The East Carolinian, July 21, 1999






i East Carolinian
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nn Online Survey
Do you think that ECU should have
allotted $55.1 million to the new
science and technology building?
Carolinian
Fats. Waller's music lives again.
See page 4.
www.tec.ecu.edu
WEDNESDAY. JULY 21.1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 54
New CRM doctoral degree offered this fall
Students enter unique,
challenging program
Kerry Pate
STAFF WRITER
The unprecedented rescue of the Cape Hatteras
Lighthouse from imminent destruction by powerful
erosion forces provided a perfect backdrop for the
introduction of KCU's newest doctoral program.
"Moving the lighthouse out of harm's way was
perhaps the best policy decision that could have be
made in this regard said Dr. Thomas Feldbush,
vice chancellor for Research and Graduate Studies.
"They could have made a terrible mistake if they
had tried to harden the shore or to put out jetties,
because of the impact that has both up and down
the coast
With the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse being
moved to a safe
location, ECU's
new doctoral pro-
gram in Coastal
Resources
Management is
ready to begin.
The formation
of this new interdis-
ciplinary doctoral
program can be
traced back nearly a
decade due to the
efforts of Dr. Bill
Queen, director of
the Institute of
Coastal and Marine
Resources (ICMR),
research faculty
within ICMR such
as Dr. Jeff Johnson
and several other
ECU departments
including Geology and Biology.
"The drive to establish a Ph.D. Program in
Coastal Resources Management was initiated in
1988 or 1989 by Dr. Bill Queen and the Institute of
Coastal and Marine Resources Feldbush said.
"The disciplines of social science, biological science
and geological science are already represented in
the ICMR
"As I understand it. Bill Queen, Stan Riggs
Geology and Bob Christian Biology had a major
impact and were the driving force in the develop-
ment of the Coastal Resources Management doc-
toral program said Dr. Michael Palmer, chair of the
History Department.
Dr. Palmer served on the CRM steering com-
mittee which coordinated and implemented the
new doctoral program, and also functioned as the
admissions committee for selecting the programs
Debbie Hume performs experiments in Marine Research Building.
PHOTO BY BILL KEITH
initial candidates.
"We are extremely enthusiastic about the
caliber of candidates and the quality of the
incoming class said Dr. Lauriston King, direc-
tor of the Ph.D program in Coastal Resources
Management and associate professor of Political
Science. "The program attracts a particular type
of student who is more willing to take a risk,
more intellectually adventurous and with expe-
rience in practical matters
One of only three doctoral programs at ECU
outside of the School of Medicine, the Ph.D.
Program in Coastal Resources Management will
welcome its inaugural class in the fall of 1999
with 12 full-time students specializing in four
distinct areas of concentration: Social Science,
Ecology, Geoscience and Maritime Studies.
"One of the real strengths of this program is
the fact it brought together biological sciences,
geological sciences, social sciences and maritime
studies Feldbush said. "There is no program
in the country today that combines those four
disciplines; this is the first. It is a totally unique
combination, but I think it
is the exact combination
for people who are going
to be involved in sustain-
able development and
ecotourism in coastal
regions
The interdisciplinary
nature of the doctoral pro-
gram is considered one.of
the primary strengths of
ECU's program when it is
compared to similar Ph.D.
programs around the
nation at other universi-
ties.
"We now recognize
that there is a need for a
doctoral program designed
to meet the needs of
resource management
practitioners and those
needs are based on the
integration of academic disciplines rather than
the pursuit of individual disciplines King said.
'There are very few Ph.D. programs in the
world that are deliberately designed to have an
interdisciplinary focus in coastal resource man-
agement. Other programs were based on
responding to the needs of international law of
the sea, territorial boundaries, fisheries deple-
tion, et cetera, but the approach was not to inte-
grate other (academic disciplines fully into the
program King said.
The program has attracted a great deal of
interest throughout the US and abroad from stu-
dents interested in this unique interdisciplinary
program.
"We are already receiving inquiries interna-
Sl F DOCTORATE PAGE 2
Director named to
CRM department
Kingseeksto
establish program
Ke rrv Pate
staff writer
The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse has to be moved because of erosion end other natural causes.
PHOTO COURTESY OF NC DIVISION OF TRAVEL AND TOURISM
Dr. Lauriston King, the new direc-
tor of the doctoral program in
Coastal Resources Management
(CRM), arrived at ECU in mid-
June prepared to meet the chal-
lenge of building a nationally rec-
ognized interdisciplinary doctoral
program investigating the environ-
mental, cultural, social and political
interactions along coastlines in the
United States and around the
world. He will also serve as an
Associate Professor of Political
Science.
"I've had a long-term desire to
take on the challenge to try and
build a program that drew the
social and natural sciences together
as a way of improving public poli-
cy King said.
Dr. King has held prestigious
positions in government and acade-
mia prior to accepting his current
position in the Division of
Research and Graduate Studies.
He was a senior scientist with the
Texas A&M Sea Grant Program,
Director of the Office of Research
and Sponsored Programs at the
University of Southern Mississippi,
and completed a 6-year term as a
social scientist with the National
Science Foundation's Office for the
International Decade of Ocean
Exploration.
"Lorry comes from a back-
ground of working in this field with
Sea Grant, so he is already connect-
ed nationally and internationally to
the organizations and federal agen-
cies that do the types of things we
are interested in accomplishing
said Dr. Thomas Feldbush, vice
chancellor for Research and
SEb KING PAGE ?
Bond package stalled after
Senate rejects revised version
House offer trims orignal
proposal by nearly two-thirds
Cory S h e e i. e r
NEWS EDITOR
The state Senate has rejected the
House's revised bond plan after the
House cut the figure from $300 bil-
lion to $1.2 billion last week.
The money was to benefit North
Carolina universities and communi-
ty colleges, with ECU slated to
receive nearly $79 million dollars
after the House cuts. While ECU
has no role in deciding if the plan
passes, most students would like to
see the plan go through.
"If it means better facilities for
us I definitely want them to pass
it said Andy Shaw, sophomore.
"This shouldn't be a partisan
debate, they should do what is best
for the students who attend the
state universities said Jarrett
Allred, senior.
Senate leaders say they will not
stay in session for the summer if a
plan cannot be agreed upon.
"We'll look at what's on the
V
table said House Speaker Jim
Black. "If we're close, we'll work it
out. If we're not, we're not going to
sit here all summer staring at each
other. We'll go home
ECU officials prepared a list
coinciding with the House cut,
backs that had $55.1 million dollars
being allotted for the new science
and technology building. Without
the bond proposal, the project will
be delayed.
While Senate leaders are not
happy with the final price of the
bond proposal, they say they ate
willing to compromise.
"Molly Broad (president of the
UNC system) wanted to have the
weekend to see if they could per-
suade enough House members to
accept a $600 million package for
the univetsities said Marc
Basnight, Senate president.
The Senate was adamant about
not putting the bond plan to a voter
referendum.
"It's a philosophical thing
Basnight said. "If you want to have
a West-Coast type of government,
where everything has to go to the
voters, that's what you'll get if we
start down this road. I hope we
don't ever get into a California type
thing
Skully's moves
to University Plaza
Skully's has moved from fifth street in downtown Greenville to it's new
location in the University Plaza. The store became widely noticed after it's
legal battle with ECU over the copyright to the pirate logo. Skully's
eventually retained the right to use the pirate logo on the front of their
store window and continue to do so in their new location.
PHOTO 6Y Will KEITH





2 Wrtmrtm J�l�21,1999
news
The East Carolinian
King
continued liom page I
Graduate Studies.
External research funding and
internship experiences are impor-
tant components of a successful
doctoral program which will create
opportunities for faculty
researchers, as well as both graduate
and undergraduate students
involved with the CRM program.
