The East Carolinian, August 24, 1999






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TUESDAY, AUGUST 24,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 57
Smart drugs for smart students
Seepg. 7
News
Briefs
Today is the last day for late regis-
tration and to drop courses with full
refunds.
In Cary, the North Carolina Bar
Association awarded eight new
scholarships and 12 renewal schol-
arships to children of law enforce-
ment officers killed or permanently
disabled in the line of duty.
Included in that amount is $21,000
to 20 students for the new school
year. ECU recipients include Garland
Gill Jr. of Winston-Salem and Shaun
Hathaway of Sharpsburg.
University Health Systems of Eastern
Carolina will be having a graduation
celebration for the physician assis-
tant program. The event will be held
on Saturday, August 28 at the Jockey
Club at Rock Springs. Dr. Harvey
Eakes, one of the founders of the PA.
program at Duke University, will be
the speaker.
Hurricane Brett hit land in Texas
producing 125- mph winds and hori-
zontal sheets of rain. The category
four storm made landfall 70 miles
south of Corpus Christie in the
sparsely populated Kenedy County.
The storm has been compared to
Hurricane Andrew, which devastat-
ed Florida in 1992.
An art gallery in the city of Erkelenz,
Germany will host exhibition of 32
works of art by faculty and graduate
students from the ECU School of Art.
The show opens on Aug. 27 and
runs through Sept. 19. Several mem-
bers of the art faculty will attend the
Opening.
SARATOGA, N.Y. (AP) - Rep. John
Sweeney has been named to Texas
Gov. George W. Bush's presidential
campaign steering committee,
Sweeney's office announced
Sunday.
Sweeney, a freshman Republican
from Rensselaer County, is one of
18 members of Congress chosen to
serve on the committee.
SANTA CLARA, Calif. (AP) - A 12-
year-old boy has died after falling
from a ride at Paramount's Great
America Theme Park.
The boy, whose name has not been
released, fell from his seat on the
Drop Zone Stunt Tower about 3:20
p.m. Sunday, park spokesman
Timothy Chanaud said.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
umm ooocour miomis srmm
Food, musk and
games offered at event
ANGELA HARNE
STAFF WRITER
ree food, music, games and out-
loors surrounded many last
Thursday.
The ongoing festivities of
ixtreme Welcome continued with
in extreme cookout. Mendenhall
ind Todd Dining Halls hosted the
lawaiianMexican extravaganza.
The campus greens filled with stu-
ients fast and the fun began
Extreme Welcome is sponsored
y PICL (Partners in Campus
living) which deals with dining,
lousing, recreational services and
tlendenhall.
The activities have been really
;ood . . . we've had big turn
utssaid Manny Amaro, director
f University Housing Services.
"This is a big kickoff to the new
school year. Welcome back to all
students said Laura Hartung,
campus nutritionist.
Students participated in games
such as the dolphin ring toss, joust-
ing, bungee runs, flamingo bike
mazes and much more, while the
'big pickle' roamed around saying
hello.
"The games are cool, but it's
hot said Don Rizzie.
"It's great . . . I've met a lot of
new people and I really enjoy the
games, especially jousting said
Marcus Mitchell.
While students enjoyed the
games, others took advantage of
the free food and drinks. Food
ranged from things such as chicken
and steak, to kabobs and hot dogs.
Green beans, carrots and cold cut
sandwiches were also served.
Mountain Dew and Pepsi were
on hand to help quench students
thirsts.
For dessert, students had to
choose between fresh baked
pound cake and refreshing ice
cream.
Another big decision came
A Mariachi baod plays tunes for the onlookers at Friday's event.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELER
when it was time to put toppings
on the ice cream
With many toppings such as
fruit, nuts, hot fudge and straw-
berry sauce, even eating desert
could require a lot of decision
making.
However, most students had
no complaints about the food.
"This is very nice and the
food looks good said David
Steel-
Many ECU employees
worked hard to put together the
festivities
"It's hot but it is beneficial
to the kids and school, and ic
shows how Mendenhall has the
same service inside or outside
said Greg Barrett, Mendenhall
worker.
During the games and food,
students enjoyed the tunes of a
four-man Mariachi band. The
music was played with the beat of
violins, trumpets and guitars.
"We love the entertainment
and the food is good too said
Tracy hindes.
In the midst of the festivities
decorations filled the campus
greens.
Pink flamingos and mer-
maids and more gave the cook-
out a little twist of fun.
Students enjoyed free give-
aways df, straw hats, Hawaiian -
leis, T-shirts and blow-up mon-
keys.
"We're having fun . . . the
entertainment is good, along
with the decorations we
really like our hats and leis
said cousins Tiffany and Laura
Heavner.
"This is off the hook I
like the music . . . it's different
from the regular hip-hop it's
Students enjoy a catered lunch at this year's Extreme Cookout.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELER
a nice treat that should be done
weekly said Reuben Mitchell.
"ECU is a good campus, and
this event shows us different cul-
tures, while staying involved with
school I think it should be a
weekly event said Terrance
Holland.
The Extreme Cookout was a
big hit.
Students enjoyed the activities
and many are ready for more.
Kickoff to the new year brought
smiles, laughter and excitement
This miter can ha contacted
at ahame8studentmedia.ecu.edu.
Cold beverages were on hand to keep students cool in the August heat.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELER
U.S. compared to world in sex study
Grad students conclude
Americans start earlier
Phillip Gilfus
SSIS 1 AN I K s EDITOR
Two ECU students discovered that
when it comes to sex, "Safe Sex or
No Sex" seems to be the best mes-
sage.
Susan Reece and Jennifer
Urbaniak, graduate students both in
health education, participated in a
study abroad last June researching
the gap between adolescent HrV
and pregnancy rates among the
United States and countries like the
Netherlands, France and Germany.
The European Study Institute,
sponsored jointly by UNC-Charlottc
and Advocates for Youth, a
Washington D.Cbased group, was
comprised of 42 researchers. They
included graduate students and pro-
fessionals, including an abortion doc-
tor and a director from the Planned
Parenthood organization. The study
group spent two weeks in the three
countries interviewing health minis-
ters, sexuality educators, clergy and
teen health professionals.
The purpose of this fact-finding
mission was to discover why
teenagers in Europe were engaging
in sexual intercourse later than
their American counterparts.
"There's no one answer said
Susan Reece.
The average beginner age of
intercourse is 17 in the Netherlands,
16.2 in Germany and 16.8 in France,
compared to 15.8 in the U.S.
"The biggest difference I found
was the media. Their media is gov-
ernment financed and delivers an
explicit and consistent message
Instead of the "Just Say No"
message about sex, Europe uses a
more open policy of "Safe Sex or No
Sex
According to the study, the
media in the U.S. often sends sexu-
al messages that say, "Just Do it
while government funded pro-
grams tell young people to "Just
Say No Until Marriage
"I feel we give kids a double
message here Reece said.
A conclusion of the study was
that European openness about sex
helps teens face and make deci-
sions concerning their sexuality.
The message also promotes
respecting and protecting both
yourself and your partner.
This writer can ha contacted at
pgilfus8studentmedia.ecu.adu.
Bowling alley to
undergo renovations
Outer Limitz to
switch to automatic scoring
Ashley R o b f. r t s
S T F F W II1EI
Are you an all-work and no play
kind of student? Say good-bye to
the days of going to bed early
because of boredom. ECU has a
place for you to work off the stress
of the day.
The Outer Limitz bowling
alley, located on the ground floor
of Mendenhall Student Center, is
under construction. Work began
on Monday, Aug. 16 by the
Brunswick Corp. Synthetic lanes,
which are extremely durable, will
replace the current wooden lanes.
Scoring will no longer be manu-
al which is a relief to all students
who are frightened by the phrase,
"by hand Lanes will now glow in
the dark and numerous black
lights have been added.
The total cost of the renova-
tions of the Outer Limitz is just
under $80,000.
"A computerized control sys-
tem will be installed which will
upgrade Outer Limitz said Bill
Clutter, director of Financial
Affairs in Mendenhall Student
Center. "The new synthetic lanes
and the automatic scoring will
bring ECU into the '90s. It is
going to be state of the art
Opinion on the arrival of the
new facility varied.
"I think the renovations are a
good idea because if they make
the bowling alley more appealing,
it will attract many more students
to come and use it said Vanessa
Olorvida, freshman.
"I think it is stupid because it is
just another distraction from
studying said Whitney Boone,
freshman.
Since the bowling classes of
ECU arc not in session at this
time, the renovations are not
affecting these students.
When bowling classes do
resume, new students will have
the privilege of being the first to
enjoy the improved bowling facili-
ty.
The estimated time of comple-
tion is the end of Aug so keep
your eyes open for weekly spe-
cials. Admission for ECU students
will be only $1.25 per game with
an ECU One Card.
The Outer Limitz will extend
their hours until midnight on the
weekends. Be sure to check it out.
This writer can ha contacted
at arobertsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu.





