The East Carolinian, July 7, 1999






The East Carolinian
resent at appeal
4799. In pre-
formed a 'sum-
elusive to each
judicial review'
titled mail. The
ifendant' appear
With receiving
: Assistant Attor-
addressing she
r A. Layton Get-
who made final
appeal of warn-
ng 4799. The
stice included
A. Layton Get-
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against A. Lay-
for education
he included!
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ay in protest" to
as not allowed,
ding to justifica-
Forum as ad-
t will begin soon
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alcome Summer
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Mass schedule:
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ants and their fa-
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utheran students
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Wednesday
High:92
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Thursday
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l?Tl.9.iSi!I?Y
Would you change your
major to Murtidisctptinary Studies?
Carolinian
Tlranas Harris bring; bad Hannibal
for fans who wanted another
See paw 4.
www.tec.ecu.edu
WEDNESDAY, JULY 7 .1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE �5
Specialized academic
programs offered to
suit personal needs
Kerry Pate
staff writer
In the spring semester of 1998, a new aca-
demic major was Introduced. The
Multidisciplinary Studies at ECU offers
undergraduate students a measure of
Input and flexibility In planning their own
unique academic degree program.
The program began with approximately
12 students last spring and officials expect
more than 20 students to choose this path
In the upcoming school year. For those
with a variety of Interests who don't want
to limit their education to one area, the
multidisciplinary studies major might be
an increasingly attractive option.
"The student comes up with their own
curriculum that will allow students to
design their own degrees said Dr. Steve
Cerutti, director of Multidisciplinary
Studies. "Students contact faculty mem-
bers In each department they are Interest-
ed in taking classes and forms an academ-
ic advisory committee
According to Cerutti, faculty mentoring
is a key aspect of the major.
"Each student works with one mentor
Cerutti said. "Dr. Doug McMillan in
English has mentored some of the stu-
dents in our program and he has been very
helpful and Dr. Ron Graziani in Art has
also done a lot to bring students into the
program as well
Dr. Cerutti also emphasized that the
program does not wish to replace existing
programs in other departments.
"When a student comes to me, I talk to
them about what they are Interested In
and I check ta see If a major already exists
and I give them suggestions Cerutti said.
Another unique aspect of the program is
that It serves the needs of students inter-
ested In majors where creativity is the key
to success.
"One of the requirements is that all stu-
dents have to produce a senior thesis, but
it does not have to be a written project
Cerutti said. "For an art student it could be
a work of art, a music student a piece of
music, for a drama student a scene,
depending on their Interest
However, Multidisciplinary Studies is
not designed to be a pushover for those
looking for an easy major or fast way out of
school.
"We want it to be a prospective degree,
not a retrospective degree Cerutti said. "I
don't want a senior coming to me saying, 'I
want to graduate next December I have
125 hours and just stick a name on it (a
degree that's not what we want. We want
motivated students to plan out a program
they want to take and will truly be benefi-
cial
Dr. Cerutti sees the program as a tool in
meeting the strategic goal of Increasing
enrollment at ECU by attracting students
from other schools that have more numer-
ous majors and larger academic programs.
It will also serve as a means to provide
challenges to students already enrolled at
ECU.
"I believe in the mission of East Carolina
to improve itself academically and I saw
this program as a way of cultivating the
best students and getting average students
to work harder and take a little Initiative in
planning out their future Cerutti said.
"One of the things that really helps a uni-
versity is the success of it's students. If a
student goes out and does good things,
East Carolina University also reaps the
benefits
One of our students was selected for a
very competitive program and is currently
in Rome, these are opportunities where all
our students are competing with other stu-
dents from universities all over the coun-
try
Recent graduates of the program have
expressed interest In attending graduate
school, and Dr. Cerutti said he believes
they are well prepared in this regard.
"Once universities start seeing students
from East Carolina prepared to go to grad-
uate school, then the reputation of East
Carolina is enhanced as well Cerutti said.
Other multidisciplinary type programs
have been already been proposed and
implemented at both the undergraduate
and graduate level at ECU.
Coastal Studies is currently offered as a
minor which has been proposed as a new
major and may be available as early as
next year pending approval.
The student comes up with
their own curriculum that will
allow students to design their
own degrees i
Dr. Steve Cerutti
Director of Multidisciplinary Studies
A new Ph.D program In Coastal
Resources Management will enroll its
Inaugural class of 12 students this fall and
has multidisciplinary tracks in social sci-
ence, maritime studies, geosclence and
ecology. Drawing on existing expertise
across different departments is the key to
a successful multidisciplinary program.
"The faculty involved In multidiscipli-
nary programs In both the undergraduate
and doctoral programs have distinguished
records In research, publications, external
support, and serve as advisors to local
state and national governments said Dr.
Lauriston King, director of the Coastal
Resources Management Ph.D. Program.
"Within universities future career
prospects and problems must be
addressed by the many disciplines that
bear on these issues King said.
The ultimate goal is making sure the
students are successful and are employed
or accepted to graduate school once they
have graduated.
"There's a lot of employers out there
who need people with a variety of
sklllssald Dr. Jim Westmoreland, director
of Career Services. "Many employers would
be attracted to graduates of multidiscipli-
nary programs, anything from Insurance
companies, newspapers�people who are
good writers and communicators, and stu-
dents who can combine a variety of work
and school experiences should be able to
find some good opportunities. Preparing a
job search for multidisciplinary graduates
is virtually the same as traditional degree
programs
However, according to Westmoreland, it
is still vital to participate In the resume
building experiences that students on a
traditional track might do.
"Whatever the major might be, it is still
important to remind them to do the net-
working and resume development, which
our office stands ready to help them with
at any time Westmoreland said. "These
skills are needed In every major; even
those who are in business or computer sci-
ence where they may be trained for a spe-
cific area
A well-
rounded
student
Multidisciplinary Studies lets students integrate many facets of the university into one major.
Photos by Robin Vuchnich
Multidisdplinary Studies allows
students to personalize majors
Co-op helps students gain work experience
Offke serves as
connection for internships
Cory Sheeler
NEWS F.DITOR
The cooperative education office
gives students an opportunity to
gain work experience in their field
of study, without making a serious
commitment to a career that they
may later regret.
Co-op helps students decide on
what kind of career they want to
pursue after graduation by placing
them in temporary jobs during the
summer, or throughout the regular
school year. By being placed in this
temporary situation, students can
decide if the field is something that
they would like to pursue later on
in life.
"Our main objective is to have
students gain practical work experi-
ence in their chosen field of study
said Larry Donley, coordinatoredu-
cation specialist. "Co-op is available
to anyone who is enrolled at ECU.
The only real requirement is that
they have a 2.0 grade point average.
"The only way around that is if
they are required to have work
experience for their major. In that
case, a faculty advisor can sign-off
on it and we'll work with them
According to Donley, students
who are enrolled in cooperative
education are more likely to find a
job after they graduate.
"If students go through a Co-op
program while they are in school,
they find a job about two times
faster than a student who doesn't do
Co-op Donley said. "Not only do
our statistics indicate that, but other
Co-op statistics around the country
show similar statistics
This belief is shared by many
employers as well. Robert Marini,
chairman and CEO of Camp
Dresser & McKee, a leading envi-
ronmental engineering firm, says a
college degree does not guarantee a
job. Rather, students should take
advantage of what Co-op programs
have to offer.

"It's clear that a college degree
no longer guarantees even the
brightest student gainful employ-
ment in his or her chosen field
Marini said. "The skills demanded
of today's new graduates are more
challenging and diverse than ever
before.
