The East Carolinian, July 28, 1999






Carolinian
der needed.
eeded begin-
onday- Friday
Duties include
school, super-
1 transporting
activities. Ex-
I on Tuesdays
e a valid driv-
ile transporta-
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jjoring in edu-
nent. nursing,
rate $7.00 hr.
i high school
ices required,
jdule an inter-
e students to
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mday through
3 6 p.m and
4:30 p.m. Pre-
I who can ass-
elections, has;
dge of carpet,
decorating, re-
3 and measur-
:o gain product
nowledge. Can
srvision of the
in a non-air
;e environment
Transportation
at Carolina Car-
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Free pictures,
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ive special pic-
family or boy-
ing pictures of
portfolio. If you
ve you free pic-
iteur photogra-
ailable. Please
number, and a
� it will be re-
jak. 4413 Pine-
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r e-mail hron-
eck my web
imflex.comus-
information.
�MENTS
:hool have you
out this Thurs-
t 9 p.m. and re-
ool at the Stud-
ter and watch a
C members.
people needed
in Pitt County,
art, and support
nts and their fa-
3 Care Hospice.
185-4525.
lies: if you're in-
frisbee golf sin-
it at the frisbee
p.m6 p m. on
Jeremy Falls
,no y-V� Fur- HDuA
� M Slice- �
iXmHC THAT"
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Wednesday
High:94
Low:73
Thursday
High:92
Low:71
pyf Online Survey
Will you pay 90 cents for a
20-ounce bottle of soda from a
campus vending machine?
Carolinian
South rVk comes to the big screen
Set1 page 4.
WEDNESDAY, JULY 28,1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 55
www.tec.ecu.edu
What the
students say:
"I don't mind either way, bottles are just
as good as cans
- Adrian Jacobs, senior.
"I think the university should have
asked us first. We are the ones
buying the drinks
- Stan Allen, senior.
"It's just like everything else, the
students are never involved
- Michelle Kable. sophomore.
"It's a better deal to spend 90 cents on
a bottle than to spend 55 cents on a
can. You can get more for your money
- Jason Thomas, junior.
12-ounce cans don't
generate enougfi revenue
Cory Sheeler
NEWS EDITOR
ii"ir-iC- . i:j� �.
Bill Smalls notices the recent switch to bottles in
machines across campus.
PHOTO BY Bill KEITH
Pepsi vending machines campus-
wide are being converted from 12-
ounce can machines to 20-ounce bottle
machines.
Along with the change in products,
prices have increased from 55 cents for
a 12-ounce can to 90 cents for a 20-
ounce bottle.
According to amendment seven of
the exclusive beverage rights agree-
ment, the price of cans in the vending
machines is not to exceed 55 cents in
the first three years of the university's
contract with Pepsi without expressed
consent of the university.
However, because Pepsi's profits
have not been as high as expected,
ECU agreed to allow the change to bot-
tles at a higher cost to the consumers.
"1 want the consumer to get what
they want, but at the same time I don't
want to lose that commitment we've
got from Pepsi said Layton Getsinger,
associate vice chancellor for
Administration and Finance and
executive director of Business Services.
"We were able to put in 20-ounce
machines rather than 12-ounce
machines. You get a higher margin of
profit on those and a higher rate of
commission on those. It's a win-win for
everyone
Getsinger has overseen the Pepsi
project since its inception and was faced
with the decision of whether or not to
switch from cans to bottles.
ECU finalized their exclusive bever-
age rights agreement with Pepsi on
Aug. 1, 1998 settling on a ten-year con-
tract that gave the university $3 million
as a signing bonus. ECU had a profit of
$148,000 a year when Coke and Pepsi
were offered campus-wide before the
agreement with Pepsi was reached.
However, Pepsi guaranteed ECU a
profit of $163,000 after the first year
that they had exclusive rights.
With the one year anniversary of the
deal approaching, Pepsi had not
received the return they had expected
and therefore could not guarantee the
Prices have increased to 90 cents for 20-ounce bottles of Pepsi compared to the previous
price of 55 cents for a 12-ounce can.
PHOTO BY BILL KEITH
university their original commission fig-
ure.
According to Pepsi's pricing and con-
ditioning terms with the university, "It
is Pepsi-Cola's evaluation that ECU's
campus is severely underdeveloped.
Soft drinks are an impulse item and cur-
rent visible locations are few. It is our
belief that with increased visibility and
availability that both ECU and Pepsi-
Cola will achieve their goals
Pepsi believes that if there are more
soft drink machines on campus, people
will spend more money on soft drinks.
The university was not able to put in
as many machines as Pepsi had planned
on having on the campus because of
various reasons. At the time of the
agreement, the university had 142
machines on campus and Pepsi wanted
to have a total of 180 by the end of the
first year.
"We still don't have 180 machines
and we're about a week away from the
end of year one Getsinger said. "We
couldn't get the cooperation we need
from all of the entities that housed
machines.
"I think that we've gained that sup-
port from the residence halls, the school
of medicine and some administration
and classroom buildings. Also, there
were not places to plug the machines in.
You've got to have electrical power, so
there are costs associated with that
While the price of a soda in a vend-
ing machines has risen, the extra money
earned gets pumped back into the uni-
versity.
"Every penny of profit that comes
out of this, whether it be commissions
or cash contributions from Pepsi, are
plowed back into those venues from
where the money was�generated. It
accrues back to the consumer
Getsinger said.
Getsinger adds that various scholar-
ships were set up using the money from
the Pepsi deal such as merit scholar-
ships, need-based scholarships and ath-
letic scholarships.
However, some people still aren't
happy with the recent switch from cans
to bottles.
"It was just easier when they were
55 cents said Kevin Jacobs, sopho-
more. "Trying to find 90 cents when
you're thirsty isn't as convenient as try-
ing to find 55
One student felt that she should
have been given the choice of bottles or
cans.
"This is our campus and wc have no
input on what goes on said Jennifer
Baker, senior. "It started with the whole
campus being forced to drink Pepsi
products and now we are forced to
spend 90 cents for a bottle of soda
Getsinger said he could not involve a
panel of students to help make his deci-
sion.
"I don't have the liberty to call in a
Dorms are
overloaded
200 students
placed on waiting list
LkAn.se Johnson
stake' whiter
Over the last three years, ECU
housing has overbooked the dorms
by 130 people who are guaranteed
housing and then, in addition to
the 130, has a waiting list of 200
who are not guaranteed.
The reason for the overbooking
of 130 students who are guaranteed
housing is because there are people
who register and pay for housing
who do not show up. To compen-
sate for those who do not show up,
housing overbooks.
Dorms on campus are overcrowded
PHOTO BY Bill KEITH
SEE BOTTLES PAGE ;
These people are guaranteed
housing and are put in temporary
housing for about ten class days. It
usually takes ten class days for
housing to figure out who showed
up and who did not. When housing
has that figured out, the students
in temporary housing are placed in
the vacant dorm rooms.
The temporary housing for the
students is located all over cam-
pus.There are some unused apart-
ments and some locked lounges in
the dorms. This is where the tem-
porarily displaced students are put
until one of the regular dorm
rooms open up.Thcsc 130 stu-
dents arc generally freshman.
"Last year, I was in temporary
housing and it took awhile for me
to get placed in a regular dorm
room said sophomore Marie
Collins. "For a while, I thought I
was going to have to live in the
lounge for the rest of the year
The 200 students on the wait-
ing list consists mostly of transfer
students and upperclassmen who
SEE HOUSING PAGE 2
Number of university internet courses rises dramatically
Masters in ITEC
offered exclusively online
Kerry Pate
staff writer
ECU's initiative to expand acade-
mic course offerings via the
Internet continues to gain momen-
tum.
During the recent Board of
Trustees meeting, a report was cir-
culated indicating 90 percent
99114 of distance education
courses offered by ECU were
taught via Internet technology
during the 1998-1999 school year.
In the fall of 1999, 144 courses
will be delivered over the internet.
