The East Carolinian, Auguat 17, 1999






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uted on August 24th.
www.tec.ecu.edu
TUESDAY. AUGUST 17,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 56
The making of a
MILLENNIUM
ITOO- The Chinese discover gun
powder.
I45v Johann Gutenberg produces
the first machine printed
copies of the Bible.
1492-
Columbus discovers the
"New World" and lays the
groundwork for a new
global civilization.
ioio-
I776-
i86v
101 �-
ms-
Galileo sees the moons of
Jupiter and proves that the
Earth revolves around
the sun.
The Declaration of
Independence is delivered to
King George III.
U.S. civil war ends; states
unite to become a world
power.
The Wright brothers take
flight in Kitty Hawk. NCi
World War I begins with the
assassination of of Austria-
Hungary's Arch Duke Francis
Ferdinand.
Hitler comes to power as
Germany's Chancellor.
1941-The United States enters
World War II after the
Japanese bomb Pearl Harbor.
1945- The United Nations is
formed.
196 j - Civil rights act adopted in
the U.S the effort is led by
Dr. Martin Luther King.
1969- Neil Armstrong becomes the
first man to walk on the moon.
i)Kcj-
Changes predicted for
University in next millennium
Facilities to be
expanded over next ten years
Ted Howard
staff whiter
As we prepare to enter a new millennium,
ECU is the second-fastest growing school in
North Carolina. Looking ahead over the next
ten years, ECU is striving to continue that
growth.
"I believe we will have something
between 25 and 27 thousand students said
Dr. Richard Eakin, Chancellor of ECU.
"Currently, we have roughly 18 thousand stu-
dents. To have that happen in ten years will
be remarkable, not just that it occurs, but also
in the challenges that it will impose on being
able to accommodate that many students
In order to meet the needs of the growing
population in the next decade, ECU will be
adding new programs as well as reconfiguring
many of its degree programs. Some of the
new programs that are being considered for
the future include a school of pharmacy, a
school of computer science and communi-
cation and new programs in engineering
and technology.
Not only will the course offerings
develop, but the way they are
being taught will change as well.
Computers will play a major
role in this change. ECU
has already teamed up
with Real Education,
Inc. of Denver, Co. to
offer classes via the
internet. Beginning
with the fall 1999
semester, 20 courses
will be available on-
I line. ECU is the first
public university in
North Carolina to
work together with
Real Education, Inc.
"We are and will
continue to be a
leader in using tech-
nology for educa-
tion Eakin said. "We will be offering edu-
cation in ways we literally can not imagine
now. It is not at all unreasonable to believe
that ten years from now we will have fifteen
to twenty percent of our students taking
classes over the computer
The rapid development in technology
will not replace the classroom setting.
"There will also be a place for traditional
18 to 20 year-old student who needs to leave
home and whose parents need them to leave
home said James Lanier, Vice Chancellor
for Institutional Advancement. "They
understand that they could stay home and
get a lot of courses, but they need the envi-
ronment and experience of a campus loca-
tion
With growth comes the need for new
facilities. Joyner Library and the Student
Recreation Center are the most recent addi-
tions to ECU's campus. In the coming
years, it will see the completion of a three
year $7 million Science and Technology
Center, which will break ground this fall. A
new dining facility, located off Cotanche
Street, will begin construction
later this year.
"We are currently in conversation with a
number of Federal agencies that will pro-
vide ECU with the opportunity to lease the
former Voice of America site said Eakin.
"That will provide us with much needed
room for growth and development
"I think if we were sitting here ten years
from now, we would also be celebrating the
fact that we have a new baseball stadium to
go with all our other wonderful facilities that
have changed the face of ECU Athletics.
"This fall we will break ground on a new
strength and conditioning center. The next
logical thing to be thinking about is a base-
ball stadium. Another logical thing for us to
think about is new track facilities. I think
ten years from now, both of those will be
complete
"You will see on-campus housing contin-
ue to be a marketable component said Dr.
Spier, the Dean of Students. Weai�ergoing
to be out front on living in the residence hall
as a pretty good place to be. We will contin-
ually upgrade buildings.
"When Jarvis opens, people are going to
be lined up to get in. It's going to be a
showpiece, but it is still going to be the old-
est residence hall we have. From an exter-
nal look, its going to be like it was in 1922,
but internally its going to be like it should in
2010
All of this growth does not come cheap.
Today, ECU has nearly $40 million in assets.
This shows significant growth over the $1
million just fifteen years ago.
"Within the next ten years I'd like for it
to be well over $100 million Lanier said.
"Our giving percent from alumni is about 15
percent, which is about average for schools
like ours. In the next ten years, I'd like to
move that into the 20 percent range. We will
do a major fundraising campaign associated
with our 100th anniversary which will prob-
ably run from 2002 to our anniversary in
.2001? '
Looking ahead to the next decade one
phrase was commonly used to describe the
future of ECU, "The best is yet to come
The Berlin Wall is torn down
uniting East and West
Germany.
1998- The House of Representatives
passes two out of four
articles of impeachment
against President William
Jefferson Clinton.
1999- U.N. begins campaign of
bombing Yugoslavia.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORK) WIDE WEB
Wi?t rnMF Rapk!
Welcome to East Carolina University. You have my best wish-
es for meaningful and enriching experiences at ECU this year.
This promises to be a very exciting year on campus. We are
actively planning many new programs in our academic areas.
The construction and renovation of many facilities which is cur-
rently underway may be inconvenient to you at present, but the
results will be wonderful. Our athletic complex has a new look
and our new scoreboard is being installed. In short, activity
abounds as we prepare for the new century.
If you are new to our campus, I join my colleagues in wel-
coming you. We have a special place in our hearts for you and
hope that you will soon consider the University your home.
Indeed, we strive to create and maintain an academic com-
munity small enough for you to feel at home but large enough
to provide you with the opportunities you need to prepare for
the years ahead.
Work hard, enjoy yourself, and fill the year with both good
memories and accomplishments that will cause you to hold
ECU in your hearts.
Very best wishes,
Richard R. Eakin
Chancellor
Campus under construction
Various construction
projects underway
Ted Howard
staff writer
Walking around campus, it is diffi-
cult not to notice the bright orange
fencing that seems to be every-
where. Chain-link fence wraps
around much of the Fifth Street
side of the mall. Sounds usually
associated with school are now
replaced with the sounds of ham-
mers, machinery, and the "beep,
beep, beep" of tractors. All of this
construction may be annoying now,
but the end result will be well
worth it.
Jarvis Residence Hall is being
completely remodeled. Built in
1909, Jarvis is the oldest building on
campus that is still used for its orig-
inal purpose. To keep up with
modern society, new walls, win-
dows and doors must be added.
Also new elevators and a heating
and cooling system were necessary.
Instead of traditional
rooms, Jarvis will
house suites and
apartments, along
with a multi-purpose
room and courtyard.
This building is
scheduled to be com-
pleted by the end of
the fall semester
1999, and it will
house 160 students.
"It's just trashy
looking now, but it'll
be nice when it's
done said Thomas
Fowler, sophomore.
The Jenkins Fine Art Center,
right next to Jarvis, is having some
major work done as well. The
gallery is being remodeled to make
it appear more professional, and the
heating and cooling system is being
modernized to be able to better
handle pieces of delicate art. New
studio classrooms are also being
added and renovated. "Our student
population is growing, and we don't
have enough spaces for everyone to
work said Dr. Cynthia Green,
Professor of Art Education. "We
couldn't keep our school going if we
Jarvis Residence Hall undergoing renovations.
PHOTO B� Mil KITH
didn't do repairs and renovations
The Edward Nelson Warren
Life Sciences Building is also
scheduled to open in the fall of
1999. This new $14 million build-
ing will offer 60,000 square feet of
classrooms and research facilities.
Construction will begin on a $7
million science and technology
center this semester. This project
is scheduled to be complete in
three years. The student publica-
tions building is currently being
SEE COHSTRUCTIOH PAGE 9
mm





2 Tmttoy. AntMt 17. 18�9
news
Tki East Carollalal
If you left for the summer, here are some of the stories you missed
�New CRM doctoral degree
offered this fall.
The Coastal Resources
Management program can be
traced back nearly a decade due to
the efforts of Dr. Bill Queen, direc-
tor of the Institute of Coastal and
Marine Resources (ICMR) and
research faculty within ICMR such
as Dr. Jeff Johnson and several
other departments including
Health Center
makes changes
Survey given out
to improve services
Geology and Biology. The program
has attracted a great deal of atten-
tion throughout the U.S. and abroad
from students interested in this
unique interdisciplinary program.
"This will be an important
expansion in the program for our
students to gain an understanding
of the coastal issues in other parts of
the world said Dr. Lauriston King,
director of the Ph.D program in
CRM and associate professor of
Political Science.
The goal for the new program
faculty and students is put empha-
sis on accomplishing a balance
between humans and the coastal
environment
By: Kerry Pate, staff writer.
Originally published July 21,1999.
�Bond package stalled after
Senate rejects revised version.
The state Senate has rejected
the House's revised bond plan after
the House cut the figure from $300
billion to $1.2 billion last week.
The money was to benefit North
Carolina universities and communi-
ty colleges, with ECU slated to
receive nearly $79 million dollars
after the House cuts.
ECU officials prepared a list
coinciding with House cut backs
that had $55.1 million being allot-
ted for the new Science and
Technology building. Without the
bond proposal, the project will be
delayed.
By: Cory Sheeler, news editor.
Originally published July 21,1999.
�Skully's moves to University
Plaza.
Skully's has moved from Fifth
Street in downtown Greenville to
it's new location in the University
Plaza. The store became widely
noticed after it's legal battle with
ECU over the copyright to the
pirate logo. Skully's eventually
retained the right to use the pirate
logo on the front of their store win-
dow and continue to do so in their
new location.
SEE MISSED PAGE 4
'?�,

Heather Zophy, H�ahh Educator.
PHOTO BY Bill KEITH
piled the results of the written sat-
isfaction surveys and surveys
done over the phone to come up
with the most requested services
on the surveys.
They plan to implement some
of those suggestions this year.
"98 percent of students sur-
veyed said that they were either
satisfied or very satisfied with
their most recent visits to student
health Zophy said.
As a result of theses surveys,
Student Health is now providing
more common items in the phar-
macy. Condoms, both male and
female, are readily available at
affordable prices to students. The
pharmacy is also offering Tylenol
cold medicine and some other
alternative over the counter cold,
fever and blister medicine. Also,
new supplies in the pharmacy
include various brands of birth
control pills and new infection
treatments.
'The Student Health Center
is also looking into some other
changes in the future as a result of
the student feedback from the
surveys said Kay Y. Wilkerson,
director of the Student Health
Center.
Such improvements include an
after-hours clinic and the ability to
use prescription cards at the
Student Health Center pharmacy.
It is also hoped that in the future,
dental and dermatologist services
can be offered.
"Student Health has always
been an easily accessible place for
me as a student, and I have always
gotten the care I needed said
Sophia Miller, junior.
erf
LeAnne Johnson
staff wmteh
The Student Health Center is
using student feedback to help
provide better service to the peo-
ple they cater to.
The Student Health Center
distributes a survey to students
once during the spring and fall
semester on Student Appreciation
Day.
These surveys are called
Student Satisfaction Surveys, and
they contain questions that cover
a variety of subjects concerning
student health.
Questions that are posed to the
students are geared towards how
to improve the services of student
health and what the students
would like to become available at
there.
Heather Zophy, the Health
Educator at student health, and
her graduate students distribute
the surveys to students who are
willing to take the time to fill
them out.
Over the past three to five
years, Student Health has com-
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Jay Mohi
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Tuesday, Aaawt 17.1MB 3
Visif us on fhe uicb: uiuu�.fec.eco.cto
asassrsaaa,
"Lessons of success
ana survival for
Adult students"
� Meets every other Wednesday
- Begins August 25
�Noon-1p.m.
�312 Wright Hall
- Attend as often as you like
For students over 24 who want to
meet other adults and succeed at
ECU
Joyner offers workshops to help you
become familiar with their resources
Library urges students to
take advantage of services
Com SlIKKI.KK
K�s union
Joyner Library provides opportuni-
ties throughout the year for mem-
bers of the University community
to learn about new library databases
and services and improve their
research skills. A wide variety of
sessions are offered free of charge to
ECU students, faculty, and staff.
The fall workshop consists of five
different sessions offered at a vari-
ety of times for your convenience.
Attend any or all of the sessions that
interest you. Library staff can also
design a specialized program for
your course or group. For more
information or to register, contact
Jan Lewis, Coordinator of
Instructional Services, at 328-2267
or lewisja@mail.ecu.edu.
All sessions held in Joyner
Library, room 1021

Graduate students are welcomeBring a lunch and
a friendcall 6881 or 6661 for more information.
5
:3
1
S3


�No time to come to the library? Find out how to connect to library databases from home using the new proxy server.Monday, August 23 Tuesday, August 31 Thursday, September 210-11 a.m. 6-7 p.m. 2-3 p.m.
�EBSCO Host: Your online source for journal and magazine articles. EBSCO covers a wide variety of subjects including health, business, humanities, general science, education and social sciences. Learn ways to effectively search this database.Tuesday, August 24 Wednesday, September 1 Thursday, September 210 -11 a.m. 3 - 4 p.m. 6-7 p.m.
�Academic Universe: Web access to news, business, medical and legal information. Be one of the first at ECU to see this popular full text resource and see why students across the U.S. love it.Wednesday, August 25 Thursday, August 26 Tuesday, August 3111 a.m. - 12 noon 6-7 p.m. 3 - 4 p.m.
�Just in time for the campaign season, Joyner Library has subscribed to Congressional Universe. Learn to use it and explore other political sites.Thursday, August 26 Friday, August 27 Monday, August 3011 a.m. - 12 noon 2-3 p.m. 6-7 p.m.
�Proquest Direct: Business literature, peer-reviewed journals, newspapers and much more. Come sec the new features contained in the latest version of this familiar service.Friday, August 27 Monday, August 30 Wednesday, September 110-11 a.m. 2 - 3 p.m. 6-7 p.m.
1
4th Annual Pirate Underground
Street Dance
MANDORiCO
Tuesday 8:30 pm MSC Brickyard
AV)DErVr
1-2616
Hendrix Fil
ROLLING STONE HILARIOUS!
DO NOT PASS 'GO'
if you uuant to sec the real 9001)5 on
blossoming talent. GO' is a mildly
entertaining ride through the night.
John August's screenplay is a
cleuerly fractured piece ol pulp
fiction and Swingers' drcctor
Doug liman weaves the
interlocking stones lo p
with danling dexterity"
Off
�� fttyR.o.3iE
For a good time call the ECU
Student Union Hotline at
252.328.6004,
or visit our website at
www.ecu .edustudentunion.
For additional information contact the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Student Center, East
Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858-4353;
or call 2522.328.4788, toll free
1.800.ECU.ARTS, or TDD 252.328.4736, 8:30
a.m. - 6 p.m Monday - Friday. Individuals
who require accommodations under ADA
should contact the Department for Disability
Support Services at 252.328.4802 forty-eight
hours prior to the start of the program.
I East CartllH
, Inlverslty
nun
I Sendees
tonitt
Phat Tuesday
Pirate Underground Steet Dance
featuring Mandorico
8 3011pm MSC Brickyard
Jay Mohr and Scott Wolf play two gay soap studs who agree to
take part in an elaborate drug bust. After they successfully ful-
fill their duties, they accidentally run over a pedestrian while
still wearing their police-issue wires. Rated R
Wednesday 7:30 pm & Thursday 10 pm
As punishment for killing Pharaoh Seti and sleeping with his
mistress, Egyptian priest Imhotep was entombed alive and
cursed. In 1923 he is inadvertently resurrected by treasure
hunters and must be stopped before he can wreak his
vengeance on the world. Rated PG-13
Thursday - Friday - Saturday 7:30 pm & Sunday 3 pm
ftTOTT
Wicked Wednesday
Mercury Cinema: 60
7:30 pm Hendrix
Thrilling Thursday
Blockbuster FilnrThe Mummy
7:30 pm Hendrix
Mercury Cinema: GO
10 pm Hendrix
Fab Friday
Blockbuster FilnrThe Mummy
7:30 pm Hendrix
Finally Saturday
Pirate Underground Doug Clark
and The Hot Nuts 4-7pm
Blockbuster Film:The Mummy
3 pm Hendrix
No Planned Events
mmmmmmujm





