The East Carolinian, August 26, 1999







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THURSDAY. AUGUST 28.1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE B8
Beware of easy money.
Seepg.7
News
Briefs
The Billingsley3 Art Exhibit is being dis-
played in the Mendenhall Student Center
Gallery. The art exhibit was produced by
two ECU School of Art faculty. Carl and
Catherine, and their son, Benjamin
Billingsley.
The annual King and Queen of the Halls
will be held today at the bottom of College
Hill. Participants will be able to partake in
wacky and unusual games. The event
begins at 4 p.m. and ends at 6 p.m.
wy
The Pirate Underground presents Lake
Trout with DJ Who on Saturday. The
Baltimore based five piece jazz combo was
formed in 1994 and has developed e fol-
lowing up and down the east coast. The
concert begins at 10 p.m. and ends at
11:45 p.m. at the Mendenhall brickyard.
The National Academic Advising
Association has selected ECU professor
Holly Mathews as one of the nation's top
academic advisers. Or. Mathews, an
anthropology professor, is one of 24 advis-
ers to be honored with a certificate of merit
in this year's nationwide competition.
The recipients will receive their awards
in October at the association's national
conference in Denver.
ECU has completed a study on the
impact of last summer's Hurricane Bonnie
and has found that the evacuation costs for
the storm were more than $46 million.
According to the study produced by ECU
Regional Development Services and the
Departments of Sociology and Economics,
the businesses in eight coastal counties
suffered the greatest economic impact
from the storm. The average cost or loss of
revenue to each of 1,740 firms impacted by
the voluntary evacuation order was esti-
mated at $17,593. The total evacuation
costs for the businesses were $30.6 mil-
lion.
YORK. PaA York police officer was
wounded in the arm but was saved from a
more serious chest injury when a bullet
from a robber's gun hit his badge.
Officer Russell Tschopp was in satisfac-
tory condition at York Hospital Tuesday
after the early morning incident at a gas
station in York.
Tschopp was hurt when he tried to stop
two robbery suspects from fleeing in a car.
A man and a woman are in custody and
police are searching for a third suspect.
Police are investigating.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
SGA executive
branch ready for new year
(from left) Overton Harper, Cliff
Webster, Jessica Dowdy, John Meriac
PHOTO CqURTESY WORLD WIDE WEB
Legislative election
slated for Sept. 22
Com Sheeler
NEWS EDITOR
The Student Government
Assoc-iation has their execu-
tive board in place and is
ready to begin a new semester.
With many goals for the
upcoming year, they want to
get as many students involved
as possible.
The SGA will be holding
elections for day representa-
tives, dorm representatives
and classes representatives.
The election" will be held
Sept. 22 and the filing dead-
line for candidates is Sept. 3.
There will be a mandatory
meeting on Sept. 8 in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Below is a list of the SGA
executive branch.
This miter can be contacted
news@stuoentmedia.ecu.edu.
Cliff Webster, Jr.
Student Body President
Major: Graduate Student,
MBA program
Marketing degree. May 1999,
East Carolina University
View on SGA: SGA gives students
their link to a "fair share" on our campus.
It gives them the chance to actually have
a voice and make decisions that impact
our student body. For example: the
Student Recreation Center. The SGA put
that into the workings for our university.
And especially now. as the University is
overlooking the master plan, we, the stu-
dent body, can have a huge voice in what
will happen over the next few years
as we start to grow rapidly.
John P. Meriac
Vice President
Mejor: PsychologyBusiness
View of SGA: Students should get
involved in SGA to get a feel of what it is
like to work with and help many people
from all areas of campus and to gain an
insider's perspective of how ECU works.
Overton Harper, III
Treasurer
Mejor: Finance
View of SGA: Participating in SGA
is an excellent way to make a lasting
impact on East Carolina University
Jessica Dowdy
Secretary
Mejor: Secondary English Education
View of SGA To become familiar with
the inner workings of ECU. To help with
issues mat students feel are imperative.
New vice chancellor named
Moore to oversee
student services
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
Dr. Garrie Moore has been appoint-
ed as the new vice chancellor for the
Division of Student Life.
Moore came to ECU last year as
assistant to the chancellor and direc-
tor of equal opportunity employ-
ment, after working a� the dean of
students at Pitt Community College
for a number of years.
As a part of the Student Life divi-
sion, he takes part in overseeing the
many services it offers. They
include a variety of non-academic
student activities and programs,
including housing and dining ser-
vices, recreation and intramural,
minority student affairs, financial
aid, orientation, career services and
student health services.
The University of North
Carolina Board of Governors
acknowledged Moore's appoint-
ment as vice chancellor at a meeting
on Aug. 13 in Cullowhee.
"I am very pleased that Dr.
Moore has accepted this appoint-
ment as vice chancellor said
Chancellor Richard Eakin. "He has
a distinguished record of service to
higher education and to this region.
I know that he will continue the tra-
dition of outstanding leadership in
the Division of Student Life
In the excitement of taking on a
new position, Moore has not over-
looked the fact that there will be
challenging times ahead.
"My first goal is to take a look at
the existing programs to see if
they're meeting the needs of the
students. Then we can move on to
see if we have the resources to begin
new things Moore said. "The
challenges will include making sure
we have appropriate quality housing
and financial aid programs that are
meeting the needs of students. We
have to become equipped and stay
equipped
Moore is replacing Dr. Alfred
Matthews, a faculty member who
will be missed.
"In his 10 years here, Matthews
invested a lot into the growth and
development of the University,
from buildings such as Wright Place,
Todd Dining Hall and the Student
Rec Center to new student leader-
ship programs said Dr. Richard
Speier, dean of students. "His vision
is going to be missed
"However, Dr. Moore brings a
new vision to the University. He's
very concerned with the way the
students think, feel and act Speier
said.
Overall, Moore feels that the
transfer of leadership within the
division will be successful.
"I'm really excited about the
staff Speier said. "They're all
energetic well-qualified, knowl-
edgeable, student-centered and
working hard to stay on the cutting
edge
This miter can ba contacted
tsteinbeiseristudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Dean of students visits ROTC camp
Speier experiences
trenches of Fort Louis
Angela Harne
staff writer
This summer camouflage, danger
and heat surrounded Dean of
Students, Dr. Ronald Speier. This
was quite a contrast from his office
environment.
Speier and his wife were invited
by the ROTC to take part in the
summer ROTC program in Fort
Louis, Washington. Upon comple-
tion of the course, the dean was
presented an ROTC Advanced
Camp 1999 plaque.
Captain Donald Mundy pre-
sented the dean with the plaque,
commenting on how proud he was
of his cadets. Many of the them had
gone through the course with
Speier.
"Thank you very much, I truly
appreciate it said Speier, receiv-
ing his plaque. "I took great pride
in wearing the uniform while I
went throughout the course
"He successfully completed a
rough course Mundy said.
SEE DEAN PAGE 4
University ranks
high in magazine poll
US.NemsattdWorU
Report rates ECU 7lh
Phillip Gilfis
assistant news editor
ECU is ranked seventh as a Top
Southern Public University, accord-
ing to the 2000 College Rankings
released this month by U.S. News
and World Report. The university is
also ranked 23rd among Southern
regional universities.
The magazine used each univer-
sity's academic reputation, retention
of students, faculty resources, stu-
dent selectivity, financial resources
and alumni generosity to decide the
rankings.
"I think it's wonderful said
Ronald Speier, dean of students.
"Our quality of faculty and types of
experiences that we offer in student
life, inside and outside the classroom
make us an excellent school
ECU was placed in the category
of "regional" schools, unlike UNC-
Chapel Hill and Wake Forest, which
were ranked in the "national univer-
sity" categories.
U.S. News and World Report
defined a "regional university" as
one that offers "a full range of under-
graduate and master's programs but
few, if any, doctoral programs
In the category of Southern
Public Universities, ECU tied for
seventh with UNC-Wilmington,
Winthrop University (S.C.) and
Longwood College (Va.).
Appalachian State ranks number
five, followed by UNC-Charlotte at
number six.
In the category of Southern
regional universities, ECU was tied
with Longwood College, UNC-
Wilmington, Winthrop University,
Bellamine College (Ky.) and
Christian Brothers University
(Tenn.).
"More and more people are view-
ing ECU as a good place to go to
school said John Durham, director
of News and Communications.
He added, though, that not too
much emphasis should be placed on
rankings.
'The University makes its poli-
cies based on how to make this a bet-
ter place to go to school, not on rank-
ings
Marion Sykes, senior associate
director of admissions, stated that
the rankings show that ECU has
"the right balance
"We have a great diversity of
degree programs, ranging from fine
arts to allied health programs he
said.
He added that ECU is large
enough to "make a complete college
experience but small enough to
have interaction among professors
and students in the classroom.
This writer can be contacted
pgilfus@sttidentmedia.ecu.edu.
Top Southern
Universities
2. Mary Washington College (Va.)
4. College of Charleston (S.C.)
6. UNC-Charlotte
7. Longwood College (Va.)
7. Winthrop University (S.C.)
�Source: U.S. News and World Report
7. fcast Carolina university
Look into his eyes
Dan LaRosa, who calls himself The Humorous Hypnotist performed for
ECU students last night at Mendenhall Student Center Guests wire enter-
tained as LaRosa hypnotized members of the audience while making the
crowd laugh throughout the show. Students were able to pick up two free
tickets prior to the show, while the general public was charged $3. Hie
show was sponsored by the Student Union.
PHOTO BV WILLIAM KEITH







2 Ttwthy, August 26. 1998
news
flC�ftSS
campuses
Colorado University's
human-rights repository in danger
University of Colorado�C.U. Boulder's campus may lose a significant portion of its world-renowned human-
rights repository because the preeminent archive program is not fiscally and philosophically compatible with the
goal of the university's so-called "Total Learning Environment" initiative, sources familiar with the situation told
the Colorado Daily on Tuesday.
C.U. Boulder's human-rights repository�currently the largest academic collection of non-governmental
human-rights materials in the world�contains documents donated by the Guatemala Human Rights
Commission, the Soviet Jewry Rescue Movement, and the El Salvador Archive Project. The repository is also
home to documents bestowed by Physicians for Human Rights, the Women's International League for Peace and
.Freedom and the U.S. Department of State, which endowed to C.U. its files pertaining to atrocities committed
by Jraqi secret police forces during the Persian Gulf War.
In January, C.U. announced with much fanfare yet another major acquisition: The New York-based Human
Rights Watch organization�which has compiled voluminous files on human-rights violations around the world�
had agreed to entrust all of its documents to C.U.
But on Tuesday, a Human Rights Watch employee who spoke on the condition of anonymity said that the
organization is very frustrated with the lack of institutional support that C. U. has given the files. According to the
employee, the organization may try to reclaim its materials so that it can entrust them to an institution that could
better promote their historical importance to the public.
Religions converge at
Indiana University in celebration
Indiana University � A swami, a rabbi, a Buddhist, a Muslim, a priest and a nun walk into a church.
' It's not the beginning of a joke, or a meeting to argue religious differences. Instead, it was a celebration of the
similarities of their faiths.
Understanding among various religious faiths was a common objective as His Holiness, the 14th Dalai Lama
of Tibet, and other spiritual leaders led an "Inter-rcligious Vigil for World Peace Monday evening.
The event was cospon-ored by the Monastic Interreligious Dialogue and the Tibetan Culture Center in cel-
ebration of the Kalachakra for World Peace 1999.
The Dalai Lama recognized Sister Mary Funk of Our Lady of Grace Monastery in Beech Grove, his brother
Thubten Norbu of the TCC and others for planning of the vigil.
His Holiness' entrance was greeted by the sounds of the Drepung Loseling Monastic Choir and the Abbey
of Gethsemani Monastic Schola. All attendants rose and many bowed as the Dalai Lama walked down the aisle,
past an illuminated globe at the front of the church.
An invocation was given by representatives of I lindu, Islamic, Jewish and Christian faiths. Attendees includ-
ed Swami Varadananda, Dr. Shahid Athar, Rabbi Eric Bram, Father Tobias Colgan and Sister Mary Sue
Freiberger. Their speaking reflected similar ideals among faiths, recognizing one god, while praying for peace
and harmony.
Twenty minutes of silent meditation followed a performance of "Ave Maria" by cellist Michael Fitzpatrick
�jind harpist Laura Bryne. The silence was broken
:� when Fitzpatrick and pianist Loren Tice softly played Ravel's "The Pavane
; To conclude the vigil, participants followed each other around the displayed globe before exiting. Bassist
Anthony Stoops and flutist Lisha McDuff joined other musicians in playing a recessional song. The Dalai Lama
sailed and shook hands with attendants as he left the church.


