The East Carolinian, July 14, 1999






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inf Online Survey
Should ECU spend the money to
build a parking deck?
American Red Cross needs your blood.
See page 4.
www.tec.ecu.edu
WEDNESDAY. JULY 14.1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE S3
Joyner offers many
resources to students
Special Collections department
added after renovations
New structures also part of Joyner's renovation.
PHOTO BY ROBIN VUCHNICH
LkAnne Johnson
staff writer
The Special Collections
department in Joyner Library
includes the North Carolina col-
lection and the East Carolina
manuscript collection for the
use of students, faculty and the
general public.
The North Carolina collec-
tion is located on the third floor
of Joyner Library and contains a
wealth of information centered
around Eastern North Carolina.
"The rtdrtfGrfolina collec-
tion has a dual purpose; its first
purpose is to meet the curricu-
lum of ECU's North Carolina
studies minor and other majors
that might find this information
helpfulsaid Maury York, head
of the North Carolina collec-
tions. "The second being just to
providekrtpwjrJe of North
Carolina's history iaits,cirizefll"
The North Carolina collec-
tion was begun in"th'e,i94g!fi(by
Wendell Smiley, ifonfterJBCU
librarian. Over theyeartK'TJie
North Carolina collection has
A student relaxes in the comfortable confines of Joyner's new interior.
FHOTO BY RUBIN VUCHNICH
grown to include over 20,00 vol-
umes.
The collection is comprised of
over 4,000 cartographic maps, cur-
rent newspapers, rare books and
broadsides, microforms and elec-
tronic databases to help students
and faculty find what they need.
The collection also includes a
vertical and clipping file which has
been maintained since the 1920's.
These files include newspaper arti-
cles with useful information about
Tarheel people, places, events and
other subjects. The clipping files
are updated every week by the
North Carolina collections staff for
the use of students and faculty.
"The clipping file has been espe-
cially useful to me in some of my
research said John Whitman, junior.
Another part of the Special
Collections department is the East
Carolina manuscripts collection
which is located on the fourth floor
of Joyner Library.
"The collection began in 1966 as
a part of the history department but
then became a part of Joyner library
in 1976 said Mary Boccaccio,
curator of manuscripts.
The manuscript collection con-
tains old journals, letters, ledgers
and other documents that have
been donated to the manuscripts
collection over the years. There is
also a rare books collection con-
tained in manuscripts.
Within the manuscripts collec-
tion, there are specific collections
such as the Hoover collection
that deals with communism in
America. Another collection is
the naval and military collection,
and it has become a leading acad-
emic repository for the preserva-
tion of materials pertaining to the
U.S. Navy.
Many of the materials found
in manuscript collections and the
North Carolina collection are
fragile or need to be repaired.
These items are sent to a doc-
ument conservation lab and photo-
graphic dark room to help maintain
them. Also, students and faculty
who wish to do research in the man
uscripts collection are allowed to
use only pencil when studying
items and sometimes might be
asked to wear gloves to prevent
wear and tear on the documents.
None of the manuscripts collec
tion can be checked out, but some
of the items can be copied for ten
cents.
'The manuscripts collection has
been very useful to me as a history
student at East Carolina and it is a
great resource for primary docu
ments said Elyssa James, sopho-
more.
For further information on the
special collection department, call
Maury York for North Carolina col
lections at 328-0252 or 328-6671 for
special manuscripts.
To look up information for either
department or to e-mail questions, go to
www.lib.ECU.eduNCCollPCC
ncchomehtm for North Carolina col
lections and go to www.lib.ECU.edu
SpclCollManuscriptman.html for
manuscripts collection.
$1.2 million bond plan
passes through House
Wish list cut
by mone than half
Cory Sheeler
news editor
The state House of
Representatives finally agreed to the
$1.2 billion bond plan that is to bene-
fit North Carolina universities and
community colleges.
The House trimmed the original
Senate approved plan from $3 billion
to $1.2 billion, nearly two-thirds of the
original figure, and has added a refer-
endum that would require the plan to
get voter approval. The referendum
is scheduled for May 2,2000.
ECU had planned on receiving
$191 million in the original bond plan
but will have to setde for $78 million
and cut their wish list by more than half.
The bond money is expected to
be used for new buildings as well as
building renovations.
"Our universities and community
colleges are expecting unprecedent-
ed enrollment growth, but most cam-
puses don't have adequate facilities to
serve these new students said
Senator Ed Warren, D-Pitt "This
plan would help them build new
facilities and repair the ones that arc
outdated or falling apart"
At the top of ECU's list of priori-
ties is a new science and technology
building that will cost $55.1 million.
The Nursing and Allied health
complex was the project the suffered
the most, dropping from a $46.9 mil-
lion budget to a $2.3 million budget
after the cuts.
Flanagan building renovations
were also severely damaged by the
House cuts and dropped from $13.4
million in proposed renovations to $0.
Although ECU was forced to cut
their original budget by 59 percent,
Chancellor Richard Eakin said he is
still pleased with the outcome of the
proposal.
"This plan is one we certainly
could live with said Eakin. "This
would certainly meet our most press-
ing needs
Eakin said that although the
revised list is not what they had origi-
nally planned on, they had an assort-
ment of things to fall back on in case
to proposal was revised.
"We have been trying to out-guess
what would happen (in the legisla-
ture) Eakin said. "We had a number
of different plans
Members of ECU Student
Government Association could not
be reached for comment.
ECU Wish List
Below are the projects that ECU officials plan on spending the money from proposed bonds
for North Carolirui universities and community colleges. The two columns show what ECU had
planned on spending and their revised spending plans after the House cuts.
Resources are readily available for research.
PHOTO BY ROBIN VUCHNICH
Proj
Uivcp. Building eangpsj
Un.iu.wt Building renmarn n
f JavmnMii improvements
Medical campus library and stiKt spuee
(njnsnuctuic
New materials warclrnit
li.ri million
New director of Health Promotion
Totals
$191 million
$78.8 million
Dr. Stmub looks to build task
fom to combat substance abuse
Kerry I' i i:
SI All WRI I ER
Dr. Betty Straub, ECU's newest staff
member in the Division of Student
Life is full of energy and ideas. She
arrived at ECU on June 15 from
Kentucky where she directed a drug
prevention program for seven coun-
ties and served as a part-time faculty
member at the University of
Louisville.
"What's been exciting for mc since
I've been here is being able to use all
this knowledge I had accumulated,
and the experience of teaching in the
classroom and working with students
is now coming to bear Straub said. I
just feel like I am exactly where I
ought to be
Straub is currendy the associate
dean of Student Development and
Director of Health Promotion for ECU.
She said she sees numerous simi-
larities in both regions and is pleased
with ECU's proximity to the coast of
North Carolina.
"We've got a lot of good initiatives
going here; that's one of the things
that really impressed me about
ECU Straub said. "I had been work-
ing in an area very much like this and
I feel at home, except a lot closer to
the beach
Dr. Straub has been a very active
advocate for health issues. She is
working closely with people like
General Barry McCaffrey, Director of
the US Office of National Drug
Control Policy, members of Congress
and agencies such as the Department
of Education and Center for
Substance Abuse Prevention to
ensure programs receive the neces-
sary funding and utilize a well-round-
ed approach to health and substance
abuse issues.
"I'm on a Southeast advisory group
to create a national prevention system
and in that capacity I'm trying to help
them see that until we get to a more
holistic approach we are going to keep
getting very poor results Straub said.