The East Carolini
2 Thufrtiy. tutjHSt 24. 1998
news
The East Carolinian
Clubhouse website offers
online registration for groups
Calender of events
offend for organizations
Tki Howard
stuk u'ritki
Students who have tried to find
information about organizations
and events at ECU may have had
trouble in the past. However, this
year that is going to change.
The Student Media Board has
created www.clubhouse.ecu.edu,
which states it is "the official source
for information about ECU's clubs
and organizations Clubhouse
makes information easy to access
from one page, as opposed to
scrolling through several menus,
which was the case in the past.
From the Clubhouse home page, it
is possible to go to the following
web sites:
Student Organizations: a page
that lists all of the officially recog-
nized student organizations
"according to affiliations or inter-
ests with each organizations pur-
pose as stated in their constitu-
tion
Student Leadership: which tells
about the programs, resources and
services available through the
Student Leadership Office. For
example, there is a sample consti-
tution for new clubs, an adviser
handbook and a "Hot Topics" page
that answers frequently asked
questions.
Student Media: houses WZMB,
Expressions, Rebel and The East
Carolinian.
Student Government: gives
information about meetings, the
Clubhouse logo up and running on student oriented site.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
constitution and the purpose of
SGA.
Student Transit: features bus
routes and schedules, as well as
other information related to trans-
portation.
Student Union: lists all of the
programs and events sponsored by
the Student Union, including films,
concerts and Barefoot on the Mall.
Another useful feature of
Clubhouse is the events calendar.
The calendar lists various happen-
ings on campus such as concerts,
films, exhibits and special tuest
lectures.
"If you're looking for something
to do, this is a great place to look
said Jim Sturm, director of Student
Leadership Development
Programs. "No one should sit in
their room complaining that they
have nothing to do
Any person wishing to have an
event listed on the calendar is
encouraged to submit the form
which is accessible from the web
site.
"It's a cheap, meaning free, easy
way to get an event publicized
said Paul Wright, Student Media
A student accesses the web in
PHOTO SV ROBIN
a computer lab on campus
VUCHNICH
Adviser.
Not only does the new web site
offer valuable information, it is now
the only way a student organization
may be officially recognized by the
university.
Previously, student organiza-
tions registered through the
Student Leadership Office. Now,
they must register by completing
the form online at Clubhouse.
"They don't have a choice,
every group on campus must regis-
ter online Sturm said.
The Media Board also hopes to
use the site to give every registered
student organization the opportuni-
ty to create a web page.
"We (the Media Board) have
tried to make it as easy as possible
for any student organization to have
a web site Wright said. "I would
love it if all student organizations
had some kind of a web page. It
doesn't have to be fancy or have
bells and whistles and so forth. It
can be as simple as the name and a
way to get in a hold of them
Clubhouse is offering S
megabytes of free space for any
organization that wants to be on
line.
"We won't do any creation, but
we will be willing to host their
site said Dan Cox, Clubhouse's
webmaster.
In the future. Clubhouse hopes
to include such features as a "Rides
WantedNeeded" boarT, a text-
book trader page and a chat room.
"We are always looking for sug-
gestions Cox said.
For more information about
Clubhouse or how to become a part
of this new form of student media,
visit the site at
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu or e-mail
the site's webmaster, Dan Cox, at
webmaster@student
media.ecu.edu.
Annual party at
Brent Road ends in arrests
Officials decreased
number of citations
Com SlIKKI.KH
KS K-tllTOR
N.C. State's annual back to
school party at Brent Road led to
many arrests this year.
Raleigh officials did take pre-
cautions to ensure safety for every-
one, but the night still ended with a
total of 366 total charges.
Officials wanted to minimize
some of the damage that is caused
by the party to the neighborhood
and cut back on underage drinking.
� "The essential aim of our work
is to protect the law and the prop-
erty of those neighbors who will not
be taking part said Public Safety
Assistant Director Terry Wright.
Wright says that officers have
been on the scene for the past three
years.
"Basically, what we've done is
work with ALE, the Raleigh Police
Department and other agencies
Wright said.
Even with the added protection
of local officials, 71 NCSU students
were still charged with various
crimes.
According to Captain Mike
Murray of the Raleigh Police
Department, charges ranged from
possession of alcohol to assault on
police officers. There were also
charges of marijuana possession
and driving under the influence.
Of the 366 total charges at this
year's party, 254 were possession of
alcohol.
However, that figure is down
from last year's bash where 449
citations were issued.
There was an alternative to
Saturday's festivities. An alcohol
free concert was put on to give stu-
dents another option to the party at
Brent Road.
The event sponsored by Cathy
Cahall who owns a Christian night-
club in Raleigh. The event was
held from 1-8 p.m. at Pullen Park
and featured Christian Bands as a
live source of entertainment
However, the concert did run
into some trouble of its own. When
the organizers went to City Hall to
get the necessary permits, they
came up $600 short. Luckily for
them, Raleigh Mayor Tom Fetzer
raised the money privately so the
show could go on.
This writer can be contacted at
newsistudentmedia.ecu.edu.
An unlucky party goer is arrested at this year's party at Brent Road.
PHOTO COURTESY OF NCSU'S THl UCHNICIAH
INQUIRY CLASSES - CONFIRMATION CLASSES
JIRST COMMUNION CLASSES - SPIRITUALITY CLASSES
Begins: Monday, August 30, at 730pm
Place: The Newman Center,953 EIQth Street
(2 houses from the Fletcher Music Building)
FOR MORE INFORMATION, PLEASE CALL US 757-1991
aul Vaeth, Chaplain 8c Campus Minister
u Let LOWE'S� help make your dorm feel more like HOME!
Sc
NOTE: I need lit following items:
Adhesive?
Air Conditioner Filter.o
Bar Stoolea
Batteriesa
Book Shelvesa
Brooma
Bucket?
Carbon Monoxide Petectora
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Cleaning Supplies?
Closet Organizers?
Clothes Hangersa
Computer Deska
Cork Board?
Corner Braces?
Curtain Rods?
Decorative Shelving CJ
Pesk Lampa
Poor Mirror?
Poor Mata
Poor Locka
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Prapery Hardwareo
Drawer Slidesa
Entertainment Centera
Extension Corda
Furniture Tipsa
Hammera
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Home Security?
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Duplicate Keysa
Laundry Accessoriesa
Light Bulbsa
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Mini Blindsn
MirrorD
Mopa
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Numbers & Letters ?
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Padlocks?
Faint Tools?
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Refrigerator (Small) CD
Ropea
Storage Containers O
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Shelf Brackets?
Shelvingo
Shower Curtain?
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Spongesa
Spray Painta
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Trash Bagsa
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Utility Knivesa
Utility Shelvesa
Utility Shelf Boarda
LOWE'S
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The Episcopal Church
Welcomes You!
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
Join us on Wednesday nights at 5:30 for a service of
Holy Eucharist followed by a free meal and conversation.
For more information call Charles Dupree, campus minister @ 752-3482.
Other service times:
Sundays @ 8am and 10:15 am
Located at 401E. 4th Street
Go one block over from 5th Street (on Holly St.) in front of Garrett Hall, St. Paul's is on the right.
Furn
is
131 Soutl