"As educators and employers, it
is incumbent upon us to help them
develop these skills, so that they
can become sought after and valu-
able employees. Co-op programs
are excellent means of accomplish-
SEE CO OP PAGt 2
Kristie Lynn endures the heat on campus.
PHOTO BV ROBIN VUCHNICH
E3G$r&say heat
can beaangerow
Sis an Wright
FEATURES EDITOR
When the heat index is 105
degrees, it's important to find
some way to get away or lessen the
effects of the oppressive heat.
There may be no way to lower the
heat outside, but there are ways
that you can avoid the negative
effects of the sun. Beth Cradle,
the Health Education graduate
assistant at Student Health
Services, has many suggestions for.
students who have to face the
summer heat.
"Don't stay out in the sun too
long, and wear light loose cloth-
ing recommends Cradle.
"Cotton is usually cooler than
nylon
She also recommends that stu-
dents "stay away from caffeinated
beverages, avoid salt intake as
much as possible, and avoid alco-
holic beverages These all take
water from your system, and they
cause you to become dehydrated
SEE HEAT PAGE 2
Exhibit shows
history of print
Harry Frank enjoys the exhibit at Joyner.
PHOTO BV ROBIN VUCHNICH
Information displayed
on second floor of Joyner library
Cory Sheei.er
news editor
Joyner library begins an exhibit
today chronicling the history of
newspapers and print in North
Carolina over the past 250 years.
The exhibit is from the North
Carolina History museum and it
contains copies of the first North
Carolina newspaper. The North
Carolina Gazette, published in New
SEE EXHIBIT PAGE 2





2 Wttairtav. Jury 7, 1999
DWJ charge dropped
against Carolina Panther
CHARLOTTE (AP) - A judge dis-
missed a drunken-driving charge
against Carolina Panthers defensive
end Jason Peter, saying botched
paperwork outweighed evidence
showing the player was legally
drunk.
Mecklenburg County District
Judge C. Jerome Leonard agreed
with a defense argument Monday
that the driving-while-impaired
charge was tainted because a magis-
trate's order signed after Peter's
arrest was improperly dated. Peter
was arrested March 14 but the mag-
istrate's order was dated March 24.
"There's negligence in this case
defense attorney George Laughrun
said. "For whatever reason, the
wre's stuck with the mistake
Prosecutor Tommy Simpson said
the state would appeal the matter to
Superior Court, but Laughrun said it
was unlikely the case would even
make it to trial on that level.
Laughrun said he would argue that
because evidence in the case was
introduced Monday in Leonard's
courtroom, hearing the matter at a
higher level would violate Peter's right
to protection against double-jeopardy.
Peter, who also had been
charged with speeding for driving
81 mph in a 55 zone at the time of
his arrest, entered a guilty plea to a
reduced charge of driving 70 in a 55
zone. Leonard fined him $100 and
ordered him to pay an additional
$86 in court costs.
Woman cashes in
on Powerball jackpot
ROSEVILLE, Minn. (AP) - A 21-
ycar-old woman who makes $9 an
hour at a mortgage company
called her boss to say she wouldn't
be in because of a death in the
family, then stepped forward
Thursday to claim a $150 million
Powerball lottery jackpot.
Farrah Slad beat 80-million-to-
1 odds to win the third-biggest
prize ever in the multistate lottery
and one of the richest jackpots
ever claimed by an individual.
Ms. Slad said she bought $5
worth of tickets at a store on the
spur of the moment after stopping
because her 1991 Acura Integra
was running low on gas. She was
on the way to her parents' house
for dinner and hadn't bought any
tickets since last summer.
"I thank my parents and my tar
for this the single young woman
said with a big smile at lottery
headquarters in this St. Paul sub-
urb.
Ms. Slad held the only winning
ticket for Wednesday night's draw-
ing, which had a jackpot of $150
million over 25 years. She elected
instead to receive a lump sum of
$78.8 million, or $50.4 million after
state and federal taxes are with-
held.
Ms. Slad saw the winning num-
bers on television Wednesday
night while rewinding a videotape
of "Austin Powers: International
Man of Mystery
"We looked it over a hundred
times and it didn't seem real she
said.
Ms. Slad, who lives in Brainerd,
called her boss at MorNorth mort-
gage Wednesday night and told
him a family member had died
and she wouldn't be in to work
Thursday. After a sleepless night
spent pondering the possibilities,
she stepped forward.
On her list of things to do and
buy: travel to Mexico, a new car, a
house, "good deeds" and possibly
veterinary school. She also plans to
buy a dream house, trucks and
boats for her parents. And she
acknowledged: "I'm going to meet
people who say they've known me
forever
Heat
conlmued limn page I
more quickly. If a person becomes
dehydrated, there are many symp-
toms that you can look for according
to the Red Cross. These symptoms
are headaches, lightheadedness,
nausea, skin cool and pale, fatigue
and dizziness. If these symptoms
are not treated, a person can devel-
op heat stroke. Meat stroke can be
fatal. ECU students realize the
magnitude of the heat as well as
what it can do to you. There are
many different strategies that arc
used to keep cool in these sultry
summer days, and one of the most
common is to avoid the sun alto-
gether. "I stay inside to avoid the
heat said Nykoll Williams,
senior.While many students stay
indoors to try to beat the heat, there
is one more important factor that
goes into spending the day inside.
"I turn the air conditioning on,
which is basically all I can do said
Sharon Hudson, graduate student.
Co-op
conlmued limn page I
ing this
Many students take advantage of
the summer sessions to work with
Co-op and gain work experience
that will help them succeed profes-
sionally after graduation.
"Co-op has done a lot for me
said David Singer, senior. "They
Exhibit
coniinued from page 1
Bern on Aug. 9, 1751. The exhibit
also traces the 125 year history of
North Carolina Press Association.
The NCPA was formed by 29 news-
news
The East Carolinian
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helped me find a job this summer
that will give me the work experi-
ence I'll need after graduation
Donlcy adds that students
should consider going to'Co-op to
see what the program has to offer.
"Give us a try Donley said.
"There's are all kinds of opportuni-
ties out there and unless you come
in and speak with someone at the
Co-op office, you're not going to
know exactly what's out there
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadseo
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The exhibit continues through July
on the second floor of the library
and is open to the public. For more
information, contact Nancy Shires
at 328-6838.
. Student Discounts
� Memberships
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Aqua Theatre
RUSHMORE
"THE BEST MOVIE OF THE YEAR
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For more: www.Rushmore-themovie.com
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Rated R
Max Fischer is a precocious 15-
year-old whose reason for living
is his attendance at Rushmore, a
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doing well in any of his classes,
but where he's the king of
extracurricular activities - from
being in the beekeeping society
to writing and producing plays,
there's very little after school he
doesn't do. His life begins to
change, however, when he finds
out he on academic probation,
and when he stumbles into love
with Miss Cross, a pretty teacher
of the elementary school at
Rushmore. Added to the mix is
his friendship with Herman
Brume, wealthy industrialist and
father to boys who attend the
school, and who also finds him-
self attracted to Miss Cross.
Max's fate becomes inextricably
bed to this odd love triangle,
and how he sets about resolving
it is the story in the film
�-
Thursday, July 8th
9:00 p.m.