"In order to get behavioral change
you can't be that specific for one
problem it has to be a holistic
approach, which is what health pro-
motion is all about
Her supervisor, Dr. Kris Smith,
Dean of Student Development, com-
mented that Dr. Straub's emphasis on
wellness and work experience will
serve the students of ECU very well.
"Betty brings a lot of experience to
the position said Smith. "One of the
things that we are really interested in
is promoting a very broad sense of
wellness amongst our students.
"She comes with a combination of
education from a variety of health
education, nutrition, and counseling
backgrounds so that not only does she
have experience but a good founda-
tion educationally Smith said.
Utilizing a holistic approach to
health promotion will require Dr.
Straub to work with many different
departments on campus.
"She will work very closely with
Student Recreation Center staff,
Student Health Service staff, the
nutritionist and Dining Services, with
the health education programs and
with the students to provide educa-
tion Smith said.
The emphasis on alcohol abuse by
underage drinkers will also be one of
her primary duties in her new position.
"I will be working realty closely
with the dean of students to expand a
campus community coalition where
we can work together to see what stu-
dents need to reduce high risk drink-
ing Straub said.
"One of the saddest things I've
heard was when we talked about why
kids begin heavy drinking before they
reach legal ages Straub said. "They
drink because they like the person
they become when they've got alco-
hol in them. For me, it's addressing
what can we do to help students like
who they are without requiring a sub-
stance to change them
Student input and collaboration
are very important to Dr. Straub and
she encourages students to contact
her anytime they have an idea or a
problem.
"I want students to be involved
and help steer me in the right direc-
tion Straub said. "I think they are
the experts because I don't remember
what it was like to be 18 or 19
Dr. Straub is looking to utilize as
many students and volunteers as pos-
sible who will act as her consultants.
She will have opportunities available
for students with majors that require
community service hours, assistant-
SEE STRAUB PAGE 2
Piggin'out
The afternoon pig pickin' is offered to orientation students in front of
Mendenhall on the brick yard on their first day at ECU. A wide variety of food is
offered. WZMB plays music for the new students snd their parents. The last pig
pickin' will b� held Thursday. July 16, but the food is only offered to students in
orientation and their parents.
PHOTO SY ROBIN VUCHNICH
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2 WrtMrin.Jnly14.198S
news
Parking project underway
Gravel lots paved to
yield 512 new spaces
Com SlIKKI.KR
Mil KIHTOI
ECU has started co pave parking lots on
Reade street in order to help alleviate
parking congestion on campus.
The gravel lots were used by stu-
dents, but officials decided to upgrade
the lots by paving them. While the pro-
ject will cost an estimated $1.1 million, it
will still be cheaper than building the
parking deck that many students have
been requesting.
"A parking deck would solve a
majority of the campus' parking prob-
lems said Cyndi Bowman, senior.
"The university should be willing to put
the money up for the project"
While students think that the uni-
versity should put up the money for
such a project, North Carolina state law
prohibits state funds that are allotted to
universities to go toward parking.
Therefore, all money for parking
renovations or a possible parking deck
would have to come from student and
faculty parking fees.
"There is a state statute that says
parking projects at any state facility must
be paid for by the people who park
there said Layton Getsinger, associate
vice chancellor of administration and
finance.
Parking permits will be $120 a year
this fall. This is an increase from last
yeaft cost of $96. The increase will go
towards paying off a loan that was taken
out for die north Ficklen lot
The Reade street project is being
funded by reserves that were on hand
from previous collections and increases
in fees that the university had accumu-
lated.
Chancellor Richard Eakin said that a
parking deck has not been ni led out of
the university's plans.
"It has been discussed on many
occasions Eakin said. "It's certainly
something we continue to consider
However, a parking deck would cost
the students an extraordinary amount of
money according to Bruce Flye, univer-
sity architect
"The number that's usually thrown
out is about $10,000 per space Flyc
said. "And I've heard as low as $8,000
The current project costs $2300 per
space, which is meager in comparison to
what a paiking deck would cost stu-
dents.
Eakin realizes that a such drawbacks
would make parking decks unappealing
to students.
"It's so expensive per spacc.more
than people wish to pay Eakin said.
Straub
continued from page I
ships, internships and similar pro-
grams in other campus departments.
"We are trying to put together an
Advisory Council comprised exclu-
sively of students who are typically
not involved or selected to be leaders
and who are very representative of
the students who may suffer from
the types of problems needing to be
addressed Straub said.
Students interested in learning
more about the Advisory Council
should contact Dr. Betty Straub at
252-6793 or by email at:
straubb@mail.ecu.edu. She is looking
forward to hearing from you.
"scene
July 7, 1999
Auto Accident - A staff member backed out of a parking
space and struck another car in the lower Minges park-
ing lot.
Damage to Property - A non-student reported damage to
construction equipment in the Reade Street lots.
Found Property - A staff member discovered a marijua-
na plant growing in front of the mechanical room north
of Scott Hall. There was no suspect information.
Underage Drinking 6 Driving - An orientation student
was observed making an illegal left turn and later reg-
istered a .06 alcohol concentration.
July 11. 1999
Traffic Accident - An auto accident occurred between
two students at the intersection of Chamberlain �
Pigford Ct and Faculty Way. No charges were filed.
July 12. 1999
Auto Accident - A staff member and a student were
involved in an auto accident in the parking lot south of
Brewster. No charges were filed.
Auto Accident - Two students were involved in an auto
accident on College Hill Drive. No charges were filed.
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ix

SILVER
BULLET
Dolls
"AToucfiOj'Class
756-6278
TUESDAY
Lingerie Night
WENESPAY
Amateur Night and
Silver Bullet Dancers
THURSDAY
Rock-N-RoU Night
FRIfcSAT
Silver Bullet Exotic Dancers.


Uoi5MUaW�ofGre�TilleM!MAlL(Belii�d.LUdinS�Ticeit;Loio)
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3
u i
Qet PW���od
eyebrow,
oaPcartila9�
navel
WewillbeAtany
competitor's advertised
prices!
Large selection of imported
And domestic jewelry!
� We spedofze m tartooJag owl
bodv Dierdee oarv
� Wt trt GreeavaVi tdy bed
oeporhieat wtpRrttl sreow
� We ktv been hi bnhwss over 8
years wit 15 years experieece
Tuesday-ThuRsday: 1-9 p-nv; tVicUyi 1-10MTM Saturday: 12-10 pjn.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
Aqua Theatre
Thursday, July 15th
9:00 p.m.
Outdoor Pool - SRC
A Simple Plan Rated r
Two brothers, one a mild-man-
nered hardware store manager
(Paxton), the other an unemployed
sk (Thornton) and a friend stum-
ble onto $4.4 million cash in stolen
money. The newfound booty leads
Paxton character, Hank, (with
help from his cunning wife) to
great lengths to keep the money
a secret from kxsd authorities.
The three men begin to doubt
each other's trust, which leads to
shocking results of Kes, deceit,
and eventually murder.
For a good time call The Student Union
Hotline @ 252.328.6004 or vltit our
website @ www.ecu.eduetudentunlon
a
'�I
'�'�2
The Ent Carollnla
t
atl
as t ha
L,other
injur
P
should
ct
these to
'therewillbe t
the Southeaste
'�Fair (yes, this
It's a rainy day 1
City. It's one of
makes you want
Hijvc other thin
for to do today b
a$ lucky enougl
oil a rainy day,
No, this is not
OPINH
Housekeeper
overworked,
are often aske
unhealthy woi
I would like to t
ry to thank the
Nancy Jenkins
Housekeeper's.
during the wi
Furthermore, th
and inspiratior





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as dedicated and
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injuries caused by
torsrxxr equipment should not be one of
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ECU has suffered enough at the hands of inadequate funds. Finally, there
is enough money in the budget that the track teams can have a new track to
practice on.