4 Tmrtiy. A�g�tt 17. 1899
news
Thi Etlt Carolinian
Missed
coniimud from pag 2
By: Cory Sheeler, news editor.
Originally published July 21,1999.
�Pepsi vending machines
campus-wide are being
converted from 12-ounce can
machines to 20-ounce bottle
machines.
Along with the change in prod-
ucts, prices have increased from 55
cents for a 12-ouncc can to 90 cents
for a 20-ounce bottle.
According to amendment seven
of the exclusive beverage rights
agreement, the price of cans in the
vending machines is not to exceed
55 cents in the first three years of
the university's contract with Pepsi
without expressed consent of the
university.
However, because Pepsi's profits
have not been as high as expected,
ECU agreed to allow the change to
bottles at a higher cost to the con-
sumers.
While the price of a soda in a
vending machines has risen, the
extra money earned gets pumped
back into the university.
"Every penny of profit that
comes out of this, whether it be
commissions or cash contributions
from Pepsi, are plowed back into
those venues from where the
money was generated said Layton
Getsinger, associate vice chancellor
for Administration and Finance and
executive director of Business It
accrues back to the consumer
However, Getsinger has noticed
a decline of people buying the bev-
erages out of the vending machines
and instead opting to bring their
sodas from home. Because the uni-
versity has so much to gain from the
Pepsi deal, Getsinger says the uni-
versity is benefiting from the deci-
sion to try and keep all parties
happy.
"The real winners in all of this is
not vending operations Getsinger
said. "The real winner in all of this
is the university as a whole. There's
a $10.1 million cash windfall that
accrues to the university over this
ten-year period. That money will
be used for a host of different
things
By: Cory Sheeler, news editor.
Originally published July 28,1999.
�Multidisciplinary Studies
allows students to personalize
majors.
In the spring of 1998, a new aca-
demic major was introduced.
The Multidisciplinary Studies
major at ECU offers undergraduate
students a measure of input and
flexibility in planning their own
unique academic degree program.
The program began with
approximately 12 students last
spring and officials expect more
than 20 students to choose this path
in the upcoming school year.
For those with a variety of inter-
ests who don't want to limit their
education to one area, the
Multidisciplinary Studies major
might be and increasingly attractive
option.
"The student comes up with
their own curriculum that will allow
students to design their own
degrees said Dr. Steven Cerrutti,
director of Multidisciplinary
Studies.
Dr. Cerrutti also emphasized
that the program does not wish to
replace existing programs in other
departments.
Moreover, Multidisciplinary
Studies is not designed to be a
pushover degree.
"We want it to be a prospective
degree, not a retrospective degree
Cerrutti said. "I don't want a senior
coming to me and saying, 'I want to
graduate in December. I have 125
hours and just stick a name on it (a
degree; that's not what we want.
We want motivated students to
plan out a program they want to
take and will be truly beneficial
By, Kerry Pate, staff writer.
Originally published July 7, 1999.
�Michael Jordan returned to
Greenville from hnT 15th annual
Celebrity Golf Classic.
The tournament, which benefits
the Ronald McDonald Houses of
North Carolina, raised $300,000 for
the charity. It gives families a place
to stay while their children are in
the hospital.
Jordan held a press conference
on Saturday morning before his
round of golf to talk about the
importance of this event and why
he is involved.
"As you know, the Ronald
McDonald House has done great
things for people around the
world Jordan said. "We stand here
in North Carolina to make sure that
whoever has problems, unfortunate
problems, are taken care of at the
Ronald McDonald House. They
have extended themselves gra-
ciously to less fortunate families.
I've always been very proud of
that
A host of celebrities were on
hand to help make the tournament
a success. Stars such as Evander
Holyfield, Matt Lauer, Mario
Lemieux and Damon Wayans
attended the golf classic.
The weekend began on
Thursday at the Wright Auditorium
with a benefit concert featuring
country music star Bryan White.
The celebrity skins game was
played on Friday morning, ending
in a tie between baseball hall of
Famer Joe Morgan and "Days of
Our Lives" star Alex Hyde-White,
each finishing with $250,000 to be
donated to the Ronald McDonald
House. Jordan and NFL star Jerry
Rice each finished with $0.
By; Cory Sheeler, news editor.
Originally published June 30, 1999.
feed uwk? Use our classifieds. THEY WoRW
off-campus student?
Attend ECU Road Rules
Room 212 Mendenhall
� Meet other freshmen commuters
� Learn ways to succeed at ECU
�. ��j TuQg Aug. 24 4-5p.m.
1
MISSION
2
MISSION
3
MISSION
4
Managing Your
Time
Test-taking and
Study tips that fit
your learning
style
OR
Weds Aug. 25 7-8p.m.
Tues Aug. 31 4-5p.m.
OR
Weds Sept 1 7-8p.m.
Dating and
Relationships
Careers that
match your
personality
Tues Sept. 74-5p.m.
OR
Weds Sept 8 7-8p.m.
Tues Sept. 144-5p.m.
OR
Weds, Sept. 15 7-8p.ro.
Utend as often as you like. Calf 6881 for more informatic
m f 1
Welcome Back ECU!
� ���
'�VfH0

' Super Sundays
$1.50 Draught Pints
$4.00 Draught pitcher
! $1.50 Domestics
Mexican Mondays
$2.50 Margaritas
$1.50 Dos Iquis
$1.50 Coronas
$1.50 Corona Lights
Fat Tuesdays
$3.00 Rum Smoothers
$2.50 Blue Hurricanes
$2.00 Red Stripes

Band Schedule
August IS - BDC
August 25 - BDC
September 1 - Magic Piper
September 8 - BDC
September 15 - Magic Piper
September 22 - BDC
Join us for Live Music in
the beer garden patio
every Wednesday night
from 7pm-11pm
uniNGNTMemnK
Hani's Brewhouse
701 S. Evans
Greenville, NC
Hours of Operation
Sun 1111
M-S ll-2am
830-2739
Take oat order! are available
h
; Thi Eatt Can






Till East Carolinian
news
T�rtf , AniMt 17. mi 5
:ig5 ���
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Body found.
in basement
HARRISON CITY, Pa. (AP) -Bob
and Linda Galet just wanted to do
a little work on their basement.
They didn't think they would find
a body down there.
The couple, who has lived in a
Pcnn Township home for 13 years,
was digging up the dirt floor of the
basement Monday when Linda
Galet's shovel struck something
hard. At first, they thought it was
no more than a box.
Moving the dirt and clay by
hand, they saw something they
couldn't have prepared themselves
for the tips of a pair of boots.
"At that point, I knew it was out
of our hands and knew to get some-
body with some kind of experience
looking at it said Bob Galet.
Officials unearthed a skeleton,
lying on its left side, buried in its
boots, covered with one to two feet
of clay. The knees were bent
slightly upward, with the toes of
the boots pointing straight up.
Now, law enforcement officials
just have to figure out whose body
it was buried in the Galet's base-
ment - and why.
On Tuesday, Westmoreland
County officials removed the
skeletal remains and called in
Dennis C. Oirkmaat, a professor of
anthropology at Mercyhurst
College in Erie, to determine the
weight, gender, race and height of
the deceased person.
A cause of death needs to be
determined as well. County Chief
Deputy Coroner V.L. "Skip"
Kusiewicz says - in what may be an
understatement - that officials con-
sider the person's death and burial
suspicious.
"(Dirkmaat is) going to make a
determination as to any traumatic
Busier than normal
hurricane season predicted
WASHINGTON (AP)
Government scientists are predict-
ing more hurricanes this season
than usual, with three or more
intense Atlantic storms possible.
Last year's hurricane season pro-
duced 14 tropical storms, including
three major hurricanes. In a typical
season, the United States experi-
ences five to six hurricanes, two of
which are severe and an average of
1.5 storms make landfall.
"Just because we haven't seen a
hurricane yet this year, don't get
fooled into thinking that this will be
a light season Gerald Bell, a
research meteorologist at National
Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration's Climate
Prediction Center, said Tuesday.
Hurricane season officially runs
from June 1 to Nov. 50, but tropical
storms don't really rev up until mid-
August. The peak period runs from
mid-August to mid-October.
The season is expected to be
busy due to atmospheric conditions
globally that contribute to hurri-
canes, said CPC meteorologist
Vernon Kousky. Among those con-
ditions are a low wind shear across
the tropical Atlantic and below-
average air pressure across the trop-
ical Atlantic Ocean and Caribbean
Sea.
Mayor fines himself for
violating lawn sprinkling law
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. (AP) - A
mayor has fined himself for water-
ing his lawn during drought restric-
tions.
Under Schenectady city law,
lawns may only be sprinkled from 7
to 9 a.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. on alter-
nate days.
Mayor Albert Jurczynski had the
day right, but the time wrong.
A sprinkler on his lawn was run-
ning at least from 1:40 p.m wlie
was first seen by a Schenectad
Daily Gazette reporter, to 2:30
p.m when his wife, Maria, came
outside and shut it off.
"I signed the directive last
week. The sprinkler should not
have been on said Jurczynski. "As
SEE MAYOR PAGE
Woodstock trash helps kids
SEE CORPSE PACE 9
ROME, N.Y. (AP) - Mountains of
trash from last month's Woodstock
'99 concert have turned into a gold
mine for a local Little League
group.
With temperatures reaching into
the 90s during the three-day con-
cert, the thirsty crowd of more than
225,000 people left behind lots of
beer and soda cans and bottles.
Concert organizers have donated
the recyclables to Rome American
Little Leaguers. "We had gone out
and asked if there was a possibility
that we could pick up the cans and
bottles said fundraiser chair-
woman Barbara DeBlasiis. "They
decided to not only give us the cans
and bottles they already had, but to
have people continue to pick them
up for us
So far the group has raised near-
ly $2,000. The money will help pay
for a new Little League field.
Promoters also donated a hot water
heater to the group.
The NEW Student Union
presents
THE HUMOROUS HYPNOTIST
Dan LaRosa
TueAug. 24 7:30 p.m.
Hendrix Theatre, Mendenhall
FREE to ECU Students with a valid ECU OneCard.
One guest permitted per ID. All other tickets are $3.00.
To guarantee your seat, you may pick-uppurchase tickets in advance at the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall, Monday-
Friday, 8:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m. The Ticket Office will open at 6:30 p.m. on the night of the show - if there are any tickets left.
DON'T MISS THIS GREAT SHOW - GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY!
' SPECIAL RESERVED SEATING FOR STUDENTS
ATTENDING THE STUDENT UNION GALA RECEPTION.
No invitation needed. The Gala will begin at 6:00 p.m. in the
Multi-Purpose Room of Mendenhall Student Center. Learn how you
can become a part of the most exciting student organization on campus!
Call 328-4715 for more information. d
For a Good Time Call
the Student Union Entertainment Hotline,
328-6004, or check out the Student Union
website at www.ecu.eduStudentUnion.
V
i
.
Individual! with disabilities who require accomodation in order lo participate in this event should contact the Central Ticket Office at 252-328-4788,1 -800-ECU-ARTS, deafspeech impaired access 252-328-4736, or by fax at 252-328-2336.
J





6 TmUly. Amut 17. 1381
news
Tht East Carolinian
Mendenhall and Recreation Services
offer students new activities for new semester
Programs span
variety of interests
lisif us on fte uiet; vauiu.fccecu.e4o
Kkrrv Path
srwv WRITRR
Mendenhall Student Center and
ECU Recreational Services want
you to join them in a PiCL.
Partners in Campus Life (PiCL)
also includes Campus Dining
Services and University Housing
services who have teamed up to
offer ECU students an "Extreme
Welcome" to the Fall 1999 semes-
ter.
Activities for Extreme Welcome
are as follows:
�August IS.
Mendenhall Crawl (featuring a
scavenger hunt)
�August 16.
! Extreme Games
� "August 17.
Pirate Underground Street
J Dance and Merchant's Expo
t 'August 17-19.
, Recreation Expo (information
on programs and services)
�August 18.
Extreme Cinema
�August 10.
J Extreme Cookout and TNT
j Explosions
I 'August 20.
Extreme Pool Party and
Aqua-Theatre
�August 21.
Pirate Underground (featuring
MANDARICO a latin-ska band)
For the recreation enthusiasts,
ECU's most popular programs will
still be offered and new adventure
sports programs have been added to
keep you pumped up and primed
for the new school year.
"A really exciting program we
are offering is a Surfing class where
the first classes take place in the
SRC pool where you learn to pad-
dle the board and make the move
to get on the board, and that is fol-
lowed up by a trip to the Outer
Banks for a day of actual surf train-
ing on the waves said Todd King,
assistant Director for Marketing of
Recreational Services.
Recreational Services is also
offering expanded program in
SCUBA diving as well. Try
SCUBA will be offered periodically
by ECU staff members and Quick
Start SCUBA certification classes
will be offered through the local
Rum Runners Dive Shop.
Intramural Sports is starting off
quickly with Flag Football registra-
tion on August 30 and flag football
officials training which pays stu-
dents a salary while they officiate
games. Other sports will begin
soon afterward.
"A full lineup of intramural
sports) starting in September rang-
ing from volleyball to ultimate fris-
bee leagues and ECU NFL Pick-
ems entree where student can win
prizes and t-shirts every week for
the best picks King said.
For the fitness junkie, Advanced
Cardio-Boxx will be offered which
is similar to Tae-Bo. Recreational
Services will also be offering special
events throughout the semester.
"We will be having our tradition-
al King and Queen of the halls out
at College Hill on August 26 from
4-6 pm King said. "We are wel-
coming the return of the world's
largest slip and slide
"For parents weekend we are
unveiling zoorama-it's a jungle out
there.
"We are going to have a jungle
pool party in the outdoor pool
Other activities will include a
campus-wide airband competition,
paintball target shooting and jungle
joust over the outdoor pool with
pugil sticks.
For students with special fitness
needs. Recreational Services offers
ARISE (Adapted Recreation
Intramural Sport Enhancement).
"ARISE is coming off a terrific
year, the WheelPower Dance
Troupe performed at the Special
Olympics this past July King said.
They also have a full line-up of
wheel-chair basketball, therapeutic
horseback riding, and sea kayaking
as well.
Homecoming is fast approaching
with a large variety of activities for-
students and alumni this year.
"This year's homecoming theme
is Pirate's swinging into the
Millennium said Sage Hunihan,
Student Homecoming Chair.
Activities for homecoming week
are as follows:
�October 5-7.
Online homecoming
representative elections
�October 20.
Banner Judging contest.
�October 21.
Swing dance lessons and
skit night.
�October 22.
Fall on the Mall
�Piratcfest
�Fireworks
�October 23
Homecoming Parade and
Football Game.
Fall on the Mall will feature the
Rutabaga Brothers and Lemon
Sisters swing band where you can
SEE ACTIVITIES PAGE 7
phh i
$2.00 Off j
anyNew j
Single CD j
i
Schoolkids �
Records - !
Greenville j
Location Only J
$13.99 or high-
er. Sale Items j
excluded. Exp. i
121799
lYjary
THE BEER
IS HERE!
y2 Price
pitchers of draft every
Monday & Thursdays!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE COMMUNITY SQUARE L ABC
757-1666 439-0003 permits
Sunday - Thursday after 9pm � Dlne-in only.
Open 7 Days for Lunch, Dinner, & Fiestas!
Now open beside Pitt Community College 1
New & used CDs,
Vinyl, Imports,
Posters, Stickers
& Collectibles
Coming Soom
TICKETMASTER
Y"m
Records
Mon-Sat io-io
Sun 12-6
424 Evans St. Mall
757-7766
THUI
newro
as
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fair
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SAT
MM





i Etst Carolinian -
.edu
Thi Eltl Cuollilii
news
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LABC
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www.attic-niqhtclub.com
jam
LAS'
TUESDAY'
DANCE NIGHT
TUES 17TH
NC'a Legendary Nightclub,
Voted 1 at ecu and Top 100 College Ban In
the Nation by Playboy magazine October 1997
New entrance on 5th St.
Entertainment Complex
Uptown Greenville "?E1 79A9'
209E.5thSt.jZ"jUJ
LADIES FREE TIL 11PM
LIVIN LARGE TUESDAYS
�"If you Live LargeDress to Impress"
WED 18TH
$1.50
Domestics
Champagne
specials!
Mike Reed
"Ragin Cajun
99
special guest Phil Perrier
before 9:30
w ECU ID
THUR 19TH
i
X Dayroom
In the
Rathskeller
FRI 20TH
Breakfast Club
CU's Favorite Band
In the
Rathskeller
Chainnen of the Board
Beach Music's 1 show
In the new
PheonixRoom
In the
Rathskeller
welcome back
to ECU concert
� Zebra Head
� Orange 9mm
� Pilphers
adm.
THUR 26TH
far too jones
special guest Ultraviolets
SAT 28TH
Linda Perry of
'4 non blondes
www.livewireonline.com
ww
?
X
X
?
X
X
?