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The Elll Carolinian
news
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August 23
9:36 a.m.�Disturbance�A staff member reported that a patient was
disruptive at the ECU Women's Physician Clinic.
4:06 p.m.�Hit & Run�A student reported that she saw a staff mem-
ber leave the scene of an accident in the parking lot cast of Brody School
of Medicine. The staff member was operating a state-owned vehicle when
he collided with a personal vehicle.
7:35 p.m.�Harassing Phone Calls�A student reported that an
unknown male made two harassing phone calls to her room.
8:21 p.m.� Harassing Phone Calls�Three students reported that they'
received harassing phone calls from an unknown male subject. Victims
were all in the same room and subject made four separate calls.
August 24
2:30 a.m.�Driving While License Revoked�A staff member was'
arrested for DWLR after being stopped for driving with one headlight out
11:29 a.m.�Larceny�A faculty member reported that someone stole
his backpack from Howell Science Building.
9:11 a.m.�Larceny�A non-student was apprehended for attempting
to steal a book from Joyner Library and later arrested. A records check '
revealed that he was wanted for auto theft in Raleigh.
3:15 p.m.�Larceny�A staff member reported that someone stole a
Scanjet scanner and circuitry board from a room in Brody School of
Medicine.
10:29 p.m.�LarcenySecond Degree Burglary�A student reported
that an unknown person entered his room and stole a bag containing an
English and math book. The student was taking at shower at the rime of
incident.
11:50 p.m.�Provisional DW1�A student was issued a citation and,
campus appearance ticket for provisional DWI after he was stopped for
speeding on College Hill Drive. ,
August 25
2:20 a.m.�Resist, Obstruct & Delay�A non-student was arrested for,
resisting, obstructing and delaying by providing a false name and birthdate.
to officers during a traffic stop. I le and two other suspects fled the scene;
later officers were able to apprehend non-student. He was originally
stopped for fictitious tags. '
S?lSs!�!�
StudentGovernment
Stop complaining about campus
issues and do something about them.
CAPTAINS' MTG.
Mon. August 3Q
5:00 pm MSC 244
Men's , Women's
moreinfo
328-6387
Register now for student legislative positions.
Qualifications:
Must have a 2.0 GPA, must be a full time student and must be in good standing
with the University.
Register in the SGA office - 255 Mendenhall Student Center between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m beginning August 25th through September 3,1999.
Candidates Mandatory Meeting will be held on Wednesday, September 8,1999
Election date: Wednesday, September 22,1999
Make a difference, join SGA

-a-





4 ThurtJiy, Aupinl 26, 1899
news
The East Carolinian
Dean
continued Irom page I
The dean visited Fort Louis
with his wife on a two to three day
vacation.
"I've been married 29 years, and
it's been the first vacation we've
taken without the children Speier
said. "We enjoyed walking around
Port Angles, while waiting for the
boat to camp
"Hopefully, upon completion of
the program, the dean will be able
to pay big dividends for the regime
presented said Lt. Colonel
Michael Loftin, jokingly.
The dean was able to see and
experience what the cadets
encounter at camp. The program
was aimed to give Speier knowl-
edge of what ROTC students go
through so that he is better
equipped to assist them with their
problems.
"Now I can be sensitive with the
knowledge I have gained from the
program for when the ROTCs
return to the campus Speier said.
"The ROTC is a great program. It
started when I came to ECU, and
now we are trying to expand the
program
In the midst of his honor cere-
mony, Speier mentioned his office
door is always open to students,
which is located in Whichard 201.
This writer can be contacted
ah3rneSstudentmedia.ecu.edu.
Hey Girls
Did you miss fall RUSH!
Rush nA
The only social sorority founded at
East Carolina University. August
30th @ 7 p.m. Mendenhall Rm 221
For more information or a ride
contact. Heather @ 328-8347 or
Tammy @ 756-4628
Interested in getting
the experience of
a lifetime?
The ECU Student Media can offer you experience which will not only
help you get a job, but will help you succeed in life.
Learn how you can join the staff of The East Carolinian, Expressions
magazine, WZMB 91.3 FM, Rebel magazine or our web media by
attending one of the interest meetings listed below:
WZMBThurs. Aug. 265 p.m.Mendenhall 221
The East CarolinianTues. Aug. 313 p.m.Mendenhall Social Rm.
Web MediaTues. Aug. 314 p.m.Student Publications Bldg.
ExpressionsWed. Sept. 13 p.m.Mendenhall 212
RebelWed. Sept. 14 p.m.Mendenhall 212
WZMBThurs. Sept. 25 p.m.Mendenhall Social Rm.
For questions or more information, call 328-6009
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The Eatt Carolinian
opinion
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ourview
This month we
liav� bci�" niiikcid
seventh anwng pub-
Ik: universities in IJhe
South and 23rd
among all Southern
regional acliools by
U.S. (Mows and World
Report magazine.
At times our university seems to have a negative image. Talk to a person
about ECU and they may start to ask about the "easy" classes, the downtown
activities and wild parties. But that is not ECU. This month we have been
ranked seventh among public universities in the South and 23rd among all
Southern regional schools by U.S. News and Worid Report magazine. And
rightly so. We offer over 14,000 students a variety of programs, both academ-
ic and recreational. There is a diverse group of degree programs to choose
from, with over 20 degree programs holding national accreditations. Our
School of Medicine draws students from everywhere and continues to excel
in its nursing programs. Our university is large enough to be involved in
Division I-A athletics, playing such schools as the University of Miami, West
Virginia University and Tulane University. We offer an amazing student
activity center at Mendenhall and an extensive Student Recreation Center.
There is a countless number of student organizations for every interest or
hobby a student has. But our school is also small enough to have a "small
town" feel. Most professors have personal interaction with their students,
calling them by name, unlike the lecture halls where "every student is just
another number This recent ranking of ECU in a magazine only encour-
ages our belief that ECU is one of the best. And though we may get an occa-
sional black mark on our record, we know that our students are trying their
best and our faculty and staff work hard.
OPINION
should be more careful
relieve it or not, there are some
B
ho would be saddened if little
I
&' me were to be flattened in the
�a
k Twiddle of campus by some mad
at
cyclist.
s
toie campus of ECU is seemingly
ftjerwhelmed with people on bicy-
gs lately. Daily, there seem to be
pre and more bicycles rolling over
r campus, and unfortunately, not all
JJU cyclists are smart, safe drivers.
I Traveling through campus, I have
jjd many close calls with bicycles. I
Ssa know that I am not the only one
who has suffered such close calls.
Everyday, I see cyclists who do not
seem to realize that our campus is a
busy place with people everywhere.
It is not a good idea to speed through
campus at high speeds, endangering
those on foot. It really makes me ill to
see someone on a bicycle hurdling
through with no regard for those
around them.
Obviously, many riders do not seem
to care about us poor lil' pedestrians
Today on campus I was nearly mn
over by at least three bicycles. 1 also wit-
nessed a near head-on collision involv-
ing two bicycles, and saw one biker
almost mn over some pxr girl with a
bag full of books. How malicious!
Granted, not all cyclists around
ECU are bad. I also do not have any-
thing against riding a bike on cam-
pus. I think that it is a convenient,
quick mode of transportation. My
beef is not with cyclists in general.
My concern is irresponsible riding.
Bikes can be dangerous and those
who ride through campus like a holy
terror are not being fair to those on
foot or to those cyclists who ride
responsibly.
If you are going to ride a bike
through campus, please do so careful-
ly. I xwk out for those of us not riding,
and also be aware of others who are.
Believe it or not, there are some who
would be saddened if little of me
were to be flattened in the middle of
campus by some mad cyclist.
This writer cm be reached
at swilkinsSstvdentmedia.ecu.edu
.OPINION
MIKE
EDWARDS
Search for perfect pants comes up short
The last time I had to wear
droopy pants was when I
herited them from my brother
or my cousin.