We realize that track and field evqnts do not have as big of an audience here
at ECU as football or basebalf(possibly because there is no competition track
in Greenville), but they deserve new practice areas as much as everyone else.
The track athletes are just as dedicated and hard working as other athletes,
and injuries caused by poor equipment should not be one of the things that
these athletes have to worry about
A new track may also increase the skill level of the track team. Many stu-
dents who the school has attempted to recniit are turned off by the mediocre
facilities that are offered to track athletes, and they have opted to go to anoth-
er school besides our beloved ECU. How can we expect to draw the
strongest shot putters and the fastest runners if the track is abhorrent? We
simply cannot.
The funds for the new track are not being provided by our student fees, sur-
prisingly enough, but they are being supplied by ESPN. Yes, ESPN, that
great sports network, is going to pay $1 million for the first football game that
ECU is going to play. The money from that game is leing split up among
various sports teams, including the track teams. Can you believe $1 million
for one football game? We would not pay that outrageous fee for the plea-
sure of one game, but part of that reason is because we consider Wendy's fine
dining (compared to McDonald's).
ITiankfully, someone stepped up to sponsor KCU's sports programs. The
track teams surely are happy for this improvement, and wc are happy that
someone could supply them with what they so desperately need.
OPINION
SCOTT
WILKINS
Cure for the rainy day blues
15th
C
it Union
�it our
Lunion
There will he other days to go to
the Southeastern Animal Filter
�Fair (yes, this is a real event).
It's a rainy day here in the Emerald
City. It's one of those days that just
makes you want to sleep. However,
iliave other things that I would pre-
fer to do today besides sleep. If you
a(C lucky enough not to have to work
oh a rainy day, try reading a book.
No, this is not one of those "The
More You Know" things or Barbara
Bush trying to encourage literacy.
Curl up with a good book on a rainy
day with the radio down low and the
lamp glowing near you. I see nothing
wrong widi that If books are not your
forte, then maybe pop one of your
favorite movies in the VCR, get a bag
of really fattening potato chips, a
glass of sweet tea and veg out. Go
ahead and pig out - you're worth it.
However, I do encourage you to
remember the motto, "The bigger
the snacks, the bigger the slacks
For the neat freak, rainy days are
good days to catch up on the clean-
ing. Even the non-neat freak can use
rainy days to catch up on taking the
pizza boxes and beer cans to their
new home in the dumpster. The
bugs may hate you for it, but they
will pick up the pieces and move on.
Of course while you're at the dump-
ster, be on the lookout You never
know what tantalizing morsel of pre-
owned furniture lurks there.
1 hinging out with friends is a good
rainy day activity as well. Sitting
around shooting the bull, listening to
music or watching "The Blues
Brothers" or "Animal I louse" for the
hundredth time (two of my personal
favorites) are excellent ways to spend
a gray, soggy afternoon.
You could use a rainy day to le
sentimental and call mom. Mom will
love it if you call just to catch up.
Surely her varicose veins will twitch -
a good sign. Here's a twist; on this par-
ticular call, don't ask for money.
Naturally you can call back later in
the day and ask for it if need be.
Rainy days are good days to
catch up on schoolwork. Of course,
not many people do this, but I just
thought I'd mention it.
If you must stay inside, put your
time to good use. There will be
other days to go to the Southeastern
Animal Fiber Fair (yes, this is a real
event). I encourage you to reac-
quaint yourself with your hobby. My
particular passion is history. Use the
rainy days to find yours.
OPINION
LETTER TO
THE EDITOR
Housekeepers typically are
overworked, underpaid and
are often asked to work under
unhealthy working conditions.
I would like to take this opportuni-
ty to thank the Honorable Mayor
Nancy Jenkins for proclaiming
Housekeeper's Appreciation Week
during the week of June 27.
Furthermore, the Mayor gave a fine
and inspirational speech at the
,
Housekeeper's complaint
Housekeeper's Appreciation Event
held on June 25 at the CM. Eppes
Recreation Center.
The event honored all house-
keepers within the surrounding
communities for their dedication
and hard work. It is uplifting for us
housekeepers to be recognized and
appreciated. Mayor Jenkins has
shown compassion and caring for
all workers and unselfishly gives of
herself. She is a remarkable elected
official. We only wish the same
could be said for the administration
at East Carolina University.
Housekeepers typically are over-
worked, underpaid and are often
asked to work under unhealthy
working conditions.
The past year's incidents involv-
ing the discrimination and harass-
ment at East Carolina University
only dramatizes the plight of the
housekeepers. Chancellor Eakin
has repeatedly refused to meet
with housekeepers to address our
concerns, and it was a shame that
not a single ECU administrator
attended the event Our situation
remains unchanged and an argu-
ment can be made that it has gotten
worse. It is time for change at ECU.
Verna Taft
Greenville
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OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Living in a mannerless society
lived in the residence halls
for two years, and anytime you
walked down a guys hall, the
sound of gas escaping was sure
to be heard.
Belching, passing gas, and spitting:
all of these things used to be taboo
to talk about, much less do in pub-
lic. If one happened to pass gas,
they would say excuse me, blush
deeply, and pretend it never hap-
pened. Now, thanks to our man-
nerless society, these disgusting
habits are glorified.
It began with television.
Characters like Bamey from "The
Simpsons" made belching cool for
men as well as boys. This trend of
disgusting behavior spread from
belching to passing gas. Spitting,
on the other hand, has been around
and grossing people out as long as
cowboys and baseball. I will never
understand the draw of chewing
tobacco or the necessity of spitting
when you are merely chewing gum,
but I suppose that it's a guy thing.
Thanks to television, we live in a
society of belching infidels.
People have no shame. I lived
in the residence halls for two years,
and anytime you walked down a
guy's hall, the sound of gas escap-
ing was sure to Ik heard. I have
even known guys who claim that
their expulsions smell GOOD!
Get a clue please. Your gas does
not have a pleasing and wonderful
aroma, and I, as well as the other
people around you, do not want to
, smell it!
I understand that there arc
sometimes when you just can't stop
it, but unless you are sick or have a
medical disorder, those times do
not occur very often. I am not ask-
ing all of the men in the world to
stop being who they are and
become dainty doilies, but please
understand that every woman
dreams of a man that has manners.
(Not that men are the only perpe-
trators of polite society, I know girls
who can burp the entire alphabet)
I just wish that I could live one day
hearing please and thank you, not
seeing crotch scratching or nose
picking in public, and smell only
the pleasant aromas that are sup-
posed to fill the air. Until burping
goes out of style, I guess that this
day will never come.
OPINION
CHRIS
SACHS
Tech school deserve respect
Why is it that universities
accept credits from technical
colleges at 23 their value (if
they accept them at all) yet uni-
versity students get full credit
for summer courses?
Hello, gang. I'm here with a ques-
tion that has, for a while now, been
making me itch. I hope many of you
have been thinking the same thing
and I would love to get the answer
to this educational enigma. I Iere is
the Q: Why is it that universities
accept credits from technical col-
leges at Zi their value (if they
accept them at all) yet university
students get full credit for summer
courses? Let me expand on this.
Traditionally, technical commu-
nity colleges have quarters that run
only 3 months whereas, as we all
know, use semesters at 4 months.