The number of courses offered
for academic credit via the Internet
by ECU and other universities has
risen dramatically in the past two
years, and unprecedented growth is
CHART COURTESY OF THE DIVISION OF CONTINUING STUDIES.
predicted for the future. By fall of said Dr. Richard Ringeisen, vice
2000, ECU expects to offer 270 aca-
demic courses via the Internet.
"East Carolina has a long-distin-
guished history in this regard; our
Continuing Studies Division recent-
ly celebrated its 50th anniversary
chancellor of Academic Affairs. "We
are fast moving towards greater
internet delivery of courses
Nationally, other universities are
taking advantage of the Internet to
expand courses and services to stu-
dents.
"This is one of those areas
where all universities are becom-
ing very active said Dr. Richard
Eakin, chancellor of ECU.
One factor contributing to the
increase in internet delivery of
academic courses is the affordabil-
iry of personal computers and soft-
ware.
"Internet instruction is acceler-
ating rapidly, and one thing that
may be driving that increase is the
reduction in the prices of the com-
puters because they have become
mlirc and more affordable for
everyone said Dr. Diana
Henshaw, director of the Division
of Continuing Studies.
ECU's efforts in establishing a
virtual university program is not
strictly limited to online courses
alone.
"We have a parallel effort of e-
mail contact, online syllabi and aca-
demic chat rooms) going on in
developing our virtual learning
SEE COURSES PAGE 2
A new place to pay
Construction is underway in the Student Publications Building to renovate the first
floor and make room for the university's new Cashiers Office. The project was
started on Jury 14, and it is expected to continue until the beginning of November.
The Student Publications building currently houses "The East Carolinian "The
Rebel "Expressions" and the Student Media Board.
PNOTO BY JASOd FEATHER
mm





2 VMuii,My U. IM�
news
Thi East Cirollnltn
rit;
July 20
Larceny - A student reported that unknown person(s) took his
bike from the rack east of Scott during the month of June.
Suspicious Activity - A part-time staff member was approached
when officers were notified that he was viewing pornography and pos-
sibly masturbating. He was advised of the computer policy.
July 22
Larceny - A staff member reported the theft of a set of computer
speaker from his office.
July 23
Attempted Breaking and Entering - A non-student reported that
four males were observed attempting to break and enter a highschool
activity bus parked SW of Scott Hall. Contact was made and no
charges were pressed.
Housing
continued 1mm page 1
did not register for housing until
July.Those on this waiting list are
sent their deposits back and are
given a list of available apartments
in the Greenville area.
"1 was upset that I was not going
to be able to live in the dorms, and I
have been having a hard time find-
ing an apartment for the fall said
junior Bryan Hart. "Housing did
send me a list of possible places that
might have openings
If more then BO people do not
show up, those on the waiting list
TV anchor apologizes for
insulting Hillary Clinton
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP)
Unaware that his microphone was
on, an Orlando TV anchor called
Hillary Rodham Clinton an "old
battle ax" as he broadcast her arrival
at the Kennedy Space Center.
"Just moments ago the first lady
rolled in WFTV anchor Steve
Rondinaro said Wednesday night.
"There she comes, the old battle
ax. There she is with Chelsea in
tow
Rondinaro apparently wasn't
aware that his microphone was still
on as WFTV received NASA's
video feed of the Clintons' arrival to
watch die space shuttle Columbia
launch.
Rondinaro apologized on the air
within minutes, calling it "an off-
hand, flippant comment that
slipped out .
"Please rest assured that I have
the highest respect for the first lady
and her role and am very pleased to
see that Mrs. Clinton saw this
launch as important enough to
make a return visit he added.
WFTV news director Mike
Rausch said the remarks were inap-
propriate and inexcusable. But no
disciplinary action will be taken
against Rondinaro, who is leaving
the station next month to run two
radio stations in North Carolina.
Courses
continued Irom page t
environment for on-campus stu-
dents as well Ringeisen said.
Educators arc now beginning to
fully realize the value of the
Internet for learning as the technol-
ogy becomes more widespread and
easily available.
"The Internet offers so many
different possibilities we are just
now beginning to explore the
opportunities that are available for
research as well as education
Henshaw said. "What's ahead for
all of us is a world that is driven by
technology, so we want to enable all
East Carolina students, both cam-
pus and otherwise, to experience
this technology firsthand.
"By doing so they become
accustomed to using this tech-
nology as tool and our faculty .
are using the internet as a tool
to enhance learning
"By using multimedia and web-
based material that a student can
� access over and over again as well as
animation, instructors are finding
that the understanding of the mate-
rial is greatly increased
Internet courses provide unique
advantages and flexibility for busy pro-
fessionals needing to enhance career
development through education.
"We are finding that leaders in
business and industry today are
very interested in continuing their
, professional education, and they
, want to get Masters degrees in their
. field Henshaw said. "With their
job responsibilities companies can-
not afford to give them a year or two
off to attend a regular program. So
to be able to take instruction over
the internet is an ideal situation
because they don't lose time from
work or family obligations.
"Many business and industry
employees travel frequently and
through the internet they have
accessibility 24 hours a day to the
course work. They can send mes-
sages to professors, no matter where
they happen to be at any given
point in time
ECU has been at the forefront of
providing this type of service for pro-
fessional development by incorpo-
rating a virtual academic degree into
an existing program. The M.S.
Industrial Technology has been rec-
ognized as one of the best virtual
degree programs in Thorson's Guide
to Accredited College Degrees
through Distance Learning.
"We have a full Masters degree
in Industrial Technology on the
web, and students are enrolled in
that program from all over the
world Ringeisen said. "We've
gotten a lot a very positive publicity
on that program
Another ECU department look-
ing to take advantage of internet-
based interaction and instructional
programming is the Office of
Alumni Relations.
"We are Constantly looking for
ways to provide innovative services
for students and alumni and
advances in internet technology will
help us expand our programs to the
ECU community in this regard
said Carolyn Brown Thompson,
director of Programs and Chapter
Development for Alumni Relations.
More information on internet
courses can be obtained by contact-
ing the Division of Continuing
Studies at 328-6321 or via the web at
http:www.dcs.ecu.edudoc-
shome.htm
Write a Letter to the Editor
arid let your view be heard
Bring all letters to
our office which
is located on the 2nd Floor of
The Student Publications Building
are given the open dorm rooms
after those guaranteed housing
have been placed into the available
rooms.
ECU will gain about 10,000 more
students over the next six to eight
years. To avoid the problem of
overbooking, ECU will be hiring an
architect.
"There is to be one to two dorms
built said Manny Amaro, the hous-
ing director. "The building will
begin this year, and it should be
completed in about four years
These new dorms are to be
modified suites and will be built
with the student's privacy in mind.
Bottles
continued Irom page I
committee or a cast of thousands
and say, 'folks, what are your
thoughts on this?' I get paid to
make these decisions Getsingcr
said.
I lowever, CJetsinger has noticed
a decline of people buying the bev-
erages out of the vending machines
and instead opting to bring their
sodas from home. Because the uni-
versity has so much to gain from the
Pepsi deal, CJetsinger says the
everyone is benefiting from the
decision to try and keep all parties
happy.
"The real winners in all of this is
not vending operations CJetsinger
said. "The real winner in all of this
is the university as a whole. There's
a $10.1 million cash windfall that
accrues to the university over this
ten-year period. That money will
be used for 'a host of different
things
Her universe is about
to explode
with possibilities
NOSTALGIA NEWSSTAND
The Comic Book Store
919 Dickinson Avenue
Greenville, NC 27834
(252)7584909
�TM DC Comics �1994.
TrutMqualityJustice
102B East. Victoria Ct
Bedford Park, Greenville
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
You drank.
Youdanced.
Youhadse3�)
riss"3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evans Street (downtown near Courthouse)
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Doors Open: 7:30 p.m.
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m.
SILVER .n II
BULLET VollS
"AVouch Of Class"
756-6278
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
Amateur N igfat and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
FRIfcSAT
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Locate! 5 MileiWesof GftcmiBtMlMAk. (MfadAMdhScnimfcUM)
Get p5erC�dKt
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earcartila9�.
�avel:25
WewillboAtany
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Large selection of imported
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NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
�ESS
OS
Aqua Theatre
Thursday, July 29st
9:00 p.m.