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18 East Carolinian
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The East Carolinian
news
Thursday. August 24, I8�9 j
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Stir Me Up!
Fresh cooked food, custom-prepared to your taste
under the direction of our aw.ird winning chef.
KMART PLAZA- ALL YOU CAN EAT
LUNCH STIR-FRY BUFFET$4.99
DINNER STIR-FRY BUFFET $7.99
$1.00 OFF DINNERAND SUNDAY
STIR-FRY BUFFET PRICE WITH ECU
STUDENT ID
You can also order from our menu
for our dining room or take-out
756-1169
Dii-Thu 11 a.m9:30p.m.
Fri-Sat I I a.m10p.m.
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e9lt?ll�7
August 20
1:42 p.m. - Miscellaneous Call - a student reported that her ex-room
mate was holding and opening her mail from last semester. She had a
friend to pick it up but wanted to notify the police of the problem.
1:33 p.m. - Auto Accident - a student collided with a speed limit sign on
Founders Drive, south of GCB. He sustained no injuries.
1:24 p.m. - Failure to Apptfar - a student was served a criminal summons
for failing to appear in court on an underage alcohol citation.
2:00 p.m. - Hit & Run - a student reported that unknown person(s) hit
and dented her vehicle while parked on College Hill Drive.
3:50 p.m. - Auto Accident - a staff member reported that he struck a
state vehicle with another state vehicle while attempting to park north
of the Old Cafeteria Bldg.
August 21
1:03 a.m. - Simple Possession of Marijuana - Two non-students were
issued a state citation for possession of marijuana when a plastic bag
containing it was seen in their parked car at 2nd & Reade streets lot.
The two students were banned from campus.
August 22
12:38 a.m. - Underage Consumption - Two students were issued cam
pus appearance tickets for underage consumption of alcohol when they
were stopped on Founders and Ormond drives.
11:15 p.m. - Public Consumption - a student was issued a state citation
and campus appearance ticket for public consumption of alcohol.
August 23
4:30 a.m. - Criminal Damage to Property - an officer discovered that
someone had broken a concrete ashtray located at the bottom steps of
Austin.
7:24 p.m. - Damage to Property - a student reported that unknown per
son(s) damaged his truck parked south of Belk Hall.
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aCfcQ-SS
campuses
NC State freshmen
face housing frustrations
RALEIGH, N.C. � The beginning of each school year brings antici-
pation, hope and anxiety to thousands of North Carolina State University
students. For some, it also brings frustration as they are placed in tempo-
rary housing for the first few weeks of their college year.
According to Jim Pappenhagen, assistant director of University
Housing, there are typically 100 tol25 students placed in temporary hous-
ing at NCSU each year. �
Students are placed up to four in a lounge, which contain beds, chair and
a television. All four also share a bathroom. Most of the lounges used for
temporary housing are converted dorm rooms that were turned into
lounges for a variety of reasons.
During the first week of school, the university compiles a "no show"
report, a list of students who have not attended classes or moved into their
assigned dorm room. University Housing begins placing overflow students
into rooms based on this report Generally, students can expect to be
moved into permanent rooms within two or three weeks of coming to
school.
While NCSU is not currently in a crisis situation regarding housing, the
university is looking into permanent solutions for the future.
UC Berkley employees
required to take lie detector tests
BERKELEY, Calif. � In an effort to safeguard national laboratories,
the Department of Energy is planning mandatory polygraph tests for
University of California and other employees with access to restricted
information, a UC official said Friday.
If implemented, employees of Energy Department laboratories nation-
wide would be required to take the tests, including workers at UC-man-
aged Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore labs, according to university
spokesperson Rick Malaspina.
Malaspina said the lie detector tests would ensure better security, and
that the university will support the government when and if it decides to
implement the tests.
He added that the lie detector proposal is likely to become law within a.
few months.
The suspected transfer of classified material to unclassified computers
in the past prompted the energy department to suggest new rules to pre-
vent future security breaches. Secretary of Energy Bill Richardson said in
a statement.
Under the new proposal, any Department of Energy employee who has
access to or works with counterintelligence information, or who holds a
position that grants him or her access to intelligence information would be
subject to a polygraph test.
Only a few questions would be asked of each employee who falls under
the proposal's jurisdiction, Malaspina said. Federal employees would
administer the tests, he added.
The proposal is being considered despite uncertainty about the accura-
cy of polygraphs. Lie detector tests are not admissible in legal courtrooms.
Staff One, Inc.
21 Glenwood Avenue, Suite 105, Raleigh, NC
27603 Fax 919.856.0829 Phone 919.856.0800
6 ve n t Services
Extra income to be earned at sporting
events and concerts.
Event Staff positions are available for ECU Football and Basketball.
Available positions include ticket takers, ushers and crowd control.
To qualify you must have NO felony convictions, be at least 16 years of age (18
years or age for crowd control position) and have reliable transportation.
Pay rates start at $6.35 per hour
Please apply in person at gate 4, minges coliseum (Williams Arena located on
the campus of ECU on the following dates:
August 26th 3pm - 7pm
September 2nd 5pm-8pm
We also provide services to Walnut Creek Amphitheater, North Carolina
State Football, Darlington Speedway, NC (Rockingham) Speedway, Duke Football. Crown
Coliseum (Fayettville), and ALL Raleigh area major concerts.
For more information contact Mel Black @ STAFF One event services 919.856.0800
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4 Tlwtrtiy. AmiHt I. '989
news
The East Carolinian
New Jersey madam
arrested for solicitation
HANOVER TOWNSHIP, N.j.
(AP) - A woman who once ran a
high-class bordello out of her
Morris County mansion has been
charged with prostituting herself
for $200 an hour while her fiance
stood guard outside the door of her
motel room.
Judith Kelly Dempsey, 46, of
Randolph Township was arrested
Friday night after police said she
accepted cash from an undercover
detective in exchange for sex.
Her fiance, Edwin B. Accini, 39,
was arrested outside Howard
Johnson's at Whippany, where
authorities said he waited near a
sliding glass door to provide securi-
ty in her dealings with clients.
After her arrest, Dempsey
agreed to cooperate with investiga-
tors by keeping or making new
appointments with clients for the
evening.
Six men were arrested after they
were greeted by Dempsey, paid
and stripped.
Dempsey's arrest conies a year
after police raided Sunnymede, her
$1.2 million Victorian mansion in
Morris Township, and arrested her,
four alleged prostitutes and 15 men
on prostitution-related charges.
She was sentenced in May to
three years probation and 250 hours
community service at a New York
City shelter for former prostitutes
after admitting she ran the $225-an-
hour "Afternoon Delight" brothel.
Prosecutors say she catered to well-
paid
businessmen, many of whom
worked at nearby office parks.
Dempsey told the Star-Ledger
of Newark for Sunday's editions
that she turned to prostitution
three weeks ago to raise money for
Accini's legal fees.
Accini is fighting a judge's deci-
sion to bar him from seeing his 5-
year-old daughter from a previous
marriage.
"I felt it was my responsibility to
do whatever I could to help him to
get her back Dempsey said,
"because she was taken away
because of me
She told the newspaper she
placed classified ads advertising
massage services.
The three-line ads said a woman
named Ashley was available for in-
call appointments Monday through
Saturday in Morris County.
Over the past three weeks,
Dempsey said she made $4,800.
The ex-Playboy bunny and real
estate agent posted a $50,000 bond
Saturday morning. Accini was
released on a $10,000 personal rec-
ognizance bond.
Students, Chick-fil-a
of Carolina East Mall
has part-time
positions available
Days or evenings,
no Sundays. Please
stop by for an
application.
Communications Majors
The ECU Athletic Department's
Media Relations Office is seeking to
hire enthusiastic student assistants
for the 1999-2000 academic year,
preferably freshmen and sophomores
It's a great opportunity to gain valuable
experience in the field of communications.
If interested, call the media relations office
at 328-4522 to set up an appointment.
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A
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It's experience you'll never forget.
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Having sex
without being
safe is one of tlie
biggest dangers
college students
have to face.
OPINION
CHRIS
SACHS
ouview
Sex is in the news again and this time its dangers are highlighted.
As everyone returns to campus ready for another exciting year at ECU, we are
reminded of the consequences of unprotected sex. The numbers show that one in
every four college students has a sexually transmitted disease. It therefore becomes
apparent that safe sex is a must in today's society. Widi a lot of people experiencing
being on their own for the first time, it is safe to say that many people will be mak-
ing decisions about sex they may not have had to make until they came to college.
Throw alcohol in the mix and some of those decisions can become irrational and
downright dumb. Having sex without being safe is one of the biggest dangers col-
lege students have to face. Studies show that as Americaas, we have sex at an aver-
age age of 15.8 years old. Comparatively, the Netherlands and Germany average 17
and 16.2 years old, respectively. Is there a correlation between the age when we
start having sex and the number of students with STDs? Maybe. But one thing is
certain; the more you have unprotected sex the more likely you are to get an STD.
We at TEC arc not going to tell anyone if they should have sex or not. That is
everyone's decision to make and one of the most important ones they will face
being on their own. Moreover, it's a decision people will use their won judgment
for and will not lie swayed by influence from other people. I lowever, we are
encouraging everyone to be responsible and safe.We do not want to see anyone
become a statistic, especially when it is something that can be prevented.
Organized religion should be banned
think that organized religion
should be banned.
Hello everyone and welcome to
a new school year at East Carolina
University. I was going to go into a
long welcoming of freshmen and
write about the expansion of the
mind in college and all that crap,
but, hey, let's not beat around the
burning bush here and dive right in.
1 think that organized religion
should be banned. Not just banned,
but made illegal to the point of dri-
ving it to extinction. That's right
folks, I wrote it, yes I did. I think
that we should not have organized
religion on this planet. Now before
you all write me, protest me, burn
me in effigy and all that useless
stuff, let me explain.
Now I am not talking alxwt
getting rid of God (that can't be di.ne.
Congress would never allow it), I am
talking about just getting rid of rhe
man-made organized groups that
choose to kill�and just generally
cause grief to�others of different
belief systems. You have to see that
religion has killed more people on
this planet than another other organi-
zation or ailment. Religion has killed
more people than bacteria, vinises,
red meat, car accidents, alcohol, drugs
and even more than daytime televi-
sion. A wise man once wrote: " If you
want to see man at his worst, observe
what he does to his fellow man in the
name of God Think about that.
Karl Marx once wrote:
"religionIt is the opium of the
people He was correct in saying
that religion offers peace of mind to
those that are too terrified with the
real world and all its coincidences.
They need a belief structure that
allows them to cope and maintain
sanity. So, in a sense, people need
religion to get through life. Religion
distracts the oppressed from their
oppression.
Frederick the Great once
said, "All religions must be tolerat-
ed, for every man must get to heav-
en in'his own way But there is a
problem there: when you have
many religions all believing in a cer-
tain way of life and a unique path to
happiness, you are bound to have
conflicts with other people's reli-
gions and their ways of life. It leads
to death, lots of it. And that's exact-
ly what has happened. Since the
beginning of time, people have
been killing each other over some-
thing as stupid as how to believe in
God. Arabs hate the Jews,
Protestants hate the Catholics,
Muslims hate
everyone Remember what Elbert
llubbard wrote: "Man's greatest
blunder has been in trying to make
peace with the skies instead of
making peace with his neighbors
Most religions are rich.
Most are ridiculous. Snake han-
dlers, feet washers, speaking in
tongues? Popes, televangelists, no
sex before marriage!? Are they real-
ly serious? All that nonsense just to
be in God's good graces. Religion
has even infected its disease into
our political system, and our politi-
cal system has slimed its way into
religion. Now they are co-depen-
dent on each other. How disgusting
is that; and right in front of the sep-
aration of church and state idea.
Elections actually have to consider
the major religious groups'
demands when voting time comes,
and they have to change their plat-
form to keep them happy. I want
mv useless, corrupt elected officials
to run my country and do what is
the best for us all, not to listen to
religious hacks and try to get this
country to follow someone's reli-
gious ideas because he gathered
enough money to get his voice
heard. The definition of politics is
trying to get everyone to- believe
your way is the best. So is reli-
gionhow convenient.
The latest issue of
"Scientific American" published an
article on religion and showed that
different religions have grown over
the centuries due to the way religious
groups recniit new followers. So color
me skeptical, but the very reason
your family is the religion they are is
Ixxause someone got to them first.
What if they were a day earlier or
later your whole family would be
based on an entirely different reli-
gion. Now you can see the faults in
other people's beliefs, and yours are
only yours because someone leat
their guy to the soapbox first.
We should all Iv allowed
to believe in our own personal God.
We should pick the story that is the
least stupid and follow it, study it
and love it. We can all debate, talk,
have quiet discussion groups and
write books, but as soon as a recog-
nized organization of that religion is
formed, it should be shut down. No
churches for gathering (this keeps
ignorant rednecks from burning
them down), no holy lands, no any-
thing. It would save millions of
lives and bring more peace to this
planet than it has ever seen.
I wish I could expand on
this topic; I have so much more that
needs to be said but there is only so
much room. I hope you all got my
point and I do want to hear what
you have to say. Write your com-
ments on a ten-dollar bill and mail
it to me here at "The East
Carolinian
You can contact Chris Sachs
at csachsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu.
OPINION
LETTER TO
THE EDITOR
Video content offends Croatan diner
i I am writing to question the
� presence of the two noisy, obnox-
" ious TVs in the Croatan which
� monotonously broadcast sleazy,
� bordering .on obscene, � music
J videos. I assume that the university
J believes that they are providing a
' relaxing environment in the
Croatan by appealing to what they
perceive are the interests of the
students�namely, sex, sexuality,
seduction and song lyrics which
pivot around these motifs.
Many students at ECU may
indeed enjoy the amoral culture
associated with such videos, but
that hardly justifies the existence of
these monitors which vomit soft
porn on anyone and everyone visit-
ing the main dining area of the
Croatan.
Sickened,
Kathy Gunter
I.
OPINION
RYAN
KElMNEMUR
Tips for surviving college
Indeed, this column is for the'
fresh crop of freshmen and
transfer students we have this
semester, or as I like to call
them, "newsies
Dear ECU students: Suckas be
thinkin' they can fake 'dis, but I
know better. I'm back and I'm
ready t be your millennium man.
This is your old buddy Ryan-Dogg.
Some of you I know, some of you
I'm meeting for the first time. Well,
if you've been schooling here for a
while, this column is not for you;
read it anyway so you can still be
cool to all your friends.
Indeed, this column is for the
fresh crop of freshmen and transfer
students we have this semester, or as
I like to call them, "newsies No
wait, that was a musical about paper-
boys. Well, you know what I mean.
Quite simply put, this organiza-
tion sometimes called by lower
scholars "E-Z-U "Cheesy-U" or
"that one college where everyone
from East Wake High School goes
is actually pretty amazing and eye
opening. I lere is a list of things that
you can expect from a place that a
great man�my dad�once called,
"The best four to seven years of a
young person's life
I.) As a freshman, don't expect
to be all that cool. The fact is, you'll
probably be like most of the rest of
your class for the first few weeks,
which means you will wander the
campus with a Krispy Kreme look
on your face muttering the halfway
coherent word "Brew-ster Also, a
question I get from lots of up-and-
coming freshmen is, "Why does
the Brewster building have to be
difficult and have four separate
wings?" Well, here's a better ques-
tion. Say you're on a long trip in a
car and you fall asleep. (You don't
actually have to say it, unless you
wanna.) Why does your hair still
look nappy when you wake up?
Especially when you didn't use a
pillow or anything. Weird, huh?
2.) Buying books is going to be a
treat, but not for you. The book-
stores, or "The loyal order of
Satan's helpers as they are some-
times called, are all about making
money. But the way they do it is
just kind of wrong. It's like a 7-11
buying a candy bar from the factory
for a quarter and then selling it to
you for $177.99. Then, after you
buy it you realize you don't need
the chocolate (you're on a diet or
simply afraid of diabetic shock)
you try to return it, and they give
you you're quarter back. (I lint: It's
not Dan Marino.)
3.) Living with a roommate.
This can be very trying, especially
if you are put with Josephine, the
mutant transvestite nun that call
use the restroom standing or sil-
ting, without any prior notice. Yej,
heshe can be intipmlating, but ydb
must remember this. With all those
extremities (third arm, Charles
Manson T-shirts, weird last name)
she is still a nun, and you must be
polite to her�until next semestfcr
when heshe moves out because if
your lack of dental hygiene.
4.) And finally, let's talk aboit
classes. These, you may need. It'sja
fact that almost 75 percent of the
incoming freshmen classes will
flunk out their first year. I wouldn't
have believed it myself had I not
just came up with that statistic out
of the blue. Seriously, I have lost
three roommates due to their
sleeping through class and staying
out all night NOT DRINKING.
(Your parents might read this.) In
all sincerity, it is in your best inter-
est to keep up in your classes, oth-
erwise it will be a very short party,
and I'm not talking about the
Republican one.
So that's all for now. Keep your
head up, players. And remember
what 1 said. It just might save your life
someday. No wait. That's the ending
of the "Ryan-Dogg's Guide to CPR"
Oh well. I'll just put this column's
ending on that one. Dogg-out.
You can contact Ryan Kennemur at
rkennemurSstudentmedia. ecu. edu.
OPINION
A little bit about this space
invite you all to hope and
believe and ponder the nature
of nature with me.
Have you talked to yourself
today? My name is Demosthenes
and I have a sole mission; to tap
your consciousness and cause you
see things from different perspec-
tives. By reading this column I am
hoping you might be forced to pon-
der some things you might have
never come across. As long as per-
sonal growth is the result than mis-
sion accomplished.
The Bard once said, "To thy
own self be true There could
never be a better slice of advice.
Constant self examination is the
only way to be true to yourself.
Everyday you allow yourself to be
deceived by your insecurities and
fears. You have to hold in your head
rhe simple fact that everyone is just
as scared and alone as you and only-
then will you truly have no fear.
Everyone is naked under their
clothes.
What are you doing sitting
there? What do you hope to get out
of reading this paper? Are you
searching for something, or are you
simply trying to pass time before
the professor enters the room? If
you choose the former route than
read my column but I challenge
you to do more than scan your eyes
from left to right.
I do not put down my thoughts
on paper because they pay me, nor
because I think I have something
superior to say. I believe communi-
cation is the basis for all human
growth and education, and if peo-
ple would speak the plain naked
tnith it would be possible to lead a
more enlightened existence.
This is idealistic, and much of
what will be laid down in this space
will be such. I do not know if any-
thing I think is possible but I can
only hope and believe. 1 invite you
all to hope and believe and (winder
the nature of nature wirh me. I feel
that I have much to say in my final
year in Greenville and the kind
people at the East Carolinian have
graciously lent me this space. ;
So this is a little bit about niy
reason and rhyme. There are other
ways to get educated along side
reading textbooks. I encourage you
to write letters to the editor �n
response to anything I write that
stirs you up. This will lie the best
way to have open lines of commu-
nication. Be conscious and free
until we meet again.
You can contact Demosthenes
at DemosthenesSstudentmedia. ecu. edu.





comics
The East Carolinian
Mama's By-product
Jeremy Falls
Brain Vomit
Stewart Sineath
r
m
I
r

M
to Mendenhall Student Center
IT' YOUR PLACE.
��.���
To view arffefic falcnf To cafch a free flick
AUGUST 1-31 IN MSC GALLERY
Wander around the Mendenhall Gallery to
view the creative works of"(Billingsley)3"
featuring the works of ECU Art Professor,
Carl Billingsley, his wife, and their son. This
free exhibit will be displayed through Au-
gust 31 with a closing reception to be held
in the gallery on the 31st from
6 to 8 p.m.
To pary hardy
AUGUST 24 AT 6 P.M. IN MSC MULTIPURPOSE
ROOM
Meet new people, grab a bit to eat. and
learn more about entertainment and aca-
demic organizations during the 1999 Stu-
dent Union Gala tonight from 6 to 7:15 p.m.
To be tyrpnoffeerf
AUGUST 24 AT 7:30 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Witness the amazing Dan LaRosa tonight
as he hypnotizes, entertains, motivates, and
inspires. ECU students may get up to 2
free tickets when you present your valid ECU
One Card at the Central Ticket Office. All
other tickets may be purchased for $3 at
the Central Ticket Office.
AUGUST 26-29 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
The Matrix (R) Keanu Reeves discovers that
life on Earth may be nothing more than an
elaborate disguise created by the Matrix, a
malicious cyber-intelligence. He is joined by
Laurence Fishburne and Carrie Ann Moss in
their struggle to overthrow the Matrix. You
and a guest get in free when you present your
valid ECU One Card.
To jefyour groove on
AUGUST 28 AT 10 P.M. IN MSC BRICKYARD
First week of classes got you down? Well
this should get your spirits rockin' Check out
the urban underground beats of the improvi-
sational instrumental jazz band. Lake Trout,
performing live with DJ Who.
To lear sfuf$
SEPTEMBER 1 AT 4 P.M. IN MSC UNDERGROUND
Want to know how to make reservations or
equipment requests? How about catering?
Need the policies on posting or fund-raising?
Then stop by this workshop to learn the ba-
sics so you and your group can enjoy a suc-
cessful semester. Learn how things are done
around here.
To Vistf With t�c �eCM T� N a shar
AUGUST 25-26 AT 8 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATRE
Elizabeth (R) When Catholic Queen Mary
dies the succession goes to Elizabeth, the
Protestant half-sister Mary was not prepared
to execute. Confronted with ruling a Catho-
lic land, Elizabeth realizes she has some
decisions to make. You and a guest get in
free with your valid ECU One Card.
To learn new things
AUGUST 25 AT 4 P.M. IN MSC UNDERGROUND
It's the beginning of the new semester and
time to get new members for your organi-
zation! But where do you find them? Spend
some time discussing tips, hints, and ideas
to really help your group grow.
SEPTEMBER 1-2 AT 8
P.M. IN HENDRIX
THEATRE
Rounders (R) A law
school student.
Matt Damon, loses
his tuition money
and everything else
in a high stakes
poker game. Learn-
ing his lesson (he
thinks), he vows to give up playing forever
until his best friend drags him back into the
circuit to pay back mobster debts. You and a
guest get in free when you present your valid
ECU One Card.
Student Government
Association
Stop complaining about campus
issues and do something about diem.
Register nowfor student legislative positions.
Qualifications:
Must have a 2.0 GPA, must be a full time student and must be in good standing
with the University.

