The East Carolinian, June 23, 1999






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Carolinian
www.tec.ecu.edu
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Student kidnapped and held at Motel 6
Victim robbed, later
released unharmed
Cory Sheri.kr
news editor
An ECU student was kidnapped,
robbed and held against his will at
the Motel 6 this weekend.
According to a Greenville Police
Department report, Seth D.
Campbell was held against his will
by Eddy Robert Damilowski.
Campbell was found in a coordi-
nated effort by ECU police and
Greenville police on June 18.
"Mr. Campbell reported that
Mr. Damilowski asked for a ride to
pick up his co.usin's car said
Melissa Bartlett, public affairs
coordinator. "When Mr. Campbell
gave him a ride, Mr. Damilowski
began threatening his life and ask-
ing for all of his money. Mr.
Damilowski than told Mr.
Campbell that he wanted to go
to a friends house to pick up
some drugs.
Damilowski is wanted for multiple charges.
PHOTO COURTESY OF GREENVILLE POLICE DEPARTMENT
"Mr. Campbell proceeded to
call his roommate and tell him that
he was in trouble. The Greenville
Police then found them at the
Motel 6 Bartlett said.
Damilowski has eluded author-
ities, and according to Bartlett, has
not been apprehended.
According to Bartlett,
Damilowski has a history of asking
people for rides and accosting
them once he gains entrance to
their car.
"He was arrested July 22,
1997 for the same type of thing
Bartlett said. "He's been doing
the same type of thing for two
summers now
Damilowski was also arrested
on June 13, 1999 for assaulting a
police officer and possession of
stolen, property.
While Campbell was unavailable
for comment, other students say
they have been approached by a
man, matching Damilowski's
description and telling a similar
story.
"He came to my door at eight in
the morning said Taylor Jones,
sophomore. "He told me that he
needed a ride to pick up his cousin's
Only 16 of rapes
arc reported, most
June is Rape
Pnirntion Month
Less than 2
of reported
Most rapes
occur at a
victim's home
75-80 of rape
victims blame
themselves
1 out of 3
women will
be a victim
im . enter.
"Before the proti
Sexual iiss.iiilt is
lie Kl l. i
Over 700
women are sexually
assaulted each vear
Everv (lav in
America 1,871
women are
tin Kl 1.
imux u hu h i i
forcibly raped
ourlesy
car. After I told him no, he asked if
there was anyone else in the house
that could help him and I told him'
no Jones said.
Bartlett warns that students
should be cautious of who they
offer assistance to.
"What he's doing is getting
people to drive him to drug hous-
es. People are just trying to be
good Samaritans and they end up
becoming victims Bartlett said.
Damilowski is described as six
feet tall, 180 pounds. He is 28
years old, with brown hair and
brown eyes.
SLD offers
new scholarship
Department expands
program services
Cory Sheeler
news editor
The Student Leadership
Development office offers ECU stu-
dents a chance to enhance their lead-
ership qualities and get a head start in
the worid after they graduate.
The Student Leadership
Development office, which is a divi-
sion of Student Life, offers a wide
variety of programs to students and
campus organizations to help them
become better leaders. The office
also helps students become more
Jim Sturm, head of Student Leadership
Development.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELER
prepared for life after college-
Some of the programs include
The Emerging Leaders Program,
The Leadership Lecture Series, and
The Leadership Corps. The office
has added a new program this year
entitled the Walter and Marie
Williams Leadership Award
Program.
"Walter Williams donated
$25,000 for leadership said Jim
Sturm, director.
"It gave me a chance to basical-
ly develop a whole program of
things I've always wanted to do
Each freshmen selected for the
SEE STUDENT LEADERSHIP PAGE 3
New state proposals speed up construction on campus
Student Health improvements pending .
PHOTO BY WILLIAM KEITH
Funds slated for
new buildings
Brian Storrings
STAFF WRITER
Proposals for new funding meth-
ods will create more construction
at ECU.
"Rather than allocating capital
money in the annual budget, the
Legislature will instead put together
a bond issuance for new construction
that would cover construction for sev-
eral years said Bruce Flye, director
of Facilities Planning, Design and
Construction.
'This would include the construc-
tion of the Science and Technology
building, the expansion of the Rivers
building and a new building for
Allied Health and Nursing on the
Medical campus
The cost for the Science and
Technology building will be $58.6
million, according to Flye. The
money for this construction will be
through bonds, which will be paid ofT
over time, rather than having all of
the money up front as was previously
done.
There will also be renovations of
the Student Health Center and the
Flannagan building as well as a new
Strength and Conditioning Center.
"The construction of the Student
Health Center will start sometime in
the next forty-five days Flye said.
"The cost will be $4,175 million,
paid for by a bond liquidated by stu-
dent fees
The new Strength and
Construction Center for the Athletic
Department will be started, which
was funded mainly by $8.5 million in
private donations Flye said.
The reasons for the renovations of
the Student Health Center are
numerous, according to Kay Y.
Wilkerson, director of the Student
SEE
PAGE 3





2 WsiMiiiy. Jsm 23.1899
news
Tht East Carolinian
University home to
variety of youth camps
Campers play basketball at the Student Recreation Center.
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEN
flfc
Ik
Programs offer
Mlenging experiences
Kkrkv Pat is
STACK w XT'Kit
.Summer school and freshmen orien-
, wtation aren't the only activities ECU
!wwill be offering or supporting this
summer.
j " ECU hosts a variety of programs
nt for people of all ages with diverse
interests and talents. Unlike the mass
.exodus of full-time students that
rtc occurs each summer at ECU, several
thousand children, teens and adults
.� arrive in Greenville from all over the
. country to spend a few hours, days, or
weeks at ECU participating in a wide
, variety of summer camp programs
and activities. The camps are
.designed to stimulate the mind,
enhance musical skills, inspire leader-
ship characteristics, and increase
physical ability and stamina. The
camps also provide a source of sum-
mer income and employment experi-
ence for staff members, many of
whom are regular ECU students.
- � Sports related camps are: football,
soccer, cheerleading, basketball, soft-
ball, baseball and a specialized youth
program offered by the Recreational
Services Department Recreational
Services offers three, two-week ses-
sions of sports and activities for boys
and girls between the ages of 7 and 12
for $155 per session. The camps run
from 9am to 5pm Monday through
Friday and offer activities such as ulti-
mate frisbee, soccer and basketball.
However, for a nominal fee of $15 per
session, parents "can drop off their
kids as early as 7 o'clock and pick
them up as late as 6 o'clock accord-
ing to Brian Weingartz, director of
Recreational Services for Youth
Summer Sports Camp.
"Many of our kids are children of
ECU faculty and staff employees and
registration is still open Weingartz
said.
There are many academically ori-
ented summer camps at ECU as well.
Program such as Summer Ventures,
Future Doctors and Ventures in
Health Care Careers provide training
in science and mathematics for career
enhancement. According to Virginia
Hardy, associate director of the
Academic Support and Counseling
Center, the premed program in
Future Doctor's provides instruction
in science courses designed to "make
them the participants more compet-
itive for medical school admission and
prepare them for the MCAT
For those with musical talent, die
ECU School of Music offers several
summer programs such as Band
Camp, Guitar Camp, the Suzuki
Institute and Choral Camp.