Outdoor Pool - SRC
October Sky Rated pg
Basal on feet, this Is the stay of a teenager named
Homer Hickam. growng up in a ccal town m West
Virginia where a boys uaal destiny was to "and up in
the mines But Homer had his eye on the sky and a
live far frymg rockets to the dsray of his nine fate-
man fether, and the oriBternatiari of the townsfolk gen-
erally. A misfit ta sure, he and three of h equally out-
cast buddies begii making mrtas. which rhey fly from
a patch of barren land exjht miles out of town so as to
no longer terrorize the community with tlai ofturnes
errant rockets. However, tie people become intrigued
and scon start coming out ndmves in watrii the
�totethoys1 send oil their homenndo mssles, ;ikI
wrtfitheenttiJSiastt;so)crtMcsRilf.y their
teacher, plus a signed picture from Wfemhet von Itaun
xiieEpcreetoacrueswiHcnHhadwnttenhiu they
tralty are entered n the Naoonal Saence Awards com
petition But none of Hie was all that easy, especially Hi
Mara, as proUans much mure due than (tyiig rockets
seemed to push the young man toward man inly as
well as to hBeventiBl destiny as an Instructor of our
shuttle misson astiorautat
for a good time call The Student Union
Hotline 262.328.6004 or vltit our
website e www.ecu.eduttudentunlon
i
The East Ceroltn
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ourvicw
By almost
doubDng the price
that students previ-
ously payed for a
scKia, the university
nnd Pepsi will begin
to turn students
,iiw�y from buyini
soft drinks on cam-
pus all 1ye1:h�r.
OPINION
DEMOSTHENES
The university has decided to change campus vending machines from 12-ounce can
machines to 20-ounce bottle machines without getting the opinion of the students
they are catering to.
While it is understandable that all 17,(100 students could not be consulted on the mat-
ter, some input from the student population would have been beneficial. This all
reminds us of when the university took the liberty to sign an exclusive deal with
Pepsi almost a year ago which severely limited students' choices for soft drinks on
campus. The SGA President. Eric Rivenbark. was the sole no' vote during the Board
of Trustees meeting, and the BOT quickly passed the motion. We were stuck with
a Pepsi campus.
It seems Pepsi did not meet its expected profit margin over the first year, so they t.xik
the stance that they would simply charge more for a soda. While that may meet their
needs financially, it does not meet some students' financial needs. By almost dou-
bling the price that students previously payed for a soda, the university and Pepsi will
begin to turn students away from buying soft drinks on campus all together.
If students simply stop buying Pepsi products out of the vending machines on cam-
pus, will the university and Pepsi decide to use 32-ounce bottles and raise the price
to $1.75? When is enough enough?
The university seemed to function without the million dollar bank roll of Pepsi
before the deal was completed, so it would be fair to say they could have kept doing
so without Pepsi. The administration says that the money made from the 20-ounce
bottles is pumped back into the university Who decides what that money will be
used for? This is another instance of the student population being left out of deci-
sions that they are paying for. When we can't even choose between a can or a bottled
soft drink, something needs to change.
Prisoners in the war against Marijuana
It's about use, not abuse,
education and the right to make
your own derisions.
Under the administration of the first
Presklent to ever admit to smoking mar-
ijuana, I find it interesting diat the num-
. berof arrests per year for possession have
more than doubled Time after time, sci-
entific and medical studies have shown
diat marijuana is rex a killer weed, yet
this information has Ixx-n repressed. Not
once lias a major US newspaper printed
the results of any snidies ot findings.
In November of 19, 'Hie I-ancct,
; Great Britain's leading medical journal,
; published an analysis of the harmful
:i effects of marijuana, They uindiisivcly
slKAved diat marijuana is less of a liealth
direat dian eidier alcoliol or nbacco. It is
also noted diat the active ingrexlient in pot,
'Icmdiyditxiirinabireil or TUC, is less
addictive dun alcoliol or nianne, instead,
it is classified closer to caffeine.
Yes, smoking pot extensively for
numerous years increases your risk of
lung cancer and may cause you to devel-
op bronchitis or mild asthma. Pregnant
women should not smoke it nor should
scliizophrenics or anyone who needs to
drive. 'Iliank you for your common
sense
Marijuana does not make you stupid
when used moderately. Repeatedly,
snidies from major American and inter-
national universities have shown diat
moderate smokers do not do any type of
permanent damage to their brains or
lungs. However, chronic use, such as
everyday for many years, lias been
linked to short-term memory loss and
lung problems. In most of the snidies,
any negative side effects In m l ng temi
use disappeared upon secession.
Anyone who chooses to smoke mari-
juana in this country faces a number of
risks. 'Ilie penalties for smoking while
sitting on the couch in your living room
can lie harsher than those for dnink dri-
ving. If you have student loans, as of last
October you would lose tliem if caught
using Marijuana. Vhi probably would
k�se any job you had if you tested posi-
tive in die many unconstitutional dmg
testing programs going on in the work-
place. Did you know that dmg testing is
a $.VK) million industry?
As a smdent adilete, I find it very dis-
quieting that I could lose my loans and
be ejected from my team for smoking a
joint rolled from the dried flowers of a
plant which grows in nature. Vet, every-
day I have to walk around watching my
friends and teammates puffing on uincer
sticks one after anotlter and tossing the
used buttsall over mvlxickyard, my cam-
pus and my city. Is this really necessary I
ask you to think for yourself and then do
something alxuit it.
It is not enough to just moan and
complain about unfairness. (Jet educat-
ed, get motivated and get some changes
made. It's about use, not abuse, educa-
tion, and the right to make your own
decisions.
OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
The female fashion perspective
ask you ladies, how many
women out there dress for the
sole purpose of impressing men?
I have read this week's opinion by my
esteemed colleague Chris. After hav-
ing done so, I feel compelled to offer
my own take on the subject.
I ask you ladies, how many
women out there dress for the sole
purpose of impressing men? I don't
know about you, but I dress to please
myself, and tme, perhaps even for
the benefit of other females � but
not because I intend to claw my way
into some guy's affections by show-
ing a little ass. More likely, liecause a
gal will show far more appreciation
for my chic sense of style and my
great eye for color�a factor in appar-
el selection Chris obviously over-
looked whilst suggesting that all
members of the female gender doll
up in peach, white or tan to show off
the outline of our drawers. Panty
lines indeed. Men insist on display-
ing their boxers to the world by the
generous fit of sagging pants.
However, somehow I don't think
that a glimpse at someone's Fniit of
the Ixxims is as exciting of an event
for the women of the world.
Platforms and high-heeled shoes
are not as difficult to walk in as some
men perceive, it is just their inept
sense of balance that would send
them tumbling down the stairs of they
attempted to don a pair of stilettos. In
the '60's and '70s, both men and
women wore platforms. The only rea-
son why they did not come back in
style for me is because of the price. I
suppose it's fine that the masculine
gender has an addiction to paying over
$100 for a pair of athletic shoes.
Sure, there are plenty of inconve-
nient and cumbersome items of
clothing that fashion designers have
created for women, but we do not all
wear them. And if we did, I was not
aware that wardrobe selections
reflected the ineptitude of an entire
group of humanity, or discredited a
social movement that did much for
equality for numerous other groups.
I lair is beautiful any color that it
comes in, no matter if Revlon con-
tributed to its glory. If a woman has
well-trimmed hair, in a hue that pleas-
es her, it's just fine with me. Long
hair, despite its mysterious aphrodisi-
ac-al qualities for guys, is cumbersome
and hot, and I'm sure that any male
who has attempted to deal with it
understands and promptly cut it.
Women have made bounds for-
ward in overcoming sexist opinions,
but it is statements that are shallow
and based on little or no actual evi-
dence that is a slap in the face to any
woman. IX) not judge a woman by
the cut of her shorts alone, but by
what lies beneath. I am not talking
about her panty lines either!
�XT"
ECU MP ftfti m ffeup TO
P)8wAse You we STVVZtiT
the cwtifeSr ChVINED
Son pflwfcs rHfcur5"
Women's guide to college fashion
Women dress to impress men,
but more importantly, to try
and look better than the other
women trying to impress men.