"He is in a terrific position to
help our faculty secure the resources
to help support the program and
their own research interests
Feldbush said.
A collaboration with Dr. Bill
Queen, director of the Institute of
Coastal and Marine Resources
(ICMR) at ECU, in The Coastal
Society initiated his journey to ECU.
King was aware of the program from
its inception and remained interested
due to a strong personal belief in the
program's goals and objectives.
"The faculty in the Coastal
Resources program has already
earned a national reputation in their
respective fields King said.
The CRM program s emphasis on
integrating the social and natural sci-
ences is considered unique among
similar programs.
" Dr. King) comes from a policy
background, and I think it is very
important for us to make the state-
ment that our program is heavily
committed to social sciences and pol-
icy Feldbush said. "If you look at
other coastal resource management
� programs around the country, they are
C dominated by biology or geology
Feldbush's feeling is that, in addi-
tion to being extremely well qualified
for ensuring the CRM program's
growth and success in the future. King
is a friendly and pleasant individual.
"I was extremely pleased we were
able to hire him for all the reasons I
mentioned, and besides he's an
. extremely nice guy Feldbush said.
Doctorate
uiiiiiiini'ii irnm page l
' nonally from students in places like
' China and the Philippines who are
interested in our program King said.
"This will be an important expansion
in the program for our students to gain
' an understanding of the coastal issues
in other parts of the world
, Faculty members have high expec-
� .rations for the new program and the stu-
dents who will be enrolled in it.
� "I see die coastal resources program
becoming a major program at ECU. I
think in this program we are training
people who arc ideally prepared to rake
�positions of leadership in government
and industry Feldbush said.
� The goal for die new program's fac-
ulty and students is to put emphasis on
.accomplishing a balance between
dnimans and the coastal environment
� "One of the things we will be striv-
ing for is this balance between conser-
vation, preservation and development
Vliat we are trying to do is explore
.alternative ways to conserve and wisely
use our coastal resources King said.
Country remembers
JFK Jr. for mystique
t N EW YORK (AP) - For one gen-
eration, he was the brave little sol-
dier: A small boy, in a blue coat and
shorts, saluting his father's casket on
his third birthday.
For another, he was The Hunk.
"The sexiest man alive said
People magazine. He was the heir to
. Camelot, the magazine publisher
who dated Daryl Hannah and
. Madonna, a glitzy jet-setter who
� .piloted his own plane. John F.
. Kennedy Jr 38, grew up in the pub-
lic eye, from that sad November day
.in 1963 until his plane was reported
.missing somewhere between the
Long Island coast and Martha's
. Vineyard, Mass. For many, he
became the embodiment of the
"Kennedy mystique" young, good-
. looking, seemingly invulnerable.
, Unlike other family members,
i Kennedy never entered politics,
although he was constantly ques-
tioned about a future in the political
arena. In 1995, he launched the
magazine George subtitled "not just
politics as usual A year later,
Kennedy married girlfriend Carolyn
Bessette in an ultra-secret wedding.
( Kennedy was a gossip column fix-
ture, demonstrating that his father's
sex appeal has passed on to the next
generation.
July 15
Minor Traffic Accident - A staff member and student reported a traffic acci-
dent involving their personal vehicles east of Financial Aid.
Endangering Behavior A student was found to have wrapped a towel
around a fire detector causing it to activate falsely.
July 17
Larceny from Motor Vehicle & Damage to Property - An officer discov-
ered a car parked north of the Rec Center with a shattered passenger window
and a stolen CDTape player.
July 19
Driving While License Revoked - A non-student was arrested for driving
while his license was permanently revoked after he was stopped for ninning
the stop light at Tenth Sl and College Hill Dr.
Crime Alert from the ECU Police Department
Over the past few weeks, numerous vehicles have been broken into at sev-
eral Greenville apartment complexes located throughout the city. This past
weekend, one vehicle was broken into near Mendenhall Student Center.
Please be aware of these crimes and take proper actions:
-Secure your valuables in the trunk of your vehicle when leaving
it unattended.
-Do not leave packages, cell phones, CDs or other valuables in plain
view.
-Repon suspicious activity or persons to the ECU Police
Department at 328-6786.
Brown & Brown
TtuBvequaMtyJustice
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
, .S A I
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
You drank.
You (kneed.
Youhadseo
fYisS'n3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evaiis Street (downtown near Courthouse)
����������ft
IuuIt tolls
-k
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. "AToucAOfClass"
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 7llfi-fi278






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WED & THURS
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ATTIC
NC's Legendary Nightclub,
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MIKE MESMER"EYES"
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Win Door Prize Tickets to see Chicago
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The fnct i� our
school systems are
not up 1� Pr or the
state, and unfortu-
nately .this country
is falling behind
many nations of the
world who have
soon the relationship
between education
nnd how it effects
the world.
ourview
Recently, ECU and the University of North Carolina system found them-
selves making significant cutbacks after the State House of Representatives
announced that costs and expenses had to be trimmed back, creating a $1.2
billion bond.
While $1.2 billion is a large amount of money, it simply is not enough to
cover the many costs and expenses which are created while attempting to
properly run a university.
Many funds desperately needed for the overall maintenance of UNC sys-
tem schools will be granted, however, other important requests must wait.
This seems to be the typical idea of a budget.
Unfortunately, these little things, which may not seem to be the most
important now, are some of the enhancements which are desperately need-
ed in the long run if universities and students are to keep up with the ever-
changing world in which we live.
While State Representatives were generous enough with taxpayer's
money to shell out such a sum it is still not enough. If students and the col-
leges are to compete, then more must be done to aid the educational process
and its advocates.
Currently North Carolina is far from the top of the national rankings in our
students' performance. Many throughout the state are wondering why, and
just as many seem to feel like they have a solution to the problem. I lowever,
few are willing to stand behind their ideas.
The fact is our school systems are not yet up to par, and unfortunately this
country is falling behind many other nations who have seen the relationship
between education and national standing. 'I"he only way to actually catch up
is to pour more money into the education system, not just for colleges and
universities, but for lower grades as well. While it may seem that we have
much greater global problems, if we do not act soon, we as a society will lie
facing dire consequences.
So please, contact both your local and national representatives. Tell them
that it is important to make sure that everyone has a chance at the most com-
prehensive and competitive education that can lie offered. Our future
depends on it.
OPINION
CHRIS
SACHS
Your guide to college fashion
The way you dress is as vital
to your future as the diploma
you will one day receive.
Attention freshman males, sum-
mer dudes, and guys with nagging
girlfriends. I have compiled a list of
the ways you need to dress to
achieve success and popularity dur-
ing your college years. The way
you dress is as vital to you r future
as the diploma you will one tlay
receive. The difference is that the
way you dress allows people to
make judgments about you from a
distance�something a diploma
cannot do. So pay attention, this
information could save your life.
To begin, you have to under-
stand the three basic types of men
in college:
a.) Those who are in a fraternity
b.) Those who want to look like
they are in a fraternity
c.) Those that don't have clue
Shoes
The main types of shoes to wear
are sneakers of the running variety.
Make sure the brand of sneakers
comes from a company that has a
minimum of 400 markup on all
their products, such as Nike,
Reebok, Adidas and New Balance.
This shows everyone that you have
money to burn on $200 sneakers
made of hand-polished kangaroo
bladders, and women pick up on
that keen sense of fashion and
monetary privilege. Kcds, Zips,
Pony and Champion are all out; you
will never make it with those.
Make sure to have the laces tied
loosely and never run in them�
this will only show that you have
physical motivation and that you
are wasting valuable drinking time
with such silly concepts like health
and fitness.