The way I see it, the universities
feel that courses taken at communi-
ty colleges are worth less than those
of the same subject taken at a four-
year university. This is highly sus-
pect in itself, but really gets my
panties in a bunch is that universi-
ties let their students take summer
courses - which are taught at Mach-
s speeds, I'm talkin' almost a chap-
ter a day! - and then give full uni-
versity credit for the course. Now
the law says that schools have to
teach the same stuff, so what what
the universities are saying is that if
you learn the material in three
months you are academically inferi-
or, but if you take the same course
in one month you get full credit
Where is the logic in that?
Now, I transferred here from a
community college and ECU
accepted all my courses except for
Developmental Psychology. I made
an A at the tech school, and my
professor, a wonderful teacher, had
a Ph.D. As soon as I got here I was
forced to take the course over again,
and a Ph.D. in psychology raught
the course. Guess what grade I
made? Right! An A. What a stupid
waste of time that was!
Research aside, learning is learn-
ing. The teachers at community
colleges are equal to, and in many
cases, better than professors at uni-
versities. I have had wonderful pro-
fessors here at ECU and I have also
had some that wcrewellsome
just sucked. But you will find that
in every college and university. AS
far as experience is concerned, my
professor for Anatomy and
Physiology back at the tech school
taught at UNC for 20 years. My
Algebra and Statistics professor
used to teach at NC State, and my
Chemistry teacher was a part-time
professor at Duke. That's just a few
I choose to mention. Not every
Ph.D. in the world can teach at a
university, there is just not enough
room. I had excellent teachers at my
community college but because
some bureaucratic nimrod in the
university system thinks communi-
ty colleges reek, I lost a bunch of
credits. The jerks!
Now if you wanna break it down,
you are only in class during summer
semesters for 25 days. That's 5
weeks, minus weekends, and that's
not including holidays and such. So
if you're taking Calculus 12-bascd
Biochemical Aspects of Analytical
Physics in Vibrational Systems of
the Neuropathological Species in
25 days, you're ah" set But you take
Public Speaking at a tech school
and lo-and-behold it's only worth a
fraction of the one you would take
at a university. Yeah, that makes
sense.


itmmi





4 Wadnasdav. July 14. 1999
fcati ires
The East Carolinian
Thirty minutes of your
time couM save a life
Millions give their blood
to the American Red Cross
Si san Wrmilit
FKVI'I HKS KI1ITOH
Blood; when people think of blood,
images of accidents, violence, and gun-
shots normally enter their mind. They
very rarely think of blood as one of the
most precious gifts that they can give.
The American Red Cross was founded in
1881, and since then, their efforts have
saved millions of lives through blood
donation, disaster relief and medical assis-
tance. The Red Cross is one of the pri-
Participants endure a needle stick to benefit others
FILE PHOTO
mary collecting agencies for human blood,
and they give this blood to hospitals world-
wide. There are other agencies that assist
in the harvesting of healthy blood, and one
of these such agencies is the American
Association of Blood Banks.
According to the American Association
of Blood Banks, 14 million units of blood
are donated each year from eight million
donors in the United States. This blood
goes to accident victims, people undergo-
ing surgery and patients with Leukemia,
cancer, and other diseases. It may sound
as if there is plenty of blood to go around
from these statistics, but this is not true.
There .are many blood drives a year at a
variety of locations to encourage people to
donate because there is so little blood and
so many who desperately need it. Some
people make the decision to become
donors because they have witnessed the
effects of the terrible shortage of blood.
Joe Schlattcr, a junior at ECU, saw a
friend of his suffer from injuries that
resulted from a car accident. He experi-
enced the shortage through all his friend
and the difficulties he had getting the
blood.
"I started donating regularly after wit-
nessing what people go through trying to
get blood Schlattcr said. "It changed my
perspective. If thirty min-
utes will save somebody's
life, it's selfish not to
Volunteers, like Joe and
many other ECU students,
supply all of this country's
blood, according to the
American Association ot
Blood Hanks. The require-
ments in order to give
blood arc simple. 'lou
must be at least 17 years
old, in good health, and
weigh at least I Id pounds.
Tattoos and body piercings
can also prevent blood
donation, but only for a
limited time. After this
time period is over, a per-
son can donate as often as
every 56 days. In only 30
to 45 minutes, a pint of
blood is given. A pint may
not seem like a lot, but it
someone is in need of
blood, that pint can mean the difference
between life and death.
The shortages are worse during certain
times of the year, and the summer months
are the worst times for blood levels in the
I'nited States. "During the summer, we
are on restricted or emergency levels for a
particular blood type almost everyday
said Becky Baker, the Communications
Representative for the Red Cross in the
Mid Atlantic region. If the Red Cross is on
emergency release for a particular blood
type, then they do not have enough to
supply the hospitals with all of the blood
that they need to perform scheduled surg-
eries and other procedures. This can post-
pone operations and other important pro-
cedures. The reason why the Red Cross is
on emergency release so often is not
because of a shortage of eligible people,
but because of a shortage of willing
donors.
"Only ten percent of the eligible popu-
lation give blood regularly; if everyone
who was eligible gave, we would not have
the shortages that we do said Baker.
The blood that is donated by commu-
nity members stays within the local area
unless there is an emergency elsewhere.
"All donations are given to a community
supply said Baker. "We try to maintain
healthy levels in the community supply so
that we are ready to give other regions
blood if there is an emergency. If some-
one has donated, we do everything we can
to get them the blood that they need. We
may be on restricted levels, but we will try-
to get that blood
The Red Cross urges people to give
and help alleviate these shortages through
promotions at schools and community
events as well as the Bloodmobile pro-
gram. This past week, bloodmobiles went
to many local cities including Wilson,
Winterville, Morehead City and
Jacksonville. There were several opportu-
nities to give blood right here in
Greenville as well. Although many people
ignore this plea for healthy blood, some
respond to the Red Cross' message.
Danny W'unker, a sophomore at ECU
recognizes the need for blood, and it
encourages him to donate. "There are
millions of people around the country that
need it, and it doesn't hurt that bad
Wtinker said. The need for blood is great,
but the donors are few and far between.
There are so many opportunities to
give blood and so few requirements. If
you cannot find a blood drive near you, but
you want to donate, simply call 1-800-
GIVE LIFE. They will help you find
somewhere to give. Once you have found
somewhere that you can go, please give.
Faculty and students participate in blood drives at ECU.
FILE PHOTO
Red Cross
milestones
1863
In order to provide neutral care for the
sick and wounded hi limes of war, the
International Red dross was created in
Geneva, Switzerland.
1881
The America ii Red Cross was founded
because of the perseverance and devotion
of Clara Barton.
1900
The American Red Cross was granted a
congressional charter.
1948
The American Red Cross established a
blood program.
1990s
Red Cross was named in a national sur-
vey by die Yankelovich Partners as one of
the most highly regarded major U.S.
Every pint counts
d
Finelli's Cafe
earnshigfi marks
N,n KaVK WtlKKI.KR
"Qui Si Mangia Bene is the
motto of Finelli's Cafe, a small
Italian eatery located on Fast 5th
Street. It simply means "We eat
well here and cat well we did.
This restaurant, which opened
in January, offers a very intimate,
yet friendly atmosphere and a
courteous and knowledgeable wait
staff. Owned and operated by
David and Becky Finelli, the cafe
boasts a very eclectic menu, but it
specializes in Italian-style fare.
They have appetizers ranging from
pizza to crab dip to chicken wings.