According to Dr. Rhonda Fleming,
director of ECU's Summer Choral
Camp, the program is open to youdis
from 8th grade to recent high school
graduates in the North Carolina,
South Carolina and Virginia areas.
The experience culminates "in a free
concert open to the public on Friday
July 30th at 2pm in the A. J. Fletcher
Recital Hall The program is "also
SEE SUMMER CAMPS PAGE 3
$90 million cleanup
slated for Baltimore
BALTIMORE (AP) After a
cleanup effort that consumed 10
years and about $90 million,
AlliedSignal Inc. has permission to
develop its old chemical plant site,
27 prime acres jutting into
Baltimore's Inner Harbor.
Company officials, and state and
federal officials, gathered Monday at
the site to talk about the cleanup and
what it means to the waterfront.
The chromium that pollutes the
site has been sealed in underground
walls of clay and layers of plastic,
making it safe for development in the
view of the Environmental
Protection Agency.
Jane Nishida, state secretary of the
environment, said the AlliedSignal
effort, carried out without state or fed-
eral aid, "is a success in preventing
continued degradation of the envi-
ronment while restoring a contami-
nated site to a useable property in a
desirable location on the waterfront
The plant processed chrome ore
for 140 years before closing in 1985.
Unknown quantities of chromium
escaped from the plant and were
washed into the soil, resulting in a con-
stant stream of the dangerous heavy
metal into the Baltimore Harbor.
To stop the pollution, the com-
pany dug trenches 60 feet or more
to bedrock and filled them with
three feet of clay. The area was
sealed at the top with 15 acres of a
multi-layer cap five feet thick.
Extraction wells pump polluted
water from the ground for process-
ing at a treatment facility.
Recent EPA tests have not
found any chromium flowing from
the site.
Despite the EPA's seal of
approval and the prime location,
fears about possible future liability
if pollution control measures fail
may make it difficult for
AlliedSignal to find a developer.
Baltimore City Solicitor Otho
Thompson said last week the city
should not take responsibility for
roads or a public park on the land
because it would be open to a
future lawsuit if pollutants leak
from the site.
C. William Struever, a developer
of several projects along the harbor,
said the city's position might make
developers squeamish about envi-
ronmental risks.
"This location is magnificent,
fabulous Struever said. "But the
city's position makes it much
tougher for the project to succeed
Tom Crain, a spokesman for
AlliedSignal, said the company is not
worried about finding a developer.
"The land, which was unuseable
at one time, is now a prime piece of
property in one of the East Coast's
most appealing cities he said.
State and federal officials are also
positive about the cleanup effort that'
AlliedSignal carried out undera 1982
consent decree.
"The AlliedSignal remediation at
Baltimore Harbor has features that
the EPA would like to see in many
more cleanups across the country
said Timothy Fields, the director of
EPA's site cleanup programs.
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CAGESNAKE EYES
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Atlantic Crtyccp Rick Sairtcro is
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wife and a mistress, gets his
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the govanrment is lolled, he soon
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past when the stakes werent
so high, or folkwuptiieinvestj-
gatiori and put his cosy lifestyle
very much at risk
For a good time call The Student Union
Hotline � 262.328.6004 or visit our
webtlte 9 www.ecu.adustudant union
Tht Ettt Cirolinii
Cour
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Court ordered to reconsider
Lemmons's death sentence
i,
GOLDSBORO, N.C. (AP) The
U.S. Supreme Court, using a deci-
sion it made earlier this month, has
ordered the state to reconsider the
death sentence of a Wayne County
man sentenced partially on the
hearsay testimony of an accomplice.
The court told the state
Supreme Court to reconsider the
sentence of Edward Lemons, 26,
who was convicted in August 1995
of the shooting deaths of Bobby
Gene Stroud, 38, and Margaret
Daniels Strickland, 35, both of
Goldsboro. Testimony showed the
murders were the result of a drug
deal gone sour.
The court said the sentence
should be reconsidered in light of
its June 10 decision in Lilly vs.
Virginia. In that case, justices limit-
ed the use of out-of-court state-
ments by accomplices who admit
to some wrongdoing but say the
defendant played the primary role.
Neither of Lemons' accomplices
testified against him. But state-
ments they made to others were
brought out during the sentencing
phase of the trial.
Two Nato soldiers killed in explosion
; Student Leadership
continued from page 1
scholarship is nominated by a facul-
ty member from their high school,
and they receive $1,000 toward
their education, as well as enroll-
ment in the program.
"We've offered it to 25 students,
and 23 accepted it Sturm said,
"and a lot of these people would not
have come to ECU, but because of
this opportunity, they decided to
come here. It's helping us attract
some top student leaders from
around the area
Sturm came to ECU in January
1997, after completing a graduate
program at the University of Buffalo.
While Sturm is excited about the
potential that the Williams
Scholarship program has, he has
seen the most success in another
program that his office conducts.
"The Chancellor's Leadership
program is the biggest success so
far Sturm said. "It's mainly for
sophomores and juniors who have
been nominated by a faculty mem-
ber. After they've applied for a spot,
we select 60 people. They are then
enrolled in the eight week program.
"They meet with successful
ECU alumni and successful com-
munity members. The Chancellor
presents one of the sessions; it's just
a really neat program that helps
with the development of profes-
sional skills
Chancellor Richard Eakin thinks
the program is a perfect fit for the
Student Leadership
Development's curriculum of pro-
grams.
"I had a chance this year to be
part of the seminars Eakin said.
"I was intrigued by the level of
intelligence of the students. I was
very impressed by the level of con-
versation that I was able to have
with them
Chancellor Eakin is also pleased
with the performance of Sturm and
the Student Leadership
Development office.
"I think Jim Sturm is doing an
incredibly fine job at ECU for our
students Eakin said. "He has
brought the whole notion of leader-
ship into a place at the university
that I think it deserves
Eakin is not the only one who
thinks that Sturm's programs are a
success. Many students have found
these programs to be a benefit to
their education.
"The many activities involving
critical thinking and problem solv-
ing strengthened my ability to think
critically, individually and as part of
a group said Janine Reynolds,
freshman. "These skills will help
me in the future Reynolds said.
PRISTINA Yugoslavia (AP)
Even as peacekeepers began build-
ing the foundations of peace in
Kosovo, they couldn't escape the
remains of war. Two NATO soldiers
were killed in an explosion as they
cleared ammunition from a desert-
ed schoolhouse.
The British army's Gurkha sol-
diers were the first allied deaths
since the peacekeepers entered
Kosovo on June 12. But dozens of
civilians already have died in similar
explosions of land mines and
booby traps since the peacekeepers
began to take control.
Two civilians also were killed in
Monday's blast, and another was
injured. He was being treated in a
British field hospital in Pristina. The
explosion occurred in a school in the
village of Negrovce, 30 kilometers
(20 miles) west of Pristina.
British peacekeepers were inves-
tigating the cause of the blast, and
withheld the names of the soldiers of
the 69th Gurkha Field Squadron
riflemen from Nepal attached to the
British peacekeeping force pend-
ing notification of their relatives.