Socks
Socks are fairly easy to learn, as
long as you are a sucker for detail
like me. Now the socks must be
low cut, just above the sneaker or
below the ankle. Knee-high and
calf-length socks will only get you a
beating at upper class establish-
ments such as the Tres' ju Elbo
Roome and the very trendy Tu
Madre es Pantana Bob's. Lastly,
make sure the name of the sneaker
company making the socks docs
not match the brand of sneakers
you are wearing.
Shorts
During the hot summer months,
shorts are a necessity. Make sure
the shorts are tan khakis that stop
just above the knee. The shorts
need to be a bit baggy. This will not
only make you look thinner, it will
also provide ample room to sneak
graphing calculators into your
chemistry and math exams.
(Remember the bagginess for foot-
ball season; if the shorts are baggy
enough you can sneak in a keg.)
The shorts should be held up by a
belt, preferably black or dark brown
eel skin. But if you plan to transfer to
NC State in the future, a rope or
extension cord will do nicely.
Shirts
T-shirts are for the trendy college
student, and polo-type shirts can
also be worn if your T-shirts are
dirty. Now the T-shirts must be
loud (but not as loud as your girl-
friend though), and have incoher-
ent phrases written on them about
being tough, drinking, sex, fraterni-
ty life or surfing. If a polo shirt is in
order, make sure everyone can
clearly see the Ralph Lauren, Duck
Head, Tommy Hilfiger, Sears, et
cetera. If you cannot afford these
name brands, you are inferior and
should just drop out of school.
Hats
The last piece of clothing to com-
plete the college look is the hat. A
hat provides many valuable func-
tions. A hat will keep your friends
from seeing that you are paying
attention during class, which could
make your social standing take a
dive if your grades go up. A hat will
also keep professors from seeing
you cheat, help disguise your hang-
over and make your black eye less
noticeable.
The hat must be well worn and
dirty and have a logo of a school
other than the one you go to. Never
show show school pride, no matter
what That is a real no-no. Use
Duke, UNC, Notre Dame, and
other big name schools. Make the
rim of the hat slopes about 25
degrees and has a crease that looks
as if it was caught in a car door.
You are now on your way to
Coolsville, so go and spend trade
deficit amounts of cash on these
goods and practice your new look.
You will feel better, and hey. Visa
will hang a plaque in the chair room
with your name on it.
I will write later about acces-
sories: jewelry, tattoos, underwear.
Ladies, my tips for you will come
next week; be sure to have a pen
and paper ready.
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OPINION
SCOTT
WILKINS
Animals have rights too
One does not have to Ik a vege-
tarian to support animal rights.
I have always loved animals,
especially dogs. Animals can be our
pets and our friends. I have found
that animals have a therapeutic and
calming quality. Often, a dog or cat
is cheaper than a shrink. I have
always thought that it is a shame
that many apartment complexes in
the area don't allow pets. I think
that it is a nice thing to have your
faithful dog, cat or other animal anx-
iously awaiting your arrival.
Sadly, many people do not treat
their animals very fairly or kindly.
Often we see dogs and eats running
on the side of the road, left to their
own devices, many of which have
been abused or neglected by their
owners. Some animals are left out-
side in the intense heat of summer
or the bitter cold of winter without
proper shelter or any shelter at all.
My grandparents own a dog that
they discovered while it was using
an old chair as its shelter. They
found it in the middle of February
while it was still freezing outside.
The dog was cold and malnour-
ished. This dog was not aban-
doned; someone did own it. My
grandparents asked if they could
have the dog, and fortunately the
owner said yes. Now the dog is
treated very well. It has a nice
warm home with loving owners and
I swear that the dog gets more
Christmas presents than I do.
I am not the only person who
feels that animal cruelty is wrong.
Several years ago at ECU, there was
an organization called SETA, which
stands for Students for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals. The organi-
zation has had somewhat of a rocky
past here at the university, and it
has not been active for a few years.
The organization is still here on
campus and can be reactivated.
The organization has a small bud-
get, a faculty advisor, and a purpose.
SETA now needs student support.
Any student of ECU can join. Dr.
Kenneth Wilburn, a history profes-
sor here at ECU and faculty advisor
for SETA encourages all students to
join. SETA is not out to have its
members raid fur farms or personal-
ly hartxr cows in their homes to
avoid sending them to slaughter.
The organization is about protect-
ing animals and an animal's right to
humane treatment
One does not have to be a vege-
tarian to support animal rights.
Personally, I am not a vegetarian. I
do, however, believe that all of God's
creatures should be treated fairly and
animals are no exception. I think all
animals, whether they be dogs, cats,
chickens, cows, or any other animal
are entitled to a good home, food to
cat water to drink and someone to
care for them. Everyday animals are
abused and neglected. It happens
here in Pitt County, and it happens
everywhere else.
Pet overpopulation is a problem
as well. Not to sound like Bob
Barker, but having your pet spayed
or neutered is a good idea. Puppies
are cute, but hard to take care of and
even harder to find good homes for
all the time. Many animals you see
on the side of the road are strays.
This is a real shame because some-
one out there who could take good
care of it would probably love to
have that animal as a pet
SETA is not just about being
anti-fur or anti-meat As in my case,
one can be pro-animal while not
being a vegetarian. In my opinion
SETA is about respecting animals.
It's about trying to ensure that all
animals are treated fairly, with
kindness, dignity, and love.
If you are interested in SETA or
would like to know more about it
contact Dr. Kenneth Wilbum at
328-1029.
OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Mini-skaters take over college campus
eastern North Carolina,
there are not as many skate
parts as in other parts of the
country.
How many of you have been
peacefully going about your busi-
ness, strolling through campus,
only to be almost run over by a
mini-skater? No, this is not a new
skating team made up of special lit-
tle people; I am talking about the
middle school and elementary
school kids who come over here
and use the steps as jumps. I must
admit, they have given me more
than my fair share of giggles when I
watched them take unfortunate
spills while trying desperately hard
to be cool. Do these kids ever quit?
I have a younger brother myself,
so I can kind of understand the
obsession with finding a good place
to skate. In eastern North Carolina,
there are not as many skate parks as
in other parts of the country. Mini-
skaters must find a place to hone
their skills, and there aren't many
places that are more appealing to
them than a college campus that is
composed of bricks and cement.
True, the bumps and bruises have
got to be worse than they would
skating on an asphalt street, but
you can't possibly trick-skate on a
plain old street! In order to be a
professional skater, you must prac-
tice. That's exactly what these kids
are doing; they are practicing to be
the best.
I have to admire the persever-
ance of the mini-skaters. Through
bruises, broken bones, scratches,
threats from police officers and
parental scolding, these kids don't
stop. They have a goal, and they
will face any obstacle in the way to
accomplish it. (Okay, okay, I am
overdramatizing this a little bit, but
stay with me.) I wish that there
were more kids who wanted to get
out and do something. Obesity in
children would not be such a prob-
lem if every child skated. Boredom
would not be a constant whine if all
children found something to do
that interested them that was
cheap and that they could do them-
selves. Though the mini-skaters
are an inconvenience, they are
motivated and active. If you see
another one rushing by you on
campus, just think, he's trying to do
well!





4WM�iriay. J�ly2fc1899
Th� East Cirolinii
Tht East Carolinian
Raleigh Record and CD Show
features musical oddities
Unique CDs,
LPsforsale
NANCV W UK K.I. KK
ST.UK W HI IK H
What do you get when you cross a
room full of rare vinyls and a herd
of music collectors - the Raleigh
Record and CD Show. Show Logic,
a small production company, puts
on this convention of music codec-
tables three times a year in Raleigh,
N.C. Mike Pottorff, the owner of
Show Logic Productions,
started as a vendor him
self. He specialized
mostly in imports
of heav
metal, psy-
chedelic,
and rare
classic,
rock,
albums,
and he
travels
t h el
south
e a s t
from
Virginia to
Georgia
putting on
shows like
these to buyv
sell and
trade nearly
every style ol
music imaginable.