As 1 promised, here is the article for
fashion tips for women in college.
Now I have to be careful here since
I am not a woman, I've had to study
the female dress code in much more
detail. Men and women dress total-
ly different and for totally different
reasons. Men dress to cover their
hairy sasquatcb-like bodies, and
women dress to impress men, but
more importantly, to try and look
better than the other women trying
to impress men. I see women wear-
ing uncomfortable outfits and
painful shoes just to impress men.
But you women have to realize that
for us dumb males there are just two
ways you need to dress:
A.) Be naked.
B.) Or wear something that costs
as much as getting you naked is
gonna be.
Many of you women may be
offended by my research, and you
have the right to be so, but you have
to realize that I am being playful and
that most of this is fiction except for
the parr about men being dumb.
Shoes-Thc latest fashion
footwear for women in college are
platform shoes. Since the beginning
of the Women's Movement, women
are still trying to match men in all
aspects, and now they are working
on height. I have noticed many
women wearing large black shoes
raised to a height of about 13 inches,
making them almost as tall as your
average male. There is a flaw in the
idea: men don't have to go down the
stairs with both bands on the banis-
ter to keep from crashing down, and
men's ankles don't twist and wobble
as they try to walk from class to class.
Try to wear what is comfortable, not
what is in style. If you go to the mall
to buy shoes, you will pay a fortune.
Try to save money buy screwing two
cans of Dinty Moore Stew to the bot-
tom of your old flip Hops and spray-
painting the the whole thing black.
With your Martha Stewart sense of
thrift and creativity, you will Uxik
great and you're sure to get a man in
a heartbeat.
Skirts and Shorts- This gives
men a reason to come to class, and it
also keeps redneck's necks red by
having them look down all the time.
The skirt should be light in color-
tan, white or peach�and if you can't
get them tight enough, try colored
Saran Wrap. The shorts need to be
"Daisy Duke" in style with no less
than 1K of your Gluteus Maximus
showing. Be sure to be constantly
tugging on them in a self-conscious
effort to cover yourself This draws
even more attention to you, and that
is the goal.
Blouses and Shirts 1-shirts are
the mainstays, just as u ith men, but
a T-shirt for a woman is much more
important. Since men are really
knuckle-dragging sex apes who
think only with their brain stem, you
have to provide ample viewing plea-
sure. Make the shirts fairly tight and
have logos and prints from bars in
resort locations on them. This
makes men think you are brainless
party animals, and they will want to
date you. You can later marry them,
show them your Master's degree
and your paycheck and make them
cry. This will do more for the
women's movement than burning
all the bras in America.
If you wear a blouse, make sure it
is white and very roomy. This allows
freshmen in your class to look
through your sleeve and see your bra.
I lair -Your hair should be consid-
ered a valuable tool to belittle all the
chicks with awful hair. Make sure
you're blonde. It's that simple. It"
you are not, load up on Clorox and
hit the sink. Have the roots showing
at all times and try to keep the
length long. If you wear a baseball
cap, then pull the pony-tail through
the back. This makes you look
tomboyish and your stupid
boyfriend will think it's cute.
Accessories -Accessories are the
final touch for your look. To be in the
cool clique, you must have the
essentials: Tattoos�Hearts, roses,
dolphins, and anything Grateftrl
Dead. All of them in interesting
places. No uniqueness is allowed.
Get whatever everyone else has.
Piercings�Pierce everything, espe-
cially the tongue. It makes men day-
dream and parents pull their hair out.
both highly amusing to watch.
. Jewelry�How much? Use this
formula: (Areas to Place Jewelry!
IBoyfricnd's Visa Limit Total
Squared! Cigarettes�2 packs a day
of Virginia Slims or other feminine
smokes. Try not to cough and gag, it
is very uncool.
OPINION
LETTER TO
THE EDITOR
UNC Student Leaders Can Impact Change
As a person who has devoted nearly
four collegiate years to the passion of
student self-governance, I am often
concerned when I hear students gripe
about the ineffectiveness of their stu-
dent representition. Students often
clamor and complain that students do
not have the power, ability and access
to influence meaningful change on a
college campus or in statewide politics.
Well this summer, these "nay say-
ers" have lieen proven wrong.
Since May, concerned students
involved in the UNC Association of
Student Governments (UNC ASG)
made the proposed $500 tuition
increase its primary focus of attention.
UNC' ASCi is an organization whose
purpose is to advocate for higher edu-
cation issues and concerns that will
enhance and improve our student col-
legiate lives. Since first mention of a
tuition increase, student leaders from
across this state banded together in a
concerted lobbying effort to contact
their elected representatives in the
North Carolina General Assembly
(NCG.U
East (iirolina's students were well
represented by Student Body
President Cliff Webster and other
members of the student leadership
delegation. They, along with ten other
Student Body Presidents from our 16-
campus University, called legislators,
lxg.in email campaigns, sent letters
and even made appointments to see
our elected representatives.
During the last two weeks of June,
concerned students and student lead-
ers once again organized and walked-
the halls of the 1 .egislativc Building,
supplied letters and materials oppos-
ing the niition increase and attended
sessions in both the I louse and
Senate Chambers.
The student voice was heard on
this issue and our presence in and
around the halls of the NCGA was
felt. Our elected representatives knew
we were concerned when their
phones 'rang from students and con-
cerned parents, read our mail and
email messages and saw us sitting in
the halls and gallery of the I louse and
Senate ("hambers.
This smdent lobbying campaign
along with the efforts of President
Broad. the UNC General
Administration, and the UNC Board of
Governors proves that students and
professional educators truly care about
our academic success and are working
hard to ensure that future. Wlien thc
l 'N( I General Administration, Bund of
Governors, campuses and students
work as a cohesive team, we can send a
powerful message to our elected repre-
sentatives in Raleigh; take us seriously
and work for the betterment of the stu-
dents of this state and not against us.
Nicholas G. Mirisis
President
UNC Association of Student
Governments





J3t Wtdnudiy, July 28, 1999
features
www-seti-inst�eduinst-top�html
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MlKK Kdwakds
STUI lll'l KH
I love to get two fortunes in my
fortune cookie, don't you? You get
to keep the best one or keep both
, - your choice. It's almost as gratify-
ing as getting two pearls in an oys-
ter, or even two yokes in an egg. I
love getting unexpected surprises!
Perhaps its because I grew up in an
era of freedom before the govern-
ment took over. You used to get
surprises in cerealhut its now
against the law to give tilings away
in cereal. Today, those prizes are
valuable collectibles, but I
digress
One day, after I finished shop-
ping for my new wardrobe at K-
Mart, I was getting rather hungry.
There was a new place across the
parking lot, a Chinese place called
Stir Me Up.
This restaurant was a great idea.
You actually get to choose what
'goes into your stir-fry. There is an
abundance of fresh chopped veg-
gies and a fair selection of little
bags of meat sitting on a bed of ice.
You get a large bowl and All it up
with goodies. Then you go to the
sauce counter and take your pick
of a dozen different bowls of sauce.
Next, you hand it to the chef
through a little window, and he
dumps it in hot wok and stirs it all
up. You can stand there and watch
- like a few people did (who appar-
ently have never cooked before) -
or head back to the table.
The decor was very pleasant
with numerous plants laying or
hanging around. Some were live,
and some were not live. The music
piped out in the background was
appealing and added to the
ambiance of the experience. I pro-
ceeded to read my "Faze 3" while
I waited for my order.
In a few minutes, my piping
bowl of stir-fry arrived. Checking it
SEE STIR ME UP. PAGE I.
"Ain't Misbehavin
wins with audiences
Upbeat music
grabs attention
N t: ku V n i: I 1.1:k
s i I I i h 111, u
I The cast of "Ain't Misbehavin lilt-
ed it out to a sold-out crowd last
Saturday night at McOinnis Theatre.