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?
X
X
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Where to go to get things done
CORV SlIKKI.KK
NKW'X KblTOK
If you are new to the Greenville
area, you are probably wondering
where to go to get some important
things done in town. Also, you may
have questions about where to go on
campus when you need something.
Below is a list of where to go when
you are trying to get settled in.
Off Campus:
Banks
BB&T
212 S Greene St
752-0131
Nations Bank
201 W First St
551-6293
Wachovia
400 Washington St
Wachovia Building
757-7185
Getting your cable
turned on:
Multimedia Cable-vision
Arlington Blvd.
756S677
Getting your power'
turned on:
Greenville Utilities
200 W fifth St.
, 752-7166
Getting your phone
turned on:
No local address, phone only.
355-9111
Paying Tickets
City Clerks Office
City Hall
830-4421
Oh Campus:
Central Ticket Office
Mendenhall Student Center
328-4788
Dining Services
Todd Dining Hall
3283663
Dowdy Student Stores
Wright Building
328-6731
The East Carolinian"
Student Publications Building
328-6366
Intramurals
Student Recreation Center
328-6387
Mendenhall Student Center
328-4700
One Cards
The Wright Building
328-2015
Parking and Transportation
Services
305 E Tenth St
328-6294
Police Department, ECU
609 E Tenth St.
328-6787
Recreational Services
128 Student Recreation Center
328-6387
Student Health Service
Between Joyner Library and
Flanagan Building
328-6841
Student Union
236 Mendenhall Student Center
328-4715
Activities
continued Ira lift 8
try out your new swing moves
from lessons offered by MSC.
"One exciting activity we have
lined up for students will be Swing
dancing lessons in the MSC Social
Room from 3-5 p.m. on Thursday
October 21 Hunihan said.
Start planning your homecom-
ing activities now so you will have
plenty of time to get your entries
in to be eligible for awards and
prizes.
"It is very important for stu-
dents to remember that the dead-
line for applications regarding all
homecoming competitions for
floats, banners, skits and
Homecoming representatives is no
later than September 17 said J.
Marshall, Assistant Director of
Student Activities.
For more information, pick up
an SRC programs brochure or visit
the Recreational Services web site
at www.recserv.ecu.edu. The
Student Union web site is
www.ecu.eduStudentUnion.
For specific information on home-
coming activities contact Sage
Hunihan at 328-2319.
Mayor
continued from page 5
the mayor of the city, I should set
an example he said.
Although the local law contains
no penalty, Jurczynski said he
would penalize himself $50.
Even Jurczynski's opponent in
the November election didn't seen
any political dirt in the dry lawn.
"He apparently has admitted
the error of his ways and corrected
it said Democrat City
Councilman Gary McCarthy.
Jarvis St. Laundromat
-
Wash for
ECU ART
ILOG
5UISI.
41 St.
Xi
203 Jarvis Street Greenville
open every day 6 am to 10 p.m.
convenient parking
single-load, double-load, and triple-load
washers and HOT Dryers!
20 mln. per quarter
SoapSoda GamesTV





I T�irtiy, Am�t 17. 1198
news
Th. tut citBiimw
Politically correct Barbie
CAIRO, Egypt (AP)- She will have an
olive complexion, long black hair and
big, dark eyes - and her extensive-
wardrobe won't include a single
miniskirt or bikini. She's Leib, the
Arab world's response to Barbie.
Leih, expected to be in stores next
year, b meant to give parents an alter-
native to the famously proportioned
blonde American doll. And she's
meant to give Arab girls something
Abb Ibrahim of the Arab League says
they've been asking for - dolls that
look like diemselves and their families.
Mrs. Ibrahim, director of the Arab
League's Child Department, said
Leib is not a declaration of war on
Barbie, whose glamorous gowns, tiny
tennis skirts and snug tops are scat-
tered in girls' bedrooms around the
world.
"Barbie is an American doll that
shows us the American way of living
Mrs. Ibrahim said. "We want to join
the group of national dolls that has
begun to invade the world
In 1996, Iran released its answer to
Barbie - Sara, who wears her country's
head-to-toe Islamic cloak, the chador,
atop other chaste costumes. The Sb vie
Muslims of Bosnia-Herzegovina also
have introduced their own doll, Amina.
Many Arab parents, including Mrs.
Ibrahim, say they worry about the val-
ues their children are absorbing when
more than 90 percent of toys available
in the Arab world are imported, main-
ly from the West and China.
"I remember when my daughter
was young, she told me she wanted to
go to the hairdresser to dye her hair
blonde Mrs. Ibrahim said. "As a
mother and as an educator, I say that
rejecting die self is very dangerous
when the girl thinks it's ideal to be
blonde, wear bikinis and dress immod-
esdy
Feeling
STRESSED
about
the
GMAT
orGRE?
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School of Business
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Em Ctrolliilut
Tht Etit Carolinian
news
Ttsssy, AfSt 17. 1�M 9


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Corpse
continued liorn page 5
injuries to any place (on the body)
said Rusiewicz.
According to police, another
couple lived in the house for sever-
al years until the mid-1970s, when
it was rented to a succession of ten-
ants. The home apparently stood
vacant for a couple of years before
the Galet's purchased it in 1986.
Authorities are trying to deter-
mine who lived in the house
between 1975 and 1986.
Former township-Police Chief
EdSchmuck was contacted to see if
he remembered any unsolved mus-
ing persons cases.
He did not So, police officers
are trying to chase down any leads,
hoping the close knit nature of the
community can aid them.
"We've talked to people who
have been out here a lot of years,
and they've been able to supply us
with names said township Police
Chief Michael Mastroianni. "We're
a lot better off today than we were
(Monday) night. But we still have a
long way to go
m
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3�t;t?rit7
August 9
125 p.m. - Hit & Run - A staff member reported that, while
stationary on College Hill Drive, a truck backed into his vehicle
and then took off at a high rate of speed.
August 10
9:29a.m. - liireny - A staff member reported the theft of four street
signs from the construction area south of Fletcher music. Workers
also reported minor vandalism to area.
4:00p.m. - Skateboarding- A staff member reported that four
juveniles were skateboarding under the north stands of Ficklen
Stadium. One had been previously given a Trespass warning. All
four were issued warnings and escorted off campus.
'�;�
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'STORE NEAREST CAMPUS: In Greenville at University: Commons Siid$il$r,
Corner of Greenville Blvd. and Evans St. Or 18C&3TJ-MAXX for location nearest you.
Construction
coniinoed from pige 1
remodeled to house the Cashier's
Office. Also being added to the list
of projects this year is a new dining
hall off of Cotanche Street and a
state-of-the-art strength and condi-
tioning center.
Off campus. Fifth Street is
being completely resurfaced.
According to Frank Barrow of the
City of Greenville, Meade and
Evans Streets near the university
will be resurfaced later this semes-
ter. ECU is also adding new park-
ing facilities off of Fifth Street
downtown.
"From being here two other
years, I think its going to make
things a real pain for all the stu-
dents moving in said Eddie
Jappell, junior. "1 just hope they're
done soon. The first week of class-
es is the worst time for things to be
congested
Not all of the work is being done
above ground. Andre Carman and
Ncal Thorpe are part of ECU
Facility Services' "steam team
They have spent many hours work-
ing in the tunnels that run under
the campus. They are replacing
parts of the steam lines that provide
heat to all of the school's buildings.
As ECU continues to be the
second fastest growing university
in North Carolina, construction will
be a vital part of that growth.
"Its just something you have to
deal with said Kim Medlin,
junior.
More information on the pro-
jects around campus can be found
on ECU Facilities Services web-
site at www.ecu.edufacilityserv.
If Thanks to you. all sorts
lo
of everyday products are
being made from the paper,
plastic, metal and glass that
you've been recycling.
But to keep recycling
I! working to help protect the
environment, you need to
buy those products.
BUY RECYCLED.
and save:
So look for products made
from recycled materials, and
buy them. It would mean the
world to all of us
For a free brochure, write
Buy Recycled. Environmental
IJ Defense Fund. 257 Park Ave.
South. New York. NY 10010.
orcalll-800-CAJX-EDF
i





10 Tmrtty, A.ty�t 17. 1998
news
Thi East Cirolinim
Animal Bites
HAMPTON, Vk(AP) - Adecisionby
the state Department of
Environmental Quality to protect a
species of salamander will cost taxpay-
ers about $1 million.
Mabee's salamanders breed in a
local gully that lies in the path of the
East-West Expressway being built
across Hampton and neighboring
Newport News. The gully is dry
three-fourths of the year but fills with
water in winter, creating a pool for the
creatures.
The Virginia Department of
Transportation initially wanted to
install pipes for the road to cross the
gully, but that would have split the
salamander breeding pool.
The DEQ decided that wasn't in
the best interest of the salamanders. So
VDOT designed a 100-foot bridge to
cross the area. The bridge will cost
$900,000 to $1.1 million.
Qty Manager George Wallace tried
to get DEQ to reconsider, but the
agency stuck by its decision.
The salamanders, common in the
Carolinas, are unusual enough in
Virginia to be considered a threatened
species.
BRECKENRIDGE, Minn. (AP) -
After 11 days on the run. Snoopy the
tortoise is home, and his owners say
he's going to be grounded for a while.
The pet tortoise, which is 2 feet
long and can live up to 100 years,
decided to get on life's fast lane after
his owners accidentally left his gate
open
Missing signs were put out and
owner Cindy Niesche combed the
country around Breckenridge, on the
North Dakota border, looking for the
African spurred sulcata reptile,
Newspapers and television stations
were alerted. The Niesches asked
everyone for help: farmers, sheriff's
deputies, mail carriers, the Schwan's
frozen food tnick driver.
When searching for the AWOL ani-
mal, Niesche said, "You try to think
like Snoopy
The approach paid off. Since the
desert tortoise dislikes mud and can't
swim, contrary to most turtles, the
Niesches hoped it would rain, forcing
Snoopy to walk on the road.
Which is exactly what happened.
Shelley Eichhom was watching televi-
sion in her living room in Breckenridge
when she noticed Snoopy walking
down the middle of the street, "just
walking around like he owned the
place
One mile from his home. Snoopy
was recaptured and returned to his
happy owners. He's not going to get on
the road until his appearance at the
Wilkin County Fair Aug. 25.
A1RVILLE, Pa. (AP) - Elmer
Sueck knew something looked differ-
ent when he caught a glimpse of a calf
soon after it was bom to one of his
cows.
"I'll be darned he marveled after
taking a closer look. "It's got no hair
The small bull calf did have a few
tufts of white hair on its tail and legs,
but was bom without the trademark
Hereford red coat over the rest of its
body. Sueck had not seen anything
like it in his 30 years of raising cattle.
The lack of hair is likely "a freak
genetic accident said Tom
Harkenrider, a dairy procurement
manager at Cienex, an artificial insemi-
nation company in Ithaca, N.Y.
The calf is nursing well and appears
healthy, but diere's one major problem
with keeping ic It can never go outside
because it would get sunburned.
"Maybe we should call
Coppertone and ask what SPF they
make for a hairless cow joked Earner's
wife, Pat Sueck.
Livestock expert Tony Dobrosky
said a hairless calf is an extremely rare
entity.
"I've seen two-headed calves, five-
legged calves and calves with no tails,
but I've never seen a hairicss calf in the
40 plus years I've been around live-
stock Dobrosky said.
Know what's
ening
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu
Browse over to the only campus-wide
calendar of events at ECU and much more.
Check it often for activities, events, meet-
ings, etc. Use it when you need to list your
own campus happenings.
Bookmark it at www.clubhouse.ecu.edu.

A web-based service of the ECU Student Media.
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OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Beware of incoming freshman
If you happen to see a lost
freshman this year, do not
bump into them as they are
buried deep in their
campus map.
On the first day of classes, you see
rhem. They are walking around,
hopelessly lost with the tmsty cam-
pus map in hand. You try to walk
around them, but there are too many!
Tiiey are everywhere, and you are
not safe from the map-watchers until
you sit in your 3000 or 4000 level
class.
Don't get me wrong, I was once
just as lost as the poor freshman, and
I remember the feeling of helpless-
ness as I prayed that my professor
would be merciful on attendance that
first day. I couldn't understand how
all the other people on campus but
me knew what GC and SRC stood
for. I am not saying that I never get
lost (I couldn't find my way out of a
wet paper bag with a pocketknife and
a flashlight), but at least I know my
abbreviations and the way to get
around campus. I felt so bad my
sophomore year because I knew
exactly what they were going
through, but I couldn't help them.
They just kept staring at their maps
and walking in aimless circles.
If you happen to see a lost fresh-
man this year, do not bump into them
as they are buried deep in their cam-
pus map. They are doing their best,
and they are trying to get around. If
you have a couple of minutes to spare
before classes begin, maybe you
could go out of your way and actually
point to where the freshman is trying
to go. I know that I would have
appreciated that during my first day
on campus.
I wish you all the best of luck in
the upcoming year. This is my final
opinion column, so I'm going to let
the other writers take it from here.
Have a beautiful itty-bitty break, and
enjoy the heat while it lasts. My
advice for next year is: don't tread on
the incoming freshmen! Good luck!
OPINION!
SCOTT
WILKINS
There is an old expression that
says "expect the worst, hope
for the best
The future. For many, that is a
frightening word. Others consider die
future as the promise of good things
ahead. Graduation, marriage, children,
� great job; all of these are in the future
for most of us. None of us knows what
the future holds, yet we can hope and
pray for good dungs. There is an old
expression that says "expect the worst,
hope for die best
Each of us has somediing to con-
tribute to die world. Some of us will be
doctors, lawyers, pediatricians, artists,
journalists, business people, senators, or
perhaps even the President of the
United States. No one really knows
what they are going to do until they get
there.
Our vocation is not die only reason
to look forward to die future. Family
and friends are sure to grow over time. I
donY mean that their weight will grow
(although it might, just remember "the
bigger the snacks, the bigger the
slacks) I mean the number of your
family and friends will grow. Most of us
Look to the Future
will many. Most will have children. I
hope that those who don't many will at
least find a meaningful relationship
with someone special. As a man
engaged to a wonderful woman, I know
what it is like to be uncertain about mar-
riage and the future.
No doubt in the future we will meet
new people. Some will be business
associates. Some of these people will
become great friends that we will form
lifelong bonds with. Some of these
people are here at ECU right now.
Some may be sitting next to you in your
classes and will become your greatest
friends here. For those living in the
dorms, die people you live with or near
may become your best friends. When I
came here as a freshman in 19, I met
people then who are some of my best
friends now. This can and will happen
to most here.
For many freshman reading this paper,
this is die first time diat you are not liv-
ing at home. I am not trying to sound
condescending at all. I know you feel
uneasy, and dial the future is uncertain.
You may not know your way around
campus or Greenville yet Some of you
may be looking for a church or campus
group to provide peace and comfort.
Some of you may be looking for that fra-
ternity or sorority. Maybe you're looking
for that new best friend. Others may be
looking for the good dining hall on cam-
pus. (Oops, thereVnot one.) Whatever
you are looking for chances are you can
find it here. It is just that immediate
future, getting started, that is scary.
Personally I still get butterflies in my
stomach at the beginning of each
semester. Buying books, meeting new
professors and meeting new friends in
my classes is sometimes a little over-
whelming. All of these things involve
the fuwre. For those new here, don't
worry. By Fall Break you will have mas-
tered your way around campus, met
many new friends and found the lesser
of the evils in regard to the dining halls.
The future. Yikes! It can be frightening.
Hell, it is frightening. But there is shel-
ter for the storm. Take each day a day at
at time. Turn to your source of strength,
whether it be God, friends, family or
yourself. Don't worry about your future
here at ECU, it will take care of itself,
along with a little hard work from you.
Enjoy your immediate future here at
ECU, and look forward to die future in
store for you beyond school. I want
everyone to have a great year. Take a
deep breath and don't worry, we'll get
through it together. ,
MY FIRST ACT-&-S�mR�.LS TO Rt
0
OUVKSW
With the millennium fast approaching ECU is forced to look at the future of
its campus. According to Chancellor Eakin, ECU is expected to have between
25 and 27 thousand students within the next ten years. Such an increase of stu-
dents would certainly be beneficial to the university as a whole, and it would
give the university the recognition and credibility it deserves. However, TEC
wonders what the university will do to keep up with the changing student pop-
ulation. For instance, there are not enough dorm rooms currently to house the
students who will be living on campus in the fall. While Jarvis Residence Hall
is slated for completion by the end of the semester, it will only yield 160 spaces
for students wanting to live on campus. That will still force students to find off-
campus housing unless the university makes plans for more residence halls or
additional student housing Also, with parking a constant problem around cam-
pus, where will all of these new students park? It has been rumored that ECU
will turn into a walking campus; no cars allowed on campus, at all. Anywhere.
Anything might be better than the parking situation as it stands right now.
Eakin does hope to have a new baseball facility in place along with a new track
facility within the next ten years. Both of those things would help elevate the
ECU athletic program to the next plateau. But without capacity for the new stu-
dents, who will be close enough to campus to come watch these events? An
increase in the number of students will be beneficial to everyone at the univer-
sity. We just hope the university changes with the student population and
makes the campus comfortable for everyone.
An Alphabetical Welcome to Freshmen
A is for Alcohol, how fun it is to
drink; the next day is rough, as you
yak in the sink. All your friends do it
and so should you. Get used to
downtown, and the local jail, too. In
high school you parried, drank and
hung out with the sweeties; get ready
man - at ECU we pour Jim Beam in
our Wheaties.
B is for Bachelor, the only way to
be in college, you don't need a nag-
ging girlfriend as you try to gain
knowledge. Living with three dudes,
partying every night; your bathroom's
nasty, in the kitchen the roaches
fight. Playing poker, smoking cigars,
making pyramids with beer cans; sure
beats being dragged to Target to shop
for pillow shams.
C is the grade for which you
should strive, A's are for nerds with no
social lives. B's show you're average;
who needs such a crutch, C's are just
right, not too little, not too much. D's
and F's will make you retake the
class, and C's will keep the dean from
tossing you on your ass.
D is for Disorderly conduct, down-
town 3:00 a.m - you'll soon see puking
dmnks screaming "Officer, she started
it, not me Be nice to the bouncers
and don't give them any lip, or they
will turn you upside down and ride you
like a pogo stick. Ieave when you're
told to, keep a smiley face; if not you
get a shiner and lungs full of mace.
E is for Energy, of which you will
have none. Between drinking dnigs
and partying, 8:00 a.m. classes are not
fun. You will always be sleepy, tired
and cranky; professors know this so
they keep pop quizzes handy. So
down go your grades, your morale and
your zest, you're not the only one, so
sleep in like the rest.
F is for Freedom, in college you do as
you please; no more sneaking out your
window at a quarter to three. No more
parents yelling, driving you insane. Just
remember: they're the ones paying for
diis educational gravy train.
G is for Girls, at ECU they look
beautiful, but they're here to team,
that's why they came to school. But
young college girls are fickle; they are
particular. You need a tat wallet and
say nice things to her. Girls want a nice
guy, or so they say, but' they always
date the jerk in the Porsche Cabriolet.
II is for Hangover, your head's
gonna explode, I don't feel sorry, you
chose the 18-credit course load. Just
one more shot, then you've got to
study. It's a shame you chose an alco-
holic as a frisbee golf buddy.
I is for Initiation, pledging the Iraq
are you really sure you wanna go
through all that? Fraternities are
great, a heck of a lot of fun. Show you
can drink like an Irish poet and you're
sure to get in one. Hazing can be
rough, so don't let your guard be poor;
prepare to be stapled naked, upside-
down on a sorority's front door.
J is for Judgment, of which you
will have none. You chose to study in
the library instead of drinking and
having fun. You chose to study for the
test - on the night before, then you
cry foul at the teacher for your
abysmal score. "It's unfair you
scream, "That teacher is a schmuck
Try reading the right chapter next
time, stupid, you'll have better luck.
K is for Kayaking done through
the Rec Center. You can pay a big fee
to go through the rapids like a
blender. The Rec Center is great, lots
of tilings to do, from playing racquet-
ball to jumping in step aerobics like a
psychotic kangaroo.What better way
to blow off steam from failing your
test, by dunking on your homies and
showing off to the rest.
I. is for Library, filled with knowl-
edge, prose and information, only you
choose to avoid such boring irritation.
You'll ignore all the science and liter-
ature greats, over your head will be
Shelley, Poe and Yeats. But English
literature is fun; it beats laying bricks,
and more fun to hang in coffee shops
with all the hippiebeatnik chicks.
M is for Mooning and other fun to
have in cars, not much else to do after
leaving the bars. College pranks are
the very staple of a good time; crazy-
gluing dorm rooms shut - simply
divine. Here's one to do to your
most hated fellow: fill his toilet tank
with cherry red Jell-O.
N is for Nietzsche, and all the
philosopher saps, if you ever take this
course, get ready for long naps.
Existentialism and logic at its best.
These teachers are nuts, and you
need your rest
O is for Offal, the sludge that
Aramark serves proudly. Overpriced
and tasteless, not much of a choice,
though, sadly, meatballs that are more
ball than meat. Soup like slime; I'm
convinced that Aramark is involved in
organized crime. Only gangsters
would torture us with such inedible
disease. Drop your declining balance
card�let's go to Wendy's!
P is for Pirates, our great football
team, support 'em well, it's gonna be a
good year, many tickets will sell. New
stadium seating, 8,000 more seats to
cheer, better conference games com-
ing every year. You'll leam to totally
hate NC: State, and how to sneak a
pint of Jack Daniels past the gate.
Q is for Questiops, of which Vou
will ask your professors none, sitting
in the back sleeping until class is
done. What a waste of time are these
early morning lectures; long-winded
professors and their ridiculous conjec-
tures. Just to get a diploma, a useless
proof of your acquired knowledge. I
know it's stupid, but hey, so is college.
R is for Road trips; all college kids
should explore. Take a few friends
and go visit lands of yore. (Only two
words for Greenville: snooze and
snore.) See all the sights and small
towns to discover; most of the ban in
New Bern have no cover. It beats sit-
ting all weekend in the dorms on the
hill. You really got to get out of this
crappy town of Greenville.
S is for Sex, that most notorious sin.
College is where most people begin.
DonY fear losing your sacred virginity;
your not a fool. Most of the guys are
lying they didn't get any in high school.
T is for Truant, to class you will
always be late. You stumble into class
with a half-asleep gait. Some anal
retentive teachers actually take role.
It makes them feel powerful, like
they're in control. Their large egos
you must leam to deflate. Get you
friends to steal his her car - tomorrow
prof will be late.
U is for Uproar, that great all-
American college bash. Beer flowing
like water, 200 people; your house is
trashed. Musk playing at mach three,
people passed out on the lawn; (he
toilet's broken, there's a keg in the
tub, all your food's gone. One can't
hold his liquor; he rulphed all over (he
floor. That's the least of your worries:
the cops just kicked in your door.
V is for Vomit, that vegetable stew-
looking spew. This verse is really a
continuation of U. The party's nor
over until the last person's left. Six
empty kegs to the store you must heft.
But your party's a success; you're the
talk of the school, $600 in damages. It's
worth it, the chicks think you're cool.
W is for Washing clothes, a thor-
oughgoing bore. How you will hate
this never ending chore. Laundromat
owners gouge us students like loan
sharks: expensive-ass washers, bro-
ken dryers shooting sparks. They're
all over this city, even in the dorms
are these places. Let's get back at
these crooks: into the dryers throw a
couple of pizza slices.
X is for Xenophobe, in college you
cannot be. Many people go here, lots of
nationalities. College is a big melting
pot; where many ideas reside. Be
open-minded, see everyone's side.
DonY be racist, biased or think that guy
is queer. He may become a great col-
lege friend, smile and hand him a beer.
Y is for year, as in four more to go,
Have fun, party, and study, take it slow.
Don Y be so serious, see the forest for the
trees, Grades are not everything; college
is really a breeze. Your real education
will happen here. But remember, the
real world is what you must fear, (that
and having no money for beer!)
Z is for Z end of this rhyming poet-
ry; this awful literary atrocity. This was
fun to write, I must admit, I hope you
got a smile out of it Much of this was
truth, but most was idiocy. I hope you
have fun at East Carolina University