'This is one of my bigger shows
with 500 in attendance at our
January show, we have finally start-
ed to create some momentum with
the music collectors Pottorff said.
"It's always great to connect with
fellow collectors, and this show is
the best way to keep the interest up
in music collecting
This show featured vendors
from local areas such a Winston-
Salem and Franklinton and from as
far away as Richmond, VA The
selection of music medium was var-
ied as well, ranging from CDs
to vinyls, both LPs and
45s. There was other
paraphernalia from the
music world such as back-
stage passes, rock and roll
comics, promotional pho-
tos, posters, tour pro-
grams and even under-
wear.
One vendor, Jon Berlinerman
from Richmond, displayed a pair of
Whitesnake thongs. "Last week I
had a pair of Led
Zeppelin
them said Pat Boyles, the owner
of Jukebox Oldies in Winston-
Salem. "I attend and sell at shows
all around, as far out as San
Antonio, Texas
Most of the vendors had a
wide selection of musical
styles to choose from, bi
leach had a specialty.
IThere was every t
including jazz, R&
heavy metal, oldies,
classical, psychedelic, clas-
sic rock, funk, soul and,
country. One vendor,
Melton's Musicf
Memories out ol
Franklinton, N.C, spe-
cialized in rare Andy
Griffith LPs and 45s. The1
prices at the show were as
varied as the musical styles.
There were vinyl 45s for
quarter, LPs and CDs from
and a black label Elvis Presley
1,45 for $500.
Beatles White Album
Show Logic does a
show in Raleigh three
times a year. You can
attend the next
Raleigh
"Rice" is
grotesque
Novels theme
tragically violent
Sis an WnitiiiT
PK.VITHK.1 KIIITOI
"Boxer
"shorts Berlinerman
said. He also displayed an album
entitled "The Pope Smokes
Dope" by David Peel and the
Lower East Side.
Where do they find these out-
landish musical articles? "I have
had a lot of my collection for years,
and I find things at shows like
these, flea markets, garage sales,
you know, wherever I can get
The ardor of the buyers
was eclectic. There were peo-
ple just picking up some CDs
they had been wanting, some
were looking to expand their vinyl
collection and then there were the
hard-core collectors like Jennifer
Stein.
"I don't do as much collecting as
I used to Stein said. "The most
I've ever paid for an album was
$900. It was an autographed John
Cale LP
Most of the collectors at the
show were a little more down to
earth with their purchases. "I found
a lot of great Beatles records for my
collection said Heidi Stover, a col-
lector from Greenville. "I think the
most I've ever spent was $30 on the
Record and CD show on Sunday
September 12 from 10:00 a.m. until
5:00 p.m. at the Marriott on
Cilenwood Avenue, across from
Crabtrce Valley Mall. Attendees arc
encouraged to bring clean unwant-
ed records or CDs to sell or trade.
For information on Show Logic-
Productions or the Record and CD
show, you can reach Mike Pottorff
at (912)923-3370.
In a novel, you expect a grain of
hope, happiness or goodness to
emerge during the course of the
story, but in "Rice" by Su Tong,
none of these happy themes can
be found.
The main character. Five
Dragons, begins in poverty and
starvation, and his life ends with a
mass of sores and a corrupted soul.
There is nothing in this novel that
gives you the hope that there is
goodness in this world; it is a book
in which suffering conquers all.
Five Dragons runs from his vil-
lage home to the city to find food.
His first encounter in the city is
with the local gang, the Wharf
rRats, and he gets his face
"grounded into the dock for a piece
of meat. From here on out, he is
the victim of evil and malicious
behavior as well as the cause. He
becomes a Wharf Rat, and he kills
for greed and power. I lis family is
corrupted as well as himself. His
oldest son kills his little daughter
because she tells her parents that
he has stolen the family gold by
drowning her in rice.
I cannot think of another book
that I has been more disappoint-
ing. I began reading a book that I
expected to be about the Chinese
culture and the life of a normal
person within that culture, but
instead I find a man who is so
twisted by greed and evil that he
can find no good in himself or
those around him. Some value can
be derived from the novel because
it is a very poignant story of human
suffering and tragedy, Su Tong
uses interesting stylistic tech-
niques and the dialogue is excel-
lent. This is not a book that I
would recommend for pleasure
reading, but it is a switch from the
literature that I normally read and
it has a unique style.
The journeymasters
coming to Greenville
The David Nelson
Band enchants
SlSAS Wit I (HIT
KKATI BKS KIM I �K
Different musical sryles all flow
effortlessly from the talented hands
and mouths of the David Nelson
Band. They play a variety of music
including country-rock, rock and roll
and psychedelic improvisations.
Because of the expertise of the
members of the band, they are not
tied to a single style. They are not
tied to a particular place either, for
the David Nelson band is a traveling
group.
David Nelson began his career in
the late '60's and early '70's playing
. with Jerry Garcia and Robert
; Hunter in the Wildwood Boys. This
' band was the precursor to the
. Grateful Dead. Nelson appeared on
several Grateful Dead albums, and
he was a member of the Good Of
Boys and the Jerry Garcia Acoustic
! Band as well. He has had a variety
! of experiences in performing and
musical styles, and his unique tal-
ents are complemented by those of
his equally talented band.
There are six band members,
and they have all played in profes-
sional ensembles. Barry Sless, the
electric and pedal steel guitarist,
played in the San Francisco band
Kingfish and Cowboy Jazz. Mookie
Siegel, who sings as well as playing
the keyboard and the accordion, is
well-known as a musician in his own
right, and he played in Kingfish and
Ratdog (a post-Grateful Dead
ensemble). Bill Laymon, the bass
guitarist and a vocalist, toured with
Jefferson Starfish, NRPS, JGB, and
the Kingfish. The drummers are
Arthur Steinhorn and Charlie Crane.
Their credits include -Uptown
Rhythm Kings, NRPS, Kingfish and
Cowboy Jazz.
"The DNB is about the music,
the people, about the journey and
others on that journey. About con-
versations and ideas, musical and
otherwise. Their music says that in
an instant said Larry CJood, a
writer for the Aspen "Daily News
Their work is often more of a story
than a stylistic chant like other mod-
ern bands. Their latest CD,
"Visions Under the Moon was
released on April 15th by High
Adventure Records. It was recorded
before a live audience in Portland,
Oregon in September of 1998. It
features songs entitled "Absolutely
Sweet Marie "Haunted Man" and
"Road to Armageddon
"The music on the new CD is a
hybrid of live performances
enhanced in the studio said band
SEE MM PAGE 4
"Ain't Misbehavin coming soon
The Fats Waller
Musical takes the stage
Si s.n V Kill Hi
IK Ml HKS KIHTIIH
The review "Ain't Misbehavin is
coming to ECU featuring profes-
sional actors from around the coun-
try, professional local musicians and
student musicians. This musical
ran on Broadway from 1978 until
1981, and it has been playing at
smaller stages since. It features
several of the musical compositions
of Fats Waller, such as "Lookin'
CJood but Feelin' Bad "Jitterbug
Waltz" and "This Joint is Jumpin
This performance is a review
instead of a typical play, and there
are some differences. "The perfor-
mance is not heavily dependent
upon story lines said Jeff
Woodruff, Managing Director for
the East Carolina Summer
Theatre. There is no set script for
the actors, instead they only have a
list of the way that the pieces will
go in sequence.
"This review has a 1930's
Harlem Renaissance feel, and
artists such as Duke Ellington and
Cab Galloway were emerging dur-
ing this time period Woodruff
said. "The music is stylistically
Jazz and Ragtime
The musical is "a joyous cele-
bration of Fats Waller's incredible
Amy Jo Phillips and Renee Chambers Licaiga are dressed for the times.