Cookout
Outdoor Pool - SRC
Rain Site - SRC Indoor Pool
Valid ECU-One Card ID Required
East Carolina
University
Services
For a good time call The Student Union
Hotline 0 252.328.6004 or visit our
website 8 www.ecu.eduitudentunion
Thi Em Carolinlar
-
In ant
the lii
av.rarj
now i
OPINK
Sexuality siou
a beautiful and
! ty that dwells i
The human bod
crafted work of ai
ship boards and I
this country are ir
to cover it up. N
expression are ill
specifically conti
and, as a result of I
sion, we have mar
J People need
Selves sexually. It
human being and
filled life. It is not
s'ity such as food
cither a factor wl
OPINIC
Well, if I got to
sou, I cannot
that are more
barbecuet
After what seems
rain, mist, cloud
yucky and depres
nomena, we final





ait Carolinian
Court 1
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yillenc.com
�&
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nors
2-0753
enc.com
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� We do oil
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Thi Eatt Carolinian
eastcarolinian
Hollv 0. Harms Sdrw
.Stephanie; K. Whitlock Managing Edira
Co�V SME�C�� Hewi Editor PtrtK Dawoyt SporaE�m
Rouin Veciinicm fhoidonphy fduot Sisan Wricsmt Hud Com fdinx
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Stephanie R. Whitlock MDnignMonarjet
Janet Respkss Advertising Manager
Rraa Bl.ACKBl UN Laynui Designer
Daniel E. Con Webmeiiei
Serving ifii ECU communir vnce 1926. wo ElH Cirolmian puabtMi 11.000 CM irrnv Tuesdet ind Trtunoa, Tin Hid Idnrnai in HCti edmon u roe opman
of lh� majority ol IM f araim Bono ana utmrten in turn Hi tOiionii Boaro mtmotri TM Elit Carobmen Mlcomei tttnn io ma artnor. um.no ro 260 word!
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opinion
Widnwdiy July 7. 1889 3
In an olfort to combat
the limitations of the
average major, ECU is
now offering � major
in the field of
Multidisciplinary
Studies.
OPINION
DEMOSTHENES
Sexuality should be viewed as
a beautiful and expressive enti-
' ty that dwells inside all of us.
The human body is a beautifully
crafted work of art, yet the censor-
ship boards and the legislatures in
this coEintry are in a constant battle
to cover it up. Nudity and sexual
expression are illegal except under
specifically controlled conditions,
and, as a result of this stifling repres-
sion, we have many problems.
J People need to express them-
selves sexually. It is part of being a
6u man being and living a wholly ful-
Clled life. It is not an absolute neces-
sity such as food and shelter but
rather a factor which improves the
Let it out
quality and meaningfulness of life.
What happens when you take
away people's ability to express
themselves? A pent-Eip energy
begins growing inside which can
occasionally show itself in twisted
and violent outbursts. Sexuality in
America is closely linked with vio-
lence and degradation because
people have had to find other
means to release the energy that
has built up inside of them.
Sexuality should be viewed as a
beautiful and expressive entity that
dwells inside all of us. No one is
devoid of all sexuality. Kveryone
has the same fears, thoughts and
dreams so why hold it all back?
I am not suggesting people go
around having sex in public nor
that there should be no agreement
over some rules of conduct. I am
just confused at the Puritanical
dam on the river of sexuality. Once
the water builds up enough on one
side, it is simply going flow around
into new territory. In any case, you
can not stop the water from flow-
ing.
A naked body should not be
something people giggle or point fin-
gers and snicker at when they see it
in a movie. Why is there so much vio-
lence on television yet you can not
see a woman's naked breast? Why
was it necessary to create special laws
just so a woman could breast feed in
public? The human body should be
something held in reverence and awe
as one of the most exquisite creations
every witnessed on this planet.
You are beautiful; you are perfect
just the way you are. I -ct no one tell
you otherwise. Be at peace until we
OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Summer days are here again
Well, if I got to choose my poi-
son, I cannot think of many
that are more appealing than
barbecued chicken.
After what seems like an eternity of
rain, mist, cloudy skies and other
yucky and depressing weather phe-
nomena, we finally get to see some
sunshine here in Greenville. This
new wave of sunny skies is wonder-
ful for me because I love to be warm
and my tan is fading fast. Thank
goodness summer is here again!
There are many fun things to do
in the summertime. Personally, I
prefer the pool. The cool water is
great, but the chlorine that you get
in you eyes is definitely a draw-
back. If you are a blonde like me,
you also have to deal with the pos-
sibility that you may have green
hair at the end of the summer.
That is not a good thing because
my hair cannot get much shorter
than it is already!
A backyard barbecue is always
fantastic. Normally, the food is great
when it is cooked outside, but there
have been a couple of times when
the food was so burnt that I worried
that the amount of carcinogens that I
was consuming would cancel out my
many years of not smoking. Well, if I
got to choose my poison, I cannot
think of many that are more appeal-
ing than barbecued chicken. The
potato salad is always tasty, and no
one can forget the sweet tea.
Someone I know takes great comfort
in the fact that there will always be
sweet tea. Enough about food
because I am beginning to make
myself hungry! What else can you do
in the summer?
There is always live music play-
ing somewhere, a game of volleyball
going or a beach that is calling your
name. Whatever it is that you do,
you had better get out there and do
it before the sun takes another recess
behind the clouds. We'll all have to
pull on our jeans again, and you have
missed your opportunity for green
hair, carcinogenic chicken, and black
eyes from volleyball. Don't let these
sunny days casually pass you by!
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In the modem working world, it is becoming increasingly important to be well
versed in many areas. Many of us receive the preparation and job skills neces-
sary for us to enter the profession of our choice. Unfortunately, many of us will
enter college and choose a field which seems to fit our desired profession only
to later realize that we arc ill prepared for our chosen field. As a result, not only
are time and money thrown down the drain, but we may also feel that we should
simply abandon all hope for our dream job and instead scrtle for an occupation
for which we have been preparing.
In an effort to combat the limitations of the average major, ECU is now offer-
ing a major in die field of Multidisciplinary Studies. For those of you who are unfa-
miliar with this new major, it is a way for a student to direct his or her own curricu-
lum based upon courses which are relevant to the student's intended profession.
Now before you go storming off to the undergraduate offices with your change
of major forms, you need to realize that this is a serious major designed, in theory,
to benefit students who may be interested in fields of study not currently offered.
In our view this, on paper, is a very exciting and novel idea. Imagine the stu-
dent who dreams of being a film maker, yet feels uncomfortable as a Theater
major, stifled by the English department and unsure in the Art building. With
the option of a Multidisciplinary Studies major available, this student could
build a concise plan of study focusing on these three courses of study which are
each integral parts of film making.
The same could be said for an aspiring cartoonist or advertising executive or
anything. The possibilities are endless.
However, the possible downside is that the student mentor factor in
this new major may not be emphasized enough. Students could take advantage
of this new program to slide by, taking easy courses with no real plan of ever
using their degree. Let us all hope that both the students and faculty involved
in the initial phases of ushering in this new major will realize the possibilities it
can create. Otherwise, it may turn out to be what it sets out to destroy, college
students' money wasted as well as their time.

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OPINION
SCOTT
WILKINS
Joys found in moving
The elusive promise of free beer
after the job is done will usual-
ly bring eager movers to your
door.
This week I am writing on a subject
that we can all relate to: moving.
Yes, it is something each of us has
had to experience in some form or
another. Whether it is moving from
one house to another or from your
house to the dorm, moving has
afflicted us all. I have moved five
times since coming to ECU in 19.
I am preparing for my sixth move on
August 1st. I lave no fear, this opin-
ion columnist isn't leaving
Oreenville, just moving across town.
I could never leave my fiancee. (You
may know her, she's Susan, the
other opinion columnist.)
There is more to moving than
just packing boxes. Moving is, in
essence, a new way of life.
Everything changes; your resi-
dence, your neighbors, your per-
spective. Your sense of who you are
in the world has much to do with
where you live.
Moving also involves those
nasty change-of-address cards from
the I ISPS. Of course, this doesn't
mean that all of your mail gets
there on time � or even gets there
at all. Biting my nails wondering if
my credit card bill has been lost in
the transition is not one of my
favorite pastimes.