13 Tueidiy, Augu
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13Tue�diy, Auguit 17. 1899
TbtEMtCarsfiniM
The malting of a
ILLENNIUM
- Attempts were made for
the first time to abolish
the corset.
- Prohibition, or the
illegalization of all
alcohol, began.
- Charles Lindbergh flew the
first solo flight across the
Atlantic in the "Spirit of
St. Louis
:�;�� Toni Morrison (Chloe
Wofford) was born in
Lorain, Ohio. She is the
author of many American
novels such as "Sula"
and "Beloved
I'M
- John Phillip Sousa died in
Reading, Pa. The March
King wrote "Semper
Fidelis" and "Stars and
Stripes Forever
� 3 - Maya Angelou, future poet
laureate of the United States,
is born in St. Louis, Mo.
)() Great Depression begins
with stock market crash,
l , - Prohibition ended.
iy v-1 � Sigmund Freud, the psycho-
logist who gave us the id,
the ego, the superego end
anal retentiveness. died in
London, England.
iw j.j - Bikini Island came under
the administration of the
US Navy.
11)45 � Nagasaki was destroyed by
an American bomb attack.
i
u)i;o- Coca Cola patented their
signature bottle design.
Party of the Century
Camels, champagne,
pyramids for charity
Susan Wright
features editor
The "Party of the Century" has been
in the works for the past twenty years. For
anyone looking for a way to bring the New
Year's in with a bang, this is it.
Three hours before the beginning of
the new millennium, the black tie charity
event begins. It is called the World
Millennium Charity Ball, and it is held
beneath the shadow of the Pyramids. The
guests will ride on camels across the
desert dunes to a bluff that overlooks all
three of the great Pyramids. The
Egyptian government is planning a little
something special for all who attend, an
event similar to the ball drop in New York
City. The Great Pyramid of Cheops is
missing its peak, and the Ministry of
Culture is going to recap it in gold and
reveal it at the stroke of midnight.
At dawn, there will be a sunrise
champagne breakfast and hot air bal
loon rides across the desert.
This trip is not just a one
day affair; it is intended to be a five-day,
four-night affair. Events like open-air
street festivals in Ramadan, excursions to
the Pyramids and the Egyptian Museum
and a trip to El Fishawi's coffee house,
which has been serving coffee for the last
200 years, are all part of this first class
vacation. If one had the money and want-
ed to go all out, he or she could even sail
at sunset on a Felouka, an ancient
Egyptian broadsail boat.
Some think that all of this advanced
planning and extravagance in a time of cri-
sis is wasteful. "The Millennium Society
is planning for a New Year's Eve that is a
little way off. With global crises and a
growing hole in the ozone layer threaten-
ing civilization as we know it, this, then, is
a society for the consummate optimist
said "The Washington Post" on
December 31, 1986.
If that is the case, there are many
"consummate optimists"
with no lack of spending money in this
world. The reservations have been sell-
ing since the society began planning for
the big event several years ago, and
these reservations are almost gone.
The tickets sell for between $3000
and $1999 per person. The
amount of lush and lavish treat-
ment that is desired deter-
mines the price. For a mil-
lennium celebration that will
never be forgotten, look into
the celebration in Egypt. It
promises to be a unique and
memorable evening.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF JOYNER LIBRARY
SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
What students are
going to be doing
at 12:01 a.m. on
January 1,2000?
"I haven't even thought
about it Kristen Harkey,
Senior
Til be at home Yumeka
Demery, Junior
1 will not be watching Dick
Clark Christine English,
Junior
"I'll be partying hard and
hoping that nothing bad
happens Anna Marshall,
Sophomore
"I'll be in church Danny
Wunker, Sophomore
Mission Impossible: Jubilee 2000
Contributions
pay off debts
A
Susan Wright
features editor
According to Hebrew and
Christian customs, the year 2000 is
meant to be a year of Jubilee. The
Jubilee tradition dates back to the
Old Testament in the Bible. Jubilee
was meant to be celebrated every 50
years, and it was a time of happiness
because it was the year of universal
pardon. Every household should be
reunited, all land should be returned
to the original family that owned it,
the Hebrew slaves should be set free
and all debts should be forgiven.
"And you shall consecrate the
fiftieth year, and proclaim liberty
throughout the land to all its inhabi-
tants. It shall be a Jubilee for you,
and each of you shall return to his
possession, and each of you shall
return to his family Leviticus 25:10.
Throughout the centuries, the
Church has celebrated Jubilee with
pilgrimages and prayers. In 1450,
there was a terrible accident among
the crowds of pil-
grims, and nearly
200 people were
trampled to
death in a panic
on the bridge of
Sant' Angelo.
The enthusiasm
for this year of cel-
ebration and for-
giveness, as well
as the numbers of
people who cele-
brate, is great
among Christians
and Jews.
The Catholic
Church, to cele-
brate the year of
charity " has
issued a call to
give the poor a chance said Frank
Morock of the Raleigh Diocese.
"Evangelization has become a top
priority of the diocese. Here in
North Carolina, Bishop Gossman
has eliminated debt from ten of the
poorest church communities
Many other churches and denomi-
nations have donated their time and
money cause of the
poor for the year of
Jubilee as well.
Other organizations
that are not affiliated
with any religious
organization are con-
tributing to the aid
for the poor in the
year 2000.
For the Jubilee
year 2000, a London
based charity is coor-
dinating an effort to
pay off unpayable
debts of the poorest
countries in the world.
A debt is considered
unpayable if it will
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
never be paid eco-
nomically or the
only way that it can be paid is in tak-
ing away money from important social
aids like health care and sanitation.
All of the donations are voluntary
contributions.
Over 50 countries in the world
arc in the debt crisis that Jubilee
2000 is fighting to cure. In Zambia,
every citizen owes the country's cred-
itors more than twice the annual
income. "21 million children's lives
could be saved if the money used for
debt service was put.into health and
education said the United Nations
Development Program.
"Why, as we approach the year
2000, do our children still go hungry,
drink dirty water and lack basic health
and education provisions?" said Julius
Nyerere, former president of
Tanzania in a recent letter to coalition
members Tools for Self Reliance. "Is
human development a possibility
when so much of Africa's wealth is
channeled into debt servicing?"
Jubilee 2000 is an attempt by
common people to liberate peoples
that are too deep in debt to live in
freedom and good health. They
believe that the beginning of the
millennium should be a true year of
Jubilee, and all those whose debt
cannot be paid any other way should
receive assistance from those who
can give it.
t tjf; - President John F. Kennedy
died from an assassin's bullet
on November 22 in Texas.
U)H � The Beatles arrive in America.
)( Gulf of Tonkin incident used
as the reason to begin US
involvement in Vietnam war.
;o Pablo Picasso died in
Mougins, France. He was
the artist who first
experimented with Cubism.
uy ,j - Nixon resigned from the
office of the President of
the United States on August 9.
KeiCOME Rack!
Dear Editor,
What is college about anyway?
Is it just about hitting the books
and taking exams? No. I believe
that when people go away to col-
lege they expect to take with them
experiences - academic as well as
social. These will have an impact
on them forever in many cases.
They may even help them in
future experiences when it comes
to getting a job or just interacting
with people. As we head into the
millennium, the new and improved
Student Union realizes what a stu-
dent at ECU expects and thrives
for. We combine entertainment
with education and great social
experiences. We strive for diversi-
ty, teamwork, organization, creativ-
ity and enthusiasm in our organiza-
tion, and we are working towards a
more professional and well-known
image.
Every student at ECU is part of
the Student Union, but not every-
one is a member. In order to be a
member, one needs to get involved
and contribute to the organization.
The Student Union is an organiza-
tion that surpasses many due to the
fact that any student who wishes
may actually have a say in what
types of programs are brought to
ECU. This is a student-run organi-
zation that demands a lot from its
members. After all, with the
money that is put into the hands of
the students in order to program
their events, one must be very
responsible and have the drive and
determination to serve the student
body well as a whole. As an organi-
zation on campus, we are by far one
of the largest and most exciting that
you can participate in. Accepting
the challenge of becoming a
Student Union member is the most
significant way for a student to have
a lasting impact on this university. I
simply cannot find any fault in trav-
eling, networking, meeting new
people, gaining leadership skills
and, most importantly, being a part
of something as defining as the
Student Union!
Thank you,
Dennis Norton
Student Union President
Melodies heal the sick
Music Therapy
program flourishing
Nancy Wheeler
staff writer
Have you ever noticed the effect
music can have on you?
Listening to classical music can calm
you down whereas something
upbeat can cheer you up. The
effects of music have been used to
treat medical patients for years - it is
know in the professional world as
music therapy.
According to the American Music
Therapy Association, music therapy
is "an established health service
similar to occupational therapy and
physical therapy. It consists of using
music thcrapeutically to address
physical, psychological, cognitive
and or social functioning for
patients of all ages
Even in patients
who have been resis-
tant to other treat-
ments, music therapy
has been proven
effective in improving
the patient's condition
and increasing his or
her ability to benefit
from other therapies.
Music therapists work
in public and private
schools, rehabilitation
hospitals, substance
abuse treatment cen-
ters, psychiatric hospi-
tals and private prac-
tices.
Brad Willams plays a tuna on his trombone.
PHOTO SY WILLIAM KEITH
Music therapy is
available in North Carolina at only
three universities: Queens College,
a private school in Charlotte, ECU
and recendy at Appalachian State
University in Boone, NC. The ECU
School of Music has been offering
music therapy as a major for over
thirty years. It was one of the pio-
neering programs of music therapy

as an accredited profession.
Currendy there are approximate-
ly 45 students enrolled in the music
therapy program at ECU. To
obtain a Bachelor of Music in
Music Therapy, one must com-
plete course work in the following:
SEETHWWV.PAGEU