Pve been searching for a pair of
Brown pants for over two weeks in
his town. Nowhere is there a pair of
iwn men's 32x34 pants. I could
Iderstand the problem when I was
Brunswick County. Most people
re wider than they were tall, but
mnd here, they're all sizes.
r Looking back on it, though, I
feve seen a lot of guys wearing
Knts that seemed a bit, well,
pbopy. The last time I had to wear
ipy pants was when I inherited
m from my brother or my cousin,
en you're a kid, you don't have
ich of a choice of what to wear,
iu take what you can get.
lerefore, I used to mn around
;ed whenever possible. But the
lighborhood ladies kept calling my
Id.
The only way my dad could cor-
:t my behavior was to keep my
ir so short that I was ashamed to
out in public! Once a week�
whether 1 needed it or not�it did-
n't matter. Just as the hair was get-
ting long enough to hold onto, off it
came. That continued all through
high school. Fortunately, back then,
a lot of fathers still ran the family,
and there were a lot of us kids run-
ning around with short hair.
Then, in the 70s, all hell broke
loose. I went home from college for
Thanksgiving and I sat across the
table from my dad and my uncle
Earl. I was proud of my dad since he
always appreciated my coming
home. But uncle Earl was another
story. I remember him cutting into
the slab of ham on his plate and
without looking at me said, "you
now one of them hippies?" Things
got so quiet that I swear the turkey
let out a little gobble. I said, "great-
grand daddy had long hair and a
beard�I wonder if anyone thought
he was a hippie?" I remember the
sweat breaking on my forehead, and
I looked up at him keeping his eyes
on his plate. Hippies had more
important things going on back in
the 70s than family grief.
How many times have I heard
the expression "clothes make the
man?" Of course, I suspect the same
goes for women, too. But why some
people wear clothes that make them
look worse than they look, I can't
understand. And why would anyone
wear clothes that said "BUM" on
them? If you already look like a
bum, why advertise it? I think I'll
make a line of clothes named
"Flunky" and another called
"Slob I'm going to give Ralph and
Tommy a run for their money. And,
why pay good money to advertise
another person's name�that's for
kids who don't know who they are. I
wonder if they still make Roy
Rogers underwear?
I used to sweat it when I was a
kid and still had my brother's or
cousin's names sewn in my undies.
I was afraid if I got hit by a car, no
one would know who I was until it
was too late. I can see it now�
"here lies George Klutz
Several years ago, I found myself
struck by a train, and no, I wasn't in
the track. The only thing I could
think of, as I was lying there in the
dust, was whose name is in my
underwear? Then, I remembered I
was over 21 and hadn't worn anyone
else's underwear in years.
What I am trying to say is that
guys have it rough finding the right
length clothes, so give them a
break. If a girl's dress is too short,
who's going to point a finger?
This writer can be contacted
at edwardsmSstudmtmedia.ecu.edu
X CAH'T BEtltVe HOUMOCD G&S AM M7H MkWC-
�m too�L aND�N6- & -mis Nmo! wrw tune Sn.viotmt
OPINION!
PATRICK
MCMAHON
Students can have positive impact
All I'm saying is just that
when you do get out into the
real world, do not forget about
the less fortunate.
Let me just start this off with a little
welcome back to everyone here at
good ol' ECl I. Now that the hellos are
exchanged, I feel the need to get this
off my chest. You know, everyday I
look around and realize how lucky I
am to be here. Lucky to Ix; in school,
lucky to have such a good group of
friends, and just lucky in general.
When I think about all the things that
could have gone wrong in my life, I
feel privileged to have the opportuni-
ty to better myself through higher
education.
I'm sure most of us here at ECU
are from North Carolina and know
that certain areas of the state are not
the best places to grow up in, but
somehow we still made it through
the rigors of early life and arrived
here (enough with the ramblings,
Patrick, get to the point). My point
is, when you come to ECU and get
your degree, don't forget about what
you left behind and just say "I'm
never going back to " You owe
that little town that you grew up in a
whole lot. Sure it may be riddled in
drugs, violence and ugly women, but
that is no excuse. Use this newfound
knowledge of the world and do
something with it I know it sounds
stupid, but HELP SOMEONE.
Not everyone is as fortunate as us.
Not everyone has a job right out of
school that starts at 25 grand. For
some people, it takes three to four
years combined to make that much
money. I'm not saying for everyone
to drop that $40,000 a year computer
analyst job and mn into the slums of
Kinston and throw $100 dollar bills
at poor people. All I'm saying is just
that when you do get out into the
real world, do not forget about the
less fortunate. You have to do some-
thing. Get involved with your
church, your community leaders, the
school board in your town and any-
thing that can make a positive differ-
ence in someone else's life. This is
not your choice, it is your duty.
This writer can be reached at
pmcmahonSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
OPINION!
MARVELLE
SULLIVAN
Laws of physics apply to relationships
No matter how hard we try as
humans to change other people
. and other thiug&jiie ean 't.
Much of the early work per-
formed in the field of physics was
devoted to explaining the concept of
motion. The result of this early work
and experimentation is adapted into
the commonplace way we all view
the world. Aristotle, Galileo and
Newton are three dominant figures
associated with the breaking ground
on the broad scope of the study of
physics. Although their work is now
in part revised, the impact of their
contribution is undeniable. So, what
is the point here? Interestingly
enough, the themes of their theories
and studies in explaining an object's
motion runs parallel to themes
regarding the fnotion of life.
One if the very first individuals
documented for investigating mat-
ters regarding physics is Aristotle. In
300 B.C he thought the world to
ultimately exist of four basic sub-
stances � earth, air, water and fire.
While this theory is obviously in
error today, his further conclusions
on the placement tendency of these
substances relates to the placement
tendency in life. Aristotle claimed
that every substance desires to exist
in a certain place and will always
end up in that place despite its tem-
porary settling places. How true this
is of people and places today. No
matter how hard we try as humans
to change other people and other
things, we can't. Our attempts are in
vain because the while we may alter
people and things, the alteration is
only temporary and thus unsustain-
able. Basically, people are who they
are and things are what they are.
Furthermore, these people and
things will always revert to where
and what they were meant to be in
the first place because essentially,
that is their true desire in the
scheme of life. The only real, true
and permanent change can only be
made within you and should only be
made for you and no one else.
The second figure to study
physics occurred in the seventeenth
century. Galileo, in his study of the
universe, concluded that motion is
constant and unless bothered, it lasts
forever. This resulted in the "Law of
Inertia Inertia is the resistance to
change motion. This law implies fur-
ther that the greater the mass, the
greater the resistance to change
motion. How does this relate to the
real world? The larger something or
someone is in your life, the more you
resist its changing and the harder it is
for that thing or that person to
change in the role they play in your
life. Think about the things and peo-
ple that either mean a lot or consume
a lot of time. It should be apparent
that these are the very things, like
school, jobs, family ties and "signifi-
cant" (or soon to be insignificant)
others that you just can't change or
from which can't break away. That is
exactly why old niles are frustrating
� why long-term relationships
never seem to end and why old
habits die hard. Large amounts of
longevity, meaning and time
increase the constancy of a situation
and decreases the chance of those
situations changing in your life.
Sir Isaac Newton should be a rec-
ognizable name for anyone familiar
with math and science. He devel-
oped three laws regarding objects
and their motion that set the prece-
dent for the way motion is viewed
still today. His third law is best suit-
ed for the application to life. Often
called the "Law of Action and
Reaction Newton claimed that
forces occur in pairs and that for
ever action, there is an equal and
opposite reaction. So, the more you
put into someone or something, the
more you will receive, expect to
receive, and hurt if you do not
receive the extent of your efforts in
return. It's like studying all night for
a test and making a 50, or like being
for with someone for 2 years and
accepting that it just isn't going to
work out. The reaction of large
amounts of action exists in two
extremes � really good or really
bad. This doesn't mean to not put a
lot of effort into something to avoid
disappointment, though. That
would be tragic because although
you will avoid defeat, you will never
experience success. It doesn't mean,
however, to adjust and prepare for
the results or the lack thereof of your
efforts.
This writer can be contacted at
msullivanSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
aMT-MfM
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7 Thursday 26. 191
5
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MAMA'S
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Wanna Win a Hummer? See OUr WebSlte fOr (ietailS. Deadline for online entry is 101599. Mail-in entries must be postmarked by 101599. No purchase
necessary Must be at least 18 years old and a licensed driver in state of residence. Void where prohibited. For Official Rules, mail a self-addressed stamped envelope to:
The eCampus com Wanna Win aflummer? Rules, co Marden-Kane Dept RF, 36 Maple Place, Manhasset, NY 11030. Requests received after 103199 will not be fulfilled.


i
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De
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Follow all
the Care
In
Dec 99 an
In additior
H
This ne
http:v
services
sites" fr
offers tl
up for i
STUDE
MOREP
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Start wii
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Tin tin CanMm
Would you like to get paid to
play on the net?
Well, Expressions is hiring
We are looking for someone
who can design and organize
a website for our magazine
If you have experience and
you are willing to work with a
winning team, please stop by
and pick up an application
today. Email us at
expressions@studentmediaecu.edu
We are located across from The
East Carolinian on the 2nd
floor of Student Publications
Building.
Telephone: 252-328-692?
i.
Ml
�1
Dec 99 and MaySummer
2000 graduating students
Connect now with ECU CAREER SERVICES
http:www.ecu.educareer
Follow all the instructions online or attend a 4PM Monday Connections Session at
the Career Services Building at 701 East Fifth Street! You will need to have your
IntakeRelease form on file and your resume online to participate.
Dec 99 and MaySummer 2000 grads must connect to meet the signup deadlines.
In addition to Career Day many of these sign up deadlines are in mid to late Sept!
Here are some organizations that have set up Fall recruiting visits:
IBM State Farm Insurance
McGladrey & Pullen Burlington Industries
Dixon St Odom Ferguson Enterprises
Arthur Anderson Coca Cola Bottling
Bank of America Olde Discount Stockbrokers
This new and enhanced Career Services website is available at
http:www.ecu.educareer. Students or alumni can access even more
services. In addition to more job links in our "Position listings-Other
sites" from employers across the country, the website for Career Services
offers the opportunity for students to create a resume on line and sign
up for additional services. Contact us with any questions at 328-6050.
STUDENTS SIGN IN AND CREATE A RESUME ON-LINE
MORE POSITION UNKS-Qther Sites-links to many states, employers,
job boards, school systems, agencies!
SYSTEM ALLOWS STUDENTS TO REVIEW JOBS
Start With http:www.ecu.educareer www.ecu.educareer.
STUDENTS MANAGE THEIR OWN REFERENCES
BUSINESS CAREER DAY on Sept 22!
US Secret Service, Hospitality & Manufacturing Firms, Banks, and more
HEALTH CAREER DAY Nov. 4,1999
Graduate and Professional School Forum-Nov. 4,1999
EDUCATION CAREER DAY-Feb. 25,2000
OTHER DEPARTMENTAL CAREER EVENT
So watch for others such as: School of Technology-Oct. 28,
Others to be announced
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Thi Eiit Carolinian
8 Thursety. Aiigust 26. 1998
Fast
Facts
The good, the bad and the ugly
of your freshman year.
The good:
The cafeteria food is much better
than high school
- Emma-Rose Triscritti
freshman
"The freedom and independence
- Danielle Custis,
senior
"The third floor of Aycock
- Chris Jennette,
sophomore
"The fly honies on our campus
- Shawn Lightfoot.
"ECU is doing a great job in response
to the concerns of minority students
and is working diligently to fulfill its
commitment at providing a more cul-
turally diverse atmosphere for stu-
dents
- Roderick Stevenson
junior
"The parties
- Phu Ho,
sophomore
"Getting away from really immature
high school people
- Kimberly Woodlief,
freshman
The bad:
"The food, the food and the food
- Kara Ramseur,
sophomore
"Fear of not making friends, the
intimidation of classes, professors
and peer pressure
- Stacey Pinney,
sophomore
"All the 8 a.m. classes I was stuck
with
- Michael Kovach.
junior
"You can't get a West Campus
parking space to save your life
- Karla Jones,
senior
"The rooms they put you in your
freshman year
-B.F
junior
"Coming from having your own room
to sharing a room with someone you
don't know for the first time
- Brooke Allen,
junior
The ugly:
No air-conditioning in the dorms
- Marie Sandok,
freshmen
The East Carolinian
(fflWl AIIOIJ) ON GKEULT
College students
drowning in plastic
Nina M. Ikv
ASSISTANTK.UT HKS KI1ITOH
Among the multitude of offers stu-
dents receive upon their arrival to
campus, one that always seems to
surpass all others would be credit
card companies. Solicitors offering
free gifts and "too good to be true"
offers can be overwhelming for
many. Arc our college campuses a
breeding ground for potential cred-
it card holders? Are college stu-
dents just setting themselves up
for some serious debt?
Credit card companies
have created a market
specifically for college
students, enticing them
with a variety of incen-
tives ranging from
posters and T-shirts to
bookbags and watches. All
you have to do is "sign up
and apply Some practical-
ly guarantee students a card
regardless of their credit his-
tory.
According to Discover card
online, they offer a specific site
for college students to apply for
a card, offering such things such as
no annual fees, discount rates on
CDs purchased on the Internet,
cash back bonus awards and what
they consider "competitive" inter-
est rates.
"ICredit card com panics! adver-
tise many gimmicks offering free
stuff, but we all know nothing is
truly free said Brooke Allen,
junior.
Another type of card that can be
found on campus would be the
Visa. If Visa creditors solicit on
campus, they usually offer free
novelty T-shirts in order to attract
students to sign up. Even if your
application isn't accepted, you at
least got a free shirt to add to your
vast wardrobe collection, right?
Well, not all students believe so.
"Students want the benefits of
of free T-shirts, but what they
don't realize is credit card compa-
nies sell their addresses to other
companies, which will just tempt
students to apply for more cards
said Stacey Pinney, sophomore. "I
believe signing up for all of those
cards ruins your credit line
One reason more students find
themselves applying for credit
cards once they get into colleges
because one of the first things they
hear is how necessary it is to build
a credit history.
According to Danielle Custis,
senior, she applied for credit cards
through the campus solicitors in
order to build a history of credit.
"When I first enrolled in
college, I knew
that
I need-
ed credit to
do anything in the "adult world
Custis said. "Without a credit basis
to build anything on, you really
can't get along
Offers of low APR, fixed rates
and the option of accumulating
free long distance when you make
purchases on a particular card con-
vinced Custis to apply for certain
cards.
"The accumulation of long-dis-
tance time is like having a prepaid
calling card, but it's perpetual
because you keep spending in
order to gain those 'free' minutes
Custis said.
The alumni association in con-
junction with BB&T sponsor a
credit card specifically aimed
towards juniors, seniors and alum-
ni.
"BB&T are our affinity credit
card partner said Phillip Home,
Associate Vice Chancellor of
Alumni Relations.
According to Home, stu
dent's approval is based on parents
and students' credit rating. Once
the student is approved, the line of
credit is usually minimal.
Like most credit cards, ' '0
the ECU Visa has its advantages.
The advantages of the card are
that it has a fairly competitive APR
rate Home said. "By virtue
to the affinity pro-
gram, a certain percentage of
the receipts of that credit
card program goes to the
alumni association,
which we use in turn
to promote stu-
dent arid alumni pro-
grams
The alumni asso-
ciation likes to
think of them-
selves as not just
sponsoring another
credit card for
uppcrclassmen
and alumni.
"As a total
package, the alum-
ni association's
affinity partner
offers several advantages for
the university in addi
tion to the
student,
I lorne said.
"Whereas some
the other credit
card compa
nies don't
have a rela-
tionship
with the
alumni
association
or the uni'ersity
beyond simply using stu-
dents as a demographic group to
which they can market and try to
make a profit
"We like to think of our credit
card as part of a larger benefits
package, primarily for alumni, but
we're glad to be supportive of stu-
dents and student activi-
ties I lorne said.
So with such a variety of
credit cards offered steps away
from one's residence hall or
classroom, do most students
acquire their first card on cam-
pus?
"I didn't get my credit card
from campus solicitors Allen
said. "You have to look around
for the best card to fit your
needs
According to Pinney,
although the big picture reads
'no annual fee' the small print
so much more.
"People need to go to
the legend and
find out exact-
ly what
that
isterisk
beside
the great
als real-
ly means
inney said.
This writer can be contacted at
ndrySstudentmedia ecu. edu
credit car!)
inciottves
l)ISCO l.ll I'AIM)
- purchase discounted computers
online
-30 percent off of CDs
- cash back bonus award
- competitive interest rate
MSA
- contests to win vacation trips
- travel promotions
- online shopping partners
- back to school online offers
MASTIUUAKI)
- online jewelry discounts
- airline discounts
- dazzling card designs
- 24 hour customer service
- verv low introductory APR
Earth Day still growing
Student participation
increases in recent years
Mikk Howards
STMf Ill'l KK
In the last 40 years, the once small
activity known as Earth Day has
grown into a world-wide event.
Even though Earth Day 1990 was
not quite "The Day the Earth
Stood Still by day's end organiz-
ers of Earth Day 1970 said that 200
million people in 140 nations had
taken part in the largest grass-roots
demonstration in history.
This year, on April 22, the cele-
bration of Earth Day will be taking
place all over the world. And guess
what? You too can participate this
year at ECU! Since the 1970s,
when people gathered to protest
the federal government's involve-
ment in Vietnam, hundreds of
activists received their unofficial
education in public speaking.
Today, many activists run various
public offices across the country.
Unfortunately, many are attempt-
ing to run the government into the
ground.
What is Earth Day? Mainly, it is
the realization each year that there
are limits to the abuse and destruc-
tion that occur on this planet with-
out causing irreversible changes.
The poisoning of our waterways
SAVJEO
7m c v�ftyaAY.a�syS vbu caw
MELPCLCAH UP THE KAirril
Unique clubs
available on campusf
Organizations cater
to students' interest
Brian Irizzki.i.k
STU I IV RITKM
DIANE MacEACHEBN
Many books are available to increase awareness about saving our planet.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE W0H10 WIOE WEB
due to major fish kills, as well as
increases in cancer and water-borne
infections are all evidence that our
natural resources are in danger.
Before the 1970s one could feel safe
in taking a drink from a lake, stream
or creek. According to Kathleen
Meyer's book, How to Shit in the
Woods, we can no longer drink from
even the most remote, crystal clear
streams without the possibility of
contracting Gardiasis.
The human population is con-
tinuing to increase at an astounding
level. It took tens of thousands of
years for humans to copulate, fertil-
SEE EARTH. PAGE 9
Coming to college for the first time-
can be shocking as your life drasti-
cally changes. A helpful idea is to
seek out others with the same
interests that you have. A simple
way to do this is to join a campus
organization.
ECU offers a broad range of
organizations to choose from.
Three of which are the
International Student Association,
East Carolina Communication
Organization (ECCO) and the
ECU Marching Pirates.
The International Student
Association includes over 150 stu-
dents hailing from 59 different
countries. The association's main
purpose is to give international stu-
dents a chance to adjust to
American living.
"We have get-togethers said
Markus Doell, association presi-
dent from Germany. "We let peo-
ple bring in their own country's
food. We also participated in
Greenville's International
Festival
The association offers services
to help international students when ,
they need it.
"We have a little network j
Doell said. "If you have a problem,
you have someone that has been
here a while to help you
The association also gives
American students a chance to find
out about other countries and cul- '
tures. !
ECCO is a pre-professional
organization for communication !
students. It is, however, open to all
other undergraduates as well.
"We are a new prganization J
looking for dedicated people said
Kelly Albada advisor to the organi- j
zation.
Education and service make up j
the mission of the East Carolina j
Communications Organization.
"We offer a lot of opportuni
ties Albada said. "And we look for
those who can create their own ;
opportunities
ECCO seeks to expand stu-
dents' possibilities in the commu- (
nication market.
"Our students want the samej
opportunities as students in j
Raleigh or Charlotte Albada said.
"People can only learn so muchj
through courses
ECU also offers the Marching j
Pirates. The Marching Pirates main i
focus is entertainment during foot- j
SEE ORGANIZATIONS, PAGE 9
DOUI
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August 25-31
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UIOHS PAGE 9
J
Tht East Carolinian
features
Thursday. August 28. 1999 9
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Earth
cominuad limn page 8
ize and produce before the popula-
tion reached one billion. According
to USA Today, this magical num-
ber occurred in 1804. The second
billion took only 74 years. By 1974,
we moaned and groaned our way to
over four billion. As luck would
have it, thanks to those individuals
who keep insisting to others "to go
forth, multiply and replenish the t
earth it took only another 13 years
to pump out another billion. If you
ever wonder why the roads seem so
crowded, why there is always a line
at the check-out and why tensions
are running so incredibly high these
days, perhaps it is a result of the 6
billion people competing for clean
air, pure water and a free lunch.
We've failed miserably in our mea-
ger attempt to control ourselves.
However, the numbers of con-
cerned citizens are steadily increas-
ing, meanwhile, more areas of the .
country are running out of water,
being subjected to genetically
altered foods to feed all of the hun-
gry mouths or dodging bullets from
gunmen who have lost their minds
from the all the pollution and noise!
Today is one of the most critical
moments in the history of life on
Karth. Unfortunately, it is not as
critical as tomorrow or the next day.
Rut organizations such as Earthday
organization (http:Earthday
info.htm) or F.arth First (www.envi-
ronweb.orgef), the more radical of
the two, are growing with individu-
als like you. Earth First believes
that over the last several hundred
years, human civilization has
declared war on large mammals.
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� Name: Jeff Bowman
� Year: Graduate Studentw �
� Major: Instructional TechnologyjM
� Hometown: Emerald, NC
� Quote: "A Master's degree equals a pay raise -??; l�

leading some respected ecologists
to conclude that die mammals that,
will survive the near future will be
those that humans allow to live.
Other prominent biologists remain
aghast at the devastation of rain-j,
forests and temperate old-growth,
forests and remain pessimistic that
the Earth could lose one quarter to
one third of all species within a very r
few years.
The world as we know it is
changing. Get involved with one or
both of these organizations. The �
Earth you save is your own, and
unless you plan on becoming an -
astronaut, get involved or get out of;
the way. Set your sites on partici-
pating at ECU's Earth Day celebra-
tion on April 22.
This writer can be contacted it
medw8rds8studentmetlia.ecu.eilu
Organizations
continued from page 8
ball games. The band also per-
forms at various places around the .
area.
"We play at local high school
band competitions to helprecruit
members for our marching band
said B.J. Bullock, snare drum play- "
er for the Marching Pirates.
The band is not exclusive to
music majors or even strictly of
ECU students.
"Sometimes we have some
members from the community
that just want to be part of our "
marching band Bullock said.
A lot of different areas of study '1
are represented by the band. b
"It's a great way to socially
meet people Bullock said.
There are many organizations
offered at ECU. Students may
find one that suits their interest.
This writer can be contacted
at blmzelleSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
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10 Thursday. August 28. 1S99
aNOTCH
above the
Professor Hill has taught classes
in both German and Spanish at
ECU since she arrived here in
1965. Her office, full of posters of
Latin American scenery as well
as books in English, Spanish and
German, is a testimony to her
interests in languages and travel.
Hill began her studies at
Mexico City College where she
earned her B.A. She continued
her studies at the University of
Southwest Louisiana and
Middlebury College in Vermont,
earning a master's in German and
an AND (All But Dissertation) in
Spanish. Her interests in lan-
guage stemmed from travels dur-
ing her youth and her strong
propensity for learning. At 13,
she moved from her home in
Germany to New Mexico, where
she learned Spanish and English
simultaneously.
Travel was natural for her, it
ran in her blood. Her father loved
to travel, and she very much
enjoys it as well. She has seen
many exotic places in the world.
Mexico, Hong Kong and China
are three of her favorites. The
United States also beckons her
with its many great scenic loca-
tions.
"Europe is so full of culture,
old world cities and beautiful
cathedrals said Hill.
She first began teaching out of
necessity, not out of desire. The
teaching certificate was some-
thing to fall back on, but once
she got into it. she was hooked.
Name
Hilda Hill
Department
Foreign Languages
Her husband was a professor at
ECU as well, and they have been
here quite a while. The classes
that are her favorite to teach are
Latin American Literature and
Latin American Business.
Obviously she has read many
books; her personal favorite is
Gabriel Garcia Marquez's One
Hundred Years of Solitude.
"It is powerful, and it speaks
about every aspect of Latin
American life that you could pos-
sibly imagine said Hill. "It
speaks to every possible aspect of
a reader's interests
If there is one thing she could
communicate to all students, it
would be that there is so much,
more for them than they realize.
"There's a whole big, wide,
beautiful world out there, and
every language is a world of its
own said Hill. "You become a
whole new person with every
language that you learn
When a person visits a country
where they can speak the native
language, they are welcomed as a
friend in that country instead of a
haughty American or a rich
tourist, according to Professor
Hill. Travel has been a source of
learning and enjoyment for her in
her life, and she encourages
ECU students to follow in her
footsteps and learn about the
world through experience as well
as literature and pictures.
This writer can be contacted at
bfriuelleBstudentmedia. ecu. edu
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Something Free From ECU!
Yes it's true, as an ECU student
you are entitled to a free planner
Some Important dates to add to vour WUWW;V
Free Planner!
�ALL ECU
Clue Book:
Organizations
must
THE CLUE BOOK!
register by September 15 and don't Que g00kS are available at
forget to check vour mailboxes! ��� j
�ogt a clue (organization Fair) is Mendenhall Student Center and
on w99,io:3o-i:oo Student Stores
�HOMECOM1NC, Registration uwu u ! � . e, . .
noaHiin0. Wpmhprl7 This valuable information was brought to you by Student
Deadline, beptemoer Leadership Development Programs at 109 Mendenhall
Wachovia Bank, N.A. is a member FDIC. Accounts subject to approval. Wachovia Bank, NA Imposes a fee for the use of non-WachovIa ATMs
nsli
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Williams On S
Saints rookie rt
Ricky Williams
weeks due to a
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game against tl
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Martinez Retu
Boston Red So:
Martinez, fanm
rout of the Mir
the Metrodome
Martinez uppei
18-4, the best i
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Head Basketba
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PHOTOS COURTESY I