Register in the SGA office - 255 Mendenhall Student Center between the hours of
8:00 a.m. and 5:00 p.m. September 3,1999
Candidates Mandatory Meeting will be held on Wednesday, September 22,1999
Election date: Wednesday, September 22,1999
Make a dfflerence,join SGA
' - - � -
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Universities and
offer courses in
mid 1970s.
Due to popular
University adde
centration to it!
PHOTOS C0URIES





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lours of
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'A
7 Tuesday, August 24. 1989
features
The East Carotintan
'holography is the method of picture
netting developed in the eerly 19th
:entury based on the principles of
girt, optics and chemistry.
The term photography stems from
breek words meaning Drawing with
Iflht
Nile trying to improve on the print-
ing techniques of lithography, French
scientist Joseph Nicephore Niepce
Bade the earliest camera photograph.
In 1851. Frederick Scott Archer
created one of the earliest cameras
known as the wet-plate camera.
the Civil War in the United States
was the first war to be recorded by
photography.
n 1888 American inventor George
tastman perfected his Kodak camera.
placing his new invention into the
(lands of millions.
(n the late 1800s, the earliest cam-
Ira used by the general public was
he Brownie Box camera, which
Replaced the wet-plate process.
fn 1914, "National Geographic"
pas one of the first magazines to
Reproduce color photographs in its
publication
�� �.
pi 1936, Margaret Bourke-White
became one of the first four staff
photographers for "Life" magazine.
Her photographs helped establish the
�ew field of photojournalism.
t
fhe dominence of color in everyday
picture taking did not occur until
1935 when Kodak began selling
Kodachrome transparency film.
jn 1940, New York's Museum of
Modern Art established a photogra-
phy department, solidifying the belief
of photography as a universal form
if modern art.
Universities and art schools began to
offer courses in photography in the
mid 1970s.
Due to popular demand, East Carolina
University added a photography con-
centration to its art program.
PHOTOS COURTESY Of THE WOBIO WIDE WEB
Students On
Smart Drags
Some substances
enhance performance
MlCIIAIl. Kdwahiis
MM-1- WRIT UK
Drugs are defined with a great
deal of leeway these days. It seems
that a great number of everyday
things are now considered drugs, at
least by the FDA or DEA. I can't
understand why they've put up such
a fight not to have to call nicotine a
drug, but that's another article. For
the purpose of putting us all on a
level playing field, I will use the nar-
rowed definition which relates to
any substance which provides a rem-
edy. In this case, a remedy for a
tired, dead or dying brain. Assuming
that the individual whose brain we
are describing is not in fact totally
dead (as in the day immediately fol-
lowing exams), there is hope yet by
reading this article.
We must first modify the vari-
ance between good drugs and bad
drugs. We will not assume that all
good drugs are legal nor bad dnigs
illegal, for this would muddy the
waters too much for rational thought.
There are way tin) many people in
jail that have tried to figure out this
oxymoron with poor results. Again,
for purposes previously mentioned
in the title, we will assume that the
good drugs will increase our brain-
power, and the wicked (bad) ones
will do the opposite.
It is recommended that before
you try any of these brain-enhancers
that you consult a professional.
(That should get me anil the rest of
the staff off the hook) Keep in
mind, the scientific community has
reached the conclusion just
within the
past few months
that whatever scientists conclude
today will in all likelihood be dis-
proved the day after tomorrow and
that what is good today may be bad
tomorrow or could have been bad
two weeks ago.
Caffeine A good drug. This drug
is usually consumed in liquid form,
often along with another drug
(sugar) which is a bad drug. Also,
cream is sometimes used, but cows
do not appreciate having their teats
Caffeine lifts one's spirits,
increases blood circulation,
dilates blood vessels and
assists in regularity.
squeezed so someone can have
cream in their coffee, so I wouldn't
recommend it. You have heard
about mad cow's disease haven't
you? Now you know why they're
mad.
Caffeine lifts one's spirits,
increases blood circulation, dilates
blood vessels, assists in regularity
and is good for a few million if
spilled in anatomical places while
driving a car. The best time of day to
consume caffeine is when you are
sitting quietly at the breakfast table
reviewing your notes from yester-
day. It is not smart to have more than
two or three eight-ounce servings of
this drug at a time or uncontrollable
trembling may occur. It also is
known to promote a sudden temper,
especially after driving long dis-
s to
tances or from an extended traffic
jam unless carrying an empty pickle
jar under the seat.
Vitamin E A good drug. Vitamin
E is said to be an excellent anti-oxi-
dant. It does, in fact, keep one's
brain from rusting. Some
.vitamin E comes from
f o o d
'sources
like fish, fish
oils, and vegetable oils.
This apparently works
gather up free radicals in the blood
stream and herd them all up before
they can gang up on you. It's amaz-
ing how this actually works. It was
explained to me in Anatomy class,
but my pencil broke and no one
around me could remember what
the professor had said. Taking too
much vitamin E could be dangerous
because it can be stored in the liver
for long periods of time. It can make
your insides so slippery that your
guts will fall out and trail around
behind you! (I found this interesting
bit of information from the person
sitting next to me.) So, be careful. If
you can't find enough fish where
you live, run down to the Tar River
and -NO, DON'T EAT ANY-
THING FROM THE TAR
RIVER!
Selenium -A good drug. Helps
Vitamin E herd up radicals. This
mineral-type drug can be found in
the pill section of Wal-mart or veg-
etables from selenium-rich farm
land in the selenium valley
California.
Vitamin C Ditto. Comes in
handy tablet form or now available
in flavored juice drinks. Helps build
collagen which is connective tissue.
It helps to keep your brain from
falling apart from cramming for
exams. Great mixed with alcohol -a
bad dmg (for the purposes of this
article).
SEE 0RUGS. PAGE 8
Marching Pirates
experience camp
Band members
can take the Jieat
Nii:i WllKKI.KR
SIM' r u K 11 K H
What would it take for you to give
up your last week of summer break
and spend it outside all day in the
sultry Greenville heat? This past
week 180 people did it; they call
themselves the ECU Marching
Pirates. This dedicated group of
people did exactly that�they spent
their last week of summer outside
learning drill and music for the
upcoming football season.
For the more experienced of the
Marching Pirates, the first day was
not such a big deal, but for fresh-
men, this was their first college
experience. Once band members
moved into their residence halls
before everyone else, the real work
began. No sooner had all of their
stuff been thrown into their room,
the first rehearsal began. Band
members were out on the field in
rehearsal from 8:30 in the morning
until 8:30 at night for five and a half
days of sweat, hard work, sweat,
(very) loud music, (did I mention
sweat?) and a bit of fun thrown in.
Marchers practice hard for the first game.
PHOTO BY ROBIN VUCHNICH
The staff meetings this year
focused on two main goals: having a
high work ethic and developing a
family atmosphere among the band
members, both of which were met
soon into camp.
"I was very impressed with this
year's camp. We got a lot accom-
plished. We did two shows in a day
and a half. I wasn't sure if the fresh-
men could cut it, but they really
came through said Lane Warden,
equipment manager and junior
Marching Pirate. "The fast-paced
rehearsals were key to the success of
this year's camp said Christine
English, a junior Marching Pirate.
"But everyone seemed to be really
into it
The rigorous practices were not
the only thing going on this year at
band camp. When you practically
live with these people for a week,
you can't help but get' to know
them. "We came in at the beginning
of camp not knowing each other,
and by the end of camp we were like
a family. The strength and intensity
of that will only continue to increase
throughout the season said Cara
DeFrank, one of the drum majors of
this year's Marching Pirates. From
get-togethers within the sections to
full-band pizza parties, the
Marching Pirates work hard to cre-
ate a family atmosphere and an
immediate social niche to fit it at
such a large university.
"This is by far the best marching
band we have ever had here�we
SEE BAND. PAGE 8
I
Vitamin A and or beta carotene
are also in this anti-oxidant group.
They both help you to see you notes
under a street light or to find your
keys in the dark. Eat more carrots
and other loudly colorful vegetables!
Ginkgo biloba
Thought to be
'the world's old-
est living plant.
The fan-shaped
leaves of this tree are said to slow
down the process of aging and
Alzheimer's, increase circulation ;
increase memory by enabling mo
oxygen to reach the brain. Even
though thousands of people tak
ginkgo with positive results, you
doctor may tell you are getting less
intelligent each time you visit asking
about herbs. There are only two
ginkgo trees in Greenville. One is on
Nicole Barnes, freshman, pours her daily dose of caffeine.
PHOTO BY BILL KEITH
Many smart drugs can be found on the shelf at General Nutrition Centers.
PHOTO BY EMILY RICHARDSON
New photography
concentration offered
Specialized courses
offered in image design
Si s w WnifillT
r i 11 k r.s ini I uk
Image design, or photography, was
added as a new concentration to the
art program last year.
Although photography has been
taught for over 31 years as part of the
art program at ECU, there has never
formally been a photography pro-
gram. The concentration was added
because of the large amount of stu-
dent requests for it. "It has always
been waiting in the background
said Gil leebrick, a professor in the
photography program.
There is no exact count of how
many students are currently working
towards a concentration in image
design. "They can't be identified
until their senior year said Robert
Rasch, a professor in the photogra-
phy program.
There are three professors in the
program, and each specializes in dif-
ferent areas of photography.
Professor Rasch specializes in non-
silver processing, professor Gil
Leebrick specializes in studio pho-
tography and professor Jacquelyn
Ixebrick specializes in digital pho-
tography. While in the program, a
student will learn about both digital
and traditional photography. One of
the goals of the program is to help
students "be creative with visual
communication said Leebrick.
"They should understand how to
make more effective visual commu-
nication. A successfully designed
image should communicate as clear-
ly as a word, a sentence or a para-
graph.
The phrase 'a picture is worth a
thousand words' is an understate-
ment. A picture is often worth more
than that"
Photography is different from
many other concentrations in the ait
school because it enables a student to
combine a successful career with an
Advanced cameras improve photo quality.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE WTMLO WISE WEI
artist's appreciation and passion for
his or her art "In photography, there
is a crossover with fine arts and a
career option Leebrick said. "You
SEE PHOTO. PAGE 8