Thev also serve a variety of salads
with an amazing homemade dress-
ing that even people who don't
like Italian dressing will heap into
their bowl. The entrees arc
grouped into three categories:
pizza, sandwiches, and pasta. The
sandwiches are served with your
choice of sourdough or kaiser bread
and seasoned fries or a side salad.
No matter-what you're in the mood
for, there is a sandwich for it -
meatballs, turkey, ham. seafood.
hamburger or just good old grilled
cheese. They also have a house
specialty, "Finelli's Finest
Chicken Sandwich an Italian
marinated grilled chicken breast,
grilled cappicolla, bacon, tomato,
onion, and provolone. There is also
a wide selection of pasta, and you
can even "create your own
Carnivore or herbivore, there is a
pasta for you - meatballs or spinach
lasagna, both were excellent.
Ravioli, Baked Pene, and Chicken
Parmesan were also among the
delicious pasta choices. For those
of us who can't go without our red
meat, they also serve steaks,
cooked to your specifications.
They also offer the catch of the
day, which is marinated and
grilled. It is served with your
choice of two sides from fries,
spaghetti, seasoned potatoes, or
SEE FINELLI'S PACE !i
Greenville residents given a
taste of old-fashioned entertainment
String quartet
charms audience
M Ik K Kl� nus
S I I I tt K IT i: K
What's the trendiest place to go for
free entertainment, fresh pastries
and an unbelievable menu of cof-
fee (and has the most up-to-date
reading material in Greenville)?
Well, Barnes & Noble has to be the
spot. Numerous times throughout
the month of July (and every other
month), various events are
planned for all age groups and
interests. This past Friday, The
Cafe hosted a string quartet that
j played classical music, featuring
Mei Yan Gawlik, Leslie Higgerson,
Joy Fowler Krimm and Susan
Vogues - all graduates of the ECU
School of Music. This was the sec-
ond visit for the foursome to The
Cife. Judy Kern, the Community
Relations Manager for Barnes and
Noble, requested their return
because of the customer's positive
; response when they played during
; the Christmas holidays. The quar-
; tct has promised to return again this
year around that time.
The quartet takes a break between pieces.
PHOTO BY SUSAN WHIGHT
The quartet seems to follow
each other well, and it is partially
due to the experience of playing
together. "We've been together
about two years Mei said. It
seemed they had many more years
than that together.
They didn't miss a beat. "Not
that you heard one of them saitl as
the rest broke down in laughter.
"We're requested at a lot of par-
ties and weddings Gawlik said.
"About twenty pieces are in our
repertoire they all agreed. It
seemed, they zipped through twice
that amount during this perfor-
mance.
Before I wrapped it up, they said
they wanted to thank another
group who had inspired them.
"We're very excited about the
(:assatt String Quartet at residency
at ECU they said. The Cassatt
String Quartet is an excellent
model to be followed because
"they're wonderful musicians and
wonderful people said the group.
"We're always looking forward
to bringing new groups to The
Cafe Judy Kern said after the per-
formance. "Anyone can call me
and we can discuss their perform-
ing here. Of course, we can't pay
them, but it's a good way to present
themselves to the public. We'd
love to present the store as a com-
munity gathering place, and 'The
Cafe' is a wonderful place to do
that. Friday nights we have chil-
dren's stories
They have a monthly calendar
which you can pick up on your next
visit.
Earlier in the month, there was
even a Star Wars Party. On July
20th, there is going to be a mystery
reading group discussing "Dance
Mall of the Dead Also, for anyone
interested in biking, an interesting
evening is planed for Friday, July
23rd, when Judi Lawson Wallace
will be signing and discussing her
new book, "Short Bike Rides-
North Carolina (For those inter-
ested, there will be a leisure bike
ride the following morning leaving
from Percolator's Coffee Shop at
around 9:15-sponsored by the
Greenville Social Club.)
If you are interested in per-
forming at The Cafe or would like
additional information on events,
give Judy a call at 321-8119.
Differences go
beyond the classroom
Students enjoy the
perks of summer school
I) II) Cl.Ot (illl.Kl
SI I K K 11 K K
Residence hall life in the summer
varies from the rest of the school
year in many ways. During the aca-
demic year, many students live in
un-air conditioned residence halls.
In the summer, AC seems to be
one of the biggest plus for campus
living in the summer. All of the
people interviewed had moved
from an non-air conditioned resi-
dence halls during the regular
school year into the much more
pleasing atmosphere of cool living
in the residence halls used during
the summer.
Parking is another problem that
students face during the school
year, and during the summer park-
ing hasn't gotten any better. You
would think that with less students
attending school, parking spaces
would be abundant.
Unfortunately, this is not the case.
Entertainment isn't hard for
some to find on or off campus, so
summer life in an ECU residence
hall doesn't seem to be so bad. For
some students, this makes staying
focused easier in the summer than
during the regular school year.
"I find it easier to maintain
focus with air conditioning said
Jason Evans, junior. "In the fall
and spring, students have a tenden-
cy to fall asleep while studying. In
the fall, I found myself taking three
or four showers a day just to stay
cool Jason, a math major, said he
studies even more in the summer.
"There's not much to do as far as
entertainment), but there are RA
programs to help students enter-
Students avoid the parking dilemma.
FILE PHOTO
tain themselves. Also, there's the
Aqua Theatre, which I sometimes
attend
Jessica Scott, a junior at ECU,
said she found studying easier in
the fall. She doesn't stay on cam-
pus for entertainment, but she
SEE COOL PAGES






5 Wednesday, July 14. 1999
features
Thi Em CinliulM
I Carolinian
ie
yle
'Cafe
marks
WllKKI. Kit
11 I K K
Bene is the
Cafe, .i small
:ed on East 5th
means "We eat
well we did.
, which opened
a very intimate,
osphere and a
wledgeable wait
d operated by
Finelli, the call-
tic menu, but it
dian-style fare,
ers ranging from
) chicken wings.
variety of salads
omemade dress-
ople who don't
ig will heap into
e entrees are
ree categories:
and pasta. The
;rved with your
h or kaiser bread
i or a side salad,
u're in the mood
ndwich for it -
, ham, seafood,
good old grilled
o have a house
lelli's finest
ch an Italian
chicken breast.
bacon, tomato,
ne. There is also
f pasta, and you
te your own
livore, there is a
atballs or spinach
were excellent.
:ne, and Chicken
also among the
roices. For those
without our red
) serve steaks,
� specifications,
the catch of the
marinated and
;rved with your
ides from fries,
led potatoes, or
.rs pace !i
room
;he summer than
school year,
ier to maintain
nditioning said
or. "In the fall
ts have a tenden-
hile studying. In
yself taking three
day just to stay
ith major, said he
; in the summer,
h to do as far as
ut there are RA
students enter-
e parking dilemma.
PHOTO
Also, there's the
hich I sometimes
a junior at ECU,
tudying easier in
isn't stay on cam-
nment, but she
OL PAGES)
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Coming to
East Carolina
University
Entertainer and
Motivational
Speaker
Dan Clark
Dan Clark is an internationally recognized speaker, enter-
tainer and consultant, having been named "one of the top
ten speakers in the world" by Achievers Canada and
Achievers Europe.
As an author, Dan is the primary contributing author to
the New York Times Best Selling series, "Chicken Soup for
the Soul and the author of ten of his own highly
acclaimed books including, "Puppies for Sale which was
recently made into a motion picture starring Jack
Lemmon.
coruinuerj Irom page 4
steamed vegetables. The wait staff
and cooks were very sensitive to
the specifications of our orders and
everything was cooked to perfec-
tion.