Moving also involves friends. It
is next to impossible to move by
oneself, especially if one has large
furniture. Making friends with
someone who owns a pickup truck
would certainly be considered in
good taste.
Strong backs are usually consid-
ered a plus in moving as well. The
elusive promise of free beer after
the job is done will usually bring
eager movers to your door. A round
of brew for everyone!
Moving also usually involves
blood, sweat, and tears. The sweat
comes from moving a 200-pound
couch and an even heavier enter-
tainment center. The blood comes
from me maiming myself in some
way during the move and the tears
are twofold: the pain of injuring
myself and the cost of the move
from one place to another. My cur-
rent move is costing me everything
but my right lung. My checkbook
is smoking from all the checks I
have written lately. They're all
good, of course.
Moving is a pain, yet it can be
fun as well. Don't think of it as lift-
ing your mattress up three flights of
stairs, think of it as an adventure.
OPINION
CHRIS
SACHS
TV for the intellectually challenged
How can one admit something
is fake and then shell out
$39.95 to watch it? That is the
very definition of stupid; I
looked it up.
Let me make something clear: I'm
a man; a male. But I agree with all
the women when they say that pro-
fessional wrestling is the most stu-
pid and ridiculous waste of time
this country has invented.
Now I love rough sports, don't get
me wrong. I'm a member of a boxing
gym, and I love football, rugby, and
chess � all the dangerous sports.
But let me say now and forever
WRESTLING IS NOT A SPORT.
I am sorry if the rednecks and the
Cro-Magnon losers are offended, but
the tnith needs to be told. Wrestling
has scripts that are followed, fake
injuries and pain and referees that
fall somewhere in between worth-
little and worthless. Now wrestling is
fine for kids (I condone any violence
for impressionable youth) because
wrestling is just like cartoons, except
for the fact that it is real. Cartoons are
better than wrestling in two ways.
A.) Cartoons require intelligence.
B.) Cartoons are not on Pay-Per-
View.
The funny thing is when I see
adults watching this stuff. Can they
really be so intellectually bankrupt
to think that this stuff is real? If
they know it's not real, then why
watch such a moronic thing? How
can one admit something is fake
and then shell out $39.95 to watch
it? That is the very definition of
stupid; I looked it up. I guess could
say the same thing about women
and their soap operas, but I excuse
women because they admit it is not
real and they just want to lose
themselves for an hour (or six) in a
fantasy world where love and pas-
sion sweep away their souls. Hey,
Shakespeare did the same thing.
Love and passion never beat the
hell out of a seven-foot steroid
monster with a dining room table.
Women have class; they know
how to enjoy a fantasy show. You
don't see grown women walking all
over town with T-shirts that say,
"Luke and Laura Rule "Save
Samantha and " Bo and I lope are
better than yon I see grown men
-adults - with hats, bumper stickers,
T-shirts, jackets, towels, toilet
paper and lunch boxes with dumb
phrases like: "Austin 3:16 said so
and "The rock is gonna rock your
world all the time. I actually saw
a car once that had an etched pic-
ture of some ape named
"Goldberg" on their rear window.
Give me a break. NWO: are you
serious? There wasn't enough crap
in the wrestling world already, so
1
now they have gang wars against
each other! Look all you wrestling-
loving sheep, I used to work for
Rick Flair (for all you intelligent
people out there, he was a profes-
sional wrestler), and he secretly
told me me many things. But in a
nutshell, the most important thing
he told me was that wrestling is
100 fake. He actually made fun
of the people that take it as serious-
ly as they do. And who should
know better than the guy who has
been draining your wallets (and
your IQ) for years now in that so
called "sport"?
The real disappointment comes
in the fact that during the amount
of time one sits watching those
wastes-of-oxygen jump all around
the ring like orangutans on angel
dust, beating themselves senseless,
they could have done something
constructive, like read a good book,
volunteer, study or buy booze for
underage freshman. You know in
the fall it takes only 50,000 book
sales for a book to make the New
York limes Best Seller's List in a
country of 270 million. That's
pathetic! Yet tens of millions watch
wrestling every week. C'mon peo-
ple, we can do better. If you must
watch TV, and you go to a bar that
has nights set aside for wrestling
and shows it on 23 big screens all
over the place, take a stand and
demand that "60 Minutes" must be
turned on instead. You will feel bet-
ter as well as the rest of us.
. � '





4 Wednesday. July 7. 1999
features
5 Widntsdiy, July
The East Carolinian
Bands perform
nigjitly at bars
Katik Williams
si uk wmtkr
The popularity of the live
music scene in downtown
Greenville is rapidly
expanding. There used to
be a very limited number
of places that had live
music, now almost
every bar or restaurant
hosts a band at least
once a week.
Six local bars and restaurants
were contacted and asked
what type of bands they
SK ROCKS QREENVillE
have and what type of crow
they draw. From Peasant's to
Staccato's, there is at least one place
that will appeal to your tastes.
On Fifth Street, there is the Attic
where you can catch some form of
live entertainment almost every
night. Whether it be beach music,
rock and roll, an '80's cover band, or a
popular regional band, the Attic has
plenty of dancing room and bars to ful-
fill your needs. There is not a typical
crowd that hangs out at the Attic; it
really depends on which band is play-
ing. 'The cover charge also varies
according to the band.
"I like to groove to the bands at the
Attic said Brian Myerhoffer, F.Cl
alumna.
'The Attic expanded last fall to suit
the needs of others like Brian who
enjoyed dancing to the music. 'The Attic is
now the largest bardance club in
Greenville. It has been listed iri Playboy
magazine as one of the 100 best bars in
America. j
Just a few doors down on Fifth Street is
Boli's restaurant. If you are looking for
something fun to do and you don't want to
spend a lot of money, Boli's is the place to
go. Every Tuesday night they have live
music, but you better get there early
because it only sits 125 people. The bands
at Boli's usually play music you can sing
along with, such as top 40 hits with some
oldies songs as well. The age group of the
people that you will typically find at Boli's on
Tuesday night range from college students
to people who are 35. There is no cover
charge, and they have great drink specials.
Across the street at BW-3's is typically
populated by people who are 20 to 30 years
old. They have live music mainly on
Wednesday and Thursday nights, but occa-
sionally they play music on other nights of die
week Hie music is mostly acoustic.
There is no cover at BW-3's.
Around the corner at
Peasant's, you can find the
biggest variety of music along with
the widest variety of people.
Peasant's has live music 'Tuesday,
Thursday, Friday and Saturday,
and on Wednesday, they
feature a DJ. The charge to
get in depends on the band
performing that night, but
it is rarely more than five
dollars. What type of crowd
can you expect to see at
Peasant's? Well, if you are
there on the infamous mug
night, which is 'Tuesday, it tends
to be more sorority and fraternity
members. On the weekends, it is
a very laid-back crowd with peo-
ple from age 18 to 60. Peasant's
hires many local bands as well as
bands from all over the country.
"1 go to Peasant's every
'Tuesday for mug night because
its cheap and there is always a
cool crowd there said Jackie
Wright, junior.
If you want something a little
farther away from the heart of
the downtown bar scene, you
might want to try Courtyard
'Tavern's Yard Party. Each
Sunday from 7 to 11p.m
Courtyard entertains a crowd of
11-A2 year-olds with local bands
such as the Magic Pipers, Groove
Riders, and Matt Thomas with Slip Joint.
They also have a large outdoor patio
where you can sit and enjoy their awe-
some drink specials and listen to live
music.
"I like to go there because it is a relax-
ing atmosphere said Brandon Lawn,
senior.
