGRATULATIONS TO all of our
new members: Tonya Collier, Laurie
Cooke, Suzanne Cotty, Jessica Craw-
ley. Kristina Davis. Elizabeth Garrett,
Corinne Grodski. Sandy Hartsoe.
Gina Jannuzzi. Michelle Leggett. Em-
ily Mickelson. Kathy Pacella, Jane
Polifrone. Niki Ringgold. Kristin
Seery. Catherine Stephens. MEghan
Wagner. Jessica Wearne. Macaria
Wheeler. Lauren White. Courtney
Zimmerman. Love, the sisters of Al-
pha Phi
PI KAPPA Alpha- thanks for show-
ing our new girls a great time at
pref. We all had a blast, and look for-
ward to-doing it again. Love. Alpha
Phi
OTHER
5 PERCENT discount. ECU students
with this coupon. Hot dogs, subs,
and pizzas. Warren's "Hot" Dogs.
1938 North Memorial Drive.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SIGMA GAMMA Rho invites all
who are interested in learning more
about our organization to the Infor-
mational Meeting. Sept. 1st in Men-
denhall Student Center at 7 p.m
Great Room 1
PASTOR JAMES D. Corbett of
Community Christian Church will be
hosting a Singles Fellowship on Fri-
day, Sept. 3 at 7 p.m. Guest speaker
will be Pastor Shirley Nicholson from
Abundant Life Community Christian
Church in Silver Spring. MD. The fel-
lowship will be held at Community
Christian Academy. 2009 Pactolus
Road. Greenville. All adult single
women and men are invited to at-
tend. Singles Fellowship is designed
to minister to the needs of the un-
married so they may learn to live
saved, single, and successful lives as
Christians. For info, call 551-9143.
FIRST DANCE of the year! Septem-
ber Contra Dance music by Contradi-
tion; caller: Brian Hayes. Free begin-
ners lessons: 7-7:30 p.m. Dance:
7:30-10:30 p.m. Location: Willis
Bldg 1st and Reade Sts. downtown.
Students $3.00. public $5-6. ECU
Folk and Country Dancers. Come
alone or bring a friend! 328-0237.
COME JOIN the RCLS Society on
September 13 in the Pirate's Club
building at 4:30 p.m . New members
are welcome! Please bring your cal-
enders.
THE REAL Crisis Center is recruiting
community people to become volun-
teer crisis counselors. We need com-
munity people for daytime and night-
time shifts We need your experienc-
es! Your achievements in everyday
situations can be useful to others.
We will be offering a training course
beginning Sept. 13. For more info.
call 758-HELP.
ECU ROAD Rules Mission 2 is be-
ing held Tuesday. Aug.31 from 4-6
p.m. or Wednesday. Sept. 1 from 7-
8 p.m. in 212 Mendenhall. All fresh-
men commuters are invited. Inves-
tigate your learning style and ways
to succeed in class. Call 6881 for
more information.
FRESHMAN FOCUS will be held on
Wednesday. Sept. 1 from 7-8 p.m. in
the Student Recreation Center's
Classroom. Come out to this free ev-
ent and learn the how's, why's, and
where's of fitness.
ENJOY A pleasant day hiking in
Umstead State Park on Sept. 12.
Reg. Sept. 1. Cost is $16 for mem-
bers and $20 for non-members.
Student Recreation Center
HELP WANTED
THE MIWMAN Catholic Student
Center wishes to announce and inv-
ite you to its 12th Annual Open
House and Pig Pickin Wednesday.
Sept. 1. 1999, 4 p.m. to 7 p.m. The
Center is located at 963 East 10th
Street. 2 houses from Fletcher Music
Building. For more information re-
garding the Newman Canter, please
call Fr. Paul at 767-1991.
PERSONALS
VOLLEYBALL OFFICIALS Meeting:
Anyone interested in being an offi-
cial for intramural voKeyba should
attend the meeting on Sept. 1 at 8
p.m in the Student Recreation Center
classroom. Some experience re-
quested and you will be payed) For
more info, please call 328-8387.
DONT MISS the sea kayaking trip
to Goose Creek scheduled for Sept.