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The Em Citoliniin
SPORTgk
Briefs ,
Williams On Shelf
Saints rookie runningback,
Ricky Williams will miss 4-6
weeks due to a torn ligament
in his left ankle. Williams suf-
fered the injury in a preseason
game against the Miami
Dolphins.
Martinez Returns to Form
Boston Red Sox ace, Pedro
Martinez, fanned 15 in a 7-1
rout of the Minnesota Twins in
the Metrodome. With the win,
Martinez upped his record to
184, the best in the Majors.
Haskins Calls it Quits
University of Texas-El Paso
Head Basketball Coach, Don
Haskins announced his retire-
ment after 38 seasons on the
bench. The 69-year-old finishes
with a 719-353 record. Haskins
coached the Texas Western
Squad that won the 1966
NCAA Championship.
Charlotte Stings Shock
The Charlotte Sting defeated
the Detroit Shock 60-54 in the
WNBA Playoffs. Andrea
Stinson led the Sting with 16
points and 14 rebounds.
U.S. Open Seeds Announced
Pete Sampras and Martina
Hingis will be the 1 seeds
heading into next month's U.S.
Open. Andre Agassi will be the
second seed, while Yevgeny
Kafelnikov and two-time
defending champ, Patrick
Rafter will be third and fourth,
respectively.
On the women's side,
Wimbledon champion Lindsey
Davenport gets the second
seed, Venus Williams will be
third and Monica Seles
grabbed the fourth seed.
Underwood Will Play For
Miami
Reluctant football player
Demitrius Underwood has
signed to play for the Miami
Dolphins. The first-round selec-
tion of the Minnesota Vikings,
Underwood left camp and said
that he no longer wanted to
play football. He was released
by the Vikings on August 11th.
ntoros counnsr or the world widi wi�
sports
Thundey, Auguit 28, 1989 11
Weaver shows versatility
Headcoach
pleased with switch
Ktkpiikn Sciikamm
SPOUTS KDITOK
Bobby Weaver came to ECU, a
quarterback with explosive speed
and loads of promise. Despite get-
ting injured twice last season, the
speed and the potential are still
there. Only now, they will be used
to move the ball on the ground
instead of through the air.
The 1998 season began with
sophomore Bobby Weaver taking
over as quarterback. Weaver led
the Pirates to two wins in his first
three starts, before the Oct. 3 home
game against Army.
Weaver threw for two touch-
downs and rushed for a third, fie
completed 16 of 23 passes for 255
yards. It was undoubtedly his best
game of the season, it also turned
out to be the worst when his season
began to unravel. He was sidelined
because of a sprained ankle in the
second half. David Garrard
stepped in and the Pirates held on
to win the game.
Garrard started two of the next
three games. The redshirt fresh-
man filled in nicely throwing for
430 yards and three touchdowns in
Weaver's absence.
Weaver's ankle healed and he
got the start against Houston. It
was on Halloween that his tri-
umphant return to the
starting lineup would
turn into a
nigh t-
mare.
He was
2 of 2 pass
ing for 29
yards when he went
down with an injured
knee. He had torn his
ACL and was done for
the season. Garrard
would go on to
the remainder of
games and wouli
be looked upon
to be the starte
For the "Jjd
campaign.
"I think I did a fair job
Weaver said. "I think we moved
the ball pretty well and every-
thing, but Dave's the quarter-
back now and that's what we've
got to concentrate on
Weaver's arm wasn't his only
weapon in 1998. His speed made
him a threat on the ground as well
as in the air. His versatility gave
him a second chance to be one of
the main contributors on the 1999
squad.
"Well, after the knee injury,
David stepped up as quarterback
and we had to get all of our best
athletes on the field and Weaver
is one of them said Steve Logan,
head football coach.
Before practices began, the
decision was made to make
Weaver a halfback. The Pirates
were deep at the position, but
they finished sixth out of eight
teams in the conference in rushing
offense in 1998.
"I welcomed the change with
open arms, I just want to get on
the field and play some ball and do
the best wherever I'm at Weaver
said.
Weaver will share time and car-
ries with junior, Marcellus Harris
and junior transfer, Keith Stokes.
Weaver has had little trouble
adjusting to his new position.
"He's doing well" Logam said.
"He's starting to get integrated
into the offense, learning how to
run the routes Logan said. "He
knows which routes to run, being
an ex-quarterback. I le just needs
to refine his route running tech-
nique
Weaver's work and versatility
will make him an integral part of
the 1999 Pirates.
"It's good to have him out there
on the field said teammate Jamie
Wilson. "He may not be a quarter-
back, but we need to get the ball
in his
tm hands. He's
very fast and I think
halfback will be the best
place for him
This Writer can be contacted at
pdawyaSstudentmeala.ecu.edu
Volleyball team
shows dedication, teamwork
Players ready
to start season
RV.W DottXKV
STUK �ITK
What does August mean to you? To
a certain group of ladies, August
means volleyball practice.
According to players and coaches
this year's August tradition is going
very well.
According to head coach Kim
Walker, the team is in better shape
coming back from summer break
than any team has been in any of
her previous five seasons at ECU.
There is much potential with this
year's team. This season's team is a
junior-laden squad, with senior
Shannon Kaes bringing in loads of
experience. The team, which was
10-18 last season, has high but
attainable hopes for this year.
"We are very excited, said Liz
Hall, a junior from Antioch,
California. "We should win the con-
ference
Experience will help the team
when the game is on the line. The
experience factor will be very
important and for this year's team, it
will be a nice change up from last
year's young team.
During the 1998 campaign, the
Pirates were among the youngest
teams in the conference. This
group has been there before and
found out what it felt like to play
their hearts out and still come up
short. Kim Walker felt that the
team had trouble closing games last
season in the early part of the fall;
by the end of the season, they had
more poise. A real positive is that
Walker can see the players have
taken that into this season's prac-
tices.
"The team has matured a lot
said Kim Walker, head coach.
Maturity is such a big factor in
sports when times get tough. Fans
should look forward to a mentally
tough as well as physically tough
team. Though there is a large group
of upperclassman and there are also
some newcomers to the squad.
Robin Drewes, a 6'2 player out of
Florida and Dawn Bender, a 57
outside hitter are, according to
Walker, talented players who are
now adjusting to the grind of col-
lege sports from high school.
According to Liz Hall, the prac-
tices are centered on individual
technique. The squad's technique
will be put to the test on an impor-
tant early trip to MissouriIn
Missouri, the team will meet com-
petition including Missouri, SE
Missouri and New Mexico State.
"We expect good competition
SEE VOLLEYBALL PAGE I?
Women's soccer aims high

Donnenwirth sets
sights on CM
Sl S.W K M HI K K 11. II
s I I o H tt H I I I H
The ECU women's soccer team is
set to begin their season this Friday
with goals set high for individual
achievement and team success in
conference play.
"Athletically we want to win the
(conference championship said
Rob Donnenwirth, women's soccer
coach. "Academically, concerning
our GPA, we are one of the top
teams
The lady Pirates will open their
season this Friday when they play-
host to F.lon.
"It is a long season so we need to
take one game at a time
Donnenwirth said.
This year the women will face
19 games, eight of which are con-
ference play, then the CAA tourna-
ment.
After preseason training and
The Lady Pirates begin the season Friday.
FILE PHOTO
play Coach Donnenwirth is confi-
dent that the women will have a
good showing this season.
"The team has steadily
improved to where they can knock
off a top team on any given day
Donnenwirth said.
With F.CU's backfield stacked
with four seniors and three other
seniors covering the other posi-
tions, the Pirates have a lot of expe-
rience to use to their advantage.
SEE SOCCER . PAGE 12
j





12 Ttwrtty. Ammt 26. 1989
Soccer
cominusd Iron pigi II
"(The seniors) have been
through it before and know what
each team means Donnenwirth
said. "We're looking to them for
leadership
Some key players to watch are
midfield players Erin Cann, Kelly
Gray, and Leanne Mclnnis who
Coach Donnenwirth describes as
very strong.
Other players to look for are for-
wards Amanda Duffy and Jennifer
Reiley.
j "Amanda is a smart player up
top and Jenn compliments her with
speed said Donnenwirth.
One of Coach Donnenwirth's
concerns is the plague of injuries
that have affected his team during
preseason training. Five potential
starters had to sit out last week's
exhibition game against UNC-
Greensboro.
. "Our goal is to get the team
healthy Donnenwirth said.
I Senior Stephanie Wrass, mid-
fielder, suffered a pulled hamstring
during preseason but will play on
Friday.
"IStephanieJ is making her way
back Donnenwirth said. "She is
not 100 percent be she'll be play-
ing in Friday's game
Other players who will not be
playing Friday include midfielders
Kelly Gray, who suffered an ankle
injury, and Leanne Mclnnis, who
This Writer can be contacted at
SportsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
Volleyball
continued from page 11
out west Hall said.
The players are also looking for-
ward to games against seven ACC
schools such as the University of
North Carolina, Duke and N.C.
State. One of the most important
games this season will be against
the Campbell Camels. Campbell,
which will visit Greenville Sept. 1,
will be the team's first home game
of (he season. The team would like
to start off the home season with a
win. Stacy Pleasant, an ECU play-
er, was confident about the
Campbell game.
"I know they are beatable this
year! " Pleasant said. She also
added that success will take a lot of
dedication and teamwork. It's no
doubt that teamwork will be
important this season. As the old
saying goes, a team is only as good
as its weakest player, but if the
players work together, they can
build on each others strengths and
minimize any weaknesses that
might exist. The team has not had
a chance to look at one game as a
barometer for how good the team is
going to be for the season, but docs
look forward to playing schools
from conferences such as the ACC.
It looks like it will be an exciting
season.
"Right now the team is taking
things one piece at a time Walker
said.
This Writer can be contacted at
smilenkevichSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
Hey Girls
Did you miss fall RUSH!
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sports
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AA EEOMFDV
o the Winners of
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Monday-Friday
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Saturday
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Thank you for your patronagel
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$50 Gift Certificate:
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Pepsi Star Wars Cooler:
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Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Scholars!
Wright Building � 328-6731
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
I
SIDEWALK SALE SATURDAY THE 28TH
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'Fr. Paul Vaeth, Ch; plain & Ca�mpu� Minister

Pirates Cove
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3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
t
l �� ��





ST CAROLINIAN
The East Carolinian
sports
reat student jobs
available
at Mendenhall
udent Center
IF CAMPUS)
I CLASSES
CLASSES
i
nister
'e
Utilities
w While
latest
et access.
ile floors,
asher,
toall!
w!
� Student Manager
� Studeni Technician
� Compute) L.ih Assistant
� Marketing Assistant
� Bowling Technician
� Central Ticket Office Student Assistant
� BowlingBilliards Worker
� Financial Affairs Office Assistant
job descriptions and applications available on line at www.ecu.edumendenhall
or stop by the job information board in Mendenhall Student Center.
Omicron Delta Kappa
All members of OAK are
cordially invited to attend the
FALL WELCOME RECEPTION
WELCOME BACK
September 1, 1999 from 5-7 pm
Mendenhall Student Center, Great Room 2
Please call Student Leadership Development Programs even
if you are not able to attend, so that we can update our ODK
mailing list.
328-4796
w'flj m
e Fall!
� � �
on 10th
i just past
th Street
to 10th,
re.
? � � �
i -
PONT
MISS IT!
End of August Fiesta!
'A Price
Pitchers of Draft
$1.99 Hi-balls
$2.75 Pink Margaritas
$1.75 Heinekens
AH day Thursday, Aug. 26th!
MexicanRestauront
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE COMMUNITY SQUARE ALL ABC
757-1666 439-0003 permits
Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Now open beside Pitt Community College!
Why travel to
Raleigh for your
favorite name brands?
'atalog
Connection
ion of UJoi
Quality name brands � Clothing for men
women at discount prices
210 E. 5th St. 758-8012 � M-S 10-0 � Sun 1-5
SPANISH MISSION
REVIVAL HOME
415 E Third St. Ayden, NC
� 3,700 sq. ft.
� 9 miles from Greenville,
PCMC, & ECU
� 18 miles from Kinston
� 4 bedrooms
� 2 baths
� 610 acres
� 1910 circa
� In designated
historic district
Sydney P. Britt
P.O. Box 9848
Greensboro, NC 27429
336-275-0881
Want A
Challenge?
TRAINING SCHOOL
Start your career off on the tight foot by enrolling in the Air Force
Officer Training School. There you will become a commissioned
officer in just 12 weeks. From the start you'll enjoy great pay,
complete medical and dental care, 30 days of vacation each year,
plus the opportunity to travel and
AIM HIGH See the world. To discover how high
a career in the Air Force can take
you, call 1-800-423-USAF or visit
our website at www.airforce.com
wvwK.airforce.com
Tbprnliv, Auottrt 26, 1999 13
Men's soccer
ready for season
Team boasts new
leadership, attitude
Si sawk Mii.knkkvk:ii
Hf.VIOI UMTKK
ECU men's soccer team is prepar-
ing to begin the 1999 season with
some changes in the coaching staff
and a new attitude.
"We want to establish ourselves
as a competitive team in the1
CAA said Devin O'Neill, men
soccer coach.
O'Neill, who has experience as
an assistant soccer coach at three1
universities, joined the purple awl
gold after Will Wiberg resigned aS
ECU's head coach after the 1998
season.
"I am very excited about the
opportunity to be a head coach at a
great institution O'Neill said. "I
am also excited about the chal-
lenge of coaching in an excellent
conference like the CAA, whicn
had teams in the NCAA
Tournament last season
With a new atmosphere about
the program the team is sure.to1
turn some heads this season.
"It is important for us to make)
sure people realize we are a good?
soccer program O'Neill said.
O'Neill and his team have
accepted their goal as a challenge
considering some teams in the
CAA are ranked nationally in pre-
season polls.
"It will be difficult because th
CAA is one of the most competi-
tive conferences in the nation
said O'Neill.
The Pirates face a tough sched-
ule this season as they are set to
play in 18 games, eight of which
are conference play, then in the
CAA tournament
O'Neill feels the team is ready
to face the road ahead as he
believes they continue to improve
every day in the preseason.
"We are very happy with the
effort and commitment the players
have shown throughout the pre-
season O'Neill said. "We are
happy with the way things are
coming together
You can check out the men
when they host their season open-
er against Appalachian State on
September 1 at 3 p.m.
NOW
SAVING
FOR THEIR
FUTURE.
CHILD'S
PLAY.
Building your children's future just got
easier, thanks to the U.S. Treasury's new
EasySaver Plan for U.S. Savings Bonds. Sign
up once and automatically purchase U.S.
Savings Bonds from your checking or
savings account.
EasySaver is a safe
and easy way to
yid their savings, a,
I-877-8II-71M
www.easysaver.gov v
i t public smirr of Ihis jMihliration
?W Garden of Eden
ECU's favorite nursery
Decorate your dorm or apart-
ment cheap with us!
beautiful ic" hanging baskets onlv flfe-af)
boston rents' 6.?�
Luxurious tree ficus 7.33
Exclusive dealer of �uperthrive
a necessity tor "growing Your own' herbs!
to) 630-3009
Located: 3831 E. 10th St.
(one mile from Hastings Ford)
Hours: Mon-Sat 9-5
Sun 10-4