U.S. President Bill Clinton, visit-
ing the former Yugoslav republic of
Slovenia, telephoned British Prime
Minister Tony Blair to offer his con-
dolences, officials said.
In spite of the blast, peace
appeared stronger than ever, with
Albanian rebels pledging in a disar-
mament pact with NATO to lay
down their arms. The deal came just
hours after the last of the 40,000 Serb
troops left Kosovo.
The 20,000 or so NATO-led
KFOR troops now in Kosovo said
they were moving beyond initial
attempts to quell the violence and
were beginning to look ahead by
establishing security and laying the
groundwork for democratic elections.
"Very soon, KFOR will be the
only military security presence here.
That is how it should be peace-
keeping chief Lt. Gen. Mike Jackson
said Monday.
One day earlier, Jackson received
both confirmation that the Yugoslav
military had withdrawn its forces
from Kosovo and a pledge from the
Kosovo Liberation Army to disband,
put down its weapons and join efforts
to establish peace in Kosovo.
With the Serb forces' retreat con-
firmed, NATO officially ended its
air campaign. And on Monday, the
Belgrade government took a recip-
rocal step, asking parliament to end
the state of war declared the day
NATO launched its airstrikes, the
state Tanjug news agency reported.
Since March 24, the state of war
has banned men of military age from
leaving the country, let the army take
over key institutions and subjected
the news media to censorship.
Still, reports of a media crackdown
persisted. An umbrella group for
Yugoslavia's fledgling independent
radio and television broadcasters said
the government was forcing stations
replace their newscasts with those of
the state-controlled networks.
Meanwhile, the KLA agreed to a
broad demilitarization that will
require them to leave their check-
points and halt any military activity
unless the peacekeepers approve it
first.
Although they can keep their
handguns, they agreed not to use
explosives, to put remaining
weapons in storage sites verified by
NATO and to clear mine fields and
booby traps within seven days.
Already, many in the rank and
file seemed to be complying.
Former fighters will apply for posi-
Budget
continued liom page 1
Health Service.
"The new building will be
designed to be an outpatient, stu-
dent-oriented facility Wilkerson
said. "It will be more convenient
and accessible for physically dis-
abled students and will allow for
more patient confidentiality with a
paperless office. The constniction
will not interfere with student care,
though there may be some inconve-
nience during constniction
"The proposal in the General
Assembly is for the UNC system to
issue limited obligation bonds for
state appropriated-type projects that
would issued as moral obligations of
the state, but not full faith obliga-
tions, which require a vote of the cit-
izens of the state said Richard
Brown, vice-chancellor for finance
and Administration.
"What has been authorized to
this point is $2.4 billion of Ixmds to
support academic facilities in the
UNC system, of which our share
would be about $191 million
Other plans for the future include
renovations to Jones Residence
Hall, a new dining hall on West
Campus and a Parking Deck.
The reason for the new method
of funding to speed up construction
is the additional 48,000 students in
the UNC system expected to enroll
within the next ten years. ECU
enrollment will be at least 25,000
Summer Camps
i'iiiiimmiimI Irum page 2
open to teachers for certification
renewal, " Fleming said.
Many of the camps participants
will reside in campus residence halls
that would otherwise remain vacant.
According to Amelie Brogden,
ECU Neighborhood Service
Manager, making housing and meals
available for summer camp partici-
pants "helps to promote recruitment


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tions in municipal government and
on the police force, the KLA (aid.
"We received an order to return
home and start a normal life wkh our
families KLA fighter Faik RccCa
teacher waiting for a ride home with
his brother, said in Prizren, Kosovc's
second-largest city.
The KLA regional commander
there, known by his code name
"Drini gave German officers man
of minefields most near die
Albanian border as required.
Sergio Vieira de Mello, the U.M.
official who essentially becomes
Kosovo's governor under the peace
deal, had expressed concern Sunday
that KLA activities could undermine
his authority. But on Monday, he
praised the agreement, and set about
the work of building peace.
His tasks include getting elec-
tricity, water and other municipal
services working again across
Kosovo; re-establishing civilian
courts and police forces and prepar-
ing for elections.
Vieira de Mello said one of hit
first acts would be to issue strict
gun-control orders.
for prospective students In addi-
tion, it "allows the university to fulfill
its missions of public service and pro-
viding a safe, secure environment for
learning Brogden said.
A significant example of how the
summer camps promote ECU recruit-
ment is Tarrick Cox, Director of
Legislator's School for Youth
Leadership Development. The
legislator's School is one of several
leadership summer camps at ECU
along with Upward Bound and
Project Excel. Cox attended the
Legislator's School in 1988 and cited
his experience as the primary reason
he chose to attend ECU as an under-
graduate student, eventually graduat-
ing from ECU in 19.
According to Cox, "the basis of the
school's leadership curriculum is The
7 Habits of Highly Effective People
by Dr. Stephen R. Ckvey There are
two sessions of the Legislator's
School. .Session one is for rising 8th
and 9th graders and session two is for
high school students from grades 10
through 12.
"Participants are nominated b)
guidance counselors at their respec-
tive schools Cox said. The 1997
interviews of Legislator's School par-
ticipants were used to provide materi-
al contained in The 7 Habits ol
Highly Effective Teens by Sean
Covey (Dr. Covey's son). The pro-
gram, and Cox specifically, arc
thanked in the Acknowledgement
section on page 248 of the book. Cm
believes the success of the prograrr
can be reflected in the feedback ol
proud parents.
"A lot of parents saw a big change
in their child from the time (he)
dropped them off Cox said
Examples of parents' comments are
"I've seen a different level of commit-
ment in my child "they are a lot
more responsible and have a different
attitude "we communicate better as
a family "the skills you that you pro-
vided for my child have really made i
difference not only personally but aca-
demically Cox said.
mmfmtmmati





3 WrtmtoUnt B. q��
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tt is bad enough when
the student fan um
increesad every year, but
whan the students do not
neve any input as to what
thoM fees are used for.
something needs to
change.
ourview
As ECU prepares for the new budget year to begin, a lot of money
is being used to construct new buildings and renovate of old ones.
While everyone enjoys progress, the price for such progress
inevitably means more construction. It seems that everywhere you
turn on campus, there are bright orange barrels and yellow tape
warning us to stay away from a new construction site. Also, these
projects that are being planned are funded with student fees.
Because student fees are used to help finance some of these pro-
jects, we wonder why the students were not consulted as to which
projects were slated for approval.
For instance, renovations to the Student Health Center will cost
$4.1 million dollars. Perhaps the students would have rather had
that much money allocated toward new dining halls. Maybe it
would have been more feasible to take the money that students pay
every semester and use it for the much debated, yet much needed
parking deck. Although, the university plans to construct a new
west campus dining hall and start renovations on Jones residence
hall, these things will not be undertaken until the Student Health
Center is renovated and the new Science and Technology building
is completed.
The new Strength and Conditioning Center will cost an estimat-
ed $8.5 million, but it is being funded by private donations.
Therefore, the Athletic Department is given the freedom of con-
ducting their project in any way they see fit. That simply should not
be the case with the Student Health Center, and any other projects
the university decides to fund with student fees.
It is bad enough when the student fees are increased every year,
but when the students do not have any input as to what those fees
are used for, something needs to change.