9. Reg. Sept. 1. Cost is $16 for mem-
bers and $20 for non-members.
Earn while
you learn
in The East Carolinian
advertising department.
We are looking for two
students to fill slots as
advertising sales
representatives.
If you're looking for a
part-time job that lets you
learn while you earn, come
by our office in the Student
Publications Buttding (across
from Mendenhall & Joyner)
or call 328-6366 for more
information.
Advertise in
The East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN UNE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5t each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 5$ each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse this rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE .$1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAYS issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
I.





Get A Clue
The Scene: It was a dark and stormy night.
The Suspects: ECU students.
The Crime: Around Greenville, students sat alone in their
residence halls and apartments tormented by loneliness, boredom,
and questions.
The Investigation: One student had enough of all this
so she began searching for clues. She began her search
with the helpful folks in the residence hall. There
she was directed to attend "Get A Clue On
Life" sponsored by the Division of
Student Life. Get A Clue, she
learned, is an event at which
student organizations and student
service offices set up information
tables on Wright Plaza to showcase
their activities. Any interested
student can drop by on September 8
between 10:30 a.m. and 1:00 p.m. to
pick up information and win prizes.
The Criminal: Any student who misses Get A Clue.
Welcome To Hie
The Tar River Neighborhood Association (TRNA)-north of campus, and The
University Neighborhood Association (TUNA)-south and east of the campus
wish to welcome ECU students to Greenville. TRNA and TUNA are the two
neighborhood organizations surrounding the university. If you live in one of these
neighborhoods your life will be intertwined with many other Greenville residents.
We encourage your involvement in our organizations as we blend the lifestyles
of working families, families withsmall children, retired families, single
professionals, faculty, and staff. The objectives of these organizations are:
To promote neighborhood preservation so that a safe, healthy, pleasant and
attractive residential community is maintained for all individuals.
To encourage a sense of community and respectful neighbor relations.
To help insure the maintenance of property values and better public services.
TRNA membership is $5.00. Please mail your name, address and fee to TRNA,
107 S. Harding St Greenville, NC 27858. The first hall meeting is September 30,
7:30 p.m. at St. Paul's Episcopal Church Fellowship Hall.
TUNA membership is also $5.00 and can be mailed to TUNA, 2007 E. Fifth St
Greenville, NC 27858. TUNA board meetings are the first Wednesday of each
month at 2007 East Fifth Street at 7:00 p.m.
For more information on off-campus living call Adult and Commuter Student
Services at 328-6881 to receive your free copy of "A Place of Your Own: A Guide
For Off-Campus Living
Joe Student
Hits The
Campaign
If Dan Quayle and Al Gore can run for office, why can't I? I could be an SGA
legislator or even Class President! Then I would have a say on all that student
fee money. Maybe I could even have an intern under me. "Yes, Mr. President
"What can I do for you Mr. President?" "Will that be one lump or two in your tea,
Mr. President?" "Happy Birthday, Mr. President
It's not even that hard to get involved. All I have to do is to file the application
form at the SGA office in Mendenhall Student Center and pay the $10
refundable fee by September 3. Where am I going to get $10 from before
the first week in September? Mom! I'm sure she'd donate $10 to help her
adorable son run for President. Then its time to campaign before
the September 22 election. I can hang banners, hand out
fliers and buttons, and make campaign promises. I'll
promise students free parking, fight for a four-day
school week, outlaw homework when there is a foot-
ball game, and demand 15 cent wings at BW3's. I
love this! I can leave my legacy at ECU.
� �
VOTE
After all, who is going to beat me? You?
Do you think you have what it takes?
Can you even remember to vote?
We Guarantee!
As ECU's food service provider, ARAMARK commits to providing quality food
and service to EVERY customer; in fact, we guarantee it! ARAMARK maintains
a "We Guarantee" program to insure that you are a satisfied customer. Our
guarantee to you is "if you are not pleased with your dining experience, please let
us know. We will gladly replace or refund your purchase If at any time you
have a concern about our food quality or customer service, inform a member of
our management team immediately. We will work to improve the situation and
offer an incentive for a more enjoyable visit in the future. Welcome to ECU and
we look forward to serving you!
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 31, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 31, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1352
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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