Th East Carolinian
features
TuMday. August 24. 1998 8
9 Tuesday, Augus
aNOTCH
above the
tyDRM
The education of literature,
history and the sciences has
played a major role in the life of
Dr. Roberta Mania From teach-
ing at ECU to attending confer-
ences and seminars around the
world she has gone to great
lengths to pursue this passion.
Martin completed her under-
graduate studies at Redlends
University in California in 1963.
She attended graduate school,
and later earned a Ph.D. at the
University of Colorado, finishing
in 1993. As a graduate student in
1989, she traveled to Florence,
Italy to read a paper at the Milton
Conference. More recently, she
attended a seminar for the
National Endowment for the
Humanities in Ann Arbor, Mich,
this past summer.
"The title of that was "The
Renaissance Body, Literature
and Medicine she said. "What
we did was look at images of the
body in the Renaissance and the
ways that anatomy opened up
that whole field
Martin teaches a variety of
English courses that range from
British and American literary his-
tory to composition. She regrets
that she is not teaching students
Introduction to the Short Story
this semester.
"I love to teach the short
story she said. "It's a wonderful
class because (the stories arc
Name
Roberta
Martin
Department
English
very manageable units to reach
and the discussions are always
great
Martin feels that a good back-
ground in literature better pre-
pares a person to understand the
world around them.
"It seems to me that literature
consciously forms an engage-
ment with every single issue that
comes up in any historical field or
any culture Martin said. "We
can read historical documents
but literature really helps us to
get inside the culture in a way
that is not possible with any
other form pf document.
Literature can be treated as a his-
torical document but with the
added dimension of imagina-
tion
Martin also believes in the
importance of teaming about lit-
erature from people of different
cultural backgrounds.
"I think everyone in the sci-
ences could benefit from litera-
ture she said. "And in some
ways I think that multi-cultural
literature is perhaps the most
important kind of literature that
we are doing now
Martin has a dedication to
learning and teaching that has
taken her many places and is
unyielding. One can only wonder
where this dedication will take
her next
This writer can be contacted at
bfriuelle8studentmedia.ecu.edu
Photo
continued Irnm page 7
have the ability to be an artist as well
as make a profitable career
Leebrick is passionate abaut the
need for an understanding of visual
images in modem life. Many forms
of communication that are used in
the United States today, such as tele-
vision, billboards and photographs
are visual images that carry a mean-
ing within the picture. "Visual litera-
cy has become more important and
will continue into the millennium
said Leebrick. "No one should leave
the university without a course in
visual literacy
The first student to graduate with
a concentration will be Susan Young,
who graduates in May. Photography
is a medium that can successfully
combine art and commercial profits,
and the popularity of the program is
expected to continue to grow for
quite some time.
This writer can be contacted at
FeaturestSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
Band
continued Irompage 7
have never accomplished so much
in such a short span of time said
Marching Pirates' director, Chris
Knighten. "I attribute that to out-
standing student leadership that
we have worked to develop
By the end of camp not only
did we all have all sorts of tan
lines, but we also had a great start
on our marching season and made
a lot of new friends.
For more information about
the ECU Marching Pirates or
information on how to join (it's
not too late!), you can find Chris
Knighten, Director of the
Marching Pirates, at A.J. Fletcher
207 or call 328-6982.
This writer can be contacted at
nwheelerSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
Pirates Cove
APARTMENTS
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Free roommate
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individual leases.
Every bedroom is a
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Fully furnished.
On ECU Bus Route.
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
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Designed and Built For Students
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�Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
�Kitchens featuring microwave, dishwasher,
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�����������������
3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
for August 1999 trien follow directions above.
Drugs
continued from page 7
.Elm Street and the other is on my
patio.
Garlic is available in the produce
section of your comer supermarket,
in little stinky pills or in dozens of
date un-friendly Italian dishes. This
litde jewel is said to aid in the pre-
vention of atherosclerosis which is
the accumulation of fat, lard, hot-
dogs, chicken wings and other junk
that has been building up in your
arteries and veins since you were
16. Those folks that eat this kind of
stuff ought to through some garlic
in the pan, or they're wasting their
college education. They ain't going
to make it to 40! The allinin in gar-
lic is said to be the active ingredient
which un-sticks the gunk in your
vessels. Be sure your supplement is
made from whole garlic.
Lecithin is another one of those
secrets your doctor doesn't want
you to know about. Your liver pro-
duces all the lecithin your body
needs. Yea, right. Then why is all
this cholesterol hanging out my
shorts? This controversial drug is
produced from soy beans and con-
tains choline which enhances the
production of acetylcholine - a neu-
rotransmitter. It is said to protect
neurons in the brain. Also, lecithin
acts as a emulsifler which helps to
dissolve fat. With lecithin, you get
two - clap - two drugs in one
Tobacco is a good dnig only
from the perspective of tobacco
farmers or legislators. It prevents
the adequate absorption of oxygen
by hemoglobin, which your brain
and other organs need to function
properly. The difference could be
in getting an A, a B or an F. More
importantly, it slowly poisons the
body. Consider giving it up if you
want better grades and a better life.
This Writer can be contacted at
medwards8studentmedia.ecu.edu
visit us at .
www.tec.ecu.edu
Brossurood
Apartments
� Quiet Neighborhood
�1 Bedroom $300
�2 Bedroom $360
� WasherDryer Hookups
� Ceiling Fan
�Free WaterSewer
�Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & restaurants
�furnished unit for
corporate leasing available
�Officeon site
3216 Brasswood Court 1
Phone 2S2-35S-4499 � Fax 252-355-1554
brasswoodffgrtenvilltnc.com
J .
i
FC
m
Women's Distance Runners Needed
Women s X-country & Distance
Teams needs walhons. Be part
of an ECU Varsity team, sign with
Coach Klepack at Scales Field
house or call 3284605 for
more Information.
Gra
aft
jsr
xfcero

Check out the
Homecoming link
� uuw.sga.edu.ecM
f��fci�iw�v,
Homecoming 1999
"PitoUei Sutiuxjiwj, into, the, MuhmUuh"
Application deadline:
Friday Sept 17,1999
5pm in Room 109
Mendenhall Student Center
ActuAittei QftftlicaUcm
'Float
Banner
Skit Night
KingQueen
Candidate
Sage Hanihan, Chair
ECUSGA Homecoming Committee
Mendenhall Student Center Room 222
Greenville, NC 27858
252.3283319
252328.2305 Five
unvw.sga.ea4.edu
"T
Bee
Am
Do
tinn
sup
If sc
Ami
Men
Aug
dAf
In Fi
ECU)
Alum
FORT





8
edu
set
its
jod Court f 1
I-Fax 252-355-1554
tenvillfnc.com
1 1i
Gi olleg1
50.
Needed
9Tu�iday, August 24, 1899
features
The East Carolinian
link
du.ecu
m
U444H
1uk

and Survival for
Adult students"
� Meets every other Wednesday
� Begins August 25
- Noon-1 p.m.
�312 Wright Hall
- Attend as of ten as you like
For students over 24 who want to
meet other adults and succeed at
ECU
Graduate students are welcomeBring a lunch and
a friendcall 6881 or 6661 for more information.
ECU Ambassadors
Become An ECU
Ambassador
Do you want to have a great
time, meet new people and
support the pirates?
If so come check out the ECU
Ambassadors!
Membership Drive will last until
August 27th
& AM - 2 PM
In Front of the Student Store
ECU Ambassadors sponsored by the
Alumni Association
FOR MORE INFORMATION CALL 328-0610
Saving your privates
Holding onto your per-
sonal information
MlCIIAKI. Kdwakds
STAFF WHITKH
Remember years ago when some-
one mentioned privacy, you
thought about getting an unlisted
phone number?
Relatively few paid the extra
buck for the extra privacy. Today,
it's estimated that between 30-40
percent of us have unlisted num-
bers.
Now, our mailing addresses are
spread around like yesterday's mar-
garine. Each year, Americans get
over 10 tons of junk mail! Years ago,
Abby Hoffman wrote a wonderful
book called Steal This Boot. Many
probably did. I bought mine. The
book was loaded with helpful hints
on getting things for free and for
getting even with people who had
done you wrong. There was also a
great section on how to stop junk
mail. I still use those ideas today.
When you get a bill with extra
stuffing, stuff it back into the return
envelope. Let the sender's landfill
take the extra trash. Our's are full of
trash like this. Whenever you get an
unsolicited mailing, send the
postage-paid card back with a
strong demand to remove your
name from their list. If this doesn't
work, the next time you receive a
mailing from them, glue the postage
paid card to a brick. You'd be sur-
prised what it costs to mail a brick
these days.
Today, many pay little attention
to. how easily they give complete
strangers personal information.
Even our once-secret social security
number now appears in many un-
private files. Insurance companies
ask for it; credit card companies use
it. Many states request it in order to
sell you a driver's license. Even
ECU wants it to put on all your
files. Look at your card. If you've
had it a while it says "for Social
Security and tax purposes�not for
identification For some reason,
the newer cards don't have this
statement on them. Don't give it
out unless there is a law that says
you must.
Did you fill out one of those gro-
cery store applications so you can
save 10 cents on toilet paper? Did
you ever wonder how they could
afford to give all their extra-special
customers such a deal? Do you ever
think about that card at all?
Unfortunately, few wonder how the
information about their shopping
habits will be used, and by whom?
Let's link some possibilities
together. You gave a fair amount of
information about yourself at the
bank. Your phone company knows
who you call and who calls you.
Your cable and local video store has
information about what you watch.
Your mortgage company or apart-
ment complex has loads of personal
information as well, including
where your mom, brother, sister and
friends live, their phone numbers
and where you work. The dealer-
ship that stuck you with your new
wheels has information that may
add knowledge to the insurance
company's file. Just today, the
mega-sports store asked you for
your telephone number and the
department store asked for your zip
code. Isn't it about time you said
no?
We have only scratched the sur-
face. Now let's go beneath the sur-
face�of your skin. Federal courts
have now upheld the rights of the
government, as well as your
employer, to probe your body to
gather information about you. They
are sucking your blood, cutting your
hair, making you pee in a jar and
even sapping the essence of your
very soul�your DNA. Who knows
what this information may be used
for today. What would H.G. Wells
or Orson Wells say the potential for
abuse may be in the future?
In the age of test-tube babies,
spy satellites and towering commu-
nication towers, don't you wonder
who's at the other end of the cam-
era, computer or listening device?
Why does the government keep
telling us we're the ones who are
paranoid? Well, between you, me
and the light post�what is that sta-
tic on my phone line lately? Maybe
my mom was right. Perhaps I
should write more letters and quit
discussing the family business over
the phone.
Writet can be contacted at
medwaidsSstudentmedia. ecu. edu
1
?
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ear Live Musw: in Greenville
-Greenville Times
Uptown Greenville
209 E. 5th St.
752-7303
EVERY TUESDAY
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Thi East Carolinian
3
Sports
eSriefs
'� Seville. Spain-Maurice
.Greene and Marion Jones
�� won gold in the men's and
women's 100 meters. Jones
" won with a time of 10.70.
Greene ran the second fastest
100 meter time in history,
9.80 seconds.
Atlanta, GA-Braved pitcher,
Greg Maddux chipped a bone
in his throwing arm Saturday
while diving for a foul ball.
He will miss his next sched-
uled start, Friday.
New York, NY-McGwire hits
two homers, mets win
Cardinals Slugger, Mark
McGwire hit his 49th and
50th home runs of the season
in the first game of a double-
header, Sunday. The Mets won
the first game 8-7, while the
Cardinals won game two 7-5.
Brooklyn, Mi-Bobby Labonte
won the Pepsi 400 in
Michigan, Sunday. Labonte
passed Jeff Gordon and Dale
jjEamhardt in the closing laps
Jo get the win. Dale Jarrett
held on to his lead in the
Winston Cup points standings.
-
sports
Tuntday, August 24, 1999 10
Summer Sports Summaryi
Who's out, who's in,
what happened
lastle Rock, CO-David Toms
won the Sprint International.
Toms had to hold off David
fiuval and Stephen Ames to
notch his second PGA Tour win.
I
I