And if jazz or the blues is your thing,
check out Staccato's every Thursday from
9 to 12p.m. It is a very relaxed atmosphere,
and the typical crowd is composed of sin-
gle, young professionals. As with many of
the other lie music locations in Greenville,
there is no cover charge. They do not offer
any drink specials because they are more
restaurant-oriented, however, they do pro-
vide several entree specials.
If you aren't interested in any of these,
there are several other places to listen to
live music in Greenville. There is Music
by the Waterfront on Sundays at the Town
Commons. Everybody's favorite new
restaurant. Ham's, also has live music on
Wednesday nights. If you like to be a part
of the live music entertainment, you can
sing karaoke at Underwater on Wednesday
nights, or you can just listen to the other
college students' attempts at music.
Whatever you do, experience the music!
Cowboys.
Return
Lukewarm reception
for mis Western drama
Where to rock
COURTYARD TAVERN - SUNDAY
They have various local bands that play popu-
lar music and top 40 hits.
SOU'S � TUESDAY
Local bands play popular music and top 40
hits, but there is very limited seating.
BW-3'S � WEDNESDAY OR THURSDAY
Bands play acoustic hits.
STACCATO'S � THURSDAY
Known lor their jazz bands. Staccato's is
branching out to add blues to their repertoire.
PEASANT'S - NIGHTLY
A wide variety of music is heard here; the
type of music is dependent upon the band.
THE ATTIC - NIGHTLY
In addition to a variety of musical types, they
also feature comedians and Mike Mesmerize.
Na'NC'Y Kavk Wiikki.kr
STAH- nil I ril
"The South will rise again' - bur
using an 80 foot, steam-powered,
steel tarantula? Believe it or not,J
that was the majority of the plot of"
the new Will Smith movie, "Wild;
Wild West This comedy, set:
during the presidency of Ulysses'
S. Grant in post-civil war America,
pairs Jim West (Smith), a gun
slinging cowboy, and Artemis
Gordon (Kevin Kline), a whimsi-
cal inventor of James Bond-like;
gadgets. These two joined forces;
to battle the remaining regalia o(
the Confederate army led by leg
less Dr. Loveless (Kenneth;
Branaugh) Loveless plans to take!
over the government using his!
incredibly unrealistic steam-pow
ered machines such as the gianC
spider that was created for him by
the world's foremost inventors?
whom he had kidnapped.
Barry Sonnenfeld ("Men iry
Black") directed this take-off on a.
popular '60's television series, and!
the movie was no more than thau
� an elongated version of the 'IV
show. The almost nonexistent?
plot and shallow characters mak
for an hour and a half of "mindless
entertainment said Christine
English, a junior at ECU.
"Wild Wild West" would like
to conjure a surreal collision of
Western and science fiction, but
the movie is struitlaced by the
stodgy overfamiliarity of its horses
and holsters setting.
"I mean, really, is there any-
thing left to parody about the,
West?"said Owen Gieiberman oY
Entertainment Weekly.
The women in the movie were
even worse, wearing hardly any
clothing throughout. They were
merely 'eye candy' and had nfj
depth of character, or character at
dl for that matter, and they served
as Dr. Loveless' minions.
However, not everyone dis-
liked the movie. ;
"It had no plot, but Will SmitrJ
SEE WILD WILL PAGE S
Festivities at Town
Commons
Thousands come
out for festivities
M icii u.i. Kn� rds
S l I H I I I, k
'Town Commons suffered another
onslaught of family fun seekers
over the 4th. It was another excel-
lent opportunity for people watch-
ing and eating!
I spoke with Gloria Poythrcss
from Wilson about the festivities
that occurred on Independence
Day. She was very generous and
polite. I was curious how and why
she got involved in this strange
amusement business. She said that
her husband's grandmother used to
have a food joint at the fair. He
used to enjoy watching them put
things together when he was
young. After they were married,
they started out with two amuse-
ments, a Ferris wheel and a swing,
then began to buy others. The
Sharpsburg (VA) 100th anniversary
was their first spot. That was over
17 years ago, when she was 25.
They now have 24 rides.
"The Jaycees asked us if we
could come back Poythress said.
The Jaycees use the proceeds to
offset expenses for other communi-
ty projects throughout the year.
The Poythress' do not ask for a
profit.
'They offer a variety of rides
at the fair, but everyone has their
favorites, I've always thought that
when I was on one of those pull the
blood away from your head till your
ankles swell rides, the chains, pul-
Tonight, we're expecting
around 10,000 people for the
fireworks - there will be arm-
to-arm people here
Jennifer Carter
Jaycees president
leys or mpes would break and I'd
go flying into the crowd like an
over-grown M&M. 1 asked about
increasing regulations.
"We're under the state, and they
are increasing regulations
Poythress said. "There have been a
few accidents (not with us), and
they have to really watch those
other folks. Our staff works full
time. It takes up tfxen to twelve
hours wset up, then it takes a few
hours fothe inspectors to go
through after our inspection. Then,
each day, an inspector shows up
and goes through them again to be
sure nothings been changed
To sum things up, I asked her
what the most rewarding part of her
occupation was. She said, unsur-
prisingly, that it was the kids.
Before heading back to the pool, I
stopped by the Jaycee tent and
spoke with Jennifer Carter who is
the president.
"We've done this for around 27
years Carter said. "There's a
small crowd here right now because
its so hot, but tonight, were expect-
ing around 10,000 people for the
fireworks � there will be arm-to-
arm people here
I asked her briefly about the
local organization. "There are over
60 members in the Greenville
Jaycees and we hope to see every
one of them out here Carter said,
"but actually there will probably be
at least 25 to 30 Well, the pur-
pose on the banks of the mighty
Tar River seems to be to eat some
grub and bake your buns. I think
Til mosey out of here and hit the
pool. There's plenty of time in the
SEE 4TH PACES
Preparing for Dinner
Hannibal eats
the competition alive
SI SAX W It I (.III
Hi.VII �KS Kill Km
'The only one who possessed the
key to his capture as well as the
knowledge necessary to save the
girl was Hannibal Lecter. Now that
Lecter is back, she is the only one
who can find him.
There is another character look-
ing for Dr. Lecter, and this man
suffered at his maniacal hands.
revenge and pleasure, and he will
not be denied.
If graphic descriptions and tales
of terrible cruelty will not give you.
nightmares for weeks, this is ani
interesting novel with many
intriguing twists. The description
that Harris uses captures the senses
and draws you into his world. All of
FBI intrigue, refined tastes, torture,
cannibalism and revenge all enter
into Hiinnihfil, the sequel to The
Silence of the Lambs by Thomas
Harris. Dr. Hannibal Lecter, now
freed from prison, continues to
elude any law enforcement by
using his clever and resourceful
mind as well as his ability to kill
without remorse. He is an intrigu-
ing character. Initially, he is mere-
ly a nithless killer, but as his char-
acter grows, he becomes a man of
cultured tastes, a lover and a pen-
sive older brother. The many faces
of Hannibal Lecter are exposed
through his actions and his relation-
ship with Clarice Starling.