OPINION
MICHAEL
EDWARDS
Just say no to wigs
still have a picture of one of
my friends standing in front of
one of the living room walls in
a towel � the whole wall was
made of beer cans.
I must admit, it has been a while
since I've lived in Greenvillemore
than 20 years according to my diplo-
ma. It seems like the trees were
much smaller on campus back then.
I know there were a lot less people
back then (all over the world in fact).
I lived in a litde white house on
Eastern street with two other guys.
It had a fireplace in the garage
below made from stolen bricks and
a Ping-Pong table made from stolen
plywood. I still have a picture of one
of my friends standing in front of
one of the living room walls in a
towel � the whole wall was made of
beer cans. The house is still there,
arid it looks really nice. Beer cans
now lie in the yard and the street. It
seems to me that if people are
responsible enough to drink they
would be responsible enough to
throw their trash away or recycle like
intelligent people.
The dang rents have gone
through the roof since I left! I was
paying my fair share � $25 a month
and we sail had to mow our own
lawn! Now, the apartment that I live
in is nearly $400 a month, and it
doesn't even have a Ping-Pong table.
Greenville is such a beautiful
town. I don't remember it being so
attractive. Perhaps the season and
the people have a lot to do with it. I
have met some of the friendliest
people since I've been back.
Perhaps I've learned something in
the past few years � walking with
my head up, greeting folks with a
smile, and not taking life too serious-
ly. The only attitudes that I've run
into are ECU Attitudes � I like to
call them "Spirit I suppose there is
just a little "pirate" in all of us. Even
the folks in the cafeteria are friendly,
they smile as they take your money.
Back when I was here in my past life,
we staged a huge boycott on the
main yard because our cafeteria food
stunk! We all called it the Ptomaine
Hilton. We must have made our
point because they've got much bet-
ter food, now, everywhere you look is
a cafeteria. No wonder so many peo-
ple are overweight
I'm disappointed with the down-
town area though. You used to be
able to shop downtown. Now, it
seems you can only drink and nibble.
Shopkeepers should know that when
people drink, they want to shop -
haven't they heard of symbiotic rela-
tionships? The shops that are down-
town don't seem to inviting to the
"average" shopper. The first place
that I ever had a job was Bissette's
drug store. Now, Bissette's (board)
Store is a wig shop! Why did they
put a board over the word "drug"? Is
this a new city ordinance? Maybe if
they'd leave the (board) word alone,
some folks would wonder in just to
check it out. Not that wigs are a bad
thing, mind you, some people can't
do without them them. I've never
dated anyone with a wig, I wouldn't
be interested. It would freak me out
if it came off at the wrong time �
like breakfast Bissette's used to be
the breakfast spot downtown � 25
cents for a cup of coffee! How things
have changed! A wig shop man
What's with the city traffic engi-
neers cutting street parking in half!
You used to be able to park your car
on either side of the strees that
branch off Fifth Street - that was
when ECU only had 12,000 stu-
dents! Now, you might as well leave
your car in Hoboken and get a bike
because you ain't going to find a
parking space in town after 8 p.m.
Speaking of Fifth Street what the
heck are those round things in front
of the Fine Arts Building across from
the Sig-Ep house of ill-repute?
Those things aren't "art" are they? It
looks like some sort of tiny landing
pads for something. This place isn't
gone to I mean, there hasn't been a
sighting since I lefthas there? The
only sightings I can remember back
when men were men and women
were women were during those late
night panty raids at Umstead, but I
guess things like that don't happen
here anymore. Maybe one of those
late night downtown revelers should
put together a wig raid. Wigs might
look rather bizarre hanging on the
wall.
OPINION
SCOTT
WILKINS
� �
Everyone seeks release
Even though we may he here at
ECU for the summer, and we
may he taking classes, we can
still seek a release.
Well, Monday was the first day of
summer. Ah, cool breezes, warm
sunshine, and blazing hot tempera-
tures. Oh wait, it was cool and
rainy. No bother, summer will
return shortly. If you are reading
this, chances are you decided to
stay around campus for the sum-
mer. If you are staff, you probably
didn't have much of a choice. Yet if
you are a student already, or a
incoming freshman here for orien-
tation and you are reading this
then you are just as crazy as me for
choosing to hang around campus
this summer.
Personally, I needed to get
caught up on some classes so I
could graduate reasonably close to
on time. Some are here just
because the thought of chilling
with mom and dad for the summer
sent you screaming. Second
Session for Summer begins
Thursday and I find myself saying,
"Why am I still here? Drop the
class before the session begins and
go to the beach Then reality hits
and I realize that I am here to catch
up and that running to the beach
isn't going to put a diploma in my
hand. That is unless I decide to do
the Sally Struthers "TVA'CR
repair" thing that I see on TV. Of
course, seeing how I can't even fig-
ure out my toaster oven, TVVVCR
repair may not be the best choice
for me. Yet I digress.
The point is that even though-
we may be here at ECU for the-
summer, and we may be taking-
classes, we can still seek a release.
Escape to the beach with your sig-
nificant other or just go by yourself.
The waves are therapeutic. Just
watch out for seagulls. Or, if you're
not really a beach lover find a friend
and a tent and head to the moun-
tains. Ride up to Washington, DC
and discover the Nations' Capital
Or ride to Washington, NC. Just
don't stay cooped up inside and
bore yourself to death with "The
Young and the Restless" and reruns
of "Charles of Charge Mavbe
your release is a good book. Maybe
it is watching your favorite movie.
Anyone ever heard of The
Towering Inferno? It's my person-
al favorite. I don't recommend
finding release in a carton of Ben �
Jerry's Chunky Monkey. It may be
good, but it puts on the pounds.
However, I see nothing wrong widj
finding release in a frosty.
Enjoy the summer, and to the
freshman and their parents, wet
come to ECU.
OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Celebrate those you love
There is nothing that a little
love can't make beautiful.
Last Sunday was Father's Day, and if
you celebrated it, it was a time to spend
with your family. Hallmark has
attempted to take all of the significance
out of simple little holidays like
Valentine's Day and Father's Day and
turn them into over commercialized
spending frenzies, but we must strive
to preserve the true meaning and beau-
ty of these holidays. The little holidays
are the most easily forgotten, but we
can be a little creative and make them
special.
Sometimes, poverty strikes and it
seems as if the holiday must pass with-
out celebration. This is a falsehood
because even in the most dire circum-
stances, one can celebrate his or her
loved ones. College student are notori-
ous for their shortages of funds (occa-
sionally so severe that they choose to
use candles to illuminate their home
instead of conventional electricity), but
also for their creativity. Who else but a
college student would take the time to
figure out that warm beer funneled
directly into the mouth is one of the
quickest ways to get dnink? Maybe
that same college student could apply
some of that infinite supply of creative
juices to create something special for a
loved one to make their day. A card
that is handmade will always bring a
light to your parents' eyes. Remember
kindergarten1 when you made the most
misshapen drawing and said that it was
a family portrait? Your mom stuck that
picture on the fridge so fast the paint
ran, and she smothered you in a hug;
Cheap, but creative, can be great.