14 Tannery. Auiml 28, 1999
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Training camp tough on rookies
BEREA, Ohio (AP) - Training
camp is over for the Cleveland
Browns and coach Chris Palmer, in
his first year as an NFL. head couch,
is as glad to end the grind of two-a-
day practices as any rookie player.
"I don't know who's more tired,
the coaches or the players he said.
"It's been taxing both mentally and
physically
The expansion Browns wrapped
up their first training camp Monday
with two sessions in front of a
sparse crowd at their headquarters
outside Cleveland. From now on,
the Browns will practice once a day
in sessions closed to the public.
Cleveland opened its camp ear-
lier than most teams and closed
later. But Palmer said he and his
staff needed all the time they could
get to teach their young team.
Quarterback Ty Detmer, a veter-
an of training camps in Green Bay,
Philadelphia and San Francisco,
said a tough camp was to be expect-
ed.
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
All types of Auto & Truck Repair
Foreign & Domestic
Major & Minor Repairs
Manual Transmissions
Brakes, Tires & Batteries
Free Towing with Major Repair
Clutches
Tune-ups
10 off with college ID -
830-6131 � 627 S. Clarke Greenville
Her universe is 3bom vo explooe
wiih possibilities
Mm
viim
four Solar Systemu
It takirograms th.it wn.kMM
ArftwpttM
75 OFF
Local company! Call us before you pay too much!
We've got it all: Liquitex, Canson, Grumbacher,
Prismacolor, Prang, Strathmoreand tons more!
Poster putty and Blacklights too!
otrs � Hungate OrArlington
8 3 a ! 3 1f II � ff The Plwa a 1 Charlesi I
To ECU
Otfe
Discount Art Supply
756-9565
Walk-in orders accepted M-F 9am � 4pm
NEWMAN
CATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
953 EAST 10TH STREET (AT THE FOOT OF COLLEC7E FULL DRIVE)
GREENVILLE, NC 27858
757-1991
Welcome Students!
Mass Schedule:
� Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
� Wed: 5:30pm
� All Masses are at the Center
We look forward to seeing you!
for more information about programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the center daily between 8:30am and 9pm.
Fr. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Minister
Employment Opportunity
GREENVILLE UTILITIES COMMISSION
Temporary PT Engineering Technician
Temporary position available for person to work twenty hours per week,
Monday through Friday, in the Water Resources Engineering Section.
This position will involve reading and interpreting maps and preparing
databases and spreadsheets. Qualified candidate should have complet-
ed one year of college level coursework in engineering, geography, or
computer related field. Ability to read and interpret maps required.
Possession of a valid North Carolina driver's license also required.
Applications accepted through August 31,1999. Salary S8.00liour.
Employment is contingent upon passing a physical examination includ-
ing a drug screening urinalysis. To ensure consideration, a completed
Greenville Utilities Commission application must be received in the
Human Resources Office. Interested persons should contact the
Human Resources Office. P.O. Box 1847, Greenville, NC 27835
(801 Mumford Road) or call (252) 551-1513.
"An Equal Opportunity Employer"
Staff M One
Staff One, Inc.
21 Glenwood Avenue, Suite 105, Raleigh, NC
27603 Fax 919.856.0829 Phone 919.856.0800
event Services
Extra income to be earned at sporting
events and concerts.
Event Staff positions are available for ECU Football and Basketball.
Available positions include ticket takers, ushers and crowd control.
To qualify you must have NO felony convictions, be at least 16 years of age (18
years of age for crowd control position) and have reliable transportation.
Pay rates start at $6.35 per hour
Please apply in person at gate 4, minges coliseum.(Williams Arena located on
the campus of ECU on the following dates:
August 26th 3pm - 7pm
September 2nd 5pm-8pm
We also provide services to Walnut Creek Amphitheater, North Carolina
State Football, Darlington Speedway, NC (Rockingham) Speedway, Duke Football, Crown
Coliseum (FayettvUle), and ALL Raleigh area major concerts.
For more information contact Mel Black @ STAFF One event services 919.856.0800
You drank.
You danced.
You had se
fvVSS� Soe4Wq �
Free Pregnancy Tests
, Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003

HEALTHY HABITS
Aromatherapy � Herbal & dean Teas
Herbs � Natural & Organic Food
Weight Loss Men's Formulas
� Essential Oils � Vitamins
6 Much More Of Your Alternative Medicines!
111W. Firetower Rd � Winterville, NC 28590
(252) 439-1899 � Ed & Mary Tinsley
WELCOME TO THE
WORLD OF SCUBA
ECU STUDENT
SCUBA
SPECIAL
$149.97
Student SCUBA Package
Kt.Ml S284.B'
BLUE REGION SCUBA
26 Carolina East Cantar
Greenville, NC
321-2670
Brassurood
AtMWtUMHte
Quiet Neighborhood 1 Bedroom $300�Small Pet with fee ftv'i � Near Malls 8c restaurants fwH 3fjlj
2 Bedroom $360�furnished unit for ViMK
WasherDryer Hookupscorporate leasing available 1 f
Ceiling Fan Free WaterSewer� Office on site , - JfL '�'�-�� 3216 Brasswood Court 1 Phone 252-355-4499 � F�x 252-355-1554 brssiwood@greenvillenc.com
Communications Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to
hire enthusiastic student assistants
for the 1999-2000 academic year,
preferably freshmen and sophomores.
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.







��������
SILVER xAe
BULLET VOllS
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. '& Touch Of Class"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 756-6278
XUBDaX
Lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur N ight and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRI&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer.
Looted 5 Ha Wen of GrttmllU M4 At (Behind AM Saitai ft Itaol
tit
�,Y

;
V

'


0 $100 OFF,
Security Deposit
with presentation of this coupon, offer expires
. 121199 not valid with any other coupon
-WESLEY COMMONS SOUTH : 1 or 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
range, refrigerator, free watersewer, washerdryer
hookups, laundry facilities, 5 blocks from campus,
ECU bus services.
-langston park: Being Renovated, 2 bedrooms, 1
bath, range, refrigerator, dishwasher, free
watersewer, approx. 900 sq. fU3washerdryer
hookups, central heatafr, 6 blocks ffcpm campus.
Other Apartments Also Available
�All Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
Pets allowed with fee
I.
i :
��-
i,
I .
�r
i
i :
t �
rroperty I I
onogement
Apartments S Rental Houses
108-ABrownlea Drive
758-1921
I
I
�.
.4
Get pierC
eyebrow
eaPcawtH-9.
navel:5
a �"at)36
WewilibeAtany
competitor's advertised
prices!
Urge aeiectiofiof Imported
And domestic jewelry!
Tue84ay-TrMt�4iay:1-8MTM Friday: HOdjtm Saturday 12-10 pan.
CALL US! 756-0600
�W.dool
txotk piefCMfS
� fit fptGMIf � TVffMaM, M
l�4y pfanfcfMly
a UU �. m �� � � �I- I i ,1L
� nt ve ut�� vhtc s eniy �����
MMnMn mewilav aiRaw
1 Wt MYft MM � MSaMSS OVeT o
yMTS wM 15 yMrs txMritace
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located ajt jM� MS Hwy. 13, Greenville.
515
Thursday
TOWNHOUSE
12 bath. $47!
Williamsburg fv
Small pets OK
13JI7. evenings I
TAKE OVER le
month and 1
phone. Large I
bath. Call Paul i
112 A and B
rooms. Close ti
Pets ok wdepc
AVAILABLE N
rcjbm duplexes,
frfin campus
downtown. Cer
ei dryer or hoc
ojte.
ECU AREA tv
houses availabl
$600. wd. v
$630. wd. cer
fenced yard. Pe
WALK TO ECI
$295month.
Avery Street or
near campus.
TOWNHOUSE
12 baths nee
lots of storage.
561-2203 pagei
RINGGOI
Now Taki
1 bedroorr
' Efficiency
CALL
ROOMMi
FEMALE ROO
share brand n�
A.S.A.P. Eastga
info, please call
ROOMMATE
three bedroom
drive, gas logs
ings. Washer
13 rent. 13 t
ROOMMATE I
bedroom house
area one mile fr
clean. $235 n
ties. 752-2116
NEED FEMAU
mate for 4 be
monthly 14
route. Call 752-
RUG FOR Sal
white Berger w
padding. $75. I
a.m. and 8 p.m.
FEMALE ROC
three bedroom
house. Spacii
included. $225
utilities. Call I
Near ECU cam)
LAST CHAN
slightly uses,
missing. Great
apartment. $61
752-5899. Ieav
YEAR old V
processor, like r
printer, $100 fil
0926.
COUCH, WAS
of drawers, des
Call Rich at 7E
message.
MAC PERFORI
SB mem. $500
:OR SALE: V
vith icemaker.
Did). Price nego
luring day at 31
6203!
rREK 970 wi
'aimer Fork 80
3XLX compor
leajpost V-bral
es? and brake
151888.
ARAMARK
CASHIERS, B.
' PUSOINI
�DEPENDAB
AfPLY AT M
PA
I, Runneri
,
'�- tr





AST CAROLINIAN
l"HE
IBA
SCUBA
Cantor
lajors
res.
able
nations.
is office
nt.