FILE PHOTO
appetite for life according to the
East Carolina Summer Theatre.
The cast for this performance at
ECU is composed of various actors,
but only one has acted in this
review before. Amy Jo Phillips
(Armelia), who has acted on
Broadway in "Show Boat" and "St.
Louis Woman" as well as in several
national tours, has played a part in
this review before.
Renee Chambers Licaiga
(Charlaine) is performing again on
stage in America after touring
Europe. She has acted in several
productions in America and Europe
both on tour and off-Broadway,
such as "Smokey Joe's Cafe" and
"Legends in Concert She is a
choreographer, a dance teacher
and a model as well as an actress.
Stan Brown (Ken) is a member
of the faculty in the Department of
Theatre at Townsend University.
He has been working in the
United Kingdom and the United
States for 15 years as a professional
actor on both the stage and televi-
sion. He has performed in "The
Boys Next Door" and "In the Heat
of the Night
Eldric Bashful (Andre) has per-
formed in theatres around the
world. He has played in perfor-
mances such as "My Fair Lady"
and "Show Boat All of the actors
in this review are talented and
experienced, and although they
have only been rehearsing as a
company with the East Carolina
Summer Theatre for two weeks,
the play is expected to be a suc-
cess.
In a play where the characters
individual personalities shine
through, expertise and talent aie
two necessary components in the
actor's repertoire. With the playjs
excellent actors and classic music, It
is sure to be a hit. I !
Tickets are still available for all
nights of the performance, which s
running July 20 - 24. Contact the
McGinnis Theatre Box Office at
(252) 328-6829 for more informa-
tion, i
s
81
hair
WITH THIS C
ANY OTHER
a
Clip these cou
Th
The
Joyn
Stuo
Al





Thl Eist Carolinian
features
Wedneiday. July 21. 1999 5
it Carolinian
5" is
sque
theme
violent
km; in
Kill III K
cpect .i grain of
or goodness to
: course of the
by Su Tong,
py themes can
haracter, Five
in poverty and
life ends with a
i corrupted soul,
n this novel that
e that there is
orld; it is a book
conquers all.
jns from his vil-
:ity to find food,
iter in the city is
fang, the Wharf
gets his face
dock for a piece
:re on out, he is
I and malicious
the cause. He
Rat, and he kills
it. Mis family is
as himself. His
� little daughter
her parents that
family gold by
:c.
if another book
lore disappoint-
ng a book that I
dm the Chinese
ife of a normal
at culture, but
man who is so
ind evil that he
I in himself or
Some value can
e novel because
t story of human
gedy, Su Tong
stylistic tech-
alogue is excel-
: a book that I
d for pleasure-
switch from the
rmally read and
le.
3on
d off-Broadway,
Joe's Cafe" and
icert She is a
dance teacher
:ll as an actress,
en) is a member
e Department of
send University,
forking in the
and the United
as a professional
stage and televi-
formed in "The
ind "In the Heat
(Andre) has pef-
res around thfc
Jayed in perfor-
'My Fair Lady"
All of the actors
re talented and
! although they
rehearsing as i
e East Carolina
for two weeks,
ted to be a suc-
i
�e the characters
malities shin);
: and talent art
nponents in thj;
With the play)
S classic music, t
'
I available for al
rmance, which ts
'A. Contact tlifc
e Box Office it
x more informa-
I
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fWUPRIMO
PARKING
For the Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is reserving 6 parking
spaces for you. Visit the I Oth Street
location and fill out an entry form for a
! chance to win one of our Primo Parking
Spaces for a semester. (MSLVem
The spaces are within easy walking distance of the Recreation Center,
Joyner Library, Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins Art Building, and
Student Health Department.
No purchase necessary to win.
Winner will be notified by phone.
Spaces are good August 18th through December 8th
Courtesy of
McDonalds � Coke
Band
continued from page 4
member Mookie Siegel to "The
Music Box TheTr music, as well as
the story that it tells, is intriguing
and fun to listen to alone or with
friends; If you want to hear more
about the David Nelson Band, they
are playing at Peasant's on
Thursday, July 29. For more infor-
mation about the concert, call
Peasant's at (252) 752-5855. For
mor information about the band,
you can go to their website at
www.nelsonband.com. This
promises to be an interesting perfor-
mance, and judging from what I've
heard so far, it is not an event to be
missed.
Meet die People
� Name: Jason Evans
� Year in school: junior
� Major: Secondary Math Education
� Hometown: Hoiiister, NC
� Quote: "Treat the earth, and all that
dwells thereon, with respect This is
one of the Ten Indian Commandments.
Pirates Cove
APARTMENTS
WaJ
$100 off
Deposit
Call
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hone: 752-9995
But With Parents In
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with panic buttons in
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Well lighted grounds
and parking lots.
Free roommate
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Fully furnished.
On ECU Bus Route.
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
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"Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
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Now Pre-leasing
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3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
Aqua Theatre
Thursday, July 21st
9:00 p.m.
Outdoor Pool - SRC
TOE FACULTY BatedR
Herrington High, Ohio, a small-town
high school. All of a sudden, the teach-
ers start changing attitude. When Casey
and Delilah have to hide in a closet in
the teachers lounge, they witness the
strangulation of Nurse Harper by two of
them. Shocked they manage to flee.
Only moments later, the nurse seems to
be very alive, but also somehow
changed, like all the teachers and most
of the students. Only Casey, Delilah and
four others seem to be suspicious. Proof
of an alien infection is finally brought by
the chemistry teacher, who also points
out a way to kill the infected humans.
The plan now is to get the queen,
before the aliens can spread out over the
whole country For a good ,lma call Th9 Student union
Hotline @ 252.328 6004 or visit our
website @ www.ec� edustudentunlon
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SAT
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l" The Best in Swing





Thi East Carolinian
sports
Will ECU ever score t
a shot at the ACC
Transition from CAA
to ACC still elusive
PKTKR Dawvoi
sports Kinri�
Despite many attempts in previous
years, ECU has still not been able
to receive recognition from the
ACC conference.
Many times in past the years,
ECU has attempted to make the
transition from the Colonial
Athletic Association to
the Atlantic Coast
Conference. Due
to other circum-
stances (and rul-
ings by ACC
boards), they have
not been able to do so
yet
While the CAA
not a bad confer-
ence for any team
to be in, the level
and caliber of
play in the ACC
is much more com
petitive. Many
today's top athletes
started their careers
for teams in the
ACC.
Players such as
Michaef Jordan and
Mia Hamm of the
rWenryVorld Cup winning
Jpyhejl soccer team both
Surfaced through intense
athletic programs at UNO
Others such as Tim Duncan
and even Deion Sanders had
careers which spawned from the
ACC.
While 'ECU may be a top team
in its conference, but many still
feel that the programs credibility
would soar to a higher level than
ever seen before with admission
into the ACC. This is not just in
basketball but overall; the whole
athletic program would probably
discover a wealth of benefits from
such a deal.
ECU has tried in
past years, but
it has not been
given the opportu
nity to get its
in the door. Past
games such as
Peach Bowl of 1992
left many wondering if
ECU could be a force
the ACC. Many realized
ECU had the strength to
compete with ACC teams after the
tunning defeat of N.C. State, but
other concerns were involving the
way that fans carried themselves
in the post-game celebrations.
Fans rushed the field and tore
up the end zone hoping for
souvenirs. When the end
zone was gone, they
tore down the goal
post.
While ECU may
be looked at as the
r e d - h e a d e d
stepchild of the
ACC, there is no doubt
that the fans' attitude
still proves to be the
only constant in the
games. Rulings to
decide if ECU
should make the
transition from the
CAA to the ACC
were postponed
until fans could
carry themselves with a
better attitude.