If after your meal you happen to
have room for it, they offer an
excellent dessert selection for all
tastes. Chocolate cappuccino cake,
ice cream, hot apple crisp (my per-
sonal favorite) and the very Italian,
and very rich, tiramisu are among
the desserts on the menu. For
those of you who are of age, they
also have a nice selection of wines
and domestic and imported beers.
The food was amazing and.
served in large' portions, and the
prices were very reasonable.
Finelli's is appropriate for a
group or a romantic dinner for two.
My friends and I had a lovely
evening and plan to return.
Cool
conifnttid from page 4
instead prefers to go out with her
friends. "I like to find things to do
off campus with my friends
Jessica said.
Jessica drives, but she has the
same parking problems as in the
fall. "I park in the street off cam-
pus said Jessica.
So, along with shorter semes-
ters, residence hall life is another
positive aspect of attending sum-
mer sessions at ECU.
iii
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Vight Auditorium � 9:00 a.m.
irody Auditorium � 1:30 p.m.
Doors Open 15 Minutes Prior to Show Time.
look Sale and Autographs Available for a Limited Time
Following Each Show
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faculty, and
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Limited Seating.
Call 328-6910
for seat
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Presentation Sponsored by
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and the ECU School of Medicine
This show is not open to the general public.
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with panic buttons in
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then follow directions above.
s





Tin Eett CtrslislM
sports
Widnirtiy, July 14, 1999 6
Sports
Briefs
ECU baseball coach, Keith
LeClair, will hold three more
baseball camps this summer.
Remaining sessions are an
overnight camp, (July 18-22;
ages 13-18) a hitting camp
(July 31-August 1; ages 13-
18) and a father and son
camp (Jury 23-25; ages 7-13).
For more information call the
baseball office at 328-4604.
NBA Rookie of the Year
and former Carolina stand-
out, Vince Carter of the
Toronto Raptors, will be par-
ticipating in the second annu-
al Winners Unlimited
Celebrity All-Star Game at
J.H. Rose High school on
Friday night.
Also scheduled to appear
are D.H. Conely standout
Keith Gatlin, former North
Carolina guard Derrick
Phelps, former Ayden-Grifton
star Shawn Farmer,
Washington standout Ralph
Biggs and former ECU stand-
outs Lester Lyons and
Ronnell Peterson.
For more information
please call Darrick Mullins at
. 355-5986 or 754-6025
ESPN reportedly paid
roughly $1,000,000 for the
upcoming ECU West Virginia
football game which will kick
off the ECU football season
this year in Ericsson Stadium
in Charlotte. The money will
be used for improvements to
be made to athletic facilities
at ECU. The game will be held
on Saturday Sept. 4th and
can be seen on ESPN or
"ESPN 2.
Last night brought forth a
fitting end to an era as base-
ball's all star game was held
for the last time in Boston's
Fenway Park. The stadium
will be closed at the end of
the season as the Red Sox
plan to move to a new stadi-
um. Fenway Park was the
home to the first All-Star
game in 1933.
Making the cut
Walk-on athletes
work to play
I HTKK DvHllll
SI'UK I S I.DI I OH
They may not be die most important
part of die team, but walk-on athletes
have proved to be a driving force in
ECU athletics.
Must college teams have at least
one athlete who may have not liccn
selected or recruited directly from high
school but matte the cut during routine
practice) that are open t any nc.
Iliese athletes are selected after
training camps with other athletes.
The challenging part comes next
Although they endure the gnicling
workouts and long hours, they still may
not get much playing time.
Haskctball head coach Kill I lemon
slid that they have walk-on athletes
just as many other teams.
Unfortunately many times these ath-
letes may receive very link- playing
time ami may not Ix; culled into the
game during the most critical
moments. For many; die sheer accom-
plishment of licing on a collegiate team
is a ward enough.
"N lany times these ate players who
conic out of high school and were not
reunited but dream of playing college
ball I lemon said.
NC"AA niles require teams to hold
open practices ft others to come and try
out tbrdie team. I lenion said sometimes
as many as 30 to 50 people will come nit
for try outs when practices first bejja
(urrently, diere is only one walk- hi
basketball player. Brian Koxx. I le was
placed on the team by former EVX
head couch. Joe Doolcy I'oxx, wlio did
not get much playing time under
Doolcy may find new life in basketball
with I lenion.
" When I first started coaching at
DicxJe,we bad a walk-on wlio did not
get much playing time in the past"
I lenion said "I le eventually became
my fust guard off the bench anil
received a scholarship
While nuking die team may lie die
fiist hualle to dear, the chance ft r tliesc
athletes to actually see much playing
time is a much more difficult bisk.
"It (staning)hapieiis. not all die
time, but it does happen I lenion said
Oriieis, such as K( V swim uwdi
Rick Kolie, luive seen wry few walk-
ons in their sport.
"I have been heMECU) ft 19
years, 17 as liead coach, and in all tliat
time we have only had one walk-on
athlete to make die team Kobe said
Kobe said diat die competition
among swimmers on a division 1 swim
team is much more ficrccand room is
limited for athletes to come out In
swimming many times adiletes do not
need as many back-ups as in sports
such as basketball or football.
' I lierefi re, die need ft ir walk-on swim-
mers is far less.
I le believes dwt in swimming, die
Client can be spotted much easier and
many times these adiletes can lie reunit-
ed (Hit of liigli sdiool instead of as walk-
ons trying to pn vc r I K'ir adiletic ability.
"Swimming in pretty much a black
ami white spore either you cm swim or
'hi can't" Kobe said It is easier for us
to find swimmers than it may he for
other teams to find their athletes
Kobe said dtat more walk-ons in the
swimmingdivisions will he found in divi-
sion 2 levd sdmois, where die competi-
tion for team spots is not quite as strong.
"InadivisitHi 1 program, wehavepeo-
ple from all over the country Kobe said
Refjudlcss of die difficulties, as king
as there are sports, diere will always be
others who will want to participate but
may have gone unnoticed
Track coach Leonard Klepack, said
diat they allow more walk-ons than
other sports because track can always
use more athletes. Klepack said diat
tliey currendy have dinee walk-ons
who will be running next season
"Our sport is a little bit different
from Iraskerlxill where you have only
12 members Klepack said" our poli-
cy is that if you come to workouts and
have a positive attitude diere s always
itxim for someone to ma"
Klepack lias only been at ECU for
two years but said diat ECl I lias liad
many strong walk-ons in past years.
We have a history of adiletes in track
and field wlio have been walk-ons and
excelled"
SEE SOCCER. PAGE I
ECU track to be renovated
Funding coming
fwmESPN
St SASXK Mll.KXKKl ICII
SKMIU � Hi I KR
After years of difficult training con-
ditions, ECU's track and field
teams are about to find their frus-
trations eased as they return to find
i new track surface.
ECU's track is scheduled to be
resurfaced starting this week and
projected to be finished by the
middle of August.
"It was desperately needed
because the condition that it was in
"cached a point where it was dan-
gerous because kids were getting
njured said Bill Carson, men's
rack and field coach.
� The project, headed by
southwest Recreational Industries,
S costing the university $243 thou-
and.
' This project was made possible
hanks to ESPN who decided to
� ck up ECU's first football game
piinst West Virginia. With the
Highly $1,000,000 ESPN paid for
ic rights to the game ECU has
found the financial support needed
to finance this project and perhaps
more in the future.
"The game is a blessing because
this is how (the resurfacing) is
being done Carson said.