14 Tuttdiy, August 17, 1989
.��lVii Minium ��������� i I
features
The Eatt Carolinian
NASA trainer turned professor
James Batten
instructed astronauts
Brian Frizzelle
staff wk1tek
Few people have seen or done as
much in their lifetime as Dr. James
Batten. He served in the Navy
before becoming a chemistry pro-
fessor at UNC Wilmington. He
then took a position as a staff mem-
ber at the Morehead planetarium in
Chapel Hill. In 1957 when the
space program began to take off,
NASA began to visit planetariums
across the country to decide which
would be the best to train the new
astronauts.
"I decided we wanted to write
the proposal to NASA and ask
them to let us train the astronauts at
Morehead (Planetarium) Batten
said. "When they looked over the
planetarium at Chapel Hill and the
plans that we had, they thought we
were the best
The contract to teach the astro-
nauts was given to Morehead. Dr.
Batten was chosen to train astro-
nauts in the first space program.
"The program was the Mercury
program, and there were seven
selected astronauts and one alter-
nate said Batten. These eight
men were divided into three teams.
They became Mercury, Gemini
and Apollo, and Batten trained all
three.
"We only allowed two astro-
nauts to travel together in case
there was an accident Batten said.
"So my classes were composed of
two students for three to four hours
at a time. I told them, 'If I teach
"Af a result of the space pro-
gram, we have instant commu-
nication around the world
Dr. James Batten
professor. ECU
you these ideas and you go into
space, you are to either confirm or
deny what we've done
One of Batten's ideas was to
establish highways in the heavens
using star constellations as road
signs. This was important so that
the astronauts could find their way
around once they were in orbit.
"We decided that it would be
better to travel between 30 degrees
North latitude and 30 South lati-
tude so as they traveled around the
earth, they would be able to see the
poles and everything else said
Batten. "So we established high-
ways.
"There are 88 constellations,
and I required that they learned all
88 to use as road signs
One outgrowth of the space pro-
gram was the need for better com-
munication. NASA put three satel-
lites in orbit around the earth.
These satellites took information
from one part of the world and
transmitted it to another.
"As a result of the space pro-
gram, we have instant communica-
tion around the world Batten
said.
Dr. Batten came to ECU as a
doctor of research in I960, and he
officially retired in 1986.
"I came right back to work the
next day Batten said. "I have an
office, and until this spring I still
taught one class. I still work for the
university.
Dr. Batten has many accom-
plishments under his belt, and he is
still going strong.
Therapy
continued from page 15
music, music therapy, psychology,
anthropology, sociology, biology,
behavioral sciences, and (of course)
general education. Here at ECU,
music therapy students must com-
plete four supervised field
practicum placements which allow
students to gain experience with
children and adults in different
areas, such as developmental dis-
abilities, substance abuse, special
education and rehabilitation. Music
therapy majors must also study
music in major and minor applied
areas such as piano, voice and gui-
tar, though it is not limited to those
three options. ECU offers a Master
of Music in Music Therapy as well,
which includes advanced study in
clinical techniques, research and
supervision.
The Director of Music Therapy
at ECU is Dr. Barbara Memory,
who is assisted by Dr. Michelle
Hairston. For more information
about music therapy at ECU, you
can contact Dr. Memory at 212
Fletcher Music Center or by calling
328-6343.
Welcome Baekl
Computing. ft Information Syat.m. i. committed to providing next generation computing �V�� ?�
f.cuhy. staff and student, of East Carolina University. We have compiled a list of important web re ourcet e.i.st you
this wm.ster. Please contact u. at 328-6868 if you have any questions or comments concerning mformat.on technology.
The University Help Desk is the centrel point of contort for all East Ceroline University IT support calls.
Please contact us at 328-6866. fax 328-0358, e-mail toH�lBntlhSffllil.�y,eilw � �n,er a iaWn M" on ,he weD'
httn:www.�ri�duciiservice�.html.
IfurSnfuiiid. email system is Microsoft Exchange. This system can be accessed with a variety of email client, and via
the web System information and tutorials on using Exchange ere available online. To access this informet.on. go to the
ECU home page .thttnwww.ecu.edu and click on the E-MAILPHONE link.
All faculty, staff, and students ere allocated space on the personal web server
Please visit the following link for specific information regarding access. htlnYmww ecu,fluWV8H�V
t'SudenTSsklop is?webl?o?dicated to student services such as course registration, course availability, grades.
exam schedules, end transfer information. htln;wwYUtudtnl,�Cy,�llU
S.?e5pl'o2LysSLfunded labs on campus. The softwere used campus-wide is Microsoft Office. N.�c.pa.
Exchange end Norton Anti-Virus. Visit this web site for specific leb locations. l)HiriVwv.Vi ftfitl.eduttclab
CIS Web She
Provides a central location for all information technology
web resources at East Carolina UniversityhH87WWW,m,eutii
FAQs
h�D:www,�Eii nducisfao
Software Downloads
hltn:www, ff" uriiidnwnload
List of ISPs
httn-www.iiTAn�.inminn.cnmwwwISPs,htnil
Internet Software Links
ttttp:mv.tmuilnn.icii.adui;nnntetinnrnot inftwifi linkl.ltlm
Help Guides
hitn:www,f.m iducissoftwire doca.html
Events of Interest
Technology Exposition is scheduled lor
October 28th. "Faculty demonstrate
how they use technology in instruction
Technology Showcase (Vendor Fair) is
scheduled for April 11th. "Vendors
demonstrate the latest technology
Frisk
:
comes to
M I C MAI. I,
JWant to meet ne
walk in the wood
adventure? Peril;
!oiu ECU'S disk
Charles Street
'near the base bal
S The previous
sis frisbee golf.
because in the
iham-o's frisbe
a
thing that you co
fast without killi
Jest. Now, there
Sing disk" maker
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�no
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TH E.ll Cir.11.1
features
Turin ftmtt IT Itlff fff
Identified Flying Objects
Frisbee Golf
comes to campus
MlCMAKI. KDWAKDS
STAiF ��ITK�
?Want to meet new people? Like to
Jwalk in the woods? Have a sense of
�adventure? Perhaps you should try
jjout ECU's disk golf course off of
Charles Street past the stadium,
near the base ball field.
i The previous name for this sport
fcs frisbee golf. This is probably
tbecause in the very beginning,
tWham-o's frisbees were the only
thing that you could throw hard and
fast without killing the neighbor's
Jcat. Now, there are dozens of "fly-
ting disk" makers. Here in our fair
city, there are several places you
can find "official" disks, or you can
use those floppy ones you have in
the trunk of your car. However, to
enter a tournament or to play by the
"rules you will need a new one
which will only set you back about
seven to ten bucks. The good news
is that you don't have a greens fee
and you don't need a cart.
It's hard to believe that the
Frisbee was invented 25 years ago
The modem-day identified flying
object was invented and patented
by a gentleman by the name of Ed
Headrick. The patent was later sold
to Wham-o, those wonderful peo-
ple who produced the hula-hoop.
Today, are millions of Frisbees out
there and dozens of look-alikes.
Years after throwing Frisbees at
trees, trash cans, people, squirrels
and telephone poles, formal disk
golf came about. The simple game
of "throw the disk at a target" has
evolved pretty much the same way
as life itself. Now, there is skill, the-
ory, practice, frustration, cursing
and a bit of luck involved. The
modern-day version began, many
believe, in 1975 in Pasadena
California. Nevertheless, the
Professional Disc Golf Association
was formed in the same year.
Today, "there are almost 800 Disc
Golf Courses in the United States
with over 2,000,000 players said
Mr. Headrick on his web page.
Believe it or not, the Worlds
Championship is held in Charlotte,
NC with a purse of over$51,000-so
put away those basketballs
Lewis Hoffmann, who helped
design the course back in 1986,
helps to put on tournaments each
Thursday evening and has disks for
sale. His ECU web page gives you
directions, a course map and a hint
of the variation of the holes. "(It's)
mostly a tight, wooded course,
making excellent use of available
space. Some open holes and two
nice boomers said Hoffman. The
best part is that you can play on the
ECU 18 hole course for free. "I'd
suggest new players get to the
course before noon said Lewis.
"You can get involved in several
ways, through the ECU intramural
program, the tournaments or on
your own
Bring a disk and a friend and
enjoy, however alcohol consump-
tion and littering arc grounds for
immediate termination of golfing
privileges. You'll have a great time
in the great outdoors and get some
exercise to boot!
TvfPPfr thp PpojtIp
� Name: Erin Warner
� Year: Junior
� Major: Ehglish
� Hometown :Havelock, NC
� Quote: All things ace
possible to him v4r believes
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Free Pregnancy Tests
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Welcome Baa-aa-

Move over to fcp
reener pastures mf jg
dSffi f�
e Green!
We'rejiot pulling
the wool over
your eyes about
our roomy
1, 2 A 3 bedroom
your back-to-school guide
to parking at ECU
ecu
"TOpid shuttle
Eostbrook A Village Green
204 Eastbrook Drive
fSrcenville, NC 27858
1 (252)752-5100
basics!
� All students, staff, and
faculty who park on campus
are required to display a
valid parking permit on their
vehicles.
� All areas not specifically
designated for parking
should be considered "no
parking" zones.
� Handicap parking spaces are
for authorized handicapped
persons only.
� Lack of a convenient space is
not considered a valid
excuse for violation of a
parking regulation.
� Activated flashers on an
illegally parked vehicle do
not exempt the vehicle from
receiving a parking violation
citation.
� Vehicles are not permitted to
wait in travel lanes, behind
parked vehicles, or along
curbsides in order to pick up
individuals from class.
Rapid Shuttle Service runs between the
Athletic Complex, Christenbury Gym, and
Joyner Library from 7:00 a.m. until 6:00 p.m
Monday through Friday. ECU Transit provides
bus service throughtout Greenville. Contact
them at 328-4724 for details.
g ��w
all!
Want to avoid the on-campus parking crunch?
Take advantage of the parking options avail-
able off main campus!
� Lot located at the north side of Dowdy-
Ficklen Stadium.
� Gravel Lots located on 14th Street across
from Belk Hall.
� Gravel lot on 9th Street, across from
Hardees.
� Lot west of Reade Street, between 3rd
and 4th Streets.
� Combined ResidentCommuter lot south
of Belk Hall.
All of these lots are designated "University
Registered - No F Decals Athletic Complex
lots are served by ECU Transit's Rapid Shuttle.
Shuttle stops are located at Christenbury Gym
and joyner Library.
no
cJ6sdsd news!
Think you may have outstanding fines or hold
tags on your record? Use the student
desktop to check. Keep in mind, however,
that only those options that apply to you wiH
show up on the desktop. So, if an option isn't
visible to you, you probably don't have any-
thing to worry about. If you have questions,
contact the Parking and Transportation
Services Office at 328-6294.
BB
Parking and Transportation Services
305 E. Tenth Street
252-328-6294
CA1UUWA .
vNinam www.ecu.eduparking

i
g0l





16 TmmI�v. A�Mt 17. 1998
features
Thi East Carolinian
Thi East Carolinian-
Screaming
from camera tricks
Scan lost to
modern technology
Sis an W mi; in
HiATI �KS KrMTOH
"The Haunting newly released
this summer, was a festival of lights
and computer graphics, but some
of the horror of the original picture
was lost
In the first movie version of
"The Haunting most of the
scares in the movie were caused by
the imagination. Your mind led
you around corners that weren't
meant to be explored and into
shadows that were created by the
lurking dead. You were the one
who determined how horrific the
monsters were and how many chil-
dren died. In the recent version of
the movie, nothing was left to the
imagination; computer graphics
filled in any questions that the
viewers might have. It was the dif-
ference between playing with a
stuffed doll and one that walks,
talks and wets her diaper. The
company has already done all of the
playing for you.
"The Haunting" set was mag-
nificent. The house that was filled
with angry and fearful spirits was a
beautiful mansion. The massive
griffins and lions hewed from stone
give the house a sense of forebod-
ing from the beginning. Every
character adds to the mood of the
movie. A sexual voyeur who wears
only designer clothes, a woman
held captive by her ailing mother's
health and a frightened young man
all come together under the pre-
tense of finding a cure for their
insomnia. In reality, it is a test of
fear.
The three insomniacs certainly
get their fill of fear as well as the
misleading psychologist who
believed that this experiment was
ethical and safe. Although it is a
horror movie, there is very little
death and gory violence. I enjoyed
sitting through a movie that didn't
turn my stomach repetitively.
"The Haunting" ends peacefully
because of a surprising twist of fate.
It is not the scariest movie ever
made, nor is it the scariest version
of the story, but it was worth watch-
ing. If you are in the mood for an
interesting movie that has lots of
creative images, beautiful sets and
interesting characters, "The
Haunting" is a good movie to
choose.
aNOTCH
above the
jtyDRM
Professor Interview
Dr. Scott Lucce
Marie DiBuduo
Staff writer
ECH's newest fluvilgeomor-
phologist (a specialist in the
study of land formations) is Dr.
Scott Lucce, and he is very
happy here.
"I like it a lot here said
Lucce. "The department is
young and active. Most geogra-
phy departments have only one,
or maybe two, physical geogra-
phers. We have three such peo-
ple here
Lucce said that the number of
physical geographers gives him
more peer interaction. "It's nice
being around people that share
one's same interests said
Lucce.
This is his first year at ECU.
Here, Lucce teaches a class
about weather and climate in
addition to a class about soils.
Lucce's specialization is in the
seasonally of floods and when
the floods occur. He is currently
working on a project for the
National Science Foundation
examining mine contamination
in river sediment The research
for the project is concentrated in
the "driftless area" in southwest
Wisconsin. The "driftless area"
Name
Dr. Scott
Lucce
Department
Geology
was bypassed by the glaciers of
the Ice Age.
Previously, he taught fluvial
and hydraulic processesthe
study of surface water hydrology
and river processes) at the
University of Southern
Mississippi.
Dr. Lucce took the time to
explain that the sun shines more
directly in the South than the
North, and therefore it is hotter
in the South. Factors such as
barometric pressure (the weight
of the gases in the air) and tem-
perature inversions (when a
warm layer of air is on top of a
cooler layer), influence the
prevalence of pollutants in the
air. Because temperature inver-
sions hold pollutants down, peo-
ple in big cities feel the effects of
smog and other atmospheric pol-
lution more in hot weather than
during the cooler periods of the
year.
"If you want to breathe clean
air, you need to go to a less pop-
ulated area said Lucce.
The study of the atmosphere
is intriguing , especially in our
globally changing weather pat-
tern that we are experiencing
currently. One's understanding
of global warming, including my
own, would be enhanced by tak-
ing Dr. Lucce's class.
Get Piorced;
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TNf Ent Carolinian
features
Uutiy. AMt 17. UN 17
Ipm
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71 years of good eating
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
1-252-758-6909
�TM DC Come O l�W
LONDON (AP) - TV cook
Jennifer Paterson, one of the Two
Fat Ladies" who joyfully salted
their recipes with political incor-
rectness, died Tuesday.
She was 71.
Miss Paterson had been diag-
nosed with lung cancer and died in
London's Chelsea and
Westminster Hospital, the British
Broadcasting Corp. said.
Trying to savor life right to the
end, she was more interested in
fine food than the traditional gifts
for hospital patients.
"She didn't see the point of
flowers. She'd rather have caviar
friend and co-star Clarissa Dickson
Wright said Tuesday. "She was
totally larger than life and a con-
stant source of fun
Miss Paterson fell ill in July dur-
ing filming of "Two Fat Ladies a
cooking show where the colorful
chefs were the main course.
Perfectly happy to be fat, the
women toured the country on Miss
Paterson's old Triumph motorcy-
WHEN IT COMES TO HEADING BACK TO SCHOOL
WE'VE
YOU COVERED FROM HEAD TO TOE�
And v�e may even threw in FREE textbooks!
V
R
mrld
vrs
il

IS
views
4 Pack 1 Sub. Notebooks Reg. $4.99 � $3.49
1 subj. Stasher Notebook Reg. $1.79. "Jjte $139
3 subj. Double Pocket Notebook Reg. $239 �S5ak$2.19
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10 Pk. Ballpoint Pens Reg. $2.00 RUbifc�14�
RUSSale 10 OFF All Jansport� Backpacks
RUSH5ale 25 OFF All Reg. Price APPAREL (including hats)
STORE HOURS
RUSH SALE PRICES VAUD AUGUST IS � 11,1999
pm
Tuesday, Aug. 17
7:30 am - 5:00 pm
Wed Aug. 18
7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Thursday, Aug. 19
7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Friday, Aug. 20
7:30 am - 8:00 pm
Sat, Aug. 21
9:00 am - 3:00 pm
ENTER to WIN
a variety of PRIZES!
Drawings Held
all WEEK!
3 p.m. DRAWING
' for FREE Fall
Textbooks
3 p.m. DRAWING
' for FREE Fall
Textbooks
3 p.m. DRAWING
' for FREE Fall
y Textbooks
3 p.m. DRAWING
' for FREE Pepsi
Cooler wdrinks!
Ronald E. Dowdy
Student Stores
Where Your Dollars Support Schoiarsl
Wright Building � 328-6731 � www.studentstoret.ecu.edu
FREE
Cluebook
Year Planners
While Supplies Last
POSTER SALE
August 15 - 20
Sunday: 130 pm - 500 pm
Monday - Friday: 900 am - 5:00 pm
Under the Tent � Student Plaza
� Entry forms available NOW at Dowdy Student Store. Winners names will bedrawn at 3 pmon
Auqust 18 19 and 20,1999. for FREE required textbooks for classes In which 'nrang stu-
dent is enrolled for fall 1999 semester at ECU.No purchase necessary "�"
student, please. Prize does not include software, reference books, or study g1
has already purchased textbooks from Dowdy Student Stores a refund to'��"��
books purchased will be given. If books have been purchasee�!�J��2l2
return books to other retailer, and accept free required textbooks from Dowdy Student Store.
clc. She in the driving seat and
Miss Dickson Wright, in Red
Baron-style helmet, squeezed into
the sidecar.
They went from one cooking
job to the next, chortling and trad-
ing wry quips about food, love and
life and happily loading their food
with butter and cream.
"Jennifer was a life force on the
side of all things that were political-
ly incorrect said BBC broadcast
chief executive Will Wyatt "She
came to television all too late, but
she left some wonderful programs
behind, which we will be enjoying
for years to come
Miss Dickson Wright once
called the program "a cookery
show with anarchy and a motor-
bike
Sadly, there will no longer be
the lard-flinging, beef-eating fat
ladies cooking show airng on televi-
sion. Luckily, (here is always
McDonald's, so there will be no
shortage of fat and cholesterol in
the American diet
Mongolian
House
Scorr Wii.kins
STACK ItTM
If you are looking for a unique din-
ing experience in the Emerald
City, look for the Mongolian
House on Greenville Boulevard.
The Mongolian House has a
distinct atmosphere that adds to
the meal. The atmosphere is
pleasing, relaxing and authentic
This restaurant is similar to a
Japanese steak house, except the
fear of being hit in the head with
something that a chef throws is
gone. While the setting is nice, the
food is even better.
The Mongolian House is set up
as a buffet. You can order from a
traditional menu, similar to the
ones that you would find at any
other Chinese restaurant, but most
go for the Mongolian barbecue
buffet
When beginning your feast you
head to the end of the counter and
pick up a bowl or two. Looking at
the buffet you will notice that all
of the food is uncooked. Don't let
this bother you, there will be a
remedy for the rawness at the end
of the bar. Start selecting what you
want to eat For the vegetable
lover, an array of fresh vegetables
such as carrots, zucchini, mush-
rooms, onions, bean sprouts,
pineapples, tomatoes, cabbage and
green peppers await The meat
follows the vegetables. At lunch,
beef, turkey, chicken and pork are
served. At dinner, you have the
lunch selection with the additions
of shrimp, veal and crab meat
After you have put all the food that
you could possibly want into your
bowl, the sauces are the finishing
touch. The "Chefs Selection" is
one spoonful of each of the twelve
sauces for proper taste. If you do
not prefer spicy food, or it does not
prefer you, pick and choose your
sauces carefully. After you are
done choosing you meat vegeta-
bles and sauces, you then hand
your bowl(s) to the chef behind the
counter. Right before your eyes,
he cooks the food on an open cir-
cular grill. Usually the food takes
about two minutes to cook the food
, all the way through.
When you return to your table,
the waitress or waiter will have
brought your beverage, rice and
soup. Sesame bread is also served,
and it is excellent for dipping in
soup. All together, the taste is
fresh, robust and satisfying.
The Mongolian House is �
unique and enjoyable dining expe-
rience that will have you craving
more and ready to go again soon.
.
mi