This show, the last in the 1999 Kast
Carolina Summer Theatre series,
brought the house down. This
motorcade of hits from Fats Waller, a
1920s jazz composer, ran on Broadway
for nearly four years and won the
Drama Critics' Circle Award and Tony
Awards for Best Musical of 1978.
"The first act takes you by storm,
die second is a hurricane warning
with occasional gusts of gale force
;3inds said Encore Magazine's Curt
Xavis. This musical montage fca-
Qured upbeat songs, such as "The
JJiint is Jumpin "Spreadin"
Rhythm Around "Your Feet's Too
3aig" , "Fat and Creasy which had
Hie audience in hysterics and the
soulful crooning of "Mean to Me
"hese swinging songs were energiz-
Jjig from the opening number
'through the seven mini-song finale.
There was no doubt that these tal-
ented singers were putting their
hearts into this production. This
show featured the talents of Kldric
Bashful, Renee Chambers Liciaga,
Amy Jo Phillips, Na'Iiisha Williams,
and Stan Brown. These actors
those of the actors. Featuring mostly
K( 11' students, the band was as much
fun to see and hear as the the singing
was. "This show was a lot of fun
said drummer Carroll Dashiell III.
The performers got a standing
ovation at the close of "Ain't
Renee Chambers liciaga and Amy Jo Phillips all dolled up for the show.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU THEATRE DEPARTMENT
rehearsed for only two weeks for this Misbehavin The audience said the
show, but one would assume they
had lccn doing it for years.
The performance is done not only
by the five singers, but an on-stage
band as well, whose talents matched
show was wonderful, outstanding,
phenomenal and full (if energy, but
audience member Jaron Jones
summed it all up when he said, "It
was the bomb
"Southpark" hits theaters
Popular TV show
comes to the movies
It K I X l; K IZZ K I. I. K
s I H w II I I I I'
Trey Parker and Matt Stone, cre-
ators of "Orgazmo" and
"Bascketball have capitalized on
the popularity of their cartoon
show "Southpark by bringing it
to audiences in the form of a
motion picture. All of the usual
characters from the show, Stan,
Kyle and of course Cartman, are
present as well as cameo appear-
ances by W'inona Ryder. Saddam
I lussein and even Conan O'Brien.
'The movie version of "Southpark"
introduces a few new characters ro
the demented scene. One of the
new faces is the Mole. As always,
Parker and Stone's original brand of
humor is a mainstay of the film.
The main plot centers around
the outrage of the parents in
Southpark over an offensive movie,
Terrence and Phillip, that has been
viewed by the children of the town.
Kyle's mother leads a protest
against the movie in order to pro-
tect the children from obscenity.
'The protest is carried to the point
Kenny can't get control of himself!
COURTESY OF THE WORLD WIDE WEB
that the United States is declaring
war on Canada, the country that
released the film.
One subplot is the lover's quar-
rel between Saddam Hussein and
Satan. Saddam tries to use Satan in
order to get his power. All the while
Satan is waiting for his chance to
take over the world, which happens
when war breaks out. All of the
characters learn a valuable lesson at
the end of the film.
Opinions of the film,
"Southpark are mixed. "I am a
big fan of "Southpark" and its
weekly show, but I felt that the
movie was just a little too much
out of the ordinary said senior Ana
Nehring. "You can only stand so
much of "Southpark and a straight
hour and a half is too much
Michelle Jackson thinks differ-
ently. "It was really cool
Jackson said. "The funniest
movie I have seen to date
'There were two scenes that
stood out. The first scene was
when Cartman was singing the full
production version of the song
about Kyle's mom. The other
scene was when Kenny's face-cov-
ering sweater is removed. Not only
do movie-goers get to see his face,
but they actually hear him speak.
It is offensive, but everyone is
equally insulted. When everyone
is insulted together, one can see
the humorous intention. Parker and
Stone go overboard with the insults,
but it is to the point that they almost
cannot be taken seriously. Some
people like this brand of humor.
"I love the movie because I love
toilet humor said sophomore Seth
Farrior. Nevertheless, anyone who
is easily offended may find that
"Southpark" does not suit their
taste.
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Till East Carolinian
features
Wtdneidty. July 28. 1899 5
irotinian
vie
ase
ide
mil
tunes in my
you? You get
it keep both
ist as gratify-
rls in an oys-
; in an egg. I
ed surprises!
;rew up in an
the govern-
used to get
)ut its now
: things away
e prizes are
is, but I
tished shop-
drobe at K-
ther hungry.
:e across the
place called
a great idea
:hoosc what
There is an
lopped veg
ion of little
a bed of ice.
md fill it up
in go to the 1
;e your pick "
wls of sauce
to the
ow, and he
nd stirs it all
e and watch
(who appar-
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)le.
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s laying or
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The music
ground was
:d to the
ence. i pro-
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my piping g
Checking it
chef 8
VSt 6
rs
the film,
xed. "I am a
irk" and its
felt that the
le too much
id senior Ana
nly stand so
and a straight.
luch
hinks differ-
:ally cool
le funniest
date
scenes that
: scene was
iging the full
if the song
The other
ly's face-cov-
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see his face,
him speak,
everyone is .
:n everyone �.
one can see
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i the insults,
they almost
usly. Some
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cause I love
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anyone who :
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suit their .
k
�i
I
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Stir me up
continued fiom page 4
carefully, I could see that, in fact, it
was my order (you never know
these days, some hospitals have
been known to mix-up babies).
The waiter brought me a cup of
fried rice which I had ordered on
the side. It was possibly one of the
best stir-frys I've had, not oily as
some end up. I only missed the gar-
lic and die ginger which was my
fault. They had a sauce made with
both, but I missed it. I was a bit dis-
appointed in the size of some of the
vegetables; they were not chopped
up quite as much as I was used to. I
kept getting a long piece of celery or
bamboo shoot stuck up my nose.
Guess that's what I get for trying to
eat and read at the same time.
When I was done, I walked to the
check-out counter before waiting for
a ticket. I figured since there was no
real menu that most folks would pay
the same. But then, I saw the waiter
smiling. I le began scribbling out my
ticket. 'The girl standing next to him
was smiling as well. I had to check
my fly just to be sure they were only
being polite. They were.
I took the ticket to the lady at the
counter and she asked me about my
meal. I told her that I enjoyed it very
much and exchanged some small
talk. I also noted that I didn't see a
sanitation grade. She explained that
they had only been open for 10 days,
and the health department said they
would not issue one for at least 30
days. (I've learned to always ask to
see the grade-especially when you
can sec a clean white space on the
wall where the frame use to be. )
Except for the kid a couple
booths away who kept playing with
and talking cither loudly to his food,
it was a very nice experience. I do
hope they will add shrimp or some
type of seafood to the selections of
meat. It is a nice place to eat alone or
to bring a date - lunch was just $4.W
- so check it out!
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aNOTCH
above the
jtyORM
Dr. Todd Finely is currently
an English professor at ECU. He
is a graduate of the University of
Puget Sound and the University
of Minnesota. In the past, he
taught at Wesleyan College as
well as in the public school sys-
tems. ' He teaches a variety of
classes, including Introduction to
Fiction Writing, Advanced
Composition and both of the
Freshman Composition classes.
ECU is an excellent school for
Finley because he gets to com-
bine both of his interests: teach-
ing and the pure art of writing.
He said he likes ECU because
he enjoys getting to know the
students, the esthetics of the uni-
versity and the unique sense of
identity that ECU has.
Finley's favorite teaching
strategy that he employs in his
classes are student conferences.
He gets to meet the students and
learn a little more about who
they are as well as connect the
class goals with the individual
student goals. In doing this, he
makes the class beneficial for all
of the students. One of the most
exciting things for Finley that is
happening currently in education
is the technological advance-
ments that are changing the way
that things are done. Finley is
working on a way to use student
conferences and his technologi-
cal knowledge to improve the
instruction for new teachers. In
conjunction with Dr. Bill Sugar,
Name
Todd
Finley
Department
English
he is currencly developing a pro-
gram that will be a software sim-
ulation of a writing conference
for pre-servicc teachers. This
program will give learning teach-
ers the ability to hold virtual con-
ferences in low-risk situations.