VanSant, Assistant Athletic
"With this money, we are able to
improve things like the lights on
the baseball field and other projects
like the track VanSant said.
The new surface, called Eurotan
S, will be about an inch thick with
two layers of rubber that will pro-
Runners should find the new track more up to date because of current technology.
FILE PHOTO
Director, said that with the money
that ESPN provided, ECU is able
to improve many of the athletic
program's facilities.
vide better padding for the athletes.
"We were looking for a great
practice surface for cross country
and track Carson said. "It is the
ideal surface to meet bur needs
VanSant said that the Eurotan S
surface is the same kind used for
the national championships in
Boise, Idaho this year.
"It will provide a better place to
train and help to improve the pro-
gram VanSant said.
Not only will the new surface
help ECU's current athletes, it will
also aid in recruiting futute athletes.
Carson said that ECU lost some
prospects in the past few years
because of the condition of the track.
"The recruiting process was great
until I brought them to the track
Carson said. "All in all, our ability to
be strong with recruiting now is
going to enhance the program
Carson said that although the
track will be better now, there are
still no plans to host a meet here in
future years. Carson estimated that
it would d cost about $100 thou-
sand more to purchase the equip-
ment needed to run a meet.
Despite not being able to host a
meet on the new track, Carson is
still very happy with the improve-
ment of the track for practices.
"I am very pleased with the sup-
port track and field has gotten
here Carson said. "This is a good
place to be a coach right now
New facilities
built for golf team
Additions happen
thanks to donations
M I K K M I'OOI.
The ECU golf team is being given
the opportunity to use the new
facilities being built at Bradford
Creek Country Club.
The new practice area will con-
sist of a 6,000 square foot practice tee
where golfers can work on their full
swing, a 70 yard pitching area
designed for various chip shots and a
practice bunker to work on those
nasty beach shots. Normally a pro-
ject like this would cost nearly
$30,000, but with the help and dona-
tions of James Duke and Briley
Enterprises, this new facility is cost-
ing the university roughly $1,000.
An irrigation system was already
installed in the area, and Briley
Enterprises and Duke took care of
projects such as new soil, shaping
the greens, and leveling the tec
boxes.
The new facility will be avail-
able to the team for between two
and three days a week as well as for
home matches. Coach Kevin
Williams said he was optimistic
about the upcoming season.
"I am very excited about the
new facilities as well as the upcom-
ing season Williams said.
Williams said that although they
had a downward slide towards the
end of last season, the golf team
will be very competitive this year.
Robbie Perry, who was rcd-shirted
last year, is expected to have a pos-
itive impact on the team.
Incoming freshman Johnathan Hill
from Kernersville, NC was ranked
third in the state last year in high
school. Me is expected to give the
team that extra punch. ECU was
ranked 90th last year in the nation-
al pole with a 96-81-5 record with
three wins against teams in the top
thirty. The ECl' golf program has
never defeated so many highly
ranked opponents.
Associate Athletic Director
Henry VanSant is very appreciative
of Bradford Creek's participation,
SEE ClUIHOUSi PAGE 1
US. beats
China at home �
LOS ANGELES (AP) - One day
after defeating China in the
biggest female sporting event in
American history, the U.S.
Women's Soccer team celebrated
their World Cup victory with a
downtown rally and a trip to
Disneyland.
Early Sunday, World Cup hero
Brandi Chastain, who converted
the last of five U.S. penalties to
give the Americans a 5-4 shootout
victory Saturday, made the rounds
on American TV talk shows.
"The victory is important, but
it really wasn't the victory that
made the difference she said.
"It was really getting this tourna-
ment off the ground an allowing
those young girls and their fami-
lies to come out and support a
game that they all love
Later, the entire team visited
the Disneyland amusement park.
A rally at the Los Angeles
Convention Center was sched-
uled for later in the day.
This American team enjoys its
titles and its celebrations. And it
had more than 90,000 fans to
party with despite 120 minutes of
goalless play Saturday that led to
the penalties.
Chastain's shot sent the sold
out, highly partisan crowd of
90,185, into delirium.
"You saw the courage of the
American team U.S. coach Tony
DiCicco sarel. "They just fought
and fought and fought. There are
two champions here today, and
only one is taking a trophy home.
China had beaten the United
States twice earlier this year,
while losing once, all by 2-1
scores. It was the third time the
Americans had beaten China in
the final a major tournament.
Besides the 1996 Olympic title
game, the United States also beat
the Chinese for the Goodwill
Games gold in 1998.
In Beijing, the bitter loss of
what many saw as a grudge match
between two rivals on the field
and two countries locked in polit-
ical disputes was tempered by a
mix of sportsmanship and nation-
alism.
"Not bad Chinese girls read
the front-page headline in the
Beijing Evening News, the only
newspaper in the Chinese capital
that published late enough
7 WirJnudiy. J
Marc
BOSTON (Al
the Boston R
the America
Philadelphia
Tuesday nigh
Boston's Fenv
Martinez le
with 15 wins :

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sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Martinez and Schilling face off in All-star Game
BOSTON (AP) - Pedro Martinez of
the Boston Red Sox will sun for
the American League against
Philadelphia's Curt Schilling in
Tuesday night's All-Star game at
Boston's Fenway Park.
Martinez leads the major leagues
with 15 wins and a 2.10 ERA, and
has 184 strikeouts in 132 2-3 innings.
National League manager Bruce
Bothy of the San Diego Padres said
today his starting lineup will have
Cincinnati shortstop Barry Larkin
leading off, followed by Colorado's
Larry Walker in right field,
Chicago's Sammy Sosa in center
field, St. Louis first baseman Mark
McGwire, Arizona third baseman
Matt Williams, Houston's Jeff
Bagwell at designated hitter. New
York Mots catcher Mike Piazza,
Milwaukee outfielder Jeromy
Burnitz and Arizona second base-
man Jay Bell.
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Soccer
coniinued liam gage 6
Sunday to carry word of the
defeat, which occurred shortly
before 7 a.m. (2200 GMT
Saturday).
Underneath ran a photograph
of U.S. President Bjll Clinton
meeting members of the Chinese
team after their defeat.
If nothing else, China had the
only clear chance.
Fan Yunjie drove a header off a
cross from Liu Ying that U.S. mid-
fielder Kristine Lilly had to clear
with a header of her own while
standing on the goal line.
Other than that, the match was
largely a morass of midfield play,
missed passes, and off-target
shots.
Under a mid-afternoon
California sun and temperatures
in the mid 30s Celsius (high 90s
Fahrenheit), the game slowed
even more, with the Americans
showing more fatigue than their
opponents in the first extra time
period.
But they rallied in the final 15
minutes, gaining momentum for
the penalties.
Clubhouse
continued (torn page 8
and he feels that it is a great asset to
ECU's golf program. Jeremy
Shadle, Head Coif Pro at Bradford
Creek Country Club, believes die
renovations will improve golf games.
"I think it will be good privacy
for the team and I hope it will take
a few strokes off of their scores
Shadle said.
The Pirate golf team begins
their season with an opening tour-
nament on September 18 at
Georgetown University.
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Next to Pitt Community Col
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ANNIVERSARY SEASON
The Fats Waller musical
ain't misbehavin'
July 20-24
Call 252-328-6829 (or ticket information.
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Uptown Greenville
?209 E. 5th St.