18 Tm�4iv. Adjust 17, 1999
reatures
The E�st Carolinian
Wr
Butter Sculptor
looking for replacement
Th� Elll Carolinian
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) -
Usually, finding a subject for the
state fair's butter sculpture wasn't a
problem for Dan Ross.
The dairy artist would just pick
something timely, such as John
Glenn's return to space last year,
then shut himself inside a 50-
degrec cooler at the fairgrounds
with a stool, a wooden stick and
hundreds of pounds of donated
butter.
After a month of work, his
sculpted creation went on display
as part of the state fain life-size
replicas of famous people, often
Ohio heroes.
This year has a bit of twist. The
sculpture unveiled on Thursday
not only was his last after 36 years,
it's also a self-portrait.
"We wouldn't do this for other
butter sculptors, but he's given us
36 years said Jenny Wilson,
spokeswoman for the American
Dairy Association, which sponsors
the sculptures. "It's a tribute to
him
Using pictures of himself taken
by his wife, Susan Gardner, Ross
started heaping butter on a steel
frame and molded a life-size repli-
ca of himself sitting on a stool,
sculpting the butter calf, a fixture
of the annual display. '
"It looks just like him Wilson
said.
Well, not exactly. Ross wears
glasses. The sculpture doesn't.
"It's too hard to sculpt glasses
SEE BUTTERBOY. PAGE 19
BIRKENSTOCK
LOVERS:
BRING YOUR FEET AND
YOUR QUESTIONS.
PARTY
MAKERS
Welcome Back ECU
� Party Supplies
� Party Decorations
� ECU Party Decorations
� Helium 'Tents 'Tables � Chairs
� Balloons � Flowers � Costumes
ONE STOP PARTY STORE
422 E. ARLINGTON BLVD.
7568606
Arizona
Meet Birkenstock specialist, Parker
who will be here to show you our latest styles.
You'll also learn how to care for your Birkenstocks,
and how Birkenstocks care for your feet.
BIRKENSTOCK
GERMAN ENGINEERING FOR YOUR FEET
Trunk Show
August 21,1999
10 a.m4 p.m.
Outpost Trail Shop � 530 Cotanche St. � Greenville
(Inside Bicycle Post Downtown)
757-0713 � 10-6 pm, Mon-Sat.
SAVE ON FOOTWEAR
Overtoil's
PRESENT THIS COUPON AND
on ahy out mi on
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One coupon per customer. Discount good on In-stock merchandise only.
Sorry - no special orders. At Greenville Store Only.
unnstia99
� Phone 252-355-5783
� Open 9am - 9pm
� Monday Thru Saturday
� 111 Red Banks Rd
Greenville, N.C. 27834
tn0
10X
fi
tci
Check out the
Homecoming link
@ ivuHv.sga.edt4.ecu
'�f CaraUft�
W
the ovcxCXO
trie v
Move to Tar JLtver In September and take
advantage of a
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We promise you'll never have to feel like your
trapped In a sardine can again.
1999
"Piloted, Butiuqiutj, inia tUe Millennium"
Application deadline:
FridaySept 17,1999
5pm in Room 109
Mendenhall Student Center
Float
Banner
Skit
S zi4ZlmSt5 (5-
Greenvtlle.NC27858
(252) 752-4225
Visit us online:
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keyword "apartmentsplus"
KingQueen
Candidate

Rosie tl
Sage Hnnihan, Chair
ECUSGA Homecoming Committee
MendenhaU Student Center Room 222
Greenville, NC27858
252.328.2519
252.328.2305Fax
wwwjga.ea4.edn






linlan
Th� Em Carolinian
features
i
only.
55-5783
�9pm
Saturday
iks Rd
C.27834
NEWMAN
ATHOLIC STUDENT CENTER
FOOI
(,KI ENVILI E, C
757-1991
Welcome Students!
� Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
Mass Schedule: :TrealtheCenter
We look forward to seeing you!
lor more information about programs sponsored by the Newman Center,
call or visit the center daily between 8:30am and 9pm.
1 r. Paul Vaeth, Chaplain and Campus Ministei
ugh fun;
this fall!
ree pass to
3ur trails with
Dike purchase!
a
:
"2T B(CYWC
.
Outpost Trail Shop
530 Cotanche St.
Greenville
(Inside Bicycle Post Downtown)
757-0713
10-6 pm, Mon-Sat.
Unity. August 17, 1999 19
Butterboy
cominued Irom page IB
hessiid.
Also on display are the butter
cow and smaller versions of his past
favorites, including golfer Jack
Nicklaus and villain Darth Vader.
The sculptures were made from
1,000 pounds of butter and took
about 150 hours to complete - one
of the reason Ross said he's calling
it quits.
This year, as usual, the butter
will be thrown out after the fair.
Although in 1988, David
Letternian took a statue of former
zoo director Jack Hanna to New
York and let it melt on his late-
night talk show stage.
"My body tells me I probably
shouldn't do a lot more of this
because it's very heavy work and a
lot of gymnastics are involved in
getting under and around things
said Ross, 64, who grew up in
Worthington but has worked as an
artist in Santa Fe, N.M since
1991. "I feel kind of sad to be walk-
ing away from it, but that's OK
because I have other things to do
Several artists have contacted
the dairy association about replac-
ing Ross, but the search for a suc-
cessor isn't officially on, Wilson
said.
"We are going to take our time,
but there will certainly be another
display she said.
Ross started working at the fair,
in 1964, when he was teaching art,
at the Ohio School for the Deaf. He
almost passed on the job, unsure
whether he wanted to spend sum
mers buttering things up.
"They took a chance on me
he said. "I told them at the time I
had no idea if I could do it because
I had never actually done any work
this size.
"And I had never worked in
butter
Ross is a bit baffled at the over-
whelming interest in his work.
About a half-million people are
expected to walk through the dairy
building to see this year's spread
before the fair ends Aug. 22.
"Many people have told me that
this is one of the main reasons they
come to the fair and this is the first
place they go he said. "It's kind
of staggering
Furniture Sales
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Furniture hair �???"�
is Hiring!
Warehouse Technician
� Part time- 29 hrs. a week
� Apply in person - ask for Dot
South West � Greenville Boulevard � 758-8093
id
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10 OFF anything with college ID
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1102 Carolina East Mall
�Greenville, NC 27834
um
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FOR THE ART PRINT & POSTER SALE!

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Rosie the Riveter
COLLEGE
s m
Hokusai's Wave

y ,�
ST
Wisdom of Yoda
Belushi
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GROOVY
?tccsn
Tuesday-Friday, August 17-20
Outside the
Wright Building Bookstore
9am-5pm
MasterCard, Visa,
Van Gogh's Night Cafe
v 4 �
Bob Mariey
8a a t Pirate Points Accepted mybytesfcom
mejH � it's my Web.
The Kiss-Hotel DeVHte





Tlit Eist Cirollnii
m
t A 1 T
CAKOLINA
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
ecPrograrm
iAfufw.pecserv.ecu.edu lnfo3EB-B3ox
ADVENTURE PROGRAMS OOOOO
Kayaking
Cape Lookout
Tar River
r urn
rVHs HOflBrB
Day Hikes
Rock Climbing
Advanced Climbing Beeeione 1
White Water Kayaking
Quick Start Kayak Instruction
Surfing
Intro to Surfing
SCUBA
Try Bouba
Quick Start Scuba
� Sept. 4-8 � R�- f �!� 25, Spa
� Sapt. 1,22 � Rap. ay Aap. 25, Spa
� Sapt. 8 � Rep. by Sapt. 1, Spa.
� Mug. 27-28 � Rag. by Aug. 23; Spa
� Sapt. 12 � Rag. by Sept. 1, Spa
� Sapt. 7 - Bet. 12 Tuesdays � Rep. by Aug. 31
� Sept. 18-11 � Rag. by Sapt. 1,5pm
� Aug. 38, Oct. 11 � Rep. by Aap. 23
� Aapaat 31 � Rap. by Aap. 24
I � Sapt. 7 - 38 � Rap. by August 24
FITNESS PROGRAMS OOOOO
KINGSOUEENOFTHEHAUJB
AUGUSTSB:1!
4pm to 6pm
College Hill
The ma
1919- Black So
baseball.
White Sc
baseball
parts in 1
World Se
1921-
1927-
Exercise Wisely for Faculty and Staff
Aqua Fitness for Faculty and Staff Beaaion
Freshmen Focus
Triple Threat
Beginner Yoga Session I
Advanced Beginner Yoga Beaaion I
Tai Chi Beaaion I
Adult Beginner Swim
Free Group Fitness Cli
��
I
T-IM-T Energy Explosions "Spiked Movi
� Aap. IB - Bet. 8 MWF 12:10pm - 12:50pm � Ba Sale Now
- Aap. 16 - Oct. 8 M-TH 5:30pm � 8:38pm � Ba Sale Maw
- Wednesday, Sapt. 1 7:00pm - 8:86pa � SRC Classroom
- Sept. 1 - Bet. 15 � On year own � Rep. Sept. 1 -18 at fitness desk
� Sept. 8 - Bet. 13 Wednesdays 4:00pm � 5:15pm � Rap. Aap. 23 - Sapt. 3
� Aap. 7 - Sapt. 12 Tuesdays 5:30 - 6:45pm � Rep. Aug. 23 - Sept. 3
� Sept. 7 - Bet. 14 TTh 12:05pm - 12:58pm � Rep. Begins Aap. 23
� Sapt. 14 - Bet. 7 TTh 7.00pm - 8:00pm � Rep- Sept. 1 � IB
� Aap. 16 - 21 aad Bac. 6 -17
� Aep. 23 - Bet. 8 � Rep. begins Aap 18
� Thursday, Aap. 18 from 5:30pm - 6:30pm
INTRAMURAL SPORTS OOOOO
inn
24 Flag Football Officiate mtg.
30 Flag FootballFB Preview Reg. mtg.
SEPTEMBER
1 Volleyball Officiate mtg.
7 ECUNFL Football Pick'Em entries
7 VolleyballPreview CM.W.CRl Rag. mtg.
ARISE OOOOO
Wheelchair Basketball
WheelPower Dance Troupe
Aqua-exercise and swimming
Climbing Wall Workshop
Sea Kayak and Canoe Trip on Tar River
9pm SRC 202
5pm MSC 244 Intramural Sports Captain's Cert.
9pm SRC 202
10am SRC 129
5pm MSC multi-purpose
� Practice: 11am - 12:30pm Sat. Aap. 28
� Practice Sea 3 - 5pm Aap. 28
6:30 - 7:30pm Sept. 13,28,27 � Rep. Bay of eveet
Wednesday Sept. 1 7 - 9pm
� Sat Bet. 218am - 4pm � Rep. by Tbars Sapt. 3B
EXTREME POOL PARTY-AQUA MOVIE
.Prizes
In a Bottle" Movli
Friday, Aupust 28, 7:06 pa - Outdoor Peel
Friday, Repeat 28, MB pm - Outdoer Peel
Adventure Programs � ARISE Program � aub Sports � Rtnese Programs � Intramural
August 17-19 � Student Recreation Center � Free Aerobics, Information, Prize.
1932-
1936-
1940
1941-
1947-
1958
1961
Babe Rut
runs in a
Ruth and
Yankees
victory. 1
consider!
greatest
history.
ECU Foot
Pirates g
season.
Jesse Ov
gold met
Olympic;
Germany
Under He
Christen
team go
its first 1
Joe DiM
consent
William!
with a .�
average,
Jackie F
color ba
African
Major b
I
"TheGn
Played"
betweei
York Gia
Colts. Tl
Overtim
Roger IV
Ruth's r
home n
belting I
Clay km
Liston a
Heavyw
Champii
change;
Muham
?1
PI
1967- TheGre
the Firs
1969- The "Am
World �
guarant
Namatl;
Jets sti
Bowl III
1972- Eleven I
Israeli (
assassii
terrorisi
Olympic
1974- Hank A;
home n
Ruth's 1
homen
finish h
homers
1980- The US
defeats
route tc
the Lak
Thefea
Miracle
PHOTOS COijRTfSY





Till Eltt Carolinian
Twrtty. Am�t117.1Hl21,
s
The making of a
MILLENNIUM
1919- Slack Sox Scandal rocks
baseball. Eight Chicago
White Sox banned from
baseball for life for their
parts in throwing the 1919
World Series.
�l
1921-
1927-
M
1932-
1936-
1940
1941
1947
Babe Ruth hits 60 home
runs in a single season.
Ruth and Gherig lead
Yankees to a World Series
victory. The team is
considered the
greatest team in baseball
history.
ECU Football Begins.
Pirates go 0-5 in first
season.
Jesse Owens wins four
gold medals in the
Olympics held in Nazi
Germany.
Under Head Coach John
Christenbury, ECU's football
team goes 5-3 and posts
its first winning season.
Joe DiMaggio hits in 56
consecutive games, and Ted
Williams ends the season
with a .406 batting
average.
Jackie Robinson breaks the
color barrier and is the first
African-American to play in
Major League Baseball.
1958- "The Greatest Game Ever
Played" took place
between the NFL's New
York Giants and Baltimore
Colts. The Colts win
Overtime.
1961- Roger Maris breaks Babe
Ruth's record for most
home runs in a season by
belting 61 homers. Cassius
Clay knocks out Sonny
Liston and wins the
Heavyweight
Championship, then
changes his name to
Muhammad Ali.
)I
PI
e
1967- The Green Bay Packers win
the First Super Bowl.
1969- The "Amazin' Mats" win the
World Series and after
guaranteeing victory, Joe
Namath and the New York
Jets stun the Colts in Super
Bowl III.
1972- Eleven Members of the
Israeli Olympic Team are
assassinated by Palestinian
terrorists at the Munich
Olympics.
1974- Hank Aaron hits his 715th
home run, breaking Babe
Ruth's record for career
home runs. Aaron would
finish his career with 755
homers.
1980 The U.S. Hockey team
defeats the Soviet Team en
route to the Gold Medal in
the Lake Placid Olympics.
The feat was dubbed "The
Miracle on Ice
PHOTOS COORTW Of Tiff WOBIO WIOE Wtt
sports
Century of Athletic Growth
Improvements coming
in the millennium
I'KTKK DAWVOT
spouts KOITON
The start of a new school year is
always a hectic time for the athlet-
ics department, but this year, with
the preparations for all the events
surrounding the millennium, ath-
letes and coaches alike have been
working overtime.
Numerous developments have
occurred in the ECU athletics
department and ECU sports.
Perhaps one of the most surprising
events at the start of ECU's athlet-