Cooking is always a winner when K
comes to making a day special
Whether cakes, cookies, or manicotlj
arc your specialties, if you say that you
made it for someone you love, they will
swear up and down that it is the best
that they have ever eaten. They will
rave even if it is burnt to a crisp and the
sweet tea has two pounds of sugar in a
gallon. Believe me, I have been in
both cases and I know. Just show a lit-
tle love in your kitchen expertise, and
your loved one's day will be bright and
sunny.
There is nothing that a little love
can't make beautiful. Family is some-
thing that we all should hold near and
dear, whether it is our biological family
or our friends here at school. Celebrate
those who you love, and never let an
opportunity pass to show them how
you feel. Whether poverty or a lack of
Julia Child expertise is your vice, uti-
lize the skills that you have and make
that emotion show. Share the warm
fuzziest
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5 Wednesday, June 21, 1999
features
TtoErtCtfoMtir
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OmJersf afttJtoq Wnese &tisfozs$
n
Faculty members embark on
trip to gain cultural insigfit
Kkvin HRITI'ON
RTAVp HIISI
L:
Faculty members from East Carolina's
School of Business visited China this
month in an attempt to gain an under-
standing of business and cultural diversity.
Funding for the trip was supplied by an
alumnus who wanted the faculty to learn
more about a culture very different from
our own, and who feels that China has the
potential to become one of the up and
coming financial powers in a global econo-
my.
In order to be selected, each faculty
member had to submit a written proposal
as to how they would anticipate using infor-
mation learned on the trip in their respect-
ed departments. The selected group con-
sisted of Ernest Uhr (Dean of the School of
Business), Richard Kerns, Robert
Schellenberger, Laura Eakins (Decision
Sciences), Doug Schneider, Rick
Niswander (Accounting), Stan Eakins
(Finance), Tope Bello, Michael Harris,
Roy Simerly (Management), and Robert
Frankel (Marketing).
They were there for two weeks and vis-
ited various parts of China, including Hong
Kong, Canton, Shanghai, Gui Lin and
Beijing.
"There is a significant difference from
Hong Kong to the mainland Dean Uhr
said.
"In Hong Kong, every Chinese sign has
an English translation, and most people
spoke at least some English. It wasn't that
way on the mainland
Upon arriving in China, some very real
differences from home became apparent.
"One of the big things that strikes you
immediately, from the moment you enter
China till the moment you leave, is the air
pollution Rick Niswander said.
"The water pollution is very bad as well.
They're doing things to improve it, but
they have a long way to go
The group visited the Great Wall, the
Summer Palace, and the Forbidden City.
"The historical sitesarc pretty much
what one would expect from all the pho-
tographs Schneider said, "but there is
nothing like actually visiting these places
Sightseeing and gaining impressions of the
culture and people were a large part of the
visit, but it was not all fun and games.
Some days consisted of breakfast at six
a.m a flight at seven, meetings and tours
all day and finally dinner at around ten
p.m.
" was important for us to see how
the people lived, as opposed to just a
business point of view
Rick Niswander
Accounting Faculty
The trip took place shortly after the
NATO bombing of the Chinese Embassy
in Kosovo. There were some concerns that
the bombing would taint the tour, but from
all accounts the people were friendly and
helpful.
"When I was standing on a street corner
Faculty from ECU visit historic China
PHOTO BY OR RICK NISWANDER
View of the Great Wall
PHOTO BY Dfl. RICK NISWANDER
in Ticnamen Square a young Chinese
woman, about twenty years old, asked if
she could practice her English by talking
with me Schneider said.
"The younger generation is very much
immersed in western culture and dress, far
more than the older generation. All
throughout China McDonald's and
Kentucky Fried Chicken are present. Coke
and Pepsi Products are everywhere as
well
China is state-run, but some small inde-
pendent businesses are starting to open up.
"It was interesting to see some of the
smaller store fronts that wouldn't have
been there ten years ago Niswander said.
"It's like there's this pent up entrepre-
neurial need
"There is clearly more affluence than
there was before said Dean Uhr, who had
been to China on an ECU sponsored trip
around fourteen years ago, "but it is a mis-
take to think there isn't still a lot of gov-
ernment control
"It was important for us to see how the
people lived, as opposed to just a business
point of view Niswander said.
"We as Americans are extremely spoiled
in many ways Whereas a student here at
ECU may have a one thousand square foot
apartment and find it very small, there may
be as many as three generations of Chinese
living in a three hundred square foot room,
not too much bigger than one of our dorm
rooms
"You can't imagine what it's like to live
in a country that defines a small city as one
that only has five million people Uhr said.
On the business level, they may seem
very inefficient compared to the US
because it seems that there are many more
people involved than are necessary.
"There are a billion and a quarter people in
China Niswander said.
"They have to do something
"One of the things that I enjoyed most
about this trip to China was seeing an
American who graduated with an MBA
from ECU in the 70's Uhr said. "He is
now a general manager of a plant there in
the People's Republic of China
Outdoor barber shop in China
PHDTO 8Y DR. RICK NISWANOER
Notting Hill
perfectly cast
Accidental'romance
has classic charm
J
AN ISA (illRAIKI
PI-ATIfSJtN KIHTOH
According to movie advertise-
ments, "this year the Force is with
Notting Hill Though I wouldn't
compare it to Star Wars, I definite-
ly think Notting Hill is one of the
best romantic comedies I've ever
seen.
It's a story of a superstar, Anna
Scott (Julia Roberts) whose pic-
ture is plastered everywhere
around the world. While visiting
London, she ventures to the dis-
trict Notting Hill. There she finds
an endless array of shops, includ-
ing a travel book shop run by
William Thacker (Hugh Grant).
It seems like love at first sight, and
despite the obstacles of Anna's
hectic career, the two manage to
hit it off. Roberts seems a bit
humble for her character, but its a
refreshing touch. Grant's charac-
ter, however, is very believable.
He is just an average Joe. While
their meeting circumstances could
really happen to "non-famous"
people, its highly unlikely.
"I love Julia Roberts' movies;
the part she plays in Notting
Hill is so true of her real life
said sophomore.TanyaWalken.
FYI: Julia Roberts is the
highest paid actress ever at
$20 million per movie.
The casting is perfect, and each
character balances out one anoth-
er. The cast member that steals
the show is Williams' dirty but
hilarious roommate Spike (Rhys
Ifans). In one scene, Spike can't
find any clean clothes (which
doesn't surprise me), so he goes
through Williams' things and puts
on a wet suit, goggles and all. I
SEE HILL PAGE 6
Local band records
live CD at Peasants
Mike Corrado Band
puts on a good show
Katik Williams
ST AH- WRI'I KB
If you didn't see the Mike Corrado
Band last Tuesday night at
Peasants, you definitely missed a
geat show put on by five great
guys!
The band had a live CD record-
ing at Peasants both Monday and
Tuesday night. This CD will be
Mike Corrado Band performing at Peasants
PHOTO BY ROBIN VUCHNICH
released in late July, and fans will
have the opportunity to buy it
when the band comes to the Attic
on July 23.