ECU fans
however, have always
carried themselves with the
same attitude. If they are
treated as a second rate team,
then they have something to prove
to all the teams who give little
respect to the program - the chip
on the shoulder syndrome. If you
have something to prove and you
prove it, your persecutors will Find
different things to criticize next.
This causes the cycle to
continue.
One day
other schools
might run out of
things for ECU to prove
order to be in the top
divisions. In past years,
the school has proved to be
a worthy opponent on the
field, but this upcoming
year has much more to offer for
the ECU program than many real-
ize.
With possibly the toughest foot-
ball season ever for ECU, the play-
ers will find themselves not only
playing their CAA conference but
also battling with some of the top-
rated schools in the nation. Games
such as the season opener in
Ericsson Stadium in Charlotte are
only small indicators of much big-
ger things to come. Later games
against the Miami Hurricanes as
well as a midseason battle against
ACC foe Duke Blue Devils will
also provide an intense match-up
which may lead fans and others to
keep a close eye on the ECU pro-
gram.
Perhaps the most important
step towards ECU getting the
recognition deserved will be the
season ending match up against
N.C. State. While State may not
be a powerhouse in the ACC or
the NCAA, the sad fact of the
matter is that ECU is judged on
how well we do against State.
If we heat State and have an
amazing year against the many
other difficult opponents we are
scheduled to play, then ECU
might have proved themselves
worthy of more competition of that
Wedneaday, July 21, 1999 Q
Umpires j
plan to resigjfi
ECU faces a tough season of high-stakes battles with top-ranked schools.
FILE PHOTO
caliber. Maybe later down the road
ECU will prove capable of playing
in the ACC. If we lose against
every other game and beat State,
ECU fans will be happy.
Unfortunately, If we lose against
State and lose most other games
this season, we'll be right back to
square one.
ESPN pays more than $1 million
for rights to air opening game
PHILADELPHIA (AP) U&.
Major League Baseball umpiijei,
stuck in a labor dispute with owrj-
ers and angry over a recent si$-
pension, said almost of all thipi
will resign Sept. 2 and skip the
final 4 12 weeks of the season
The move was announced foC;
lowing a sometimes raucous
meeting of the Major Leagii
Umpires Association at S
Philadelphia hotel.
"The tension is much greatp
than it's ever been said Richie
Phillips, head of the umpires!
union. "Baseball is in a state oT
chaos
Phillips said umpires would
form a new corporation on Sept. �
Baseball would have to eontracj
for umpires' services with th$
new body and the umpires would
supervise themselves and make
their own schedules, he said. ;i
Owners seem to have adopted
an attitude that umpires can b�
replaced, likely with college anj3
high school umpires.
"Unless I'm mistaken, I dorft
think these tactics have con-
vinced a single person to be sup-
portive said Sandy Alderson,
executive vice president of base-
ball operations in the commii-
sioner's office. "That woutil
include the fans, the media and
baseball itself
Tension has been high since
September 1996, when player
Roberto Alomar was suspended
for five games for spitting hi
umpire John Hirschbeck's face.
Umpires considered the suspen-
sion inn light.
Umpires also were angered,fay
a July 2 decision to suspend
umpire Tom Hallion for three
days for bumping a player during
an argument.
There are 68 Major League
umpires, and 57 of them attended
the meeting. The other II were
expected to announce their resig-
nations in the next few days.
The umpires have a contract
that runs through this season and
pays them between dlrs 75,000
and dlrs 225,000 a year. The deal
prohibits them from striking.
Figurethreetimes
more than usual profits
St SANS K Mlt.KNKKVICII
KKMUI) WH I IK K
ECU fans may feel discouraged
that the Pirates' opening football
game was moved five hours away to
Charlotte's Ericsson Stadium, but
the decision proved to be an asset to
Pirates athletics.
ESPN Regional offered ECU a
large amount of money to move the
Pirates' opening game on
September 4th against West
Virginia from Greenville to
Charlotte.
"They (ESPN Regional 1 offered
a significant amount of moneyin
excess of $1 million said Norm
Rcilly, Sports Information Director.
The money received from
ESPN Regional is nearly three
times more than ECU would have
made if the game were played at
Ficklen Stadium.
"It b additional revenue for ath-
letics this year Rcilly said.
The money has helped the uni-
versity to complete two projects
ECU will be seen on ESPN in the home opener in Charlotte.
FILE PHOTO
that otherwise would have been dif-
ficult to do. Harrington Field has
new lights that cost over $300,000
and the track resurfacing which cost
$243,000.
"The money enabled us to do
those two projects said Henry
VanSant, Assistant Athletic
Director. "It's been a good help to
the overall athletic program
ESPN Regional, which is based
in Charlotte and affiliated with
ESPN, looks to promotes events
that it believes would be appealing
to the public and improve ratings as
well as revenues. ECU versus West
Virginia is one such event.
"It (ECU versus West Virginia)
is an attractive match-up, an attrac-
tive event to bring to Charlotte
Reilly said.
The game should attract a num-
ber of fans from both teams
because the location of the
Charlotte stadium is closer to the
West Virginia area than some games
than will be played later in the year.
"It's a pretty short trip for West
Virginia people VanSant said.
"There should be a good crowd
there from both teams
ECU is no stranger to Ericsson
Stadium, a stadium that can hold a
crowd of 73,250. The Pirates
played on that same field on
November 30, 19 when they
crushed North Carolina State
University with a final score of 50-
29.
"Despite the bad weather, there
were about 60,000 people there
Reilly said. "We had 35 to 40,000
people so we outnumbered State's
crowd
ESPN 2 will also show ECU's
home game versus Miami at 6 p.m.
on September 25th.
There are no other definite plans
for any other ECU games to be
broadcast on ESPN 2. The network
has a 12-day rule. It waits until 12
days prior to games to designate
which games will be shown on tele-
vision.
Cuban basketball
players defect
SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico (AP)
Four Cuban basketball players
might have defected during an
Olympic qualifying tournament,
the organizing committee said.
"The information we have is
that there are at least two of them
and possibly more Salvador
Villela, president of the organizers,
said Sunday.
Cuba had only eight players in
uniform Sunday for its 88-52 loss to
the United States that eliminated
the Cubans from advancing to the
next round.
The team arrived at the arena
without three of its four leading
scorers: Lazaro Borrell, a 26-year-
old center Roberto Herrera, 24, a
guard; and Angel Cabellero, 28, a
guard. A fourth player, 23-year-old
center Hector Pino, also was miss-
ing.
Herrera is the son of Cuban
Basketball Federation president
Ruperto Herrera. His brother,
Ruperto Jr defected in Argentina
in May.
"We don't know if they defect-
ed or if they are with some Puerto
Rican women coach Miguel
Oilderon said. "What I can say is
that they are not in the arena
A spokeswoman for the
Immigration and Naturalization
Service in Washington said she had
no information oh any Cuban
defections in San Juan.
Borrell was averaging 21.3
points in the tournament, and
Herrera and Cabellero were the
third- and fourth-leading scorers for
Cuba. Pino had not played in
Cuba's first three games.
"They (the players) have not
told us anything Calderon said.
"Until they tell us something, we
cannot make statements
None of the Cuban players
would comment before the game.
One of them, center Amiel Vega,
drew his finger across his mouth
when asked what had happened.
Two other Cuban players walked
away when approached by a
reporter.
The Pan American basketball
federation confirmed four missing
players. No one could immediately
say for certain they had indeed
defected.