ic career was the original mascot.
Long before ECU has Pee Dee
the Pirate, ECU was known as
The Teachers.
The ECU Teachers was named
in part because the university was
mostly a teaching school. The
name simply did not evoke much
fear in rival schools. Shortly there-
after, the school found the Pirate
to be the most suitable name for
the university's mascots.
After years of changing nd
developing, the school found
themselves winning games, espe-
cially in football. Shortly there-
after, ECU and N.C.State started
up a rivalry. To this day, it still is'
one of the most anticipated games
of any season at ECU.
Pirates' fans have witnessed
some memorable moments against
State, such as the 1992 Peach
Bowl when ECU came back from
a 21 point deficit to rally and win
the game in the final quarter.
Others have credited the uni-
versity's hard work and dedication
to its athletes. Former ECU play-
ers such as Jeff Blake, currently
the quarterback for the Cincinnati
Bangles, have often said that the
program at ECU helped propel
him to the next level.
Statistic have shown that many
professional teams are aware of the
caliber of the players that come
from ECU. At least one ECU
player has been selected in 19 of
the last 11 NFL football drafts,
including an all-time ECU high of
eight in 1984. In the 1990's, 17
players have been selected.
"ECU moved from playing at
the small college level to a
national level. The develop-
ment of athletic programs
improved scholarships, athlet-
ic facilities and recruiting
Henry VanSant
Associate Athletic Oirecior
While the university may con-
tinue to work towards improving
athletic teams, others within the
athletic department are working
hard to develop other improve-
ments towards the school's depart-
ments. Recent renovations and
additions to Dowdy-Ficklen
Stadium -have dramatically
improved the capacity seating as
well as the comfort of the
spectators. With the addi-
tion of the new score-
board, fans will be able
to see instant replays of
the game immediate-
ly-
The Associate
Athletic Director,
Henry VanSant,
said he has
seen many
changes in the
past 30 years
that he has been
with the
University. He
remembers the
original stadium
which had a capacity
seating of 5,000.
Football games were
hosted there and other
athletic events up
until 1963. The
stadium at the
time was
located
PHOTOS COURTESY OF J0YNER LIBRARY SPECIAL COLLECTIONS
where Brewster.the Croaun,
Austin Building and Rivers
Building now stand.
With smaller stadiums and ath-
letic programs, ECU played at the
small college level in the Carolina
Conference against schools such
as Guilford College, Appalachian,
Newbury College and
Presbyterian College.
"ECU moved from playing at
the small college level to a nation-
al level VanSant said. "The
development of athletic programs
improved scholarships, athletic
facilities and recruiting.
"The athletic program contin-
ues to grow with what is going on
now with the expansion of the sta-
dium, a new score board and
resurfacing the track
Other areas of the athletics pro-
gram have also been gearing up for
the millennium. Athletics direc-
tors and developers have been
' preparing for the groundbreaking
of the new $10.6 million Strength
and Conditioning Center in the
fall which should be completed
roughly 18 month from the pro-
jected starting date. The ground-
breaking ceremony for the center
will be during the Nov. 20th N.G
State game.
VanSant thinks that these reno-
vations are simply part of ECU
growing up process.
"The whole structure of the
athletic department has changed
VanSant said.
"There has been a tremendous
amount of growth here even in the
last ten years
Before, the school was called
East Carolina College, but it
reached university status in the
late 1960s. At that time, women's
athletics was at a loss. ECU only
had one women's sport; synchro-
nized swimming. Today, ECU has
multiple athletic sports for not just
women but even co-ed club
sports. These are popular among
students throughout the campus.
"The sports program kind of
kept pace with the whole universi-
ty VanSant said.
"I think it (ECU's athletic pro-
gram) will continue to expand and
improve.
"With the rise in enrollment,
there has been a growth in the
alumni base and fan support and
growth of eastern North Carolina
and even Greenville has explod-
ed
With such growth comes more
money that will help fund bigger
and better projects as ECU moves
into the 21st century.
Pirates gear up for the upcoming season
Season starts with
ESPN televised game
STKVK 1) I l)SO
s I l I HI li: K
With a new defensive coordinator,
a new scoreboard, a refurbished
stadium and a demanding sched-
ule, the ECU Pirates are geared
up for the 1999 football season.
ECU supporters will experi-
ence an exciting and memorable
season in 1999 with their team
competing against an extremely
challenging schedule. The season
opener is slated for September 4
against West Virginia "and that's
all we're focusing on right now
said head coach Steve Logan.
The game will be played in
Charlotte's Ericsson Stadium,
home of the Carolina Panthers.
The schedule also includes tough
games against Miami and Tulane,
who finished undefeated last sea-
son.
"Playing West Virginia in
Charlotte will be an exciting game
with a bowl-like atmosphere said
Norm Reily, ECU Sports
Information Director.
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium
underwent a facelift during the off-
season, and a new scoreboard will
be in place for ECU's home open-
er against Duke on September
Pirates listen intently to drills.
PHOTO BY BILL KEITH
11th. It will feature a huge video
display showing instant replays,
commercials and game informa-
tion, so fans will have plenty to
cheer about this fall as the Pirates
take to the gridiron.
With the addition of coordinator
Tim Rose, the Pirates look to
improve a defense that ranked
65th in'the nation in 1998 out of
112 Division l-A schools in total
yards allowed.
Anchoring the defense will be
Jeff Kerr, a senior linebacker, who,
despite being hampered with
injuries, was the team's leading
tackier (115) and an All-
Conference USA First Team selec-
tion last season. Alongside Kerr
will be Parnell Griffin, a Football
News' All-Freshman Team pick
last year. Griffin was second on the
team in tackles with 99.
"Our new defensive style with
four linebackers and one or two
coming on a blitz should be very
effective Logan said. "Fans will
be able to see the work of Tim
Rose and the difference immedi-
SEE SMS0M . PAGE 23
Coach Steve Logan looks towards the season's crop of players.
. FILE PHOTO �





22 TW�t. ��" �� 1999
?ports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Soccer program changing
Clubs offer various recreational activities
Players to get
new coaches
Madison University from 1988 to
1990.
While at Wesleyan,
Donnenwirth led the team to the
lK i kk Dwvvoi
scorns kimtoh
ECU soccer fans will notice sur-
prising changes to the soccer pro-
gram next season.
Perhaps the biggest change is
that women's soccer coach Neil
Roberts resigned in order to take
over the women's soccer program
at UNC Charlotte. Roberts will be
replaced by Rob Donnenwirth who
has steered the helm of Wesleyan
College's soccer program for five
years.
Donnenwirth is preparing for
the upcoming start of the season
with very little time to get the team
in order. Practices begin August
11th, even sooner than
Donnenwirth's former Wesleyan
College which begins on the 20th
of August.
Before Wesleyan, Donnenwirth
an assistant coach for the University
of Massachusetts as well as James
Sean Hawley slips past a defender.
FILE PHOTO
NCAA Division 111 Final Four in
1994 and made other tournament
appearances in 1996 and 1997.
Donnenwirth leaves the college
with a record of 62-26-9 and a
strong team.
That's not the only change
towards the coaching positions for
ECU's soccer program. The men's
head soccer coach, Devin O'Neill,
has hired Mike Benn, an assistant
coach at Lehigh university in
Pennsylvania, to take over the job
as assistant coach for the men's pro-
gram.
While at Lehigh, Benn was
responsible for managing, recruit-
ing and conditioning in addition to
game-day coaching and prepara-
tions. Benn was also responsible for
daily practice sessions and the
team's academic affairs, in the 1998
season with the help of Benn,
Lehigh finished die season with a
record of 13-5-1 advancing to the
championship game of the Patriot
League Tournament. ,
"We are very excited to have
Mike Benn coming to ECU
O'Neill said. "He is a coach with a
great energy who is an excellent
recruiter and a quality on the field
coach. He will help our program in
SEE SOCCER . PAGE 24
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All the stylists are from local salons in the area.
VVe reserved the best seat in the house for you at the
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WVre open from 8 a.m. - 9 p.m. Monday through Saturday
and from 16 p.m. each Sunday.
(Jive us a try You'll love your whole new look!
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Rec Center hosts
many athletic activities
Si SANS. Mll.KNKKVICII
SKNIIII WHITKI
Clubs and organizations are an
important part of student life �t
ECU. They offer many different
ways to become involved and meet
new people at ECU through per-
sonal interests and talents.
"joining a club when I first came
to ECU helped me to meet people
with a similar interest in swimming
as well as help make my transition
from being at home to coming to
college easier said Michelle
Neptun, Swim Club President.
Recreational Services will spon-
sor 20 club sports this semester that
will involve practices and competi-
SEE ACTIVITIES . PAGE 27
M Ent Cirolinlin
I
Outdoor lun plsying ri�bee goH.
PHOTO BY Bill KEITH
You Players Club
A -WESLEY
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1ST CAROLINIAN
trisbee golf.

in
)AY!
m

IVILLE
it East Cirolinim
spoils
Tatrtiy, ��!�� 17,1�H 23
-WESLEY
. hookups, I
K ECU but -
lie.
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amons south: 1or 2 bedrooms, 1 bath,
irator. free watersewer, washerdryer
i faftllitl�. S hlnelM from eampua.
�LANQSW4 PARK: �pincb HMefl �Doms, 1
bath, Ifege, rjAlgfitttor, d�asher, free
waterseMr, a Mr ox 900 sq. ft washerdryer
hookups! JProatfj6 blockajpm campus.
OtherApartmenta Also Available
, - Properties have 24 hr. emergency maintenance-
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i
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Apmfaiwnts & Mrtol Houses
108-A Brownies Drive
758-1921
Season
continued Irani page 21
ately. I'm very excited about it
The defensive line, which lost
Three starters from last year's squad,
will have to step up and fill the
voids left by All-American
Roderick Coleman and Travis
Darden, who both are in NFL
camps this fall . Mainstay Norris
McCleary and the only other
defensive lineman with starting
experience. Marc Yellock, will be
up front The other three starters
coming out of spring practices are
Kevin Ward, Kwabena Green and
Tomha McMillian.
"It was one of the best springs
we ever had Logan said.
The defensive backfield returns
starting cornerbacks Forrest Foster
and Kevin Monroe, another All-
Conference USA' selection last
The Episcopal Church
Welcomes You!
St. Pauls Episcopal Church
Join us on Wednesday nights at 5:30 for a service of
Holy Eucharist followed by a free meal and conversation.
For more information call Charles Dupree, campus minister @ 752-3482.
Other service times:
Sundays @ 8am and 10:15 am
� Located at 401E. 4th Street
Go one block over from 5th Street (on Holly St.) in front of Garrett Hall, St. Paul's is on the right.
WILSON ACRES APARTMENTS
752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, NC 27858-0772
We Charge No Application Fee.
Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for 2 Bedrooms,
& $400 Security Deposit for 3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom Townhouses � 1 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets Ok With Fee
5 BLOCKS FROM ECU WITH
' BUS SERVICE AVAILABLE
year. Chris Satcerfield will likely
start at strong safety with converted
receiver Travis Mayck at free safe-
ty Redshirt freshman Antwan
Adams is quite capable of filling in
at either safety position.
ECU has an outstanding crop of
freshmen recruits arriving this fall
that could make an early impact on
the defensive side of the ball.
Defensive backs Kelly Hardy,
Travis Heath and Kevin Jackson
are speedsters that will challenge
for positions. The signing of line-
men Damane Duckett, 6-6 280,
and Brian Fox, 6-3 260, give the
Pirates added depth up front
Leading the offense will be
quarterback David Garrard, a
Conference USA All-Freshmen
team selection who finished the
season strong throwing for a school
record 414 yards against Memphis.
"We weren't shuffling our quar-
terbacks around this spring prac-
tice Logan said. "Garrard will be
our starting quarterback
Ciarrard's poise and leadership
are essential if ECU is to have suc-
cess on offense this year. Joining
Garrard in the backfield will be
Jamie Wilson and Marcellus Harris,
both returning starters from last
year. Wilson finished the 1998 cam-
paign as Pirate's leading rusher with
,687 yards. Redshirt freshman
Christshawn Gilliam, sophomore
Leonard Henry and Junior college
transfer Keith Stokes will see plen-
ty of time in the backfield as well.
Lamont Chappell will return at
flanker while Arnie Powell will start
at split end. Delayo Dodd and
Aaron Harris will start at tight end,
replacing Buck Collins, who signed
a free agent contract with the
Green Bay Packers.
Samien Jones and Sherwin
Lacewell will again be on the right
side of the offensive line. With the
loss of All-Conference USA center
Danny Moore, center Anthony
Nobles will have some big shoes to
fill. Senior Derrick gamble and
sophomore Aaron Walker will start
on the left side, being pushed hard
by Chris Nelson and Phoenix
Evans.
On the special team, the Pirates
will rely on senior Andrew Bayes to
handle the punting duties. Bayes is
a two time All-Conference USA
member. Walk-on Kevin Miller had
a great spring and finished as the
top place kicker. He is expected to
be challenged by incoming fresh-
man Bryce Hamilton who kicked a
54- yard field goal in high school,
showing both power and accuracy.
With those changes in style and
in lineup positions, the Pirates will
try to finish with a wining record
again this year.
TRY OUTS
1999-2000
CHEERLEADER &
MASCOT TRYOUTS
PRACTICE: August 19 4:30-6:30 PM
August 20 4:30-6:30 PM
August 21 10:00-12:00 PM
PLACE: Grassy area between Dowdy
Ficklen Stadium and Scales Field House
TRYOUTS: Sunday, August 22,12:00 PM
Minges Coliseum
FOR MORE INFORMATION CONTACT
COACH CORBETT AT 328-4510






sports
24 ttttfcn, towtt 0.1IM
Development of Athletic Wellness Center to start
, , working towards vastly improving
GrOUnd making Set the athletic program.
"The new facilities will enhance
for N.C. StateganU recruiting and training for all
teams said Henry VanSant,
Associate Athletic Director.
The facility will hopefully bring
about miraculous changes in the
way people look at ECU's program.
Not only will the center give ath-
letes a much more advanced train-
ing atmosphere, but it should also
include many of the the latesNech-
niques for athletes to maximize
their potential.
This creation, along with many
others which have started this sum-
mer, all have been financed
THE EAST CAHOUHIAM
Jim "Catfish" Hunter conscious after head injury.
ivii!
I'KTK H.XWVOT
wbtrn kuitix
Without the help of some of the
most advanced training facilities of
other colleges, many athletes may
have never achieved their athletic
goals. Fortunately, ECU has recog-
nized this.
With the decision to build the
$10.6 million Strength and
Conditioning Center, many feel
that their school may actually be
GREENVILLE, N.G (AP) - Jim the Hall of Famer fell down con- majors 15 years and �"ft-T
"Catfish" Hunter was conscious cretc steps at his home and hit his World Senes nngs. remained i
and responding to doctors' com- head
mands Wednesday, three days after Hunter. 53, who pitched in the �E CAWHH �W m. 7�
project expected to colt S10.6
f HE PHOTO
SEE FACILITY . PAGE V
Soccer
continued lion page 22
a number of ways, and we feel
excited to bring a coach of such
high quality to the program
O'Niell believes that with this
addition, ECU is getting an aggres-
sive hard worker that could greatly
improve the level of play.
"1 am very confident in Mike,
he is well spoken and tactical in
knowledge. He has great coaching
experience in recruiting O'Neill
said.
The women's soccer team may
currently be without a coach, but
they certainly are not without tal-
ent this year. New prospects such
as Charity McClure and Brooke
Crews, a freshman goal keeper
from Pope High School in
Marrietta, Georgia, are among the
many talented new hopefuls for the
program.
McClure an Ashevillo, NC
native who will be transferring to
ECU after playing two seasons at
the University of Pittsburgh.
McClure was Pittsburgh's leading
scorer as a freshman, and the sec-
ond leading scorer in her sopho-
more year. She has also been hon-
ored as Big East player during the
1998 season when Pittsburgh fin-
ished 8-11 overall and 5-7 in the
Big East
In earlier interviews with Neil
Roberts, he spoke of how excited
the program was to get this type of
player.
"We arc certainly excited to
have Charity coming to East
Carolina Roberts said. "We
recruited her while she was in high
school, and wc arc very pleased
with her decision to return home to
North Carolina. She has done a
great job in a quality league like the
Big East She will greatly benefit
the team by already being a sea-
soned veteran when she arrives on
campus in August
O'Neill said he believes that
with the new additions to the uni-
versity, athletics may find a
stronger team than in previous
years.
"I am optimistic about the
upcoming season; I think we made
real progress this spring and got a
lot accomplished O'Neill said. "
Hopefully we will be looking at a
winning season, but we have to
work hard with such a challenging
conference
Crystal Connection
J Jeveby S Gifts
� New Tapestries
� Hemp
� Celtic jewelry
� Intricate Wooden
Boxes
� Paper Lanterns
New Clothes
Nag Champa Incense
� Men's Sterling
Rings
� Tarot cards
�Runes
422 E. Arlington Blvd - (behind the Animal House)
Hours: Mon-Sat 11-6PM � 355-5250
PHI SIGMA PI
Co-ed National Honor Fraternity
Do you want to get more involved at ECU and
your community? Do you enjoy spending time
with your friends and also strive to excel in school?
OII1 may be for you!
Come see what we are all about!
August 31 at 6:00 p.m. in GC 1032
Attire is informal: dressslacks, coat and tie.
Requirement for membership is a minimum GPA of 3.3
and 32-96 semester hours
If you are unable to attend or need more information, call Emily at 757-1407
FREE
a.
Aimo
PARKING
For the Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is
reserving 6 parking spaces for
you. Visit the 10th Street location
and fill out an entry form for a
chance to win one of our Primo
Parking Spaces for a semester.
&itt
((w(ti
The spaces aie within
of the Recreation Center, Joyner Library,
Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins Art
Building and Student Health Department
and with Coke providing a Kiosk vending
stand beside the spaces, beverages will be
quick and easy to get on your way to class.

No purchase necessary to win.
Winner will be notified by phone.
Spaces are good August 18th through December 8th.
Pirates Cove
APARTMENTS
VaJ
$100 off
Deposit
(all
Today
one: 752-9995
But With Parents In
Mind!
Limited access.
�Monitored alarm
systems in each unit
with panic buttons in
each bedroom.
Well lighted grounds
and parking lots.
�Free roommate
matching.
?Individual leases.
�Every bedroom is a
master suite.
�Fully furnished.
�On ECU Bus Route.
Surprisingly
Affordable at
$375 per room
(includes utilities)
Now Pre-leasing
for August 1999
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
there is Still Limited Availability!
Designed and Built For Students
�Computer center equipped with the latest
software, hardware, printers & internet access.
�Equipped Fitness Center.
�Clubhouse wbig screen TV
�Swimming Pool WLarge Deck.
�Washer and Dryer in each unit.
�Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
�Kitchens featuring microwave, dishwasher,
self-cleaning oven disposal,
refrigeratorice maker
�FREE Cable television includes HBO
�Two phone jacks in all bedrooms
�Plus Basketball, Tennis & Sand Volleyball!