On a more personal note,
Finley's favorite author is Gabriel
Garcia Marquez. Marquez wrote
"100 Years of Solitude" and
"Love in the time of Cholera
"His prose is so fluid, and every
sentence is just genius Finley
said. Each of Marquez's para-
graphs are meticulously revised
and polished until they are per-
fect, and his attention to detail is
apparent in his novels. Finley
encourages his students to pay
the same attention to detail and
attempt to capture the feeling of
the moment in their words. The
audience is meant to be captivat-
ed and drawn in.
?Finley's two favorite pastimes,
besides spending time with his
wife and his daughter Rachel, are
playing Badminton and watching
movies.
When asked what would be
the one remark that he would
share with students at ECU, he
replied, "Students need to be in
charge of their own learning.
They must aggressively initiate a
dialogue with textbooks and
their won personal interests.
They must also challenge their
professors to be better teachers
.�J'
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side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.






Tha East Carolinian
sports
Wtdwdiy, July 28, 1999 6
Drug testing causes concern g
Briefs.
Coaches and athletes have
Ok von Wiiitk
S us Ann � Mii.kn kkvicii
SKNIOH ftHITKRS
In recent years, student athlete drug testing
has come under fire by school staff, athletes
and court systems. Some say it is a violation of
student rights, and others say it has to be
done.
Ben Irons, ECU attorney, and Henry
VanSant, ECU Associate Athletic Director,
agree that drug testing is not a violation of stu-
dent rights.
"I think there is ample precedence which
supports this type of testing and is warranted
under the circumstances Irons said.
Irons used an example set in a previous
1995 case as a reference of why he thinks
drug testing is constitutional.
In 1995, Supreme Court case "Veronica
School District 47J vs. Acton" found that ath-
letic drug testing is neither a violation of stu-
dent rights nor unconstitutional.
Despite this ruling, there are some stu-
be provided to ench al
d tu iill stu-
ally or in a
owleilneable member
Marijuana and cocaine are two of the drugs that can be detected in drug tests.
PHOTOS COURTESY OF THE WORLO WIDE WEB
ol the E;ist
ns about the pro-
Positive nrug Tost
FIRST POSITIVE TEST
� Meet with head coach and their parents are called.
� Counsel with team physician
�Weekly testing is condui' imed necessary
by team physician.
� If the problem is deemed sufficiently serious by the
athletic director, I
SECOND POSITIVE TEST
� Notil I the athlete's parents
� Suspension or loss of eligibility for a
of one year
�Counseling and rehabilitation
� Follow-up weekly testing
THIRD POSITIVE TEST
� Permanent cancellation of eligibility
� Notification of parents
�Counseling and rehabilitation
dents who still believe it violates the fourth
amendment which says that people have the
right to secure their belongings from unrea-
sonable search and seizures. In this difficult
case, however, the object being searched is
not a house or a car, but actually a persons
own body.
"It is a violation, but it is something that
is needed said Robbie, a former ECU soc-
cer player.
For some it is not a question of if drug
testing is a violation, but instead it is a ques-
tion are of fairness. Some drugs, such as
steroids, are used by athletes to obtain maxi-
mum strength and
endurance. Athletes
who do not use such
drugs cannot obtain
an overcxaggcrated
level of fitness. This
can make their per-
formance inferior to
those that use
unnatural sub-
stances to boost
strength.
"When athletes
use drug enhance-
ments, they often
have lctter perfor-
mance said
Stephanie W'r.iss, a
member of ECU
women's soccer
team. "That isn't
fair to the other ath-
letes who choose to
be natural
VanSant said that
the testing is done
not only to catch an
tended from
athlete doing something illegal, but also to
look out for the well-being of the athletes.
"Drug testing is for the safety of our ath-
letes VaaSant said. "It helps us to identify
problems so we am get counseling and help
for the students
Wrass said she thinks that while some the
testing could lie seen as a possible violation,
the idea that the school is looking after her
well-being is comforting.
"I think it's good for health and safety rea-
sonsWrass said.
VanSant said that when an athlete is
caught, they are entered into a counseling
program and dieir parents are notified. After
that, the decisions are left to the team and the
player.
"There are rules in place about drug use -
it is done in a confidential way VanSant said.
One football player who wished to remain
anonymous said that many athletes he knows
use dmgs on a regular basis.
"We're not supposed to do it, but I know a
lot of people who do he said.
The football player said that while testing
positive can lead to serious consequences,
many have found ways to beat the test by
using substances that make the test show a
negative response when drugs have actually
been in one's system.
"There's a lot of ways to beat it the foot-
ball player said. "If you can beat it, do it
While dnig use may be suspected among
athletes in various programs, VanSant feels
that the most important step is getting help
for the problem.
"If we can identify the problem and get
the athlete counseling and help, it is a worth-
while processVanSant said.
ality will be maintained
� nits
� A written notification form for testing
of urine samples and authorizing limited
release of information shall be signed by
each athlete upon complete understanding.
� The test may be announced or unan-
nounced and will be done during the sea-
son and the off-season. Athletes will be
notified in writing within 18 hours prior to
testing for announced tests. Mo prior noti-
fication will be given for unannounced
tests, only immediate written notification
is requu
� All students will be notified in sufficient
time to complete urine collection. If an ath-
lete misses the test after being notified,
heshe will he considered as a positive
treated acco
� The tests will he conducted by a
qualified laboratory and all positive tests
will be confirmed as positive by a different
method of testing urine The cost of the
tests will be defrayed by the department
of athletics at no expense to the student
athlete.
� The results of the test will be delivered
by the laboratory to the team physician.
He will then counsel the athlete individual-
ly and privately regarding the health haz-
ards of any particular substance detected
in the athlete's urine.
Craig Curtis, who has served
at the University of Houston as
director of football operations
for the past two years, has
been named Assistant Athletics
Director for Operations and
Equipment at ECU. ECU
Athletics Director, Mike
Hamrick, made the announce-
ment last week.
Curtis, a native of Arlington,
Va was director of Marketing
and Promotions at Troy State
University in Alabama three
years prior to taking the posi-
tion with Houston. While at
Troy State, Curtis also served
as Game Day Coordinator for
football, basketball and base-
ball, and as Tournament
Director for several Mid-
Continental conference cham-
pionship events.
Curtis is a 1990 graduate of
the University of South
Carolina where he received
his Bachelor's degree in sports
administration.
In addition to Curtis,
Hamrick also announced that
Angie Wellman, ECU Director
of Marketing, has been promot-
ed to Assistant Athletics
Director for Marketing.
Wellman took the position as
the Pirates' Director for
Marketing after work with the
Indianapolis Colts NFL team in
the area of group sales. Earlier,
the Illinois native worked as
Network Coordinator Account
Manager for International
Sports Properties (ISP) in
Winston Salem, N.C. Wellman
Graduated in 1995 from Illinois
Wesleyan University.
As the summer comes to a
close, athletes start gearing up
for the beginning of the football
season, particularly for the
September 4th season opener
between ECU and West
Virginia at Ericsson stadium in
Charlotte, N.C.
Youth basketball camp
helps kids
Community
members reach out
Ml HI) I'llOI.
S I 1II � H I I K K
Throughout Greenville, many
young kids love to play basketball.
More times than not, kids either
have to play outside or in a gym
with no air conditioning. Darrick
Mullins has developed a youth bas-
ketball camp where kids can play in
a cooler atmosphere, improve their
skills and learn a little about life
while they are having fun.
Mullins developed his camp
three years ago and has worked to
improve it each year. It has gone
from about sixty campers the first
year to a little over a hundred this
year.
The camp takes place at J.I I
Rose High School for a week from 9
�.m. until 4 p.m. the camp costs
$75 for the week. This includes
.instruction, use of the facility and
meals .during the camp. Mullins
wants these kids to improve their
Camp kids gather for a group photo.
basketball skills, but, aside from
that, he wants them to make a pos-
itive impact in society.
"Drug abuse, teen pregnancy,
team work and opening their hearts
to the community are some of the
things we stress to these kids
Mullins said.
Carnellc Burney, Co-director of
the camp, loves working with these
kids and does various projects
involving kids throughout the year.