ECU Baseball gets new coach-
es Tommy Eason and Kevin
jVlcMullan are two new addi-
tions to the coaching staff of
the ECU Baseball squad.
I
I
MLUMBUS, Ohio (AP)
:ifth-year seniors Ahmed
Mummer and Matt Keller have
teen named Ohio State's foot-
tall co-captains I definitely
vant to be an outspoken cap-
ain, a leader on the field and
iff the field said Plummer, a
hird year starting cornerback
rom Wyoming, Ohio.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIOl WCI
I'ktkk D.wvvor
ASSISTANT SI'ORTS llITOR
While the majority of ECU stu-
dents and faculty were on vacation,
many in the athletic department
never stopped.
Like all things changes must be
made, the old often gives way to
the new.
This was especially present
with the numerous changes which
took place at coaching positions at
ECU. The addition of head basket-
ball coach Bill Herrion marked the
end of the Joe Dooley era. Dooley
who led the men's team to mere
niediocre highlights in his four
years at ECU left in March after a
disappointing season.
His resignation sent athletic
directors on a hunt for Dooley's
successor, in which Herrion was
chosen. Herrion a former head
coach at Drexel University in
Pennsylvania guided his former
team to a record of 121-32 in 8 years
with the Dragons. Herrion's .791
winning percentage makes him
15th among active coaches in the
NCAA.
Under Herrion many players
have found their niche in the game.
including former Drexel
standout Malik Rose who is
currently a member of the
NBA champion San
Antonio Spurs.
Herrion has already
begun to make an impact
on ECU athletics by hold-
ing basketball camps-for
area youths which were
highlighted by a visit from
Rose.
Preseason predictions
by CAA coaches also show
promise for Herrion as ECU
expected to finish second in the
The kids I'm leaving behind
are great kids who are over-
achievers, and they're all good
kids as well as good athletes.
Charles Justice,
women's Hack coach
conference behind George Mason.
Herrion however does not see the
prediction as being that important.
A poll in the summer is nice but
unfortunately we
are going to be
concerned about
the one at the end
good athletes
On the baseball
field many wit-
nessed the departure
of TEC Athlete of
the Year, and All
American, Steve
Salargo. Salargo com-
bined with a danger-
of the year
Herrion said.
Other changes included
that of Women's soccer coach
Neil Roberts who left ECU
for a position as head coach of
UNC Charlotte's women's
soccer program. Women's
track coach Charles "Choo"
Justice also left this summer
after 20 years in ECU's ath-
letic program in order to
take time off and spend it with his
family.
"The biggest reason was to get
the opportunity to stay at home
more Justice said. "It's a tough
decision because the kids I'm leav-
ing behind are great kids who are
over achievers, and they're all good
kids as well as
tion and team work combined
helped advance the Pirates to thfc
birth of the NCAA playoffs beforfc
losing to LSU (0-8).
Salargo in currently playing for a
single "A" minor league team the
Blueficld Orioles in Virginia. (
Throughout the Greenville arejf
the biggest hype of the summej
was the Michael Jordan Celebritj
golf classic. Greenville Countrf
Club as well as Brook Vallcj
Country Club played host to " Hi�
Airness" as well as many other
celebrities including Heavy
Weight boxing Champion
Evander Holyfield, hockey great
Mario Lemuix, San Francisco '49er
wide receiver Jerry Rice as well as
many other athletes and
entertainment personalities.
Proceeds from the event
went to support the Ronald
McDonald House which
helps with area families who
are having medical probj
lems with their children.
As the summer came t$
a close and classes seemed
ever so close, the ECU
football team geared up for
what looks possibly to
their toughest season
history.
Games versus some of
the top schools in the nation
such as the University of
Miami (Fla), the seasorj
opener against West Virginia?
in Charlotte at Ericsson
Stadium, (the home of tha
Carolina Panthers), as well as
the showdown against N.Ct
State has led many polls to
rate ECU in the top 50
teams in the nation.
This Writer can be contacted at
PDAWYot@studentmedia.ecu.edu
Football players endure intensive summer training
Team members
suffer mild injuries
S'TKI'IIKV Sciikwim
SI'ORTS KDITOR
While most students spent the past
few weeks obsessing over living
arrangements, class schedules and
student loans, members of ECU's
football squad have also had to con-
centrate on learning a new defense,
earning a starting spot and just stay-
ing healthy.
This is the part of the year that
can be the most painful or the most
rewarding for a football program.
This is the time of year where last
year's problems can be fixed and
next year's stars can be born. It is
also when grueling practices can
take their toll.
The final weeks of summer have
held both triumphs and adversity
for the Pirate football program.
In the weeks preceding the start
of classes, the players endured the
physically draining three times a
day practices.
"I don't know of anybody who
goes through the same three-a-days
that we do, but it makes us better
football players said sophomore
quarterback, David Gafrard.
Three practices in one day in the
heat of the Greenville summer can
put a strain on even the fittest ath-
letes, but the experience gained is
an important factor in the early sea-
son development of a football team.
"We've come light years said
senior flanker LaMont Chappell.
"I feel we came out and practiced
everyday and fought through the
heat. Everybody's getting better,
everybody's got a good feeling
about themselves
However, the rigorous practice
schedule was not without cost. A
trio of linebackers suffered mild
injuries. Senior Jeff Kerr missed
some practice with an injured ham-
string, while junior Eric Reyes and
sophomore Pernell Griffin suffered
a bruised calf and a bruised knee
respectively.
"They're all six to ten day deals,
they'll be back said Steve Logan,
Head Coach.
The most serious injury of the
preseason was suffered by sopho-
more flanker, Aaron Harris. Harris
went down with an injury last
week.
"It looks like he's gone for the
season, they called me today and
said it might be cartilage and then
they turned around and called me
right back and told me it was the
ACL Logan said.
The injury to Harris will proba-
bly cause the'Pirates not to redshirt
true freshman, Torey Monroe, giv-
ing the New Jersey native a crack
at some playing time.
The preseason is a time for
learning and improvement. The
team is learning a new defensive
scheme brought to ECU by new
defensive coordinator Tim Rose.
The squad that finished third in
Conference USA last season in total
defense and sixth against the run
Pirate football players gear up for 1999 season.
HIE PHOTO
will take on the 3-4 defensive align-
ment this season.
Another area where changes will
be made will be in the kicking
game. Last season, juniors Andrew
Bayes and Brantley Rivers com-
bined to hit 11 of their 19 field goaj
attempts and only 25 of their 3
extra points.
Redshirt freshman Kevin Mill
SEE FOOTBALL . PAGE 12
1





versus some of
Is in the nation
University of
I, the season
t West Virginia!
: at Ericsson
; home of th�
hers), as well as
n against N.Cf
many polls to
n the top 50
nation.
be contacted at
itmedia.ecu.edu
leir 19 field gonj
25 of their 3
in Kevin Mille
11 Tuildiy, Augtilt 24. 1898
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Exhibition game showcases Pirate soccer teams
wcam3tis student?
Attend ECU Road Rules
Room 212 Mendenhall
� Meet other freshmen commuters
� Learn ways to succeed at ECU
Coaches expect
winningseason
St SASNK M II.K k KVICII
MtHIIOI WilTKt
ECU men's and women's soccer
teams had a chance to preview their
talent for the fall season as both
teams played exhibition games last
week.
The women traveled to UNC-
Greensboro last Thursday to take on
the Spartans who defeated ECU in
an exhibition game 4-2.
ECU went down 4-0 in the first
half before getting things together
and scoring two unanswered goals in
the second.
"The game showed the team's
mental toughness said Rob
Donnenwirth, women's soccer
coach, "They were able to get things
together to win the second half
The game was not about winning
or losing. Exhibition games provide
an opportunity for coaches to view
the talent they have to work with
throughout the season.
"In any exhibition game, we real-
ly want to sec what the players can
do Donnenwirth said.
The game gave the new coach a
SK SOCCf R . PAGE B '
I MISSION 1College Life and I Tues Aug. 24 4-5p.m. Managing Your OR Time j Weds Aug. 25 7-8p.m.
MISSION 2Test-taking and ! Tues Aug. 31 4-5p.m. Study tips that fit OR your learning j Weds Sept 1 7-8p.m. style
MISSION 3Dating and RelationshipsTues Sept. 7 4-5p.m. OR Weds Sept 8 7-8p.m.
MISSION 4Careers that match your personalityTues Sept. 144-5p.m. OR Weds, Sept. 15 7-8p.m.
You Players Club
Uterid as often as you like. Call 6881 for more informatk
�H Sigma Phi Epsilon
Founded:
Location:
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Fastest growing of the two largest Fraternities in
the world, one of the largest on campus.
505 E. Fifth Street, two blocks from downtown
across the street from campus. We have two houses
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Academics: Balanced man scholarship, Alumni scholarships.
Athletics: Chancellors cup, which we won last year.
8 out of past 10 years.
RUSH
Aug. 23-26
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Tha Esst Carolinian

sports
Tundiv. Auguit 24, 1999 12
Women's track team loses coach
Justice resigns y
Klepack to fill position
STKPIIKN SCIIKAMM
!�()� IS KDITIIH
The 1999 ECU cross country sea-
son effectively began on June 23rd.
After eight seasons at the helm of
ECU's women's cross country and
women's track squads, Charles
"Choo" Justice resigned, leaving
the program without a coach.
To fill the position of women's
cross country coach, ECU didn't
have to look far. In fact, they need-
ed only to look a few doors down
the hall in Scales' field house.
Men's cross country coach,
Leonard Klepack accepted the job,
and in doing so made the 1999 sea-
son all that more interesting.
"I think it's great that the whole
team is coached by the same per-
son. I know most programs run
Football
continued hom page 10
and true freshman Bryce
Harrington enter the program and
may provide the answer to the
Pirates' kicking woes. However,
they are a still a long way from
ready
"We've been working on the
kicking game) hard. I don't think
it's ready to play a game but we've
been working on it hard and we've
been diligent on the preparation. I
think by game time we will have a
good kicker Logan said.
This Writer can be contacted at
SportsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
The Pirates will rely on
veterans such as Abrial Hayes.
Flit PHOTO
their girls and guys together said
senior Justin England.
Justice's departure left the
women's team with a rocky founda-
tion to begin their 1999 campaign.
"I think it might have affected
recruiting Klepack said. "We're
going to have to work harder.
Coach Justice did a good job and
we are going to try to continue
what he built up. We want to con-
tinue in the direction he was head-
ed
Despite only losing two seniors,
the team was depleted enough to
force Klepack to call on the ECU
student population to provide dis-
tance runners for this year's
women's squad. Klepack went as
far as to publish an ad in The East
Carolinian, asking for female dis-
tance runners.
The women open their season
along with the men, in Wilmington
at the UNC-W Seahawk
Invitational on September 11. Both
teams then travel to Raleigh to take
on the nationally ranked N.C. State
squad at the N.C State Wolfpack
Invitational.
While the women will hope to
be able to field a competitive
SEE CROSS COUNTRY. HOB
WHAT ii
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Employment Opportunity
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Temporary position available for person to work twenty hours per week,
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Possession of a valid North Carolina driver's license also required.
Applications accepted through August 31,1999. Salary W.QOhour.
Employment is contingent upon passing a physical examination includ-
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TueAug. 24 7:30 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall
FREE to ECU Students with a valid ECU OneCard.
One guest permitted per ID. All other tickets are $3.00.
To guarantee your seat, you may pick-uppurchase tickets in advance at the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, Monday-
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13 Tuisdty. Aujust 24, 1999sportsTHE EAST CAftOUNMN
��t�'�-J9(Soccer cuminuod from page II
WL.AmmForest's scoring chances and wen concerned about exposing our defensive weaknesses
M I �
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good look at the team's strengths
arid, weaknesses and helped
Ddnnenwirth to get a feel for the
team's chemistry.
"As a new coach, I want to see
(he strengths and weaknesses and
begin to get a team chemistry
going Donnenwirth said.
However, Donnenwirth could
not get a full feel for the team as
five potential starters had to sit out
the game due to injuries and sore
muscles.
"I didn't get to. see everything
without the five Donnenwirth
said. "Our goal is to get the team
healthy
The game also gave the team an
opportunity to see their potential
and set goals for the season.
"The team's goal is to win the
conference championship
Donnenwirth said. "The team has
steadily improved to where they
can knock off a top team on any
given day so anything is possible
Athletically, the team wants to
win the conference championship
but they also are focused on their
grades. The women's soccer team
boasts one of the highest grade
point averages.
"We want to look not just at the
athletic part, but look at the whole
picture Donnenwirth said.
The ECU men also have a good
outlook for the season after their
exhibition game against Wake
Forest last Friday.
"We saw a lot of positive indi-
vidual performance said Devin
O'Neil, men's soccer coach. "Even
from the new playets
The Deacons, ranked 25th
nationally in a preseason poll,
defeated the Pirates 2-0.
"We wanted to focus our atten-
tion on getting our defense orga-
nized in the preseason O'Neil
said. "We wanted to reduce Wake
The game gave the team a
chance to look at in weaknesses
and make changes before the tea-
son starts.
"Typical with exhibition, we
saw some weaknesses O'Neil
said. " The attacking side needs
more scoring opportunities
although we had good chances off
of restarts
By looking at how the Pirates
fared in last weeks game, the team
was able to set its goals for the sea-
son.
"It is important for us to make
sure people realize we are a good
soccer program O'Neil said.
The team also wants to have a
strong showing in conference play
this year.
"We want to establish ourselves
THis Writer can be contacted it
smilenkeviohSstudentmedia.ectt.edu
Cross Country
continued from page 12
squad, the men will be aiming to
steal the show.
Coming off of a season where
they won a state championship, fin-
ished fourth in the CAA and com-
peted in the NCAA Regionals, the
men hope to build off of the
momentum from last season.
"The men had a real good sea-
son last year, they just need to
solidify that and step up a notch
this year. I think the men are
stronger this year Klepack said.
For the men, the goal is a better
showing at the NCAA Regionals.
In 1999, the team placed 14th.
"Our big meet will be the
regionals. We're going to try to key
that meet, and everything we do
will be so we can peak at this
meet said Stuart Will, junior.
This Writer can be contacted at
SportsSstudentmedia.ecu.edu
lit
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768-1888.
BUY BOOKS
OpO; COMM 20
call 353-8930.
r
1995 HONDA
condition, fully
roof. CD change
0330, ask for
$12,500 OBO.
NEED A comp
Shawn at Custo
him build you o
Free setup and
at752-4335.
Afewv Vbrfc
Polo, Fubi
mom C pr
can afforc
9 328-3116