:�
�:
1

You can have it all in the Fall!
�����������������
3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
THE EAST CABOl
HA'
WE
WC
ECU ST
SCI
SPEI
$14!
W�
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AST CAROLINIAN
injury;
1
1 earned five)j
remained itjli
ER . PAGE 26
0
I
n

e
Utilities
w While
latest
let access. S
1
rile floors.
washer,
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
sports
Tiirtav, A��n IT, 1tt 25
VIA'
on 10th
e just past
5th Street
to 10th,
ire.
I � i
Apartments
� Quiet Neighborhood
�1 Bedroom $300
�2 Bedroom $360
� WasherDryer Hookups
�Ceiling Fan
�Free WaterSewer
� Small Pet with fee
�Near Malls & restaurants
�furnished unit for
corporate leasing available
�Office on site
3216 Brasswood Court l
Phone 252-355-4499 � Fax 252-355-1554
brauwoodgKenvilltnccom
3493C South Evans Street
Bedford Commons, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
WELCOME TO THE
WORLD OF SCUBA
ECU STUDENT
SCUBA
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$149.97
Student SCUBA Package
MASKS, FINS, SNURKtl. BOOTS, GLOVES.
BAG PIUS iRtl OIVI IICINSI I'I Aft
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BLUE REGION SCUBA
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Greenville, NC
321-2670
Q
ny�" Masterpieces
&f Pdf-ry Stmtt,
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Behind Bowen Cleaners
Off Charles Blvd.
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Closed Monday Qy
Tues A Wed I0-? � Thurs ft Fri I0-9
SaMO-6 � Son I-6 O
Debbie O'Neal. Owner 0
i$C�CQ
Aloha Students!
Jn77Tr777T7777n77777pf777mf fr f(f 'r(?
� it
IIIHI�,lriffllfP'lll�'�1�IHMyiniWni�IW
New Life Christian Fellowship
� Thursday, August 19th
Large Group Meeting
7pm GCB 1010
� Friday, August 20th
Aloha BashCookout
(more details at Thursday night's meeting or call 752-2100)
A great place to make friends and study the Bible!
WEEK '99
Join us
and get a head start on a rewarding career.
Healthcare is a growing and
exciting career field. As a
volunteer, you can get a head
start by learning job skills and
gaining experience while you
help people in need. With
more than 100 volunteer areas
to choose from, there's sure to
be a position that fits your
interests. Call Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Volunteer
Services at 816-4491 today.
You'll be glad you did.
www.uhsaast.com
Top athletes heading to
Greenville for a new millennium
Many coaches happy
with recruitment
I'K.WK IlKSDKICKS
XIITKI
ECU athletics has had a big recruit-
ing year, not only in numbers but
also in the talent of the athletes.
The football team has nearly 30
new recruits, and the swim teams
have almost 20. Among these
incoming freshmen are some high-
ly-touted athletes.
Kelly Hardy, a defensive back
from Kinston High school, is one of
this years' Pirate Freshmen. Hardy
is ranked a top twenty football
prospect in N.C and was heavily
recruited by not only ECU, but
Penn State as well as many other
colleges. Head football coach Steve
Logan wanted Hardy for his raw
speed. Hardy was the NC State 3-A
track champion in the 100-meter
dash in 1996 and will likely be one
of the only starting freshmen for the
team.
The ECU swim team also
scored big for the upcoming season.
The Men's swim team is bringing
in three Junior National Qualifiers,
Pat Bonds, Casey Charles and Chris
Miller. The women have signed
YMCA national finalist Leslie
Baronklin, along with a pair of
Junior National Qualifiers; Aryn
Letterman and Abbey Stallworth.
"We are extremely happy with
the athletes we are bringing in this
fall said Rick Kobe, head swim-
ming coach.
Kobe is not the only ECU head
coach who is happy with his recruit-
ing class. Though first year basket-
ball coach Bill Herrion only needed
one recruit, he managed to attract a
formidably talented underclass-
man. Travis Holcomb-Faye, a 6'1"
SEE RECRUITS . RAGE 27
�����������


it

SILVER
BULLET
Volls
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. 'AToucftCfCtasS"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. m j-15 CO7ft
TUESDAY
lingerie Night
WEDNESDAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
FR1&SAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancer
������




A.


Women's Distance Runners Needed
Womens X-country & Distance
Teams needs waltons. Be part
of an ECU varsity team. Sign with k.
Coach Klepxh at Scales Field (fegft jT
f
house or call 328-4605 for
more Information.
GREENVILLE AUTO REPAIR INC.
All types of Auto & Truck Repair . Major & Minor Repairs
Foreign & Domestic im , . . �
- Manual Transmissions
- Brakes, Tires & Batteries
- Free Towing with Major Repair
- Clutches
- Tune-ups
-10 off with college ID
830-6131 � 627 S. Clarke � Greenville
f Sweet Dreams
Video & Book Store
Large selection of videos, magazines and novelties.
300 SW Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27858
V
(252) 321-4050
IMwrtty HmWi Srm t MS wth Et Or. l���� Sdiool of Mrfdn
Take a look around at
the people next to you
Now for $35 you can do
what they probably have not.
FLY!
Call 757-1841.





29 Tantay, Aagirtt IT. MM
sports
THE EAST CABOUNIAN
Catfish Hunter
cmimihhI Iram p��� M
critical condition in Pitt County
Memorial Hospital's intensive care
unit, hooked to a ventilator.
Doctors said Hunter, diagnosed
last year with amyotrophic lateral
sclerosis a gradual, irreversible
deterioration of the muscles suf-
fered brain bruising. He likely will
require rehabilitation because he
Pirate Fans
Wanted
Student Pirates has
shortag of members
already was weakened by ALS.
"But it would be premature to
even think about that said Dr.
Paul Cunningham, a trauma physi-
cian and professor of surgery at the
East Carolina University School of
Medicine.
"His prognosis is still somewhat
guarded. We're being hopeful as we
can be, but we're taking things one
day at a time said Cunningham.
He said no surgery was planned.
Hospital spokesman Doug Boyd
said Hunter regained consciousness
Wednesday after being uncon-
scious much of Tuesday. He began
responding to commands "wiggle
your toes and that sort of thing
said Boyd.
Hunters wife Helen and other
relatives, gathered in the hospital
ICU, declined to talk to the media.
"The family is very private right
now Boyd said.
Hunter left Hertford id play for
the Kansas City Athletics inl5
and moved with the club to
Oakland in 1968. He became the
first multimillionaire baseball play-
er when he signed with the
Yankees in 1974. Beginning in
1971, Hunter strung together five
straight, 20-victory seasons and won
the Cy Young Award in 1974. He
retired from the Yankees in
1979 and returned to Hertford
A diabetic who required thrice-
daily insulin injections, Hunter
announced last fall he had ALS,
also known as Lou Gehrig's disease,
a neurological disease that inter-
feres with signals the brain sends to
muscles, causing the muscles to
degenerate over time. There is no
cure.
ALS has robbed Hunter of use
of his right arm and diminished his
upper-body strength.
Hunter's minister, the Rev.
Keith Vaughan of The Hertford
Baptist Church, said Wednesday
that churchgoers pray usually for
the sick at their regular Wednesday
night prayer
services. "And he will be right at
the top ofthe list tonight Vaughan
Stkpiikn Scmramm
spouts iuitoi
For many ECU students and
alumni, ECU football and basket-
ball arc a source of school pride.
The Pirate Club is an organiza-
tion, through which alumni can
show their pride and support for
Pirate athletics. The Student
Pirate Club is a branch of the
Pirate Club whose members are
ECU students. The Student
Pirate Club is a new organization
whose purpose and effectiveness
have raised questions.
For $25, an ECU student can
join the Pirate Club. Student
Pirate Club members get a Pirate
Club decal, 20 issues ofthe Pirate
Club newsletter and access to cer-
tain Pirate Club social events.
Student Pirate Club members
also receive all of their free stu-
dent guest tickets before the sea-
son begins.
"They are regular student
tickets and they are first come,
first serve said Mark Wharton,
Assistant Pirate Club Director.
The club is an arm of the
Pirate Club and works with the
club in many community events.
"We try to help the Pirate
Club run things better. In the
past, we have helped with the
Ronald McDonald House and
the University Book Exchange
Wharton said.
So far, the ECU student body
has not been as receptive to the
idea of a Student Pirate Club as
the Pirate Club would like.
Membership in the club has been
CHILD'S
PLAY.
Buildmg your crritdran's future just got
eosier, monks to At U.S. Treosury's
new EosySavef Plan for U.S. Saving
Bonds. Sign up once and autonMtxoRy
purchase U.S. Savings lands from your
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B Q SOT" OHu 6Q5y "wy Iw Mm MHi
omy raising kids
SmMmJmOiBmr
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said.
He said people in Hertford, a
tight-knit community in northeast?
ern North Carolina, are concerned-
about Hunter's condition.
"People have been calling here
(the church) all day long he said
"The main thing is people are
doing exacdy what Helen asked
and are praying for Jimmy n
Mrs. Hunter issued a statement
Wednesday expressing gratitude for!
the solicitude of Hunter's friends
and fans. ��. m
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E EAST CAROLI
Pirat
PITTSBUR
Garcia and Tun
played their fi
Pittsburgh Pirat
�"Garcia, a po
er-outfielder wl
season as the Pi
baseman, was
assignment We
roster spot fo
Benjamin.
Benjamin bi
finger July 22 a
Garcia, 27, i
before he can .
club. If he is i
likely will be, I
days to trade h
reassign him.
Garcia expec
er team.
"I didn't get
here he saic
because I wa
much. I would I
team where m
more. They jus
over her and tin
Tut �HWEir Sumr Or Utn �ooks in Greenville.
any purchase of
$75.00 or more.
�M �. ctTMcat �Tatar � fnw� Mtsaviui. m-l�i� � �������lae.
One coupon per customer.
Not valid with other offers.
Not valid on previous sales.
Not valid after 8-25-99.
yjftjfc
S16 S.Cotanche Street � Uptown Greenville � 758-2616 � www.ubeinc.coni
l






HEEASTCAHOUHIMI
le in Hertford, a
nicy in northcas
w, are concerned-
ndition.
been calling here
ay long he said.
ig is people are
wt Helen asked
ir Jimmy �
sued a statement
ssing gratitude for1
Hunter's friends
'ii
J&i
MAI'
4
EAST CAROLINIAN
sports
iwutn. imm tf. mm 27
, Pirates say goodbye to Garcia
PITTSBURGH (AP) - Freddy
Garcia and Turner Ward may have
played their final games for the
Pittsburgh Pirates.
�"Garcia, a power-hitting infield-
er-outfielder who began the 1998
season as the Pirates' starting third
baseman, was designated for
assignment Wednesday to clear a
roster spot for shortstop Mike
Benjamin.
Benjamin broke his left index
finger July 11 against the Cubs.
Garcia, 27, must clear options
before he can join a Pirates farm
club. If he is not claimed, as he
likely will be, the Pirates have 10
days to trade him, release him or
reassign him.
Garcia expects to play for anoth-
er team.
"I didn't get to play much over
here he said. "It was tough
because I wasn't playing very
much. I would like to go to another
team where maybe I could play
more. They just have a lot of guys
over her and they can't play every-
body
Garcia was batting .233 with six
homers and 23 RBIs as a part-time
third baseman and outfielder and
was in a 2-for-lH slump.
The right-handed hitting Garcia
showed flashes of power he hit a
combined 31 homers with the
Pirates (9) and Nashville (22) last
season but had trouble hitting for
average in the majors and was
below-average defensively.
The former Rule 5 draft pick
has never been able to channel his
considerable power into a full time
job. He would often hit a 420-foot
homer, then go into a l-for-17 or 1-
for-20 slide.
"He's got upper-deck power,
and you don't like to give up on a
player with that kind of power
manager Gene Lamont said.
He has used up all of his reha-
bilitation time, and the Pirates
have no plans to activate him soon,
even though he told trainer Kent
Bigger staff that his sore right knee
feels better than it has in months.
Facility
continued Irom page 4
through privately funded groups
and donations like those received
from the Pirate Club.
The upcoming ECU-West
Virginia match up at Ericsson stadi-
um in Charlotte has amassed rough-
ly $1 million from ESPN Regional
who bought the television airing
rights to the game. Through dona-
tions and deals such as this, the ath-
letic department has found the
money for funding new projects.
The money from the ESPN
game has helped the department
already complete two projects.
They put lights over Herrionton
Field so that the baseball team can
now have night games as well as a
$243,000 track resurfacing for the
the track and field teams.
The money enabled us to do
those two projects VanSant said.
"It's been a big help to the overall
athletic program
Many times, with projects head-
ed by the athletic department, the
university actually plays little part in
the processes; most projects tie
almost entirely funded by the ath-
�"letic department and their sponsors.
The center will providespccialty
advanced equipment for the many
athletic teams � ECU and possibly
for other events which may take
place in the area. One possible use
would be for the Olympic hopefuls
in training.
The 20,000 square, foot facility
will be equipped with a recruit din-
ing area, kitchen, study areas, a
track, weight lifting areas and a 500
seat banquet hall.
Bruce Flye, Director of Facilities
PbiutinfcsaidtaMthehaUbaptiM
fbrtheimtvefssryandrJiecommunt-
"It is one of the biggest spaces
(of its kind! in the country Flye
said.
Others, such as Jeff Connors,
Director of Strength and
Conditioning, believe that the cen-
ter will be well worth the cost and
with out a doubt wiH serve its pur-
pose.
Recruits
continued Irom page 3
point guard from Winston Salem,
has signed a letter of intent to play
for the Pirates. Hocomb-Fayc aver-
aged 16 points and 6 rebounds in
his senior season, leading RJ
Reynolds High School to a 24-4
record.
" We are happy to sign Travis
Herrion said. "He's the type of
point guard that will fit into our sys-
tem and our style of play
On the women's side of basket-
ball, head coach Dee Gibson has
just signed a pair of Jamaican junior"
college transfers to play for the
Pirates. 'Camilla Murray and Sancha
Cargill helped lead Tallahassee
Community College to within one
win of a National Junior College
tournament game.
Murray is ranked among the top
' 10 wing players in the junior college
game currently, while Cargill is a
top 50 power forward.
"We were looking to add athleti-
cism, and we definitely did it with
these two Gibson said.
Kate Vcazey, one of Virginias top
junior tennis players, has signed a
letter of intent to attend ECU and
play for head coach Tom Morris.
Vcazey has high school experience
as well as displayed Mid-Atlantic
USTA abilities. Vcazey helped her
team win a state championship in
her freshmen year, and played first
seed in singles and doubles
through high school. Vcazey is
ranked 29th in singles and No.l in
doubles by the Mid-Atlantic USTA
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girls 18 section.
"We expect Kate to play an
important role next year Morris
said
This year's recruits seem poised
to carry ECU into the next millen-
nium. All of EClf's coaches are
excited about the incoming class
and arc prepared to help these
recruits become better athletes and
students.
Activities
continued Irom paoi 2
lion. Some of the activities include
swimming, men's lacrosse, men's
rugby, men's and women's ulti-
mate frisbee, disc golf, men's and
women's volleyball, kayaking,
underwater hockey, water skiing, a
variety of martial arts and, for the
first year, roller hockey and bowl-
ing.
The different dubs compete
against other dub teams from vari-
ous colleges and universities in
intercollegiate non-varsity leagues.
Clubs also try to recruit new
people to compete for them
regardless of a person's level of
play.
"We are just trying to help peo-
ple learn trie fundamentals said
Michael Wiegand, Ultimate
Frisbee player. "We're out there to
help them learn to play and recruit
new players
Last year ECU dub sports host-
ed many competitions here as well
as traveled to other universities to
compete.
The Isshinryu Karate dub host-
ed a competition that drew 125
participants to ECU and the
Lacrosse team traveled to Penn
State for a competition that hosted
32 teams. The Ultimate Frisbee
teams finished the year in the
nations top 11, and the Swim Club
traveled to Atlanta to compete in
the Olympic pool at Georgia Tech.
Also faring well last season was
the women's Volleyball dub that
was ranked number 20 in the
nation after the NIRSA volleyball
championships in Maryland The
men's Rugby team traveled to
Savannah for a tournament in
which they tied for third in a field
of 24 teams.
The dub teams will compete
again this fall with hopes of contin-
uing to be successful as wdl as
improving from last year with new
players and strategies.
"We hope that we will have a
strong showing again this year see-
ing how we were hard to beat in
the pool last year Neptun said
ECU Recreational Services
funds the dub sports to allow the
teams to participate in competi-
tions.
The teams also have to do their
share of fund raising. Every semes-
ter the dubs must submit a budget
request to Recreational Services
and upon acceptance, the teams
arc given 60 percent of the request
requiring that they raise the other
40 percent.
Anyone interested in starting a
new dub can contact Gray Hodges
at the Recreational Center at 328-
6387.
For further information about
the dub sports offered this fall,
there are listings and information
at the Recreational Center or they
can be accessed online at www.rec-
scrv.ccu.edu.





ft
Attention: Juniors, Seniors and Graduate Students
Are you tired of sra? to
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Title
The East Carolinian, Auguat 17, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 17, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1349
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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