Said Tomas Herrera, president
of the Cuban delegation: "It would
be a disgrace if we talk about these
players as defectors and then .they
appear. When they appear, then a
statement will be made
The Cubans lost all four of their
games in the 10-nation tourna-
ment They did not play Saturday
following their loss to Argentina on
Friday,
l
7 Wedneaday. J
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7 Widnudiy, July 21, 1998
.July
21 1999 JQ
3ires
Ct
i Juan.
s averaging 21.3
tournament, and
ibellero were the
-leading scorers for
d not played in
: games.
players) have not
g Calderon said.
us something, we
tements
e Cuban players
: before the game,
enter Amiel Vega,
across his mouth
lat had happened,
an players walked
pproached by a
nerican basketball
rmed four missing
could immediately
they had indeed
I lerrera, president
legation: "It would
ve talk about these
tors and then they
icy appear, then a
e made
lost all four of their
10-nation touma-
nor play Saturday
ass to Argentina on
sports
THE EAST CABOUNIAN

A Cut Above
Tanning Salon
iresigi i
j! P
IA (AP) IW.
iseball umpires,
spute with ovjri-
er a recent s-
nost of all thif in
2 and skip the
of the season
s announced fb&
;times raucous
Major Leagu'
ciation at J
is much greatest
en said Richie
f the umpires
is in a state oi
umpires would
ration on Sept. S.
have to contract
rvices with th$
e umpires would
elves and make
les, he said. 2
to have adopted
umpires can be
with college ainl
ires. f
nistaken, I dorft
:tics have co4-
terson to be sufS-
iandy Alderson,
resident of base-
in the commuV
"Thut woutl
, the media and
been high since
6, when player
was suspended
for spitting m
irschbeck's face.
:red the suspe'n-
wcre angered,by
ion to suspend
lallion for three
g a player during
3 Major League
of them attended
le other 11 were
junce their resig-
:xt few days.
have a contract
h this season and
veen dlrs 75,000
a year. The deal
rom striking.
tball
Student Discounts
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Specials
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The top two teams advance to
the 2000 Olympics in Sydney,
Australia.
"The defections make you
think about how lucky we are to
live the way we live while mem-
bers of the opposite team are try-
ing to leave their country U.S.
forward Tom Gugliotta said.
Cuba has a history of defec-
tions at sports events, especially
in baseball and often in Puerto
Rico.
In 1993, basketball player
Andres Guibert defected at a
tournament in Ponce. He later
played briefly for the Minnesota
Timberwolves. He now plays in
Europe and is attending the
qualifying games in San Juan.
"I wasn't surprised that they
defected, but I was surprised at
the players who defected
Guibert said, referring to Borrell
and Caballero. "They seemed to
me like very disciplined guys
Two other Cuban basketball
players defected during the 1994
world championships in Toronto.
The most prominent baseball
defector is Orlando "El Duque"
Hernandez, who fled Cuba in
December 1997 and signed with
the New York Yankees. There
was also Hernandez' half-broth-
er, Livan Hernandez of the
Florida Marlins and U.S. Major
Leaguers Rene Arocha, Osvaldo
Fernandez, Rey Ordonez, Ariel
Prieto and Rolando Arrojo.
In May, Cuban baseball coach
Rigoberto Bctancourt Herrera
defected to the United States
during the national team's visit to
Baltimore for an exhibition game
against the Orioles.
Coming to
East Carolina
University
Entertainer and
Motivational
Speaker
Dan Clark
Dan Clark is an internationally recognized i
tainer and consultant, having been named "one of the top
ten speakers in the world" by Achievers Canada and
Achievers Europe.
As an author, Dan is the primary contributing author to
the New York Times Best Selling series, "Chicken Soup far
the Soul and the author of ten of his own highly
acclaimed books including, "Puppies for Sale which was
recently made into a motion picture starring Jack
Lemmon.
in us for this inspirational and entertaining presentation!
�pun.
ea- ��I
Wednesday, July 28, 1999 ��
right Auditorium � 9:00 a.m.
Doors Open 15 Minutes Prior to Show Time.
look Sale and Autographs Available for a Limited Time
Following Each Show
FREE to ECU staff,
faculty, and
students!
Call 328-6910
or email:
WolfcJ@mail.ecu.edu
for seat
availability.
Presentation Sponsored by
ECU Business Services,
the Division of Administration
and Finance,
and the ECU School of Medicine
This show It not open to the general public; however, guests of
staff, faculty, and students may he able to be accommodated.
Call 328-6910, or eijof Julh Wolfe at Wbrfejemall.ecu.edu for
teat availability.





8 Wednesday. July 21. 1999
ROOMMATE WANTED ROOMMATE WANTED
ECU AREA: one and three bedroom
'houses. One bedroom $210; three
"bedroom $600 a month. Pets OK!
?�Available August 1st. Call 830-
9502.
2 BEDROOM. 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
$400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price. 551-3426.
ABOVE BW-3 2 BR. 1 bath. $675
month. Walk to ECU. Call 252-726-
8846.
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath home on Bilt-
more St. No pets. Graduate students
"preferred. Washer, dryer, dishwash-
er, big back yard. $750month.
Beautiful home. Call 931-0449. leave
message.
THREE BEDROOM house two
blocks from campus available first of
jjuly or August. Prefer responsible
students. Pets OK. All major ap-
pliances including washerdryer.
Call 321-8937.
TAKE OVER lease by August. 2 bed-
room, 1 12 bath. $450 a month.
Close to campus. Call 754-2840.
please leave message.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available' now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
�Street, near campus. 758-6596.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month, available now. 125
Avery Street or 705 East First Street,
near campus. 758-6596.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS. 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management. ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
TWO BEDROOM, two bath fully
furnished apartment, free cable,
sewer and water. Located on ECU
bus line. Available August 15th.
School year lease. No pets. $500
par month. Call 758-5393.
112 A and B Holly Street 2 bed-
rooms. Close to campus. 809-1922
Pets ok wdeposit.
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
BR. 1 bath duplex 8 minute walk to
ECU. Central airheat. Prefer serious
student. $190month 12 utilities.
551-3871.
MF NEEDED for 2 BR. 1 bath locat-
ed across 5th St. from Wright Place.
$175 a month plus 12 utilities. Call
752-9383. please leave message &
.
MALE OR FEMALE roommate
Wyndham Court, short walk to cam-
pus, on bus route. Rent $213 per
month, half utilities. Call Charles at
752-7971.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
"three bedroom. 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities. Call Mindy at 355-2956.
Near ECU campus.
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex, Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU, on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374. leave mes-
sage. Call now.
ROOM FOR rent: BW-3 apartment
1600 sq walk to campus & down-
town. $283.00month. Call 413-
0330 & leave message or ask for
Jon or Dennis.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse. On bus route. Call
355-0276.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Aug. 15.
2 bedroom. 1 12 bath spacious
apartment. Rent is $230 12
phone and utilities. For more details
call Mike at 353-8950 after 6 p.m.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
ROOMMATE NEEDED on Aug. 10.
Rent is $175 plus 13 utilities. Large
room in 3 bedroom house 1 block
from Rec Center. Call Kate or Steph.
931-9015.
NEEDED: FEMALE roommate to
share two bedroom townhouse in
Wilson Acres. $270 includes basic
cable, water, sewer. Needed to move
in by'second week in July. Call 355-
2940. ask for Sabrina.
GRAD STUDENT seeking mature
non-smoking female roommate to
share 2 BR. apt. in August.
$210month plus 12 utilities. Call
Allison, 919-828-6183.
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air, ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $250 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
FEMALE ROOMMATE to share
three bedroom. 2 12 bath town-
house. Spacious. Washerdryer
included. $225 per month plus 13
utilities. Call Mindy at 355-2956.