"Putting on a camp of this mag-
nitude is really beneficial, and it is
giving something good back to the
community Burney said.
Although this camp has only
been around for three years, a cou-
ple of former campers have taken
their talents to the next level.
Jumail Blount and Terrance
Smith are teaming up together to
play at Merced Junior College in
California.
"These are two guys who I
have dealt with personally, and
they are going on to pursue col-
careers Mullins said,
ast week's conclusion to the
camp sessions was an all-star
game. Originally, Mullins was
expecting stars such as Vince
Carter and Derrick Phelps, but
time conflicts could not be
worked out with their agents.
Mullins managed to pull togeth-
er some area standouts, such as
Lester Lyons, Bershard
Thompson and Ricco Hines, a
player for UCLA The game
really excited the kids and even
the adults with lots of high-flying
above-the-rim play.
In past years, Mullins has had
former ECU players also come
for the all-star game as well as the
camp in attempts to help educate
the kids. Lester Lyons and Ronell
Patterson, both former standouts
from ECU have attended the camp
in previous sessions.
Burney feels this camp as well as
the all-star game are unique oppor-
SEE BAIL CAMP . PAGE 1
Athletes honored in
baseball Hall of Fame
COOPERSTOWN, New York
(AP)- George Brett never hit
exceptionally well against Nolan
Ryan. Still, that proved a lot easier
than following him on the Hall of
Fame podium.
Wiping away tears, one of base-
ball's best pressure hitters in histo-
ry broke down several times during
his speech at Sunday's induction
ceremonies.
"Today concludes a long jour-
ney Brett said, choking up. "I
stand humbly before you in
Cooperstown
A record crowd estimated at
50,000 jammed an open field near
the shrine, watching the largest
I lull class since 1972.
Robin Vount, Orlando Cepeda
and Ryan preceded Brett on the
stage. Late umpire Nestor Chylak,
Negro leagues pitcher Smokey Joe
Williams and rurn-of-the-century
manager Frank Selee also were
honored.
Ryan spent most of his 16-
minute speech thanking those who
had made his career possible. Along
with family members and friends,
the man whose 11,ill plaque praised
him as a "Texas legend" paid trib-
ute to Marvin Miller, the founder of
the players' union, and all fans.
'I always thought there was
going to be life after baseball the
greatest power pitcher ever said,
evenly. "I didn't realize the grip
baseball had on me. It took me two
full years to get over the fact that 1
was no longer a baseball player
Ryan, 52, played a record 27 sea-
sons and holds U.S. Major League
marks of seven no-hitters and 5,714
strikeouts.
"A fierce competitor and one of
baseball's most intimidating figures
on the pitching mound read his
bronze plaque, which bears a "T"
for the Texas Rangers.
Brett and Yount each topped
3,000 hits and Cepeda hit 379
home runs. All three were Ryan
strikeout victims Brett was 29-for-
101 (.287) with no home runs and
18 strikeouts against him.
This year's inductees increased
the Hall membership to 244 with
space for only 240 plaques in the
main gallery, extra room was found
in an adjacent rotunda.
Brett had 3,154 hits and batted
.305 in a 21-year career with Kansas
City. "Played each game with
ceaseless intensity and unbridled
passion his plaque reild.
Brett, 46, brought his family,
including son Robin named for
Yount and two of his three brothers.
Ken was a former big league pitch-
er and Bobby was a minor leaguer.
Crying, George Brett looked at
his older brothers and said,
"Sometimes I wonder why all this
happened to me and not you. All I
SEE HAU . PAGE 1
1





raduate of j
if South
i received &
5 in sports S
1
I
i
7 Widnndiy, July 27. 1989
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Elway looking to buy sports teams
Greenville's
Best Kept Secret
� State of the art FHiwtt Center.
� Pool, tennis A volleyball
� Clo�e to campus.
� Washers & dryers available
� Great Location
1,2 & 3
Bedroom
CALL
TODAY
355-2198
Homes
airlane
�Equal Housing opportunity 1510 Bridle Circle
DENVER (AP) - Former Denver
Broncos quarterback John Elway
has joined an effort to buy the
NBA's Denver Nuggets, the NHL's
Colorado Avalanche and their
future arena from Ascent
Entertainment Group Inc a news-
paper reported Tuesday.
Businessmen Lars Erik Borgen
and George Gillett, who already
had offered to buy the basketball
and ice hockey teams and the Pepsi
Center, are teaming up with the
retired quarterback, The Denver
Post reported, citing a source it did
not name.
Two other bidders also have sub-
mitted formal bids to Ascent's
board of directors, the newspaper
reported.
Ascent agreed in March to sell
the Nuggets, the Avalanche and the
Pepsi Center to Bill Laurie and
Wal-Mart heiress Nancy Walton
Laurie for dlrs 400 million.
But that deal fell through after
Ascent shareholders filed lawsuits
asserting the price was below mar-
ket value and that former Ascent
chairman Charlie Lyons sacrificed
the interests of shareholders in
negotiating a sweetheart deal for
himself.
Jordan paraphernalia for sale
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EahaasfiteHSSS.
assgssgse
gg good com�auon � support.
The iob requires on can
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NEWPORT BEACH, California
(AP) - The entire basketball court
on which Michael Jordan made the
final shot of his career will be auc-
tioned off by Michael Barnes, the
man who negotiated the3 million
sale of Mark McGwire's 70th home
run ball.
The floor is the one the Utah
Jazz used from 19 to 1999 and on
which Jordan made the jumper
with 5.2 seconds left in the sixth
game of the 1998 NBA finals. That
beat Utah and gave Chicago its
sixth NBA title in seven years.
The floorboards and baskets will
be offered in lots at the auction.
"This will probably go down as
one of the most expensive pieces of
sports memorabilia ever sold
Barnes said.
Ball Camp
coniinued Irom page 6
tunities for some of these kids.
"Some of these kids will never
have a chance to go to camp or see
some great players play live in
front of them Burney said.
Both Miillins and Burney could
not stress enough how important it
is to give back to the community
and encourage kids to take part in
non-profit camps such as this. Call
355-5986 for more information
about camp registration.
Hall
coniinued from page 6
ever wanted to do was be as good as
you
Yount, 43, a two-time American
League MVP, had 3,142 hits in a
20-year career with Milwaukee.
"A bastion of consistency and
durability read his plaque, which
also denoted his "stoic demeanor
"I never dreamed of being in
the Hall of Fame Yount said.
"And with all due respect, Mr.
Gehrig, today I consider myself the
luckiest man on the face of the
earth
Cepeda, 61, was the second
player from Puerto Rico to be elect-
ed, following Roberto Clemente.
"His ability to drive rhe ball
with authority was respected and
feared by the opposition his
plaque read.
Cepeda rose to stardom with the
San Francisco Giants, and entered
the Hall wearing their cap. His final
season was 1974, when he played
two months with Brett for the
Royals.
"This kid is never going to
make it Cepeda recalled himself
thinking, drawing a laugh from
Brett. "Sometimes, you make mis-
takes
j po Box 1967 �
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1 252-931-4217
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S Wtdmsdiy, July 28. 1999
FOR RENT
2 BEDROOM. 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
$400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price 551-3426.
ROOMMATE NEEDED on Aug. 10.
Rent is $175 plus 13 utilities. Large
room in 3 bedroom house 1 block
from Rec Center. Call Kate or Steph.
931-9015.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month. available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 758-6596.
112 A and B Holly Street 2 bed-
rooms. Close to campus. 809-1922
Pets ok wdeposit.
TAKE OVER lease by August. 2 bed-
room. 1 12 bath. $450 a month.
Close to campus. Call 754-2840.
please leave message.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 758-6596.
FOR RENT: 4 bedroom. 2 bathroom.
central heatAC. 2nd story duplex 3
blocks from ECU. $600month. Call
752-5536, leave message.
' 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath home on Bilt-
more St. No pets. Graduate students
preferred. Washer. '� yer. dishwash-
er, big back yard $760munlli.
Beautiful home. Call 931-0449. leave
message.