New entrance on 5th St
ATTIC
Former
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Voted tl at ECU and
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the Nation by Playboy
magazine October 1997
752-7303
Entertainment Complex
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8 Wednesday. July 14. 1998
ABOVE BW-3. 2 BR. 1 bath. $675
month. Walk to ECU. Call 252-726-
8846.
2 BEDROOM. 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
$400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price. 551-3426,
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management. ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
TAKE OVER lease by August. 2 bed-
room. 1 12 bath. $450 a month.
Close to campus. Call 754-2840,
please leave message.
TAKE OVER lease ASAP: Players
Club, 4 bedroom. 3 bath apt. Great
location - right next to tennis courts,
volleyball, 8 pool. Can move in in
Aug. Call 353-8930.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 758-6596.
ECU AREA: one and three bedroom
houses. One bedroom $210: three
bedroom $600 a month. Pets OK!
Available August 1st. Call 830-
9502.
TWO BEDROOM, two bath fully
furnished apartment, free cable,
sewer and water. Located on ECU
bus line. Available August 15th.
School year lease. No pets. $500
per month. Call 758-5393.
FEMALE NEEDS roommates to
share 3 bdrm. duplex. 11th & Evans.
1 bath, private fenced backyard,
washerdryer. central AC.
$210mo. Call Giselle 754-2026.
THREE BEDROOM house two
blocks from campils available first of
July or August. Prefer responsible
students. Pets OK. All major ap-
pliances including washerdryer.
Call 321-8937.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MFNS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS. ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Any Condition Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, � CD Players -
Home, Portable
Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:(X)
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
3 BEDROOM, 2 bath home on Bilt-
more St. No pets. Graduate students
preferred. Washer, dryer, dishwash-
er, big back yard. $750month.
Beautiful home. Call 931-0449. leave
message.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex. Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU, on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374. leave mes-
sage. Call now.
ROOMMATE NEEDED on Aug. 10.
Rent is $175 plus 13 utilities. Large
room in 3 bedroom house 1 block
from Rec Center. Call Kate or Steph,
931-9015.
NEEDED: FEMALE roommate to
share two bedroom townhouse in
Wilson Acres. $270 includes basic
cable, water, sewer. Needed to move
in by second week in July. Call 355-
2940. ask for Sabrina.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 BR, 1 BA apartment on 5th
St. $260 a mo. util. Available Au-
gust 1st. 703-532-0317.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Aug. 15.
2 bedroom, 1 12 bath spacious
apartment. Rent is $230 12
phone and utilities. For more details
call Mike at 353-8950 after 6 p.m.
ROOM FOR rent: BW-3 apartment:
1600 sq walk to campus Et down-
town. $283.00month. Call 413-
0330 & leave message or ask for
Jon or Dennis.
ESUS IS THE
ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
Daytime 756-3315 or
714-0718 Ministry Outreach
anytime after 7pm.
321-6012 confidential.
ROOMMATE WANTED for 2 bed-
room apartment. 6 minutes from
ECU. Near hospital. Female pre-
ferred, pets possible. Half rent, half
utilities. Available Immediately. 551-
7607.
QRAD STUDENT seeking mature
non-smoking female roommate to
share 2 BR. apt. in August.
$210month plus 12 utilities. Call
Allison. 919-828-6183.
ROOMMATE WANTED Undergrad.
graduate student room open now,
$162.00 a month, no deposit need-
ed. Fully furnished on ECU bus ro-
ute. Call Chris. 752-9038.
FEMALE SHARE 3 bedroom town-
house near ECU. Furnished wash-
erdryer. Beginning Fall '99.
$225mo. plus share utilities .
phone, cable. Call Mindy 355-2956.
Collingdale Court
HELP WANTED
NON-SMOKING Female roommate
needed now to share 2 BR. 1 12
bath apt. 12 rent utilities. Clean,
serious student preferred Call 752-
8647. Mel.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse. On bus route. Call
355-2827.
WANTED: PART-Time sitter for
adorable 3-year-old boy beginning in
September. 8-9 a.m 12-1 p.m.
MonThurs. Must provide transpor-
tation to and from preschool. $30
week. 321-0512.
NOW HIRING adult entertainers
and dancers. Up to $1500 weekly.
Must be at least 18. have phone,
transportation be drug free Call
758-2737 for information
D.J. FOR HIRE
HYPE UP'YOUR PARTY
FOR All FUNCTIONS 8 CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
�Trainee's needed part-time. $7
billion dollar communications com-
pany looking for representatives. Re-
quires Internet e-mail access. $400
per week part-time. Details at
www.e-repsUSA.com
ATTN: EASTERN Carolina's finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Day and night shifts available. Earn
up to $1000 a week. Call Playmates
at 747-7686.
EXPERIENCED NANNY needed for
1-12 year old weekdays 8:15-2:15
beginning August 15. Requires 10
month minimum commitment, no
smoking, safe driving record, own
transportation. Send letter re qualifi-
cations &� desired salary, include
phone number, to "Nanny PO Box
8088, Greenville, NC 27835.
NEED RELIABLE person to provide
child care on Tuesday andor Thurs-
day from 7 a.m. to 2 p.m. Must have
own transportation. Call 752-2723.
SEEKING COMMUNICATIONS
majors for afternoon and evening
work. No previous experience re-
quired. Paid training. Great working
conditions. Call 355-0210 for full de-
tails.
CHILD CARE provider needed.
Child care provider needed begin-
ning August 17th Monday- Friday
from 3:15 -5:30 p.m. Duties include
picking child up from school, super-
vising homework, and transporting
child to extracurricular activities. Ex-
tended care is needed on Tuesdays
until 9 p.m. Must have a valid driv-
er's license, dependable transporta-
tion, and excellent driving record,
prefer ECU student majoring in edu-
cation, child development, nursing,
or psychology. Hourly rate $700 hr.
Will consider mature high school
student. Three references required.
Call 758-8228 to schedule an inter-
GREENHOUSE PRESCHOOL is ex-
panding. Full-time and part-time po-
sitions available immediately and in
August. CDFR and ELEM majors.
Call 355-2404 for more information.
SUMMER FUN - Free pictures.
Looking for some summer fun?
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friend? I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio. If you
model for me, I will give you free pic-
tures. Reputable amateur photogra-
pher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson. NC 27896-9001 or
call 252-237-8218 or e-mail hron-
jak�simflex.com. Check my web
site at www.simflex.comus-
ershronjak for more information.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
WANTED: ECU Lutheran students!
Our Redeemer Lutheran Church is
looking for ELCA Lutheran students
to work with youth. Call 756-2058
about becoming a young adult re-
source person. Training will be of-
fered by the NC Synod for students
ages 18-25
THE GREENVILLE Social Club will
hold its 1st organizational meeting
on Saturday at Percolators Coffee
Shop. July 17th at 9 a.m. Anyone
wanting to participate in a leisurely
bike ride, oil up your bike and show
up. For father info contact Mike Ed-
wards at: nutyhermit@earthlink.net
PREPARATIONS ARE under way
for the 4th Annual Downtown Fami-
ly Music Festival to be held Saturday.
August 21 at the Greenville Town
Common. Vendor space is now avail-
able. For father information call 931-
6161. Proceeds from this event will
benefit The Bone Marrow Founda-
tion. Call to register for your vendor
space now
LOW ON cash and need something
fun to do? Come out to the outdoor
pool at the Student Recreation Cen-
ter on July 15 and see a great mov-
ie while enjoying the pool and the
outdoors Movie starts at 9 p.m. Free
to all SRC members. See you there!
ADVERTISE INTHE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
ramies
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour Mama's By-product
Jeremy Falls
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 14, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 14, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1346
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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