-15 Tueiday. August 24. 1999
FOR RENT
Available now. 2 and 3 bed-
Vbom duplexes. 12 block4 blocks
from campus and 2 blocks from
downtown. Central heat. AC, wash-
er, dryer or hookup. $365-700. 767-
0502.
112 A AND B Holly Street 2 bed-
rooms. Close to campus. 809-1922
Pets ok wdeposit.
TOWNHOUSE - 3 BEDROOMS, 2
't2 baths near ECU. WD hook-up.
lots of storage. 752-1899 M-F day,
�661-2203 pager night.
' � � �
4 BEDROOM, 3.5 bath townhome
1.4 miles from ECU campus avail-
able immediately. Wild wood Villas.
Call 412-2588 or 758-4747.
FREE RENT! Never pay rent again.
Step by Step Book $8.95. PO Box
251362, Little Rock. AR 72225-1362.
TAKE OVER lease, rent is $200 per
month and 14 of utilities and
phone. Large 5 bedroom house. 2
bath. Call Paul at 329-8666.
ECU AREA two three bedroom
houses available immediately. One
$500. wd. window ac. Other
$630. wd. central ac. dishwasher,
fenced yard. Pets OKI Call 830-9502.
TOWNHOUSE FOR rent. 2 BR. 1
12 bath. $500mo $500 deposit.
Williamsburg Manor off Hooker Rd.
Small pets OK. Info, call days 931-
.1317 evenings 355-0741.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. available now. 125
fyery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 758-6596.
ROOMMATE WANTED
NEED FEMALE non-smoking room-
mate for 4 bedroom house. $215
monthly 14 utilities. On ECU bus
foute. Call 752-0281.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 3
bedroom house in quiet residential
area one mile from campus. Must be
clean. $235 month plus 13 utili-
ties. 752-2116
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share brand new 2-bdrm. apartment
AS.A.P. Eastgate Village. For more
rrifo. please call 561-8464.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share brand new 2-bdrm. apartment
A.S.A.P. Eastgate Village. For more
jhfo. please call 561-8464
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
three bedroom. 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities. Call Mindy at 355-2956.
Near ECU campus.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share
fWee bedroom duplex with private
drive, gas logs and cathedral ceil-
iiigs. Washer and dryer included.
13 rent, 13 bills. Call 551-6939.
NON-SMOKING Female roommate
needed now to share 2 BR, 1 12
bath apt. 12 rent utilities. Clean,
serious student preferred. Call 752-
8647. Mel.
FOR SALE
AKC DOBERMAN puppy for sale.
13 weeks old. needs good home.
$200.00 with kennel included. Call
762-5469.
AAA! CANCUN & Jamaica
SpringBreak Specials! 7 nights, air.
hotel, meals, drinks from $399! 1 of
6 small businesses recognized for
outstanding ethics! springbreaktrav-
el.com 1-800-678-6386
CHEVROLET CAVALIER recently
passed inspection. $500 or best off-
er. 756-5081, please leave your num-
ber
AAA! SPRING Break Specials! Ba-
hamas Party Cruise 5 days $279! In-
cludes most meals! Awesome
beaches, nightlife! Panama City, Day-
tona. South Beach. Florida $129!
springbreaktravel.com 1-800-678-
6386
TREK 370 with Manitou Shawn
Palmer Fork 80mm Travel. Shimano
QXLX components, new IRC tires.
seatpost V-brakes. Rapid-Fire shift-
less and brake levers. $350 OBO.
768-1888.
BUY BOOKS - Math 1065 $40
QBO; COMM 2001. $10 OBO. Please
call 353-8930.