Clarice, a beautiful FBI agent,
forms a relationship with Lecter in
the first book, and she is now
haunted by his memory. Crimes
that bear his signature as well as
notes in his copperplate hand begin
to appear, and she has no choice
but to delve into the past and their
conversations. The cause of the
interviews was the abduction of a
senator's daughter by Jame Gumb.
mi mi wsa
lthomJB H.AKRHT i 9 Man i j i ka '
1 W
Hannibal flies from the shelves
rat photo
Mason, a vengeful victim, desires
to put Lecter through torture that
causes unimaginable pain before he
dies. He was formerly an expert in
pain and suffering, and he knows
how to inflict torture so horrible
that a man cannot survive without
the aid of medical technology. He
is willing to pay any price for his
SEE
PAGES
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the characters have many dimer- ,
sions, and, as you read, you begin to
understand their unique psychol-
gy, desires, wants and needs; M
Although there were many parts
that made my stomach churfi
(sauteed brains are served to the
Pi
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5 Wednesday, July 7. 1999
irolinian
ays
rn
vception
n drama
k'UKKI.KR
I K �
; again' - but
;am-powered,�
eve it or not,J
I of the plot of
movie, "Wild;
comedy, set;
icy of Ulysses"
I war America,
mith), a gun
and Artemis
ie), a whimsi-
nes Bond-like;
i joined forces;
ning regalia of,
ny led by leg
ss (Kenneth
plans to takel
ent using hi
ic steam-pow
li as the gianC
ted for him by-
iost inventors
ipped.
:ld ("Men irw
is take-off on a.
iion series, and
more than thai;
sion of the TV;
x nonexistent?
laracters make?
ilfof "mindlessj
iaid Christine
ECU.
st" would like
;al collision of
ice fiction, but
itlaced by the
ity of its horses
7,
, is there any-
udy about th:
Cleiberrilan dY
:ekly.
the movie were
ing hardly any
at. They were
y' and had np
, or character at
and they served
linions.
everyone dis-
but Will Smitrj
LI PAGE b
IX
jre, and he will
ptions and taleS
fill not give you,
:eks, this is ;m
I with many
The description
tures the senses
his world. All of
te many dimen
ead, you begin tct
inique psycholo:
us and needs;
�;re many pares
stomach churn
re served to the
J'
M PAGE 6 �
features
The- East Carolinian
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Wachovia is much more that one of the top 20 bank holding companies in
the U.S. We're comprehensive financial services. Family friendly employee
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Wild Will
continued from page 4
was awesome said Danny
Wunker, a sophomore at ECU.
True, the movie lacked any real
values, but it was not overly vio-
lent, profane or sexual. It was more
like good clean fun, but it was for
kids over 13.
All in all, if you like the shoot-
em-up, saloon girl kind of enter-
tainment, then this is a good pick,
out on video.
Hannibal
connnued (torn page 4
still-conscious and coherent donor),
I thought that this book was well
My only warning to those who are
brave enough to begin the journey
through the mind of Dr. Hannibal
Lecter is to set aside an entire
evening to read. Once Hannibal
has captured you, it is hard to break
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written, fascinating and exciting, free!
continued from page 4
day for relaxation. I'll be back
later on for a packed house on the
lawn to smell the gunpowder! I
hope people don't forget what this
day is all about. Really, we should
celebrate our independence each
and every day. Let's appreciate
those who get off their butts and
fight for us (or get out and vote),
and give them support, before we
wake up one day and realize many
of our freedoms have all but div
appeared.
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Tilt Eilt Clcoli�i��
Sports
Briefs
Pitt County Girls Softball
League will host the Eastern
North Carolina Babe Ruth Girls
State Softball Tournament July
14th through the 18th in
Winterville. 42 teams will compete
in five different age brackets for
the Girls State Softball
Championship. All Games will be
held at the Sara A. Law Memorial
Softball Complex located off
Reedy Branch Road in Winterville.
For more information contact
Tommy Cooke at (252) 353-2886.
The Special Olympics World
Games wrapped up last week in
Raleigh with more than a few
smiles on everybody's faces. The
games help the disabled achieve
dreams of competitionarhat would
not have been possible without
events such as this. Participants
came from as far as war-torn
Albania to Libya. Next, Raleigh
hopes to host the 2007 Pan Am
Games.
Kristi Overton-Johnson was one
of 12 named to the United States
Pan American Games.
The teams were selected by
; USA Water Ski's 13-member
; International Activities
; Committee (IAC) after competing
; in slalom, tricks and jumping
5 events at the 1999 U.S.Water Ski
I and Junior Olympic Team Trials at
; McCormick lakes in Seffner, FL.
; The Pan Am games are held every
; four years and include water ski
athletes from North America,
South America and the Caribbean.
The America's Challenge is held
every two years and also includes
water ski athletes from North
America, South America and the
Caribbean.
Mendy Nestor, who has gained
a broad range of experience in
media relations at both the colle-
giate and professional sports levels
and publishing, has been named
Assistant Director of Media
Relations at ECU.
The 22-year-old Nestor earned
her collegiate sports information
SEE BRIEFS. PACE I
7 Wednesday, Jt
W�dn�idiy. July 7. 1999 6
Malik makes
an impression
Herrion s basketball
camp is a hit with kids
I'KIKK DAWVOT
si'Urts cumin
Basketball stars seem to have a
habit of following old coaches. For
Michael Jordan, it was Dean
Smith. For San Antonio Spurs
Forward, Malik Rose, it is Pirates
head coach Bill Herrion.
Area kids who attended
Herrion's basketball camp last
week were given a special treat
when Rose, who recently won the
NBA championship, visited.
Rose, a former standout for
Herrion at Drexle University, was
fresh off an NBA season that
brought him many rewards. Rose is
known as one of the most
improved players in the league. He
participated and later won the
NBA championship, and time was
something that Rose did not have
in abundance. Rose, however, saw
the importance of giving back to
his roots.
Herrion said that it was not hard
getting Rose to come to the camp.
"I spoke with Malik once a
week while he was going through
the playoffs, and he agreed to
come once the season was over
Herrion said.
The week long camp for boys
and girls age 6 12 - 17 focused on
many aspects of the game, espe-
cially sticking to the fundamentals.
Rose visited on Friday, and while
he was there, he sought to teach
the kids many important aspects,
including his favorite, the pick and
roll. Aside from the basketball
pointers, he also offered advice to
the kids on becoming a better per-
son.
Rose, while still not seeing as
much playing time as he would
liked2.9 mpg), understands his
value to the Spurs, and made cer-
tain that all the kids attending
understood that everybody is
important to the team.
"My role for the Spurs is to
get out of the way of Tim and
Dave; to come in with a lot of
energy off the bench. The time I
was in there was minimum so I
had to maximize my output
Rose said.
Herrion said that Rose has
qualities which go unnoticed by
many in the league, but these
qualities often are extremely
important. The role played by
Rose is similar to Charles Barkley
or Dennis Rodman because they
are all necessary components to
the team, but they are not high
scorers.
"Malik was only recruited by-
three colleges out of high school
Kids at the Bill Heron Basketball Camp raise their hands for the chance to run through a pick and roll drill with Malik Rose of the
San Antonio Spurs.
PHOTO AND CAPTION BY JEAN HENRI WHITE, THE DAILY REFLECTOR
Justice retires after 20 years
Track coach wants
spend time with family
Hi sawk Milks kkyicii
SUM (IB tt Kl 1KB
After 20 years of service to ECU,
Charles "Choo" Justice, head coach
for the women's track and field
team and the women's cross coun-
try team, has stepped down from
the program to spend more time
with his family.
Justice announced his resigna-
tion late in June, and Athletic
Director, Mike Hamrick, con-
firmed the resignation through the
university on June 23.
Justice said he resigned because
he wanted to spend more time with
his wife, Sharon, and their children,
Andrea, five, and Dylan, one. An
opportunity to teach at Pitt
Community College gave him the
chance to be at home more often.