oils
6278 J




ItLM.S :
����
sxpires
pon
)ms, 1 bath,
rasherdryer
m campus,
edrooms, 1 .�
sher, free J. ,
asherdryer
n campus. t -�'
ible
enance- ,��
!�
I '
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t:
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Morkpitrdais
lit � ftffOoiM f�
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MVSM S Mfy Hen
Mrt lasptdM irsSo
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ISyMrifxptriwct
��day: 12-10 p-m.
on Avenue
�eenvllle.
15 Thursday 26. 1999
FOR RENT
TOWNHOUSE FOR rent. 2 BR. 1
12 bath, $475mo $475 deposit.
Wllliamsburg Manor off Hooker Rd.
Small pets OK. Info, call days 931-
1317, evenings 366-0741.
TAKE OVER lease, rent is $200 per
month and 14 of utilities and
phone. Large 6 bedroom house. 2
bath. Call Paul at 329-8666.
112 A and B Holly Street 2 bed-
rooms. Close to campus. 809-1922
Pets ok wdeposit.
AVAILABLE NOW. 2 and 3 bed-
rciom duplexes. 12 block4 blocks
from campus and 2 blocks from
ddyvntown. Central heat, AC, wash-
er, dryer or hookup. $365-700. 767-
0552.
ECU AREA two three bedroom
houses available immediately. One
$600. wd, window ac. Other
$630. wd, central ac. dishwasher,
fenced yard. Pets OKI Call 830-9502.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 768-6696.
TOWNHOUSE - 3 BEDROOMS, 2
12 baths near ECU, WD hook-up,
lots of storage. 762-1899 M-F day.
561-2203 pager night.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
� Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share brand new 2-bdrm. apartment
A.S.A.P. Eastgate Village. For more
info, please call 661-8464.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
three bedroom duplex with private
drive, gas logs and cathedral ceil-
ings. Washer and dryer included.
13 rent, 13 bills. Call 661-6939.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house in quiet residential
area one mile from campus. Must be
clean. $235 month plus 13 utili-
ties. 752-2116
NEED FEMALE non-smoking room-
mate for 4 bedroom house. $215
monthly 14 utilities. On ECU bus
route. Call 752-0281.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
three bedroom. 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities. Call Mindy at 355-2956.
Near ECU campus.
FOR SALE
LAST CHANCE: Student desk,
slightly uses, one drawer handle
missing. Great for studying or small
apartment. $60 or best offer. Call
752-5899. leave message.
2 YEAR old Whisper Writer word
processor, like new with monitor and
printer. $100 firm. Call Paula at 754-
0926.
RUG FOR Sale. 7 12X12' off-
white Berger with bound edges and
padding. $75. 321-0320 between 8
a.m. and 8 p.m.
COUCH, WASHER, recliner. chest
Df drawers, desk, and misc. items.
Call Rich at 756-2767 and leave a
message.
MAC PERFORMA 24 megs RAM 1
SB mem. $500. 767-2433.
FOR SALE: Whirlpool refrigerator
with icemaker. (Only 3 12 months
ski). Price negotiable. Please call me
luring day at 355-3741. night at 321-
S203!
IREK 970 with Manitou Shawn
Calmer Fork 80mm Travel. Shimano
3XLX components, new IRC tires.
ieatpost V-brakes. Rapid-Fire shift-
ess and brake levers. $350 OBO.
P58-1888.
FOR SALE
A computer for class? Call
Shawn at Custom Computer and let
him build you one. Excellent prices.
Free setup and delivery. Call Shawn
at 752-4336.
BUY BOOKS � Math 1065 $40
OBO: COMM 2001. $10 OBO. Please
call 353-8930.
AAAI CANCUN 6 Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air,
hotel, meals, drinks from $3991 1 of
6 small businesses recognized for
outstanding ethics! springbreaktrav-
ei.com 1-800-678-6386
AAAI SPRING Break Specials! Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 5 days $2791 In-
cludes most mealsl Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City, Day-
tona. South Beach, Florida $129!
springbreaktraval.com 1-800-678-
6386
HUGE 280 sq.ft. bedroom With pri-
vate entrance available in vintage
home for a responsible and tidy fe-
male upperclassman. Washerdryer.
3 blocks from campus. Private bath-
room available; must provide own
window ac. Must not mind smoking
and cats. $260, 12 utilities. Serious
inquiries only. 661-7591.
1995 HONDA Civic EX. excellent
condition, fully loaded, power sun-
roof. CD changer, new tires, call 413-
0330. ask for Dennis or Tracy.
$12,500 OBO.
SERVICES
SOME ASSEMBLY required, holes
in the wall, odd jobs, repair work,
painting, low rates, save that depos-
it and call 757-8781. leave message.
HELP WANTED
FACTORY MATTRESS & Bed-
rooms has an opening in its ware-
house and delivery department.
Good pay with benefits. Apply in
person only. 730 Greenville Boule-
vard. No phone calls, please.
A PART-TIME nanny needed for 1
12 year old twins. Mon-Fri morn-
ings 7:30-12:30. Experience, related
education preferred. Call Nease Per-
sonnel. 766-6820
HELP WANTED: hiring part-time
kitchen, dish, and wait staff. Apply at
Basil's Restaurant, 1675 E. Firetower
Rd.
WANTED: AFTER school care pro-
vider for 5th grade boy. 6 days per
week. 2:30 p.m. until 6 p.m. Own
transportation. Help with homework.
Hourly rate and mileage. Call Robin
Parkin at 830-8998.
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
11 a.m2 p.m. Flexible work sched-
ule. For more information contact
Jim Sakell or Ronald Barrett at Cy-
press Glen Retirement Community,
830-0713.
LOOKING FOR A job? The ECU Tel-
efund is hiring studentsfor the Fall of
1999 to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212,
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
SSSSSTUTORS NEEDEDSSSSS
Looking for some extra money (best
pay on campus!) and a way to im-
prove academically? Become a tutor
for the Office of Student Develop-
ment-Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any level (0001-
5999) in all subject areas. Under-
graduate students are paid six dol-
lars an hour ($6) and graduate stud-
ents are paid seven dollars an hour
($7). If this sounds like the job for
you, join us for an orientation meet-
ings in Ward Sports Medicine Build-
ing (behind Minges Coliseum) on
either 824 at 5 p.m 825 at 3 p.m.
or 830 at 5 p.m. Questions? Need
more information? Contact Isha Wil-
liams at 328-4691 for further infor-
mation.
aramark, the worlds leader in managed services is hiring
cashiers, bake shop assistants and grill cooks for ecu cam-
" pus oining. must have customer service skills, and be
Dependable and friendly! bring complete work history &
apply at mendenhall student ctr-ecu mtwf 9am4pm. great
pay & benefits1 no phone calls please. e0e.
Rumun
Food Delivery Drivers Wanted
We offer:
� Perfect hours & Flexible schedule for college students
5:30 pm -10 pm � 11 pm on weekends (No dorm students)
� Two way radio communication offers innovative freedom of
movement when not delivering
� Competitive pay at $4-$5 per hour tips so your average
income ranges from $8-$ 15 per hour
� We have over 1 year experience delivering in greenville.
Reliable transportation a must Knowledge of Creenville
streets advantageous. (756-5527 after 6 pm, leave message)
www.restaurantrunners.com
HELP WANTED
BABYSITTERS NEEDED Tues.
andor Thursday for Community Bi-
ble Study. Hours 9-11:15. Please call
766-9394.
NEED BABYSITTER for Thursdays
from 11:30 until 4:30 for my 4 year
old and 9 year old boys. Must have
transportation. Please call 353-7446.
WANTED: PART-Time warehouse
and delivery position available for
morning hours. License required.
Apply in person at Larry's Carpet
One, 3010 East 10th Street. Green-
ville, NC
YOUTH IN-LINE Hockey Coaches.
The Greenville Recreation and Parks
Department is recruiting part-time
youth In-Line Hockey coaches. Ap-
plicant must possess some knowl-
edge of the hockey skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-18, in
hockey fundamentals. This program
will run from early October to mid-
December. Salary rates start at
$5.15 per hour. Applications will be
taken until the positions are filled.
For more information, please call
Judd Crumpler. Michael Daly or Ben
James at 329-4660 after 2PM.
COMPUTER SCIENCE student
needed for new computer software
company. Basic computer skills a
must. Flexible hrs. 20hrs.wk. Call
756-8716, leave message.
SPRING BREAK 2000 with STS -
Join America's 1 Student Tour Op-
erator to Jamaica. Mexico, Bahamas,
Cruises, and Florida. Now hiring on-
campus reps. Call 1-800-648-4849
or visit online O www.ststravel.com
TUTORSITTER NEEDED for 5th
grader after school M-F every other
week. $60 per week. Call Sherry.
758-8400.
FALL YOUTH Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Paries De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3 pm. until 7 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November,
Salary rates start at $5.16 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James. Judd Crumpler or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
CHILD CARE needed mornings &
evenings. Must have transportation.
Carry & pick-up from school. Pay
neg. Call 353-5317.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY workers
needed Sunday mornings 9:15-
12:15. Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church. 610 S. Washington St. Ap-
ply at church office. Office hours 8
a.m12noon and 1:30-6 p.m.
TEACHER NEEDED full-time to
teach 2 year olds class. Must have
experience. Also hiring substitutes.
Call Harmony Child Care. 766-6229.
SZECHUAN GARDEN needs part-
time or full-time wait staff & cashiers.
No phone calls. Come after 2 p.m. in
person only. 909 South Evans.
Greenville (10th 6 Evans).
NEED SOMEONE to carpool, run er-
rands, and take my 6 and 9 yr. olds
to after school activities 3-6
dayswk. (Monday-Friday) Sept. 15
till Nov. Must have transportation.
Good pay. fun children! Call 321-
8010. leave message.
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Thursdays (no morning classes,
please), for two young children. No
smokers, please. Must have refer-
ences. Call 355-7876.
MALE AND FEMALE GYMNASTICS
TEACHERS WANTED CALL ROSES
GYMNASTICS AT 321-7264 FOR JOB
OPPORTUNITIES.
SKYDIVE!
euiuusiYsniTS
191IMM-2224
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPSINC.
t looking for mxvi. HUOJM �o load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift houn 300am to 8am.
S7.50hour; tuition assistance available after 30 days.
Future career opportunity In opnbons and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2410
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
ARAMARK, THE WORLD'S LEADER IN MANAGED SERVICES IS HIRING
CATERING PERSONNEL MUST BE DEPENDABLE AND FRIENDLY! AVAIL-
ABLE NIGHTS, MORNINGS AND WEEKENDS. BRING COMPLETE WORK
HISTORY 7 APPLY AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CTR-ECU MTWF 9AM-
4PM MTWF. GREAT PAY & BENEFITS 1 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. EOE.
Tat tan Curtain
HELP WANTED
EARN $80X0 to $100.00 per hour
modeling and dancing for local adult
entertainment agency. No expert- .
ence required. Flexible work hours.
Discretion and confidentiality as-
sured. 830-0494.
CONSTRUCTION MANAGE-
MENT, industrial engineer or similar
major needed for part-time to full-
time work. Must be able to use drill,
etc. Will work with your schedule.
Call 756-8470 for appt.
WORK STUDY Jobs. Applications
now being accepted thru September
16, 1999. Please bring: work study
hiring authorization form, driver's li-
cense, social security card, class
schedule. 2nd Floor Administration.
Joyner Library
NEED STUDENT to work after-
noons Monday-Thursday for 3 to 4
hours helping1 a 5th and 8th grader
with homework. Should be good at
Algebra. Call Mrs. Lee at 356-4860.
$25 PER Hour. Direct sales reps
needed Now! Market credit card
appl. Person-to-person. Commissions
avg. S25O-600wk. 1-800661-2832.
EXPERIENCED SITTER needed to
keep four year old daughter in my
home beginning Fall semester. Pre-
fer child development major. Non-
smoker, own transportation. Must be
able to provide developmental ap-
propriate activities. References re-
quired. Call 931-7439 for interview.
WANTED: STUDENT for after
school care for an 8 year-old. Need-
ed M-F 3-6 p.m. Will require trans-
portation. If interested call after 5.
766-6981; daytime 365-6423.
FUN f free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me. I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available (I've pho-
tographed dozens of ECU girls).
Please send a note, phone number
and a picture (if available - it will be
returned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413
Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC 27893 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail me at
hronjak) simflex.com
BABYSITTER NEEDED for after
school care M-F. Call Cindy 356-
3476 after 5 p.m.
PART-TIME library page Monday-
Friday 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Shelving
books, assisting librarians as need-
ed. Apply in person only 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. weekdays in the Children's
Library. Sheppard Memorial Library.
530 Evans Street. Greenville. No
phone calls.
WAREHOUSE HELP needed, morn-
ings and Saturdays. Apply in person.
1009 Dickinson Ave Carpet Bargain
Center.
MOTHER'S HELPER needed for 4
children. Includes housecleaning.
cooking & babysitting. Requires ex-
cellent references with reliable trans-
portation. Mondays. Tuesdays &or
Thursdays for full days. Call 321-
1379.
LOOKING FOR a hard working, de-
pendable person for a flight line po-
sition. Duties include cleaning and
moving airplanes. Aviation experi-
ence preferred but not required. 15-
26 hrsweek. Some weekends.
$6.50hr start. Apply in person at
Diltew's -Aviation, 1105 -N MeTnorial
Drive. Pitt-Greenville Airport.
BABYSITTER NEEDED in my home
for 3 year old child. Needed Tuesday
and Thursday 8:30 a.m2:30 p.m.
Contact Mary Cavanagh at 353-
6338.
GREEK PERSONALS
ATTENTION EPSILON Sigma Al-
pha sisters. There will be a meeting
829 at 7 p.m. in MSC multipurpose
room. Welcome back and good luck
PI KAPPA Alpha would like to con-
gratulate and welcome the new so-
rority pledges. We look forward to
breaking you in to your new life and
our world.
GAMMA SIGMA Sigma announces
its last night of Fall Rush. This is your
last chance to see what service and
sisterhood is about. Where: Menden-
hall Room 244 7-8:30 p.m. Dress is
semiformal. For more questions or
rides, call Karen, 439-0999.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
OTHER
THE LUTHERAN Student Move-
ment, LSM, meat Sunday at 6 p.m.
at Our Redeemer Lutheran Church's
Annex. 1801 S. Elm St. Our first
meeting is Sunday, August 29. when
we'll get acquainted, make plan for
the school year, and eat! Have ques-
tions or need a ride? Contact Lynda
Werdal. 363-7113 or 707-2146. LSM
is an ECU student organization and
part of Our Redeemer Lutheran
Church. Summer Sunday Worship.
9:30. Regular Sunday worship
schedule begins September 12 with
services at 8:30 and 11:00. Sunday
School classes at 9:46 beginning
Sept. 12. Everyone's welcome!
KITTENS! FREE to a good home.
Please cad 767-2068 ASAP.
PERSONALS
THE CARD Post Report 333
Pleaz Inn. The following is a brief up-
date to the 'petition for judicial re-
view' of 'warning of trespass' issued
12999 by ECU. The petition was
'ordered' by Wayne Superior Court's
judge to a 'mediated settlement con-
ference Recognizing that would not
address the legal questions present-
ed in my petition made a formal
motion to dispense with the 'mediat-
ed settlement conference move the
case to Wake Superior court. .& for
discovery purposes to have access
of tapes of taped ECU appeal hear-
ing 4799 (due to lapses, dele-
tions, misquotes of hearing tran-
scripts). & copies of papers left for
ECU's Vice Chancellor of Academics
Affairs. Those were the papers re-
quested by the Vice Chancellor of
Academic Affair for review & re-
sponse to my efforts 12498 of go-
ing toECU to seek an ombudsman to
address a potential flawmalpractice
in education at ECU. My present un-
derstanding of the progress of this
'motion' is that there is no time table
for the Superior Court judge to re-
spond. Hope to research this matter
in time for next report. Prosper n
Live Long. Tom Drew. 27533-0587
ANNOUNCEMENTS
COME OUT for the annual King and
Queen of the Halls event on Aug. 26
from 4-6 p.m. There will be free
food, prizes, and lots of fun You
won't leave disappointed!
THERAPEUTIC HORSEBACK rid-
ing sponsored by the ARISE program
will be held on Mon. or Wed. after-
noons from Sept-Dec. at the Rock
Springs Equestrian Center. Reg. by
Aug. 26. Cost is $120.00
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PHIMGMA Pi invites everyone with
a 3.30 GPA and 32-96 semester
hours id Smoker. Coma see what
we're all about. Tuesday. August SIM
in GC 1032 6 p.m. For more info, cat
Emily at 767-1407.
INTERESTED M learning to scuba?
Meet at the SRC pool Autf. 31. 7-10
p.m. Register one week prior �
class. Cost is $16 for SRC members
and $26 for non-membara
HEY STUDENTS. The GreenviHe-
Pftt County Special Olympics is cur-
rently recruiting volunteers for the
following sport: bowling, basketbal
skills, volleyball, soccer, aquatic,
roller skating, powerlifting and
bocce. For more information, con-
tact Dean Foy or Kelvin Yarretl at
3294641 or 329-4844.
WANT TO learn to surf? You don't
want to miss Intro to Surfing on Aug.
30. 7-9 p.m. in the SRC pool. I
register one week prior to the
Cost is $10 for members and $20
for non-members.
ECU ROAD Rules Mission 2 is be-
ing held Tuesday. Aug.31 from 4-6
p.m. or Wednesday. Sept. 1 from 7-
8 p.m. in 212 Mendenhall. AH fresh-
men commuters are invited. Inves-
tigate your learning style and way
to succeed in class. Call '6881 for
more information.
THE DEPARTMENT OF Communi-
cation Sciences and Disorders wiH
be providing the speech, language
and hearing screening on the follow-
ing dates: Screenings for students in
the College of Arts and Sciences.
General College, and the Schools of
Art. Health and Human Perfor-
mance. Human Environmental Sci-
ences, and Music will be held Mon-
day. August 30 or Wednesday. Sep-
tember 1. Screenings for students in
the School of Education win be held
Thursday. September 2 or Wedne
day, September 8 from 6:16-6:16.
The screening will be conducted in
the ECU Speech and Hearing Clinic
Balk Annex 1, School of AMed
Health Sciences. No appointment is
needed-Flease do not call their office
for a appointment. Whiting is outside
the clinic waiting room. Sign in be-
gins at 5PM. Screenings are con-
ducted on a first come, first serve ba-
sis. Makeup sessions are held each
Thursday afternoon from 3:30-4:30.
$10 charge: call 328-4405 for an ap-
pointment.
WOMENS DISTANCE runners
needed. Womens X-country & dis-
tance teams need walk-ons. Be part
of an ECU varsity team. Sign with
Coach Klepack at Scales Fieldhouse
or call 328-4605 for more informa-
tion
I
3
i