2 BEDROOM, 2 bath apt. by ECU.
Share utilities. $250.00month. Call
Dave. 752-6557.
1
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management. ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Aug. 15.
2 bedroom. 1 12 bath spacious
apartment. Rent is $230 12
phone and utilities. For more details
call Mike at 353-8950 after 6 p.m.
TWO BEDROOM, two bath fully
furnished apartment, free cable,
sewer and water. Located on ECU
bus line. Available August 15th.
School year lease. No pets. $500
per month. Call 758-5393.
ABOVE BW-3. 2 BR. 1 bath. $675
month. Walk to ECU. Call 252-726-
8846.
ECU AREA: one and three bedroom
houses. One bedroom $210; three
bedroom $600 a month Pets OK!
Available August 1st. Call 830-
9502.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
D.J. FOR HIRE
FOR ALL FUNCTIONS 8 CAMhS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
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AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
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� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, � CD Players -
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Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:00
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
S T U f) E N
:OR RENT
4 BEDROOM, 3.5 bath townhome
1.4 miles from ECU campus avail-
able immediately. Wildwood Villas.
Call 412-1945 or 413-6898.
ROOMMATE
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex. Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU. on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374. leave mes-
sage. Call now.
MF NEEDED for 2 BR. 1 bath locat-
ed across 5th St. from Wright Place.
$175 a month plus 12 utilities. Call
752-9373. please leave message &
.
ROOMMATE WANTED Undergrad.
graduate student room open now.
$162.00 a month, no deposit need-
ed. Fully furnished on ECU bus ro-
ute. Call Chris, 752-9038.
280 SOFT bedroom available in
vintage home 3 blocks from cam-
pus. Upperclassmen preferred, must
not mind smoking or cats. 12 utili-
ties. 12 cable. Call 561-7591.
MALEFEMALE ROOMMATE
needed to share 3BR house 3 blocks
from campus 6 13 utilities. Call
Lisa at 754-8094 for August.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 2
BR, 1 bath furnished apt. Walking
distance to ECU. $212.50mo. Cen-
tral AC. heat & hot water included.
Call 328-0133M or 830-9447.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
three bedroom, 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities Call Mindy at 355-2956
Near ECU campus.
ONE BEDROOM for rent $50 a
month. 12 utilities. Call 551-9136
and ask for Matt.
ROOMMATE WANTED. 2 BR. one
bath apt. one mile from ECU on bus
line. Rent $175month plus 12 util-
ities Deposit $175. Please contact
Rick. 919-231-1612.
JESUS IS THE
' ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
Daytime 756-3315 or
714-0718 Ministry Outreach
anytime after 7pm.
321-6012 confidential.
ROOMMATE
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students.
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air. ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $250 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
NEEDED: FEMALE roommate to
share two bedroom townhouse in
Wilson Acres. $270 includes basic
cable, water, sewer. Needed to move
in by second week in July. Call 355-
2940. ask for Sabrina.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
three bedroom. 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities. Call Mindy at 355-2956.
Near ECU campus.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR, 1 BA apartment on 5th
St. $260 a mo. util. Available Au-
gust 1st. 703-532-0317.
ROOMMATE WANTED for 2 bed-
room apartment. 5 minutes from
ECU. Near hospital. Female pre-
ferred, pets possible. Half rent, half
utilities. Available immediately 551-
7607.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse On bus route. Call
355-0276.
FOR SALE
RELOCATION SALE: Matching
sofa, chair & ottoman, oak entertain-
ment center & bookcase. 9 drawer
dresser, nightstand & other house-
hold items. Open house 7-24-99 8
am until. Call for more info. 752-
0828
PHONE CARDS for sale $10 cards
with 197 minutes. $20 cards with
497 minutes If interested in pur-
chasing contact Eric at TYGER-
TYPE0HOTMAIL.COM
MOVING BOXES (S-M-L): 11 war-
drobes, mirrorpicture boxes, assort-
ed packing materials. $75. Carpet
remnants ($5-25), clear vinyl floor
mat for under desk ($20). Call 439-
1357.
HOTPOINT WASHER and dryer for
sale. $250 Call 931-0833.
:0R SALE HOUSE, APARTMENT 6 LANDl
IDEAL FOR HORSES AND PETS'
17 ACRES 110 ACRES PASTURE S ACRES. WOODED
W 3 6R RENOVATED FARM HOUSE AND SEPARATE
APARTMENT 8 MILES FROM ECU ANO MED SCHOOL
OVER 600 FRONTAGE ON NC 43 SOUTH ACREAGE &
HOUSES CAN 8E DIVIDED S289.S00
CONTACT OWNER 912-786-5592
ADVERTISE IN THE
CLASSIFIEDS. �
ATTN. ALL parents! Need a break?
Want a night outin without the
kids? Experienced sitter & recent
grad of ECU'S School of Education
will superviseinformentertain your
children. Anytime. Call Kate at 353-
3138.
HELP WANTED
CHILDCARE PROVIDER, M-F. 2-5
p.m $5hr. References required.
Contact Janet or Steve Porter for ad-
ditional info, 756-8523,
TOP DOLLAR for top nanny. Must
have experience with children, high
energy, confidence, and willingness
to work hard. Must be non-smoker.
Must have reliable transportation, a
good driving record and insurance.
College degree preferred, but not
required. References required.
Morning shift 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.
Afternoon shift 2:30 p.m. - 7 p.m.
Monday - Friday. Or someone willing
to work 7-7. Available now Call 321-
8658 or 931-0760.
SITTER NEEDED in my home for 6-
yr. old child, weekdays beginning
July 19 to August 13. No smoking,
safe driving record, own transporta-
tion. References. Call 321-8221.
PART-TIME library page - evenings
and weekends - 10 hours per week.
Shelving books, assisting librarians
as needed. Apply in person only 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays in the Child-
ren's Library. Sheppard Memorial Li-
brary, 530 Evans Street, Greenville.
No phone calls.
EXPERIENCED SITTER needed to
keep four year old daughter in my
home beginning Fall semester. Pre-
fer child development major. Non-
smoker, own transportation. Must be
able to provide developmentally ap-
propriate activities. References re-
quired. Call 931-7439 for interview
WANTED: PART-time students to
work approximately 12-15 hours per
week. Hours are Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m and
Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Pre-
fer a mature individual who can ass-
ist customers with selections, has
some product knowledge of carpet,
vinyl, textiles, interior decorating, re-
tail sales, calculations and measur-
ing, or who is willing to gain product
and carpet industry knowledge. Can
work under the supervision of the
warehouse manager in a non-air
conditioned warehouse environment
and lift up to 50 lbs Transportation
required. Call Debbie at Carolina Car-
pet Outlet at 752-6616 to schedule a
time for application No walk-ins
please!
PERSONAL!
HEALTHFITNESSSportsEnthu-
siasts needed. International compa-
ny expanding .Earn 30-60K year one.
Work around your schedule. Mail re-
sume to PO Box 30283, Greenville,
NC 27833-0283. Good attitude a
must!
FALL YOUTH Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation & Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15, in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James. Judd Crumpler or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
ATTN: EASTERN Carolina's finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Day and night shifts available. Earn
up to $1000 a week. Call Playmates
at 747-7686.
SEEKING COMMUNICATIONS
majors for afternoon and evening
work. No previous experience re-
quired. Paid training. Great working
conditions. Call 355-0210 for full de-
tails.
OTHER
SUMMER FUN - Free pictures
Looking for some summer fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me. I will give you free pic-
tures Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak, 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson. NC 27896-9001 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail hron-
jak@simflex.com. Check my web
site at www.simflex.comus-
ershronjak for more information.
BUYING GUITARS, amp Fender
and others, motorcycles, sports cars,
Rolex watches, etc Call 637-6550
before 8 p.m. on recorder. Please
call.
NEED A
JOB?
comics
Mama's By-product
Jeremy Falls
Four Seats Left
Cartoonists Needed
Apply at The East Carolinian, located on the
second floor of the Student Publications
Building. Positions open for Fall Semester.
ISSSitffe


Title
The East Carolinian, July 28, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 28, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1348
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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