Before the band took the stage, I
had the pleasure of meeting Mike
Corrado as well as the other band
members. With Joe Yankel playing
the saxophone, Gary Wooten on
guitar, David Gerichten bassist,
percussionist Lamont Sydnor, and
special guest Adrianne Duke
you've got a group of talented
musicians as well as amazing young
men. The group met at Camp
Lejune in Jacksonville, NC where
three of the five were marines. All
of the members of the band were
very excited to be performing in
Greenville again.
"I just love Greenville.
Everybody's so cool said lead
singer Mike Corrado.
If you've ever seen the band
play before you know that they are
great entertainers. They were laid
back and fun off the stage and even
more exciting to watch on stage.
They really knew how to get the
crowd going. They opened up with
a couple of songs and then intro-
duced each band member to the
audience. Saxophone player Joe
Yankel definitely stole the show. I
was fascinated by how well he
played the crowd. Not only is he an
SEE LIVE PAGE 6
Southern Party plans for succession
Organizers already
registered with FEC
RALEIGH, N.C. (AP) Six score
and 18 years ago, their forefathers
brought forth upon this continent a
new nation, conceived in secession
and dedicated to the proposition
that states are sovereign and not
beholden to a central government.
Now, the philosophical heirs to
the Confederate States of America
are making another go at it.
Organizers of the Southern
Party have registered with the
Federal Election Commission and
with the secretaries of state in
Florida, Georgia, Texas and
Virginia. By August, the party
hopes to be established in all 11
states of the old Confederacy arid
the border states of Kentucky,
Maryland. Missouri, Oklahoma
and West Virginia.
The short-term goal is to get
candidates elected to state and
local offices. The long-term objec-
tive, which troubles independent
political observers even though
they doubt it will ever happen:
Send enough party members to
Congress to push for a separate
Southern nation.
Wasn't that settled in the Civil
War? Not in the view of the
Southern Party.
"The shotgun wedding forced
upon the South at Appomattox has)
reached a dead end, and it is time
to initiate a political divorce for the'
good of all parties concerned
declares the group's Web site.
Those who believe that such
talk is the very heart of sedition are
the victims of 130 years of Yankee
propaganda and of a poor under-
standing of the U.S. Constitution,
says national committee chairman
George Kalas.
"Lincoln once said that a house
divided would not stand Kalas
says. "Lincoln was wrong. A house
SEE CIVIL WAR PAGE 6
Croc Hunter educates from Down Under
Steve Erwin catches
prime time by the tail
A MS A (illRAIKI
re Tt'RKK tinrcua
Every Wednesday, Saturday, and
Sunday the Animal Planet airs
"Crocodile Hunter" hosted by
Steve Irwin and his side kick, Terri
who is his wife.
If you are a channel surfer, you
definitely know about Steve. He is
the crazy guy who is always
wrestling, relocating, and running
for his life from dangerous crea-
tures. He is the Ditector of the
Australia Zoo in Queensland,
Australia, whete he is an expert on
Steve Irwin and reptilian friend.
PHOTO C0UBTESV OF WORID WIDE WEB
local wildlife, particularly reptiles.
The son of naturalists Bob and
Lyn Irwin, Steve has spent his
entire life studying, living and
working with animals. By the time
he was nine, his dad had taught him
how to jump in and catch crocodiles
in the rivers of North Queensland.
Together, Steve and his father can
boast that every crocodile at the
Australia Zoo (over 150) was either
caught with their own hands or
bred and raised at the zoo.
Today, Steve has an internation-
al following, and he and Terri (the
more sensible one) travel together
to help educate the pubic about the
responsibility we all have to the
natural world including reptiles.
"I love that show exclaims
sophomore Amy Miller.
"It keeps me on the edge of my
seat
SEE CROC PAGE 6






6 Wednesday. Jum 21.1999
features
The East Carolinian
5 Civil War
continued liom page S
divided will stand. It's culled a
duplex
Kalas, a Houstonian who filed
the party's Texas papers in March,
says there's popular support for
the idea of a new Confederacy.
But is he just whistling "Dixie"?
Since 1992, the Southern Focus
Polls from the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill have asked
whether the South would be bet-
ter off as a separate nation, if that
could be achieved without blood-
shed. Between 8 percent and 16
percent of Southerners have
agreed at any given time, and up
to 9 percent of non-Southerners
have accepted the premise.
Twenty years ago, John
Shelton Reed, the author, histori-
an and sociologist whose depart-
ment oversees the polling, predict-
ed the time was coming when
Southerners would again seek
autonomy. His reasoning: Those
who actually fought the
Civil War were all dead;
America's role in the world was
becoming less clear following
Vietnam, and the South was
"finally ridding itself of the
incubus of white supremacy
"Although I'm pleased to have
my prophecy validated, I'm per-
sonally ambivalent about this
development Reed says.
Even so, he adds, "I certainly
believe that any group that's
telling the 'federals' to mind their
constitutional business is doing a
good thing
Separatist movements are noth-
ing new. Groups of native
Hawaiians have been pushing for a
return to sovereignty in recent
years, and the Alaskan
Independence Party, founded on a
platform of secession from the
lower 48, helped elect a governor
in 1990. But a Southern nation?
Live
Croc
continued Itom page 5
Most students watch "Crocodile
Hunter" more for entertainment
than for educational purposes.
Even though Steve is highly
trained and knows what he is
doing, more often than not he
sounds like a complete idiot.
Senior Brandon Lawn's favorite
quote from Steve is, "We're gonna
sneak up on him mate
My personal favorite is when he
is talking to his komodo dragons
(he often talks to the animals) and
in reference to their mating says,
"hey you feisty girls, would you
like me to catch you three a mate?"
If you log onto the Animal
Planet web site, you can catch a
glimpse of "Crocodile Hunter's"
Danger Videos which offer rare
sightings of Super Steve in action
as he becomes intimate with lurk-
ing creatures. You can view such
hot topics as the angry komodo
dragon chases Steve up a tree,
Steve swims in the shark tank, a
bearded dragon lunges at Steve
and a python takes a chunk out of
Steve.
"The funniest episode is the
one where the snake takes a bite
out of Steve's nose said senior
Matthew Cochrane.
Whether Steve and Terri are
observing the fury of the mother
crocodile as they try to take her
eggs or swimming in shark infested
water, the two blatantly put them-
selves in the path of danger. I
guess that's why we like their show
so much.
continued Itom page 5
awesome sax player but quite a
dancer as well. However, none of
the band's antics would be possi-
ble without the roar of the fans.
From girls screaming to guys play-
ing the maracas in the audience,
everyone was having a great time.
I was also extremely impressed
with how good they sounded live.
Junior Rachele Shiffler, who got to
see the band play at Monday
night's 'invitation only' show, said,
"They were awesome! I've seen
them play a lot, but this was defi-
nitely the best
The songs the band
chose to record on their live CD
are all awesome! They also added
a few musical interludes that were
incredible. When I talked to per-
cussionist Lamont Sydnor about
the CD, he had this to say:
"We love Greenville. We
want to say 'thank you' to the fans
for being so supportive. This is
your CD and we hope you enjoy
it
cnnlinued Itom page ft
guess you have to see the movie in
order to get the full effect, but I
promise you won't stop laughing
at him.
"I usually don't like romantic
comedies but Spike made the
movie worth while said Scott
Curtis, junior.
While most students enjoyed
the movie, there are some who
will never like romantic comedies.