1995 HONDA Civic EX. excellent
condition, fully loaded, power sun-
roof, CD changer, new tires, call 413-
0330. ask for Dennis or Tracy.
$12.500 OBO.
NEED A computer for class? Call
Shawn at Custom Computer and let
him build you one. Excellent prices.
Free setup and delivery. Call Shawn
at:752-4335.
Afew York atyla clotning
Polo, Fubu, Iceborg and
C oricoft students
afford. Caff Ja'Maul
0 328-8116 for moro Info.
MAC PERFORMA 24 megs RAM 1
GB mem. $600. 767-2433.
LAST CHANCE: Student desk,
slightly uses, one drawer handle
missing. Great for studying or small
apartment. $60 or best offer. Call
752-5899. leave message.
COUCH, WASHER, recliner. chest
of drawers, desk, and misc. items.
Call Rich at 766-2767 and leave a
message.
HUGE 280 sq.ft. bedroom with pri-
vate entrance available in vintage
home for a responsible and tidy fe-
male upperclassman. Washerdryer,
3 blocks from campus. Private bath-
room available: must provide own
window ac. Must not mind smoking
and cats. $250. 12 utilities. Serious
inquiries only. 561-7591.
FOR SALE: Entertainment center.
Excellent condition, used one year.
Best offer. Call 758-4796.
RELOCATION SALE: Matching
sofa, chair & ottoman, oak entertain-
ment center & bookcase. 9 drawer
dresser, nightstand & other house-
hold items. Open house 7-24-99 8
a.m. until. Call for more info. 752-
0828.
.
HELP WANTED
SOME ASSEMBLY required, holes
in the wall, odd jobs, repair work,
painting, low rates, save that depos-
it and call 757-8781, leave message.
HEALTHFITNESSSpprtsEnthu-
siasts needed. International compa-
ny expanding.Earn 30-60K year one.
Work around your schedule. Mail re-
sume to PO Box 30283, Greenville,
NC 27833-0283. Good attitude a
must!
$25 PER Hour. Direct sales reps
needed Now! Market credit card
appl. Person-to-person. Commissions
avg. $250-500wk. 1-800-651-2832.
$$$$$TUTORS NEEDED$$$$$
Looking for some extra money (best
pay on campus!) and a way to im-
prove academically? Become a tutor
for the Office of Student Develop-
ment-Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any level (0001-
5999) in all subject areas. Under-
for the Office of Student Develop-
ment-Athletics? We need individuals
capable of tutoring any level (0001-
5999) in all subject areas. Under-
graduate students are paid six dol-
lars an hour ($6) and graduate stud-
ents are paid seven dollars an hour
($7). If this sounds like the job for
you. join us for an orientation meet-
ings in Ward Sports Medicine Build-
ing (behind Minges Coliseum) on
either 824 at 5 p.m 825 at 3 p.m.
or 830 at 5 p.m. Questions? Need
more information? Contact Isha Wil-
liams at 328-4691 for further infor-
mation.
WANTED: PART-Time warehouse
and delivery position available for
morning hours. License required.
Apply in person at Larry's Carpet
One. 3010 East 10th Street, Green-
ville. NC
WANTED: AFTER school care pro-
vider for 5th grade boy. 5 days per
week. 2:30 p.m. until 6 p.m. Own
transportation. Help with homework.
Hourly rate and mileage. Call Robin
Parkin at 830-8998.
FILM TECHNICIAN for Women's
Basketball, East Carolina University:
Looking for film technician for all
home games and practices. Job be-
gins on October 16, 1999 through
March 1. 2000. Contact Donna Car-
rell, ECUWB. 252-328-4590. Salary:
$1000.00
CHILD CARE needed mornings &
evenings. Must have transportation.
Carry & pick-up from school. Pay
neg. Call 353-5317.
COMPUTER SCIENCE student
needed for new computer software
company. Basic computer skills a
must. Flexible hrs. 20hrs.wk. Call
756-8715. leave message.
A PART-TIME nanny needed for 1
12 year old twins. Mon-Fri morn-
ings 7:30-12:30. Experience, related
education preferred. Call Nease Per-
sonnel. 756-5820
classifieds
LEARN TO
SKYDIVE!
CURIUM SKY SPIRTS
(919)496-2224
HELP WANTED
MOTHER'S HELPER needed for 4
children. Includes housecleaning,
cooking & babysitting. Requires ex-
cellent references with reliable trans-
portation. Mondays. Tuesdays 6or
Thursdays for full days. Call 321-
1379.
NEED BABYSITTER for Thursdays
from 11:30 until 4:30 for my 4 year
old and 9 year old boys. Must have
transportation. Please call 353-7446.
THE GREENVILLE Recreation and
Parks Department is still accepting
teams for the upcoming Adult Soc-
cer programs. A registration packet
may be picked up at the Elm Street
Gym after 2 p.m. Monday-Friday.
Games for the Master's Division
(Ages 30 & over by Dec. 1, 1999) will
be held on week nights from 7 -10
p.m. and the Open Division (Ages 16
6- over by Dec. 1, 1999) will play pre-
dominately on Sundays from 12-5
p.m. beginning in September. A reg-
istration fee will be required. For
more information call the Athletic Of-
fice at 329-4550 after 2 p.m. (Mon-
day-Friday
LOOKING FOR a hard working, de-
pendable person for a flight line po-
sition. Duties include cleaning and
moving airplanes. Aviation experi-
ence preferred but not required. 15-
25 hrsweek. Some weekends.
$6.50hr start. Apply in person at
Dillon's Aviation. 1105 N. Memorial
Drive. Pitt-Greenville Airport.
EXPERIENCED SITTER needed to
keep four year old daughter in my
home beginning Fall semester. Pre-
fer child development major. Non-
smoker, own transportation. Must be
able to provide developmental ap-
propriate activities. References re-
quired . Call 931-7439 for interview.
FEMALE SITTER wanted for 2 girls
from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. Monday to
Friday. Transportation needed to pick
up from school and do light activi-
ties. Piano knowledge a plus. Phone
756-5533 after 6 p.m.756-5533.
ADMINISTRATIVE- MANAGER for
Women's Basketball. East Carolina
University: Responsibilities include
audiovisual breakdown. tape ex-
change, general office management,
supervision of student managers, co-
ordinating mailings, compiling statis-
tical databases, assisting with game
change, general office management,
supervision of student managers, co-
ordinating mailings, compiling statis-
tical databases, assisting with game
day activities, marketing and promo-
tions, and other duties as assigned
by head coach. Prefer an individual
with a strong administrative back-
ground and desire to remain in athle-
tic administration. Person will travel
with the team-prefer graduate stud-
ent. Inquiries: contact Donna Carrell,
ECUWB, 252-328-4590. Stipend for
the year
WORK STUDY Jobs. Applications
now being accepted thru September
15. 1999. Please bring: work study
hiring authorization form, driver's li-
cense, social security card, class
schedule. 2nd Floor Administration.
Joyner Library
MALE AND FEMALE GYMNASTICS
TEACHERS WANTED CALL ROSE'S
GYMNASTICS AT 321-7264 FOR JOB
OPPORTUNITIES.
PITT COUNTY Community Schools
& Recreation is hiring Site Super-
visors, for the Fall Soccer Program.
Individual qualifications include:
must be 18 years of age with a valid
drivers license, must have some
knowledge of the rules and regula-
tions of soccer, must be available on
Saturdays, possesses good commu-
nication skills and enjoy working
with children. Anyone interested in
applying for a position, should con-
tact Sherry Williams, Recreation Co-
ordinator at 830-4244 for an applica-
tion.
BABYSITTER NEEDED for after
school care M-F. Call Cindy 355r
3476 after 5 p.m.
NEED A PART TIME JOB?
RPS INC.
Is looking lor i � m xv ,i i iamjujci to load vans and
unload trailers for the am shift hours 3:00am to 8am.
S7�S0lKHir; tuition assistance available after 30days
Future career opportunities in operations and manage-
ment possible. Applications can be filled out at 2410
United Drive (near the aquatics center) Greenville
HELP WANTED
WAITSTAFF POSITIONS available
11 a m2 p.m. Flexible work sched-
ule. For more information contact
Jim Sakell or Ronald Barrett at Cy-
press Glen Retirement Community.
830-0713.
SITTER NEEDED in my home for 6-
yr. old child, weekdays beginning
July 19 to August 13. No smoking,
safe driving record, own transporta-
tion. References. Call 321-8221.
TUTORSITTER NEEDED for 5th
grader after school M-F every other
week. $60 per week. Call Sherry.
758-8400.
NEED STUDENT to work after-
noons Monday-Thursday for 3 to 4
hours helping a 5th and 8th grader
with homework. Should be good at
Algebra. Call Mrs. Lee at 355-4860.
WAREHOUSE HELP needed, morn-
ings and Saturdays. Apply in person.
1009 Dickinson Ave Carpet Bargain
Center.
FUN ft free pictures. Looking to try
something new? Looking for fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me. I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available (I've pho-
tographed dozens of ECU girls).
Please send a note, phone number
and a picture (if available - it will be
returned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413
Pinehurst Dr Wilson. NC 27893 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail me at
hronjak8simflex.com
CONSTRUCTION MANAGE-
MENT, industrial engineer or similar
major needed for part-time to full-
time work. Must be able to use drill,
etc. Will work with your schedule.
Call 756-8470 for appt.
EARN $50.00 to100.00 per hour
modeling and dancing for local adult
entertainment agency. No experi-
ence required. Flexible work hours.
Discretion and confidentiality as-
sured. 830-0494.
CHRISTIAN NURSERY workers
needed Sunday mornings 9:15-
12:15. Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church. 510 S. Washington St. Ap-
ply at church office. Office hours 8
12:15. Additional hours available.
Jarvis Memorial United Methodist
Church. 510 S. Washington St. Ap-
ply at church office. Office hours 8
a.m12noon and 1:30-5 p.m.
NEED SOMEONE to carpool. run er-
rands, and take my 6 and 9 yr. olds
to after school activities 3-5
dayswk. (Monday-Friday) Sept. 15
till Nov. Must have transportation.
Good pay. fun children! Call 321-
8010, leave message.
SZECHUAN GARDEN needs part-
time or full-time waitstaff & cashiers.
No phone calls. Come after 2 p.m. in
person only, 909 South Evans.
Greenville (10th 8- Evans).
CHILD CARE needed in my home.
Must have own transportation and
available M T andor TH mornings
from 7 a.m12p.m. or 2 p.m. CPR
certified preferred. Call 756-9611.
BABYSITTER NEEDED to care for
1 and 3 year old boys. Some after-
noons and weekends. Hours are
flexible. Light housekeeping re-
quired. Must have prior babysitting
experience plus references. 353-
1797.
PITT COUNTY Community Schools
& Recreation needs soccer referees
Individual with knowledge of rules
and regulations in the game of soc-
cer and who have played on the high
school level or above are needed to
referee youth soccer games begin-
ning the end of September. Games
will take place on Saturdays starting
September 25-November 6. Interest-
ed individuals, please call Sherry
Williams. Recreation Coordinator at
830-4244.
PART-TIME library page Monday-
Friday 9 a.m. to 12 noon. Shelving
books, assisting librarians as need-
ed. Apply in person only 9 a.m. to 6
p.m. weekdays in the Children's
Library, Sheppard Memorial Library.
530 Evans Street, Greenville. No
phone calls.
ARAMARK. THE WORLD'S LEADER IN MANAGED SERVICES IS HIRING
CATERING PERSONNEL. MUST BE DEPENDABLE AND FRIENDLY! AVAIL-
ABLE NIGHTS. MORNINGS AND WEEKENDS. BRING COMPLETE WORK
HISTORY 7 APPLY AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CTR-ECU MTWF 9AM-
4PM MTWF. GREAT PAY & BENEFITS 1 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. EOE.
t
Runners
Food Delivery Drivers Wanted
We offer:
� Perfect hours & Flexible schedule for college students
5:30 pm- 10 pm � 11 pm on weekends (No dorm students)
� Two way radio communication offers innovative freedom of
movement when not delivering
� Competitive pay at $4-$5 per hour tips so your average
income ranges from $8-$15 per hour
� We have over 1 year experience delivering in greenville.
Reliable transportation a must. Knowledge of Creenville
streets advantageous. (756-5527 after 6 pm, leave message)
www.rettaurantrunners.com
���
Si
n v
Students, Chick-fil-a of
Carolina East Mall has
daytime positions available
11-3 or 12-4 weekdays. No
Saturdays or Sundays. Please
stop, by for an application.
4
The Eist Crolfflitu
HELP WANTED
FACTORY MATTRESS 8 Bad-
rooms has an opening in its ware-
house and delivery department.
Good pay with benefits. Apply in
person only. 730 Greenville Boule-
vard. No phone calls, please.
BABYSITTER NEEDED in my home
for 3 year old child. Needed Tuesday
and Thursday 8:30 a.m2:30 p.m.
Contact Mary Cavanagh at 353-
5338.
CHILDCARE NEEDED. ENERGE-
TIC, responsible individual with ref-
erences. TuesThurs. p.m Wed. Fri.
a.m. 758-6787
PART-TIME employees needed.
Warren's 'Hot' Dogs. 1938 North
Memorial Drive. Will work around
class schedule.
BABYSITTER NEEDED all day on
Thursdays (no morning classes,
please), for two young children. No
smokers, please. Must have refer-
ences. Call 355-7875.
FREE BABY Boom Box Earn
$12001 Fundraiser for student
groupa & organizations. Earn up
to $4 por MasterCard app. Call
for info or visit our website.
Qualified callers receive a fro
baby boom box. 1-80O-932-O528
�xt. 119 or ext. 126 www.ocm-
concapta.com
LOCAL LAW firm has a part-time
mail room position available. Duties
include general office support and
errands. Own transportation a must.
Hours 1-6. M-F. Send resume to: Le-
gal Administrator, 1698 E. Arlington
Blvd Greenville. NC 27858. 252-
321-2020
CHILDCARE : OCCASIONAL wee-
kend evening sitter needed. 2 to 3x
per month, for 2 children, ages 10
and 14. three cats and one docile
iguana. Must be non-smoker with
own transportation. Previous experi-
ence with references preferable. Call
evenings: 752-6372
LOOKING FOR A job? The ECU Tel-
efund is hiring studentsfor the Fall of
1999 to contact alumni and parents
for the ECU Annual Fund Drive.
$5.50 per hour. Make your own
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212.
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
schedule. If interested, call 328-4212.
M-TH between the hours of 3-6PM
FALL YOUTH Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James. Judd Crumpler or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL HAS
full-time & part-time positions avail-
able. Great experience for CDFR or
ELEM majors. Call 355-2404 for
more information.
SPRING BREAK 2000 with STS -
Join America's 1 Student Tour Op-
erator to Jamaica. Mexico. Bahamas.
Cruises, and Florida. Now hiring on-
campus reps. Call 1-800-648-4849
or visit online 9 www.ststravel.com
BABYSITTERS NEEDED Tues.
andor Thursday for Community Bi-
ble Study. Hours 9-11:15. Please call
756-9394.
H � � �
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
Costa r�
development
N.C. - business, creator, dist. of New
Line high Quality active-casual wear
pvt. labels seeking lodfldx, sales
recruiting assoc. for order taking sys-
tem. Home, work, school-based.
P-TF-TM-F. Prefer long range associa-
tion for mutual growth, oj MLM.
Casual, dignified, positive style. $35
invest if your right for it. I back if
you're not. Work with us & you can
have your own store(s). Name &
best time to call to:
Dan Coleman
P.O. Box AA
Newton Grove, N.C.28366
from the Mountains to the Sea and Beyond
k personal:
GAMMA SIOMA Sigma announce
its Fan Rush 1999. 'Coma sae what
service and sisterhood is about.
When: August 24-26 from 7 p.m. till
8:30 p.m. Where: August 24 - Men-
denhall Great Rooms 2 & 3. August
25 Mendenhall Multipurpose Room.
August 26 Mendenhall Room 244.
Choose only one of the three. Dress
is semi-formal. For questions or
rides, call Karen. 439-0999.
OTHER
S PERCENT discount. ECU students
with this coupon. Hot dogs. subs,
and pizzas. Warren's 'Hot Dogs.
1938 North Memorial Drive.
INFORMAL JEWISH student
gathering in private home of author
near campus. Friday 5-7:30 p.m.
Nosh and exchange ideas. For addi-
tional info call 752-5644.
KITTENS! FREE to a good home.
Please call 757-2068 ASAP.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
PHI SIOMA Pi invites everyone wit
a 3.30 GPA and 32-96 semestc
hours to Smoker. Come see whs t
we're all about. Tuesday. August 31: t
in GC 1032 6 p.m. For more info. ca)l
Emily at 767-1407.
THE DEPARTMENT OF Commpnj-
cation Sciences and Disorders will
be providing the speech, language
and hearing screening for students
who are fulfilling requirement for ad-
mission to Upper Division on the fol-
lowing dates: Screenings for stud-
ents in the College of Arts and Sci-
ences. General College, and the
Schools of Art. Health and Human
Performance. Human Environmental
Sciences, and Music will be held
Monday. August 30 or Wednesday.
September 1. 1999. Screenings for
students in the School of Education
will be held Thursday. September 2
or Wednesday. September 8. 1999
from 5:15-6:15. These are the only
screening dates during the Fall Se-
mester. The screening will be con-
ducted in the ECU Speech and Hear-
ing Clinic. Belk Annex 1. School of
Allied Health Sciences, near the in-
tersection of Charles Street and the
ducted in the ECU Speech and Hear-
ing Clinic. Belk Annex 1. School of
Allied Health Sciences, near the in-
tersection of Charles Street and the
264 By-pass. No appointment is
needed-Please do not call their office
for a appointment. Waiting is outside
the clinic waiting room. Sign in be-
gins at 5PM. Screenings are con-
ducted on a first come, first serve ba-
sis. Make-up sessions are held each
Thursday afternoon from 3:30-4:30.
$10 charge: call 328-4405 for an ap-
pointment.
WOMENS DISTANCE runners
needed. Womens X-country 8- dis-
tance teams need walk-ons. Be part
of an ECU varsity team. Sign with
Coach Klepack at Scales Fieldhouse
or call 328-4605 for more informa-
tion! '
FIRST-YEAR commuter students
are invited to attend ECU Road Rules
- Mission �1. Tuesday. Aug. 24 4-5
p.m. or Wednesday. August 25 7-8
p.m. in 212 Mendenhall. Meet other
freshmen and learn tips for succeed-
ing at ECU. Call 6881 for more in-
formation.
Join us
for the
experience
of a lifetime.
Why waste time working
at a part-time job you
hate?
Learn while you earn in
the advertising department
of The East Carolinian.r
We have openings for two
Advertising Account
Executives and an
Advertising Assistant.
Come by our office in the
Student Publications
Building across from
Mendenhall and Joyner
to complete an application
or call 328-6366 for more
information.
ARAMARK. THE WORLD'S LEADER IN MANAGED SERVICES IS HIRING
CASHIERS. BAKE SHOP ASSISTANTS AND GRILL COOKS FOR ECU CAM-
PUS DINING. MUST HAVE CUSTOMER SERVICE SKILLS, AND BE
DEPENDABLE AND FRIENOLYI BRING COMPLETE WORK HISTORY b
APPLY AT MENDENHALL STUDENT CTR-ECU MTWF 9AM4PM. GREAT
PAY & BENEFITS 1 NO PHONE CALLS PLEASE. EOE.





e�
m
Wanna Win a Hummer? See OUr WebSlte fOr details. Deadline for online entry is 1015f99. Mail-in entries must be postmarked by 101599 No purchase nee
essary. Must be at least 18 years old and a licensed driver in state of residence. Void where prohibited. For Official Rules, mall a self-addressed stamped envelODe to- The
eCampus.com Wanna Win a Hummer? Rules, co Marden-Kane Dept RF, 36 Maple Place, Manhasset, NY 11030. Requests received after 103199 will not be fulfilled.
1 " �

The Billingsl
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PHOTOS COURTE:


Title
The East Carolinian, August 24, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 24, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1350
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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