The biggest reason was to get
the opportunity to stay at home
more Justice said in an interview
with the Daily Reflector. "In the
course of a year, I travel at least 40
weekends. I felt I needed to be
home more. I fell into an opportu-
nity to teach some classes at (Pitt
Community College) in the contin-
uing education program
According to Henry VanSant,
assistant athletic director. Justice
did a great job at ECU. Under his
direction the program became
Sk
mmm
In
j- " �
wn
r
AifLS
y &� '��.��:��'�
i
Justice leaves after being first full time women's
coach.
FILE PHOTO
nationally competitive.
"We regret that Justice won't be
here to help the program VanSant
said. "He took us from virtual
obscurity to being nationally com-
petitive
Since Justice only
recently resigned, the uni-
versity has not yet hired a
new coach to take his
place.
"We are in the process
of taking applications and
reviewing applications to
fill the position VanSant
said. "We will take some-
one with considerable
coaching experience, col-
lege experience, and track
experience
Justice began his career
at ECU when he enrolled
for classes in 1980 as an
industrial technology
major. As a student, he
served as the football
team's equipment manager
since there was no cross
country team for him to
join. After completing his
degree in 1985, the univer-
sity offered him a full time
job as equipment manager.
Three years later,
Justice took a year off to
run competitively but soon
returned to begin working
on his masters degree in
business administration. By
this time, ECU had begun
a cross country program coached by
John Welborn. He talked Justice
10 year-old Kramer Sneed dribbles past Malik Rose while learning about the pick and roll
during the Bill Heron Basketball Camp.
PH0T0 AND CAPTION BY JEAN HENRI WHITE. THE DAILY REFLECTOR
said Herrion. " I wasn't sure how
good a player he was, but once he
started practice I could tell he had
a good work attitude and wanted
to win
"Three things that I wanted to
convey to the kick: first and
foremost believe in God, believe
in yourself, if you don' believe
in yourself no one will. The
third most important is to
work hard and never give up
Malik Rose
San Amomo Spins
Rose advised kids to focus less on
strategy and more on experiencing
themselves if they want to make it
to the NBA. This advice also
applies to the younger crowd
which has been developing pre-
maturely in the NBA. He believes
that making an impact on the court.
is a skill which takes time to develop
" Some, like Kobe (Bryant), are
doing well, but the odds are against
a high school kid coming in and i
making an immediate impact
Rose said. " I would rather see col-
lege kids getting drafted over
young kids just out of high school
Herrion has offered basketball
camps for over six years at Drexle. j
He continues the tradition here �
and plans next year to continue the'
camp as well as start a camp for
fathers and sons.
Herrion has paid little attention
to the CAA high-rated preseason
polls for ECU but instead likes to
put his mind to other activities
such as the camps and meetings
with players during the summer.
"When you change (schools),the
biggest adjustment is getting to
know the players as people, f am
pleased with the progress made so
far Herrion said.
Basketball team expected
to finish second in conference
into helping coach the program.
In 1991, Justice was named
ECU's first ever full-time track
coach.
"He (Justice) was a fine young
man with knowledge of track
VanSant said.
Justice went on to coach two All
-Americans, Dava Rhodes in 1994,
a distance runner in the 5,000 and
10,000 meter events, and Michelle
"We are in the process of tak-
ing applications and reviewing
applications to fill the position.
. "We will take someone with
considerable coaching experi-
ence, college experience, and
track experience
Henry VanSant
SSISTAT ATIU.KTIC: IIIRKIIIIIR
Clayton in 1999, a thrower.
Justice said that the decision to
leave was hard because of his con-
nection with the athletes.
"It's a tough decision because
the kids I'm leaving behind are
great kids Justice said. "So many
are special kids who are overachiev-
ers, and they're all good kids as well
as good athletes
Championship
winner predicted
l)i:vo Wiiiii:
simih � hi 11-�
After a roller coaster ride last sea-
son concluding with the changing
of the guard for ECU coaches, the
men's basketball team has been
predicted to finish second in the
conference.
"It's great to be picked high,
but it presents a big challenge for
the players said Bill Herrion,
ECU men's basketball coach.
A summer vote by the nine
Colonial Athletic Associations
coaches tabbed ECU for a second
place top finish in the 1999-2000
season. This was an overwhelm
ing improvement from last season
in which the team finished sev-
enth in the conference. First-year
coach. Bill Herrion, welcomes
back an entire roster except for
point guard Alico Dunk.
ECU is expected to finish
behind George Mason, defending
conference champions. George
Mason is the coaches' choice to
repeat as the conference champion
George Mason, like ECU, wel-
comes back four of the five starters
from their 1998-1999 season.
Despite missing nine games
due to a fracture in his lower left
leg, forward Evaldas Joeys, who
led the pirates in both points (
13.8) and rebounds (6.2), was
named to the preseason All-CAA
first team. Joining Joeys were
George Mason center George
Evans, Richmond forward Charles
Stephens, James Madison guard
Jabari Outtz, and guard LeMar
Taylor of Virginia Commonwealth.
In addition to Joeys, senior
guard Garrett Blackwelder (11.8
ppg, 46 three-pointers), junior
guard-forward David Taylor (7.3
gpg, 4.1 rpg), and 6'8" senior Neil
Punt (7.2 ppg, 4.9 rpg) return to
play for ECU as starters. ECU fin-
ished 13-14 last season and 7-9 in
CAA play, losing a 65-62 double
overtime contest to Old Dominion
in the season finale at the confer-
ence tournament.
The Pirates' depth should also
SEE RANKING. PAGE
That
The spt
joyner I
Student
Count
McDonald
j-
'
OffiM





ily 7. 1999 6
J
t the pick and roM
eloping pre-
i. r le believes
;t on the court;
me to develop
: (Bryant), are
Ids are against
jming in and i
iate impact
rather see col-
drafted over
Fhigh school
ed basketball
;ars at Drexle
tradition here'
n continue the;
rt a camp for
little attention
ted preseason
istead likes to
ther activities
and meetings
he summer,
e (schools),the
is getting to
people, f am
gress made so
'Cted
rence
i finished sev-
:nce. First-year
on, welcomes
iter except for
)unk.
:ted to finish
son, defending
�ions. George
rhes' choice to
ence champion
ke ECU, wel-
the five starters
)9 season,
g nine games
n his lower left
las Joeys, who
both points (
ids (6.2), was
.eason All-CAA
ig Joeys were
enter George
"orward Charles
Madison guard
guard LeMar
lommonwealth.
Joeys, senior
ckwelder (11.8
inters), junior
'id Taylor (7.3
'8" senior Neil
1 rpg) return to
irters. ECU fin-
ason and 7-9 in
� 65-62 double
i Old Dominion
s at the confer-
pth should also
.pace;
7 Widmadiy, July 7. 1999
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
WLIPrimo
PARKING
For The Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is reserving 6 parking
sPaces for You' V,$,t tne '0th Street
I W 'ocat,on and fM out an entrv form for �
MMMf chance to win one of our Primo Parking
'Spaces for a semester. (�vw&
The spaces are within easy walking distance of the Recreation Center,
joyner Library, Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins Art Building, and
Student Health Department.
No purchase necessary to win.
Winner will be notified by phone.
Spaces are good August 18th through December 8th
Courtesy of
McDonalds & Coke
Briefs
cominued (ram page 6
experience while serving as a stu-
dent assistant at her alma mater.
West Virginia University in 1998
with a Bachelor of Science degree
in journalism.
Nestor also served in 1997 as
public relations intern with the
Pittsburgh Penguins of the
National Hockey League.
The 18th annual Colonial invita-
tional tennis tournament will be
held July 30th - August 1 in
Edenton, NC.
Ranking
cominued liom page 6
be a strength with junior forward
Steven Branch (4.9 ppg, 5.9 rpg)
returning from a knee injury which
kept him out of the season's final
12 games last season; sophomore
guard Brandon Hawkins (9.0 ppg),
7-0 senior center Quincy Hall7.3
ppg, 28 blocks) and junior 7-footer
Alphons van lerland (2.6 ppg, 1.9).