�?
A
Advertise in
Hie East
Carolinian
classifieds
OPEN LINE AD RATE$4.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 50 each
STUDENT LINE AD RATE$2.00
for 25 or fewer words
additional words 59 each
Must present a valid ECU I.D. to qualify. The East Carolinian
reserves the right to refuse this rate for any ad deemed to be
non-student or business related.
CLASSIFIED AD EXTRAS RATE $1.00
add to above line rate for either BOLD or
ALL CAPS type.
.All classified ads placed by individuals or campus
groups must be prepaid. Classified ads placed by a
business must be prepaid unless credit has been
established. Cancelled ads can be removed from the
paper if notification is made before the deadline, but
no cash refunds are given. No proofs or tearsheets
are available. The Personals section of the classi-
fieds is intended for non-commercial communication
placed by individuals or campus groups. Business
ads will not be placed in this section.
All Personals are subject to editing for indecent or
inflammatory language as determined by the edi-
tors.
CLASSIFIED AD DEADLINE
4 p.m. FRIDAY
for the following TUESDAY'S issue
4 p.m. MONDAY
for the following THURSDAY'S issue
rl
i





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tips for off campus living
Did you know?
s a tenant you have certain rights! Every house uu
apartment in Greenville must meel the minimum housing code. Ihe
place you live should be weathertiqht, watertight, and rodent proof! You
ulcl have aclequal md cold running water, heat and ventilation.
H rical lil md wiring should be in 0,00c! repair and be
Be smart! Lverv house and apartment in Greenville is required
gsmoki 1! ini iblic hall and stairwell in
apartments, (ownhouses, andcondosmusl have adequate liohlinoal all
our doors. think aboul vour personal safety!
WE CAN HELP if you have questions!
By choosing to live off campus you
face challenges and responsibilities
different from residence hall students.
Besides being an ECU student you are
a citizen of the City of Greenville. Here
are a few lifestyle issues to consider.
Common Courtesies
By living off campus you have become part of a larger
community than the umbrella provided by the University.
You will be interacting with more people who have less in common,
therefore, attitudes ol loloranc c respec t, and c onsideration are very
important. Some of your new neighbors will be students, like you.
Others ma be families with young children or teens, rhere may be1
some senior citizens living on vour street or in vour apartment
building. Ml of ihosr people with differenl lifestyles have1 to get
along.
Public Safety ,nd Crime Prevention(Grc
trash Collection (Greenville Publii Works Dept.l
i lousing Disc rimination (Greenville Commur
Don't Know Who to Calk I Greenville Public
Free Resources
A Place of Your Own - A Guidp for Off-CamPUS Uvini
gives Information about leasing a place to live, City ordinances, parkiru
and alternative transportation, how to connect with the communit
and a quick reference of City and ECU phone numbers. This booklet!
available at no cost from the Office of Adult and Commuter Studer
Services, 210 Whichard Building or by calling 328-6881.
A Citizen's Handbook- is a comprehensive listing of city service
(like trash collection), plus local government information. This bookie
is available at no cost from the Office of Public Information in City Hall
201 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive or by calling 329-4434.
The City Page - is an advertisement in Thp Daily Reflector every
Sunday, which publicizes current city business, Council Agendas, Public
Notices and Hearings, events, recreation programs, and changes
city-provided services.
The Government Access Channel - watch ioc
government programming on cable television channel 9.
Greenville Office of Public Information
If you would like any of the booklets described above or have questions
regarding the Greenville community, please call us at 329-4434.
Pets and Animals
I ew things dn make a place feel like home more than
a pet. rhere are many places locally where von can adopl a
cat or dog. I low over. Gr� uuvHIe is a very transient oit with
many people moving in iu out during the year, loo
329-4110
.830-3937
329-4522
. 329-449-1
.329-4434
thai
rts not
The City of Greenville has plenty of parks and open spaces to throw a (risbee,
play basketball (01 soccer, or football), bike, skateboard or rollerblade. There's
a place ricjht next to the main campus to play bocce, shuffleboard, or tennis. You
can joo, on the greenway or play roller hockey at the1 "extreme" skate park.
Parties
Y01
yoii onl
alcohol wilhoi
cosi ol your p
purchase
If yon wanl mi
1 soil

1
100 a
public r lu a
day fines.
If you're planning a party don't let it grow to something you can't manage.
Tell your neighbors when you are having the party and give them your phone
number so thev can call you directly if there's a problem.
Parking
But it
-IFYi
clod
fED
apci. mere are many places locaiiywneit; yuu edi 1 auupid ��Linrt ctirior mH nv iho ; 1 ninoi
Nm 1 ,ire one ouraord o or an I (.I pa kino, she mm and use 1110 111 wansit
cat or dog. However, GrecnvHIe is a very transient utv with � Ullhm u"ul ' . . . nf
many people moving in and out during the year, loo system. Ihis bus service is free when you show vour student ID rhe City of
frequently pets are abandoned by their departing owners. 11 Greenville offers the "Bikes 2 Bus" program at a minimal charge. You ride vour
is wise to consider the responsibility involved in having a bike to the bus stop, load your bike on the racks mounted on the front of each
pot. I nderstand the cost and the (are involved when you GREAT bus, ride to the stop closest to vour destination, then use your bike to
adopt an animal. Please onsiderand plai priately what navigate around campus.
VOU Will do will
VM CAM H have questions!
Greenville Recreation and Parks
Greenville Police en
GRLAT Bus System
I (I Parking (uwvv.ecu.eduparking
Wl CAM HI IP 11
mat (onlro! Di
iety
329-4567
329-4317
329-4532
328-6294
328-4724
Access information on the web
ECU Adult & Commuter Student Services @www.ecu.edustudentllfeacss
City of Greenville @ www.state.nc.us.greenvffle
lent Is sponsored by the Community Connection Network, the ECU Division of Student Ufe, and the City of creenvllle.
0 save this page save this page save this page save this page save this page
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ECU and Wei
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PHOTOS COURTESY


Title
The East Carolinian, August 26, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 26, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1351
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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