"My girlfriend dragged me to
the movie theater, and just like I
thought, it sucked said Brent
Laws, sophomore.
"All the girls sitting around me
were crying (typical)
Pirates Cove
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Fully furnished.
On ECU Bus Route.
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
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'Washer and Dryer in each unit.
'Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
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Two phone jacks in all bedrooms
'Plus Basketball, Tennis & Sand Volleyball!
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Affordable at
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Now Pre-leasing
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You can have it all in the Fall!
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3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
NEWMAN
ir- QTI mrMT (l NTFR
Welcome Summer Students!
- , � Sun: 11:30am and 8:30pm
Mass Schedule: �� ffK r te
� All Masses are at the Center
We look forward to seeing you!
sponsored In the Newman Center,
etweeii S: ili.un and 9pm.
.nul I .lmims Minisli'i
fVELPRIMO
PARKING
For The Whole Semester
That's right, McDonald's is reserving 6 parking
spaces for you. Visit the iOth Street
iocation and fiil out an entry form for a
chance to win one of our Primo Parking
Spaces for a semester. (@�0'6
The spaces are within easy walking distance of the Recreation Center,
Joyner Library, Mendenhall Student Center, Jenkins Art Building, and
Student Health Department.
No purchase necessary to win.
I by
Winner will be notified by phone.
Spaces are good August 18th through December 8th
Courtesy of
McDonalds & Coke
BRING YOUR
HUNGRY ASS
Now open beside Pitt Community College!
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE COMMUNITY SQUARE
757-1666 439-0003
"WHERE'S THE LATE NIGHT? CHICO'S
ALL ABC PERMITS
12 PRICE APPETIZER SPECIALS
Sunday - Thursday after 9pm Dine-in only.
Open 7 Days for Lunch, Pinner, & Fiestas!
Tilt tut C�n
Sao
HBr
I The Bomb Si
basketball ct
turn) the 2ni
Basketball m
title in Los A
outlasted nin
ons. The toui
played in the
theNBA's U
The Michael
Classic start!
and lasts uni
Tickets are $
and $50 for i
a private mal
actor Joe Pet
Rice, and soa
White. All pn
support ol Nl
Houses. Ticki
calling (252):
Pirates Footb
camp for peo
rising seniors
already regisl
school teams
Virginia and!
day, three nig
After a record
the Pirates tn
Ward was nai
Athletic Assoi
Year.

rec
Koh
I'KTK
ECH's women
to take a slice
tion with the
North Carolina
Emily Kc
Wilmington, 1
states top-rate
ranked 5th it
DSTA and n
Southern regio
Kohl amas
record of 45-4
conference pi
years of varsit
school in Wi
Hoggard High.
Tom Morri
ECU women
hopes she will
the school's pre
"We feel
Emily join us ;
more depth th�
Morris said.
"She will h
top six players
depth. Overall,
will be a good r.
took to make a
this fall
' Kohl, who I
players in th
ranked among i
competitors in





� East Carolinian
9
1
ter
ror a
king
r8th
S
LSI!
Tilt tut Carolinian
Sports
Briefs
� The Bomb Squad women's intramural
basketball championship team cap-
tured the 2nd annual Pepsi 5-on-5
Basketball national Championship
title in Los Angeles, CA, where they
outlasted nine other regional champi-
ons. The tournament finals were
played in the famed Forum, home on
the NBAs LA Lakers.
� The Michael Jordan Celebrity Golf
Classic starts up Friday, June 25th
and lasts until Sunday.
Tickets are $10 for the tournament
and $50 for the celebrity skins game,
a private match between Jordan,
actor Joe Pecsi, football great Jerry
Rice, and soap opera star Alex Hyde-
White. All proceeds go toward the
support of NC Ronald McDonald
Houses. Tickets can be bought by
celling (252)355-3222
Pirates Football will hold a youth
camp for people from the age 13 to
rising seniors. 350 to 400 kids have
already registered including 14 high
school teams from as far away as
Virginia and South Carolina. The four
day, three night camp will teach kids
fundamentals
of football as
well as allow
for scrimmage
games during
the night
between the
teams visiting.
� After a record-breaking season with
the Pirates track team, Lawrence
Ward was named the Colonial
Athletic Association Rookie of the
Year.
sports
Wedaeriw. hn. 1IW 7
Salargo named TO
Athlete of the Year
Baseball player honored for
outstanding achievements
I'KTKR DAWVOT
STOHTS KDI'I'OH
Salargo rounds the bases.
PHOTO BY PAUt WRIGHT
Oum
�lal
Another powerful hit by Salargo
PHOIO BY PAUL WRICHT
After fierce competition for the
award as well as anchoring his team
through the season, outfielder Steve
Salargo was named as TEC Athlete of
the Year.
This year will go down as an eventful
year in Salargo's life. In 1999, Salargo
capped off a season with ECU winning
the Colonial Championship and going
to the NCAA birth. At the same time,
he personally took part in the Major
League Baseball draft, where he was
selected by the Baltimore Orioles as the
607th overall pick.
The Wilson native may have ended
his college career, but he certainly will
not be forgotten with all of the records
the he now owns. The left fielder
racked up records for career hits at
ECU( 301),games played (223),at
bats(862),doubles(54),and runs
scored 198).
Combining his career records with
the many single season records which
he holds, he attracted attention from
many other recognized sports associa-
tions. Salargo was named to the second-
team All-American by the National
Collegiate Baseball Writers Association.
Salargo's numerous single season
records including games played(62),at
bats(244),doubles(20),RBI(77),and runs
scored(70) all helped Salargo in his draft
campaign.
Associate Athletic Director, Henry
VanSant, saw Salargo to be one of the
top Pirates baseball players ever.
"He was a great outfielder who prac-
tically rewrote ECU's baseball book
VanSant said.
Salargo has already moved past ECU.
Salargo's mother said that he has already
begun play with a minor league farm
team for the Orioles in Blue-field, West
Virginia.
Salargo said that once he left ECU,
he went to Sarasota, Florida for an
Orioles mini-camp. There his mother
shocked him when she told him that he
won Ail-American honors.
"We were talking on the phone one
night when she told me that I had won
Salargo said.
"I was really surprised and honored
with receiving the award
After a few weeks in Florida, he
headed to the Bluefield Orioles for an
advanced rookie ball league, and he is
there currendy. Salargo said that the
change has not been that difficult
thanks to the training he was put
through with Pirates head baseball
coach, Keith LeClair.
"The strategy is a little more fast
paced, every one here is a good ball
player. Some are at another level than
ECU's, but otherwise it is pretty much
the same as what coach Leclair did. It's
not much different Salargo said.
With Salargo gone, it is up to others
to pick up the pace and continue to
excel. Salargo said that many players
should be expected to step up in the
upcoming year.
"Players like Jeremy Schumacher
and John Williamson are incredible ball
players who I think will be looked to
lead the team Salargo said.
"It doesn't take one guy to be a
leader but every one pulling together
Women's tennis team
recruits top-ranked player
Kohl ranked
fifth in state
I'KTKR Daw v or
SPORTS K HIT OR
ECU's women's tennis team hopes
to take a slice out of the competi-
tion with the addition of one of
North Carolina's top prospects.