Randy Barnes, a 6'6" forward who
sat out last season after transferring
from Lenoir-Rhyne, is also expect-
ed to make a significant impact in
the coming season.
Rounding out the projected
team finishes behind George
Mason and ECU were Richmond,
VCU, Old Dominion, James
Madison, UNC- Wilmington,
American and William & Mary.
George Mason garnered five of
the nine first place votes while
ECU received two and Richmond
one.
"A poll in the summer is nice,
but unfortunately the poll we are
going to be concerned about is the
one at the end of the year
Herrion said.
The ECU women's basketball
team was picked third in the sum-
mer poll, right behind George
Mason.
"It's great that the coaches think
so highly of the team, but it's what
we do during the year that counts
said Debbie Gibson, ECU
women's coach.
Old Dominion led the poll with
eight first place votes. In last year's
CAA Tournament, ECU was run-
ner up to ODU.
"In last summer's poll, we were
picked to finish 9th in the tourna-
ment and we finished 5th Gibson
saidIt was a great achievement
The women's pre-season selec-
tions as player of the year were led
by Old Dominion's Lucienne
Berthieu. ECU's Danielle Melvin,
who averaged 11.8 points and 8.6
rebounds a year ago, was also
named along with CJeorge Mason's
Jen Surlas and Trish Halpin, and
American's Kate Miller.
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8 WtdnwUy, July 7, 1999
classifieds
The East Carolinian
FOR RENT
FEMALE NEEDS roommates to
share 3 bdrm. duplex. 11th 6 Evans.
1 bath, private fenced backyard,
washerdryer. central AC.
$210mo. Call Giselle 754-2026.
ECU AREA: TWO and one bedroom
duplexes. Heat and AC in both
units. One is $250.00. the other
$210.00 a month. Pets OK! Call 830-
9502.
ABOVE BW-3 2 BR. 1 bath. $675
month. Walk to ECU. Call 252-726-
8846.
TAKE OVER lease ASAP: Players
Club. 4 bedroom. 3 bath apt. Can
move in in Aug. Call 353-8930.
TAKE OVER lease by August. 2 bed-
room. 1 12 bath. $450 a month.
Close to campus. Call 754-2840.
please leave message.
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
$400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price. 551-3426.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 758-6596.
PINEBROOK APARTMENTS, 1-2
BRs available, water, sewer, cable in-
cluded. Reduced Deposits Novem-
ber. December. On-site main-
tenance, management. ECU bus
line. 9-12 month lease, pets allowed.
758-4015
ROOMMATE WANTED I ROOMMATE WANTED HELP WANTED
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Aug. 15.
2 bedroom. 1 12 bath spacious
apartment. Rent is $230 12
phone and utilities. For more details
call Mike at 353-8950 after 6 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
BR. 1 bath furnished apt. Walking
distance to ECU. $212.5mo. Central
AC. heat 6- hot water included. Call
328-0133(w) or 329-7137 leave mes-
sage.
ROOMMATE WANTED Undergrad.
graduate student room open now.
$162.00 a month, no deposit need-
ed. Fully furnished on ECU bus ro-
ute. CallChriW52-903�
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Grad stud-
ent seeking female grad or upper-
classman to share 2 BR. 1 bath, rent
$195each. Reedy Branch Apts.
329-1438.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse. On bus route. Call
355-2827.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
BR. 1 bath duplex 8 minute walk to
ECU. Central airheat. Prefer serious
student. $190month 12 utilities.
551-3871.
NON-SMOKING Female roommate
needed now to share 2 BR. 112
bath apt. 12 rent utilities. Clean,
serious student preferred. Call 752-
8647. Mel.
GRAD STUDENT seeking mature
non-smoking female roommate to
share 2 BR. apt. in August.
$210month plus 12 utilities. Call
Allison. 919-828-6183.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU,
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Any Condition Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, � CD Players -
Home, Portable
Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:00
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex. Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU. on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374. leave mes-
sage. Call now.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 3
BR. 1 bath house on Student St.
with two graduate students. One
block to ECU. $133.4mo. Call 328-
0133(w) or 329-7137.
NEEDED: FEMALE roommate to
share two bedroom townhouse in
Wilson Acres. $270 includes basic
cable, water, sewer. Needed to move
in by second week in July. Call 355-
2940, ask for Sabrina.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 7 room house 3 blocks from
campus. Clean and responsible a
must. Huge bedroom. $250month
12 utilities. Must not mind smok-
ing or cats. Call 561-7591.
FEMALE SHARE 3 bedroom town-
house near ECU. Furnished wash-
erdryer. Beginning Fall '99.
$225mo. plus share utilities .
phone, cable. Call Mindy 355-2956.
Collingdale Court
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students.
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air. ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $250 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
D.J. FOR HIRE
FOR All FUNCTIONS & CAMPUS
ORGANIZATIONS
Call J.Arthur @ 252-412-0971
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
FOR SALE
1991 RED Ford Probe, auto runs
well, some minor problems. $1000
neg. Call Julie at 355-2687 or email
jan 10280mail.ecu.edu
PENTIUM 120, 16 megs RAM 1.2
gig. 28.8 modem. CD ROM 14" col-
or monitor, speakers. Office 97. Win.
98 and more, needs sound card. Call
David. 353-5103. $225.
HELP WANTED
ATTN: EASTERN Carolina's finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Day and night shifts available. Earn
up to $1000 a week. Call Playmates
at 747-7686.
NOW HIRING adult entertainers
and dancers. Up to $1500 weekly.
Must be at least 18, have phone,
transportation, be drug free. Call
758-2737 for information.
SITTER NEEDED in my home for 6-
yr. old child, weekdays beginning
July 19 to August 13. No smoking,
safe driving record, own transporta-
tion. References. Call 321-8221.
PART-TIME HELP needed imme-
diately for office and clerical duties.
Afternoons; 20 to 25 hours per
week. Responsibilities include filing,
sorting, compiling and disposing
corporate files. Respond to Tommy
at 757-0234
EXPERIENCED NANNY needed for
1-12 year old weekdays 8:15-2:15
beginning August 15. Requires 10
month minimum commitment, no
smoking, safe driving record, own
transportation. Send letter re qualifi-
cations b desired salary, include
phone number, to "Nanny PO Box
8088. Greenville. NC 27835.
PERSONALS
LOSE WEIGHT like crazy! 30
pounds or more safe. fast, easy, af-
fordable and all natural. Programs
start at $39. 96. Call now, 931-7526.
THE CARD Post Report 329. Try
Inn. To reflect on another's comment
that a state run school for speech &
hearing impaired's teaching method
"is child abuse is to recall an ex-
perience of seeking workstudy
students at a state run school for the
handicapped. After exploring with
the job counselor a workstudy op-
portunity where an apparent 'handi-
cap was actually a blessing in
meeting a particular job need I was -
introduced to a vocational educatot
After some comfortable 'shop talk
I addressed as I had with coun-
selor that there was one condition
a perspective student would need to
meet. They would need to put in
writing their answers to the ques-
tions "Is World Peace possible?
and Why or why not? and be
open to open discussion of their an-
swers The educator said "World
peace is not possible end of discus-
sion please leave Though I left
the place behind the issue the
students ft educator remain in
the front of my mind. Prosper n Live
Long. Tom Drew
JESUS IS THE
J ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
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comics
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Jason Latour
Mama's By-product
Jeremy Falls
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
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Jason Latour
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Title
The East Carolinian, July 7, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
July 07, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1345
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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