Near ECU campus.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Any Condition Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, � CD Players -
Home, Portable
Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:00
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
T S W A P S II O P
D.J. FOR HIRE
jjftffi fk
FOR ALL FUNCTIONS ff CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
NON-SMOKING Female roommate
needed now to share 2 BR, 112
bath apt. 12 rent utilities. Clean,
serious student preferred. Call 752-
8647. Mel.
ROOMMATE WANTED Undergrad.
graduate student room open now.
$162.00 a month, no deposit need-
ed. Fully furnished on ECU bus ro-
ute. Call Chris, 752-9038.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR. 1 BA apartment on 5th
St. $260 a mo. util. Available Au-
gust 1st. 703-532-0317.
FOR SALE
FULL BLOOD American pit bulls
ADBA registered, 2 males, 1 female,
red nosed. $300, $350. 752-5760.
HOTPOINT WASHER and dryer for
sale, $250. Call 931-0833.
RELOCATION SALE: Matching
sofa, chair & ottoman, oak entertain-
ment center & bookcase, 9 drawer
dresser, nightstand & other house-
hold items. Open house 7-24-99 8
a.m. until. Call for more info. 752-
0828,
VINTAGE MARSHALL JMP. 4x12
slant cabinet, digitech DSP-256 Ef-
fects processor $550.00. Also Mac
computer with Hewlett Packard
printer, desk writer. Clarisworks w-
processing, good condition.
$150.00. Call Jen Joey. 830-0648.
PENTIUM 120, 16 megs RAM 1.2
gig. 28.8 modem, CD ROM 14" col-
or monitor, speakers. Office 97. Win.
98 and more, needs sound card. Call
David. 353-5103. $225.
RESPONSIBLE, ENERGETIC indi-
vidual needed to provide part-time
child care for 2 12 year-old boy.
and after school care two days per
week for his three brothers.
Tuesdays and Thursdays PM.
Wednesdays and Fridays AM.
Starting August 17. References
required. Call Fiona Cook 758-6787.
FOR SALE HOUSE. APARTMENT b LANDl
�I0CAI FOR HORSES AND PETS'
17 ACRES 110 ACRES PASTURE. 5 ACRES, W00DE0I
W 3 BR RENOVATED FARM HOUSE AND SEPARATE
APARTMENT B MILES FROM ECU ANO MED SCHOOL
OVER 500 FRONTAGE ON NC 43 SOUTH ACREAGE b
HOUSES CAN BE DIVIDED S2B9.500
CONTACT OWNER 912-786-5592
SERVICES
JESUS IS THE
J ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
Daytime 756-3315 or
714-018 Ministry Outreach
anytime after 7pm.
321-6012 confidential.
comics
The East Carolinian
HELP WANTED
ATTN. ALL parents! Need a break?
Want a night outin without the
kids? Experienced sitter & recent
grad of ECU'S School of Education
will superviseinformentertain your
children. Anytime. Call Kate at 353-
3138.
HELP WANTED
ATTN: EASTERN Carolina's finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Day and night shifts available. Earn
up to $1000 a week. Call Playmates
at 747-7686.
SEEKING COMMUNICATIONS
majors for afternoon and evening
work. No previous experience re-
quired. Paid training. Great working
conditions. Call 355-0210 for full de-
tails.
E-REP Trainees needed part-time. $7
billion dollar communications com-
pany looking for representatives. Re-
quires Internet e-mail access. $400
per week part-time. Details at
www.e-repsUSA.com
PART-TIME library page - evenings
and weekends - 10 hours per week.
Shelving books, assisting librarians
as needed. Apply in person only 9
a.m. to 6 p.m. weekdays in the Child-
ren's Library. Sheppard Memorial Li-
brary. 530 Evans Street. Greenville.
No phone calls.
FALL YOUTH Soccer Coaches. The
Greenville Recreation 8 Parks De-
partment is recruiting for 12 to 16
part-time youth soccer coaches for
the fall youth soccer program. Ap-
plicants must possess some knowl-
edge of the soccer skills and have
the ability and patience to work with
youth. Applicants must be able to
coach young people ages 5-15. in
soccer fundamentals. Hours are
from 3 p.m. until 7 p.m. with some
night and weekend coaching. Flexi-
ble with hours according to class
schedules. This program will run
from September to mid November.
Salary rates start at $5.15 per hour.
For more information, please call
Ben James, Judd Crumpler or
Michael Daly at 329-4550 after 2
p.m.
SITTER NEEDED in my home for 6-
yr. old child, weekdays beginning
July 19 to August 13. No smoking,
safe driving record, own transporta-
tion. References. Call 321-8221.
RESPONSIBLE, ENERGETIC indi-
vidual needed to provide part-time
child care for 2 12 year-old boy,
and.after school care two days per
week for his three brothers.
Tuesdays and Thursdays PM.
Wednesdays and Fridays AM.
Starting August 17. References
required. Call Fiona Cook 758-6787.
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL is ex-
panding. Full-time and part-time po-
sitions available immediately and in
August. CDFR and ELEM majors.
Call 355-2404 for more information.
NOW HIRING adult entertainers
and dancers. Up to $1500 weekly.
Must be at least 18, have phone,
transportation, be drug free. Call
758-2737 for information.
HELP WANTED: seeking a student
to vacuum and dust my house.
$10hr. Please call 353-0888. Char-
acter references required.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
HELP WANTED
CHILD CARE provider needed.
Child care provider needed begin-
ning August 17th Monday- Friday
from 3:15 -5:30 p.m. Duties include
picking child up from school, super-
vising homework, and transporting
child to extracurricular activities. Ex-
tended care is needed on Tuesdays
until 9 p.m. Must have a valid driv-
er's license, dependable transporta-
tion, and excellent driving record,
prefer ECU student majoring in edu-
cation, child development, nursing,
or psychology. Hourly rate $7.00 hr.
Will consider mature high school
student. Three references required.
Call 758-8228 to schedule an inter-
view.
WANTED: PART-time students to
work approximately 12-15 hours per
week. Hours are Monday through
Friday from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m and
Saturday 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Pre- ,
fer a mature individual who can ass-
ist customers with selections. has;
some product knowledge of carpet,
vinyl, textiles, interior decorating, re-
tail sales, calculations and measur-
ing, or who is willing to gain product
and carpet industry knowledge. Can
work under the supervision of the
warehouse manager in a non-air
conditioned warehouse environment
and lift up to 50 lbs. Transportation
required. Call Debbie at Carolina Car-
pet Outlet at 752-6616 to schedule a
time for application. No walk-ins
please!
SUMMER FUN - Free pictures.
Looking for some summer fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me, I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson, NC 27896-9001 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail hron-
jak@simflex.com. Check my web
site at www.simflex.comus-
ershronjak for more information.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
DOES SUMMER school have you
stressed?! Come on out this Thurs-
day night. July 22. at 9 p.m. and re-
lax by the outdoor pool at the Stud-
ent Recreational Center and watch a
movie! Free to all SRC members.
HELPFUL, CARING people needed
for volunteer work in Pitt County.
They give help, comfort, and support
to terminally ill patients and their fa-
milies. Beverly Home Care Hospice,
353-3326 or 1-800-685-4525.
FRISBEE GOLF singles: if you're in-
terested in playing frisbee golf sin-
gles, be sure to meet at the frisbee
golf course from 3 p.m6 p.m. on
Wednesday. July 21.
Four Seats Left
Jason latour
Mama's Byproduct.
Jeremy Falls
JJ
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H)u OGN'T U)ArjT ToPi-rtH tuir�
AM cf TuCJf TW.vfcs "Hv
&�we? prs crust UvtcoS
KlfJr�i rt
Cartoonists Needed
Apply at The East Carolinian, located on the
second floor of the Student Publications
Building. Positions open for Fall Semester.
v


Title
The East Carolinian, July 21, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 21, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1347
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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