Emily Kohl, a native of
Wilmington, NC, is one of the
states top-rated juniors. She is
ranked 5th in the state by the
USTA and ranked 45th in the
Southern region.
Kohl amassed an individual
record of 45-4 overall and 31-0 in
conference play over her three
years of varsity play at her high
school in Wilmington, John T.
Hoggard High.
Tom Morris, head coach of the
ECU women's tennis program,
hopes she will have a big impact on
the school's program.
"We feel fortunate to have
Emily join us as she gives us a lot
more depth than we had last year
Morris said.
"She will help us to solidify our
top six players and add to our team
depth. Overall, we think that Emily
will be a good player for us who will
took to make an immediate impact
tliis fall
' Kohl, who has faced many top
players in the state, has been
ranked among some of the toughest
competitors in the state. Coaches
Dallas Stars win Stanley Cup;
Women's tennis coach Tom Morris demonstrates backhand to players.
Fill PHOTO
from both high school and colleges
have been awed by her ability to
play off the ball. Kohl's high school
tennis coach Jeff Holcomb said that
she really proved to have have an
impact on the tennis program at her
high school.
"Emily is exactly what a coach
SEE TENNIS PAGE 8
Victory tainted
by controversy
BUFFALO, New York (AP) �The
NIIL got what it wanted most: a
competitive, entertaining and dra-
matic Stanley Cup finals It also got
what it needed least: a possibly
tainted title.
Brett Hull's rebound goal at
14:51 of the third overtime gave the
Dallas Stars a cup-clinching 2-1 vic-
tory over the Buffalo Sabres early
Sunday morning and ended the sec-
ond-longest Stanley Cup finals
game ever.
It also started the biggest Cup
controversy in years. Several Sabres
said the Game 6 finish will haunt
them and, they said, the National
Hockey League for years because
Hull's left skate was in the goal
crease before he shot.
"I believe everybody will
remember this as the Stanley Cup
that was never won in 1999 rhti
Sabres' Joe Juneau said. "It was
given away to a good team, but the
goal was not a legal goal
With both teams nearingexhaus-
tion in a game that was 23 seconds
away from becoming the longest in
Stanley Cup finals history, goal-
tender Dominik Hasek sprawled to
play Mike Modano's shot.
Hasek stopped the puck, but the
rebound bounced out to Hull dur-
ing a furious scramble at the goal
SEE CUP RUE I
Knicks win Game 3, prevent sweep
Houston catapults
team to victory
NEW YORK (Ticker) � Put
away the brooms and postpone
the parade plans.
Allan Houston upstaged Tim
Duncan and shot the New York
Knicks back into the NBA Finals.
Allan Houston matched his
playoff his first playoff career high
to 34 for the points Knicks to a
crucial 89-81 victory over the San
Antonio Spurs, who had their
NBA playoff record 12-game win-
ning streak snapped.
"Allan Houston was incredi-
ble Duncan saidHe played a
great game throughout
"He was a pain in the neck
Spurs coach Gregg Popovich said.
The Knicks had been dominated
by Duncan in two losses in San
Antonio but found a way to shut
Duncan was stopped by the Knicks
defense.
him down the fourth quarter. The
7-foot superstar finished with 20
points and 12 rebounds but was 0-
of-4 in the final period.
"They were a little more
aggressive said Duncan, the first
two games. "They didn't let me
get to the middle as much as I
have before. But I missed some
shots that I usually hit"
Houston came out firing and
never stopped, saddling the Spurs'
guards with early foul trouble and
finishing 10-of-24 from the field.
He scored 13 points in the first
quarter, when New York bolted to
a 14-point lead. He was the
offense in the third period, scoring
12 of his team's 16 points. And
when the Spurs pulled within four
down the stretch, Houston hit a
20-footer for an 83-77 lead with
three minutes remaining and the
Knicks led by at least six there-
after. He tied his post season high
SEE KNICKS PAGE I





t RXwfay, Jw 23. HM
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Cup
csnunuid Irom pigi 7
Hull's first shot also was
, but he poked at the puck
ESo slipped it into the net
, Game over. Controversy begin-
ning.
Pttyers can play a puck in the
crease, but only if it arrives there
before they da
i "I don't know if we'll ever be
able to put this behind us for the
asst of our lives Jay McKee of the
Sabres said. "This is what we all
dreamed to do and the situation to
be in and, now, it's gone
The debate isn't. NHL officials
supervisor Bryan Lewis said Hull's
goal counted because he main-
tained possession of the puck from
the time he played it beyond the
crease.
"A puck that rebounds off the
goalie, the goal post, an opposing
player is not deemed to be a
change of possession Lewis said.
"Therefore, Hull would be
deemed to be in control of the
puck, allowed to shoot and score a
goal, even though the one foot
would be in the crease in advance
of the puck
Still, the rules application
seemed to violate the spirit of the
NHL's no-tolerance policy on goal
crease violations.
So many games were delayed
this season for video reviews, and
enough goals were wiped out by
crease infractions, that the NHL's
Board of Governors could vote as
early as this week to relax the rule.
NHL commissioner Gary Bettman
hinted strongly he wants the rule
relaxed.
Harry Sinden of the Boston
Bruins said the topic created so
much debate at last week's general
managers meetings that if any GM
didn't know how to curse, he does
now.
The rule interpretation creates
yet again the perception that the
NHL often governs itself by the
seat of the pants rather than a set of
rules. Sabres coach Lindy Ruff was-
n't convinced the goal was
reviewed by the video replay judge
and other NHL officials, although
Lewis said it was.
"I really think that if we had
scored a goal like that, it would
have been called back Juneau
said. "I think because it was a goal
that gave them the Stanley Cup,
everybody jumped on the ice and
they were afraid to make the call
Still, there is no dispute the Stars
are worthy champions. The Stars
and the 1994 New York Rangers are
the only teams in the 1990s to win
the regular-season Presidents'
Trophy and Stanley Cup in the
same season.
1 Knicks
continued Irom page 7
t
set in Game One of the Eastern
Conference semi-finals against
Atlanta.
. "1 hope to be a pain in the neck
and unstoppable Houston said.
"If I'm not.that's how I think. And
sometimes you're going to have
good nights. I just want to be con-
sistent. I don't want to have 30-
point nights and then go down and
have 10 or whatever
i Latrell Sprewell scored 24
points and Larry Johnson added 16
and strong defense for the Knicks,
who never trailed but never
seemed secure with the lead,
either. New York had solid ball
movement, got to the foul line and
gave Sprewell and Houston some
help, which it had not done in the
first two games.
Houston made all 12 of his free
throw attempts. The Knicks made
23-of-30 foul shots and had 17
assists on 31 baskets.
Houston said. "I think we did a
much better job of just playing
together, driving the ball, kicking it
to the open man
It was another gutty perfor-
mance by the Knicks, who made
Marcus Camby a surprise starter at
center and endured yet another
injury, this one a sprained medial
capsule in the left knee of reserve
guard Chris Childs, who did return
with a leg wrap.
"I think any team starts with
belief and trust Knicks coach Jeff
Van Gundy said. "Belief in them-
selves as individuals, belief in their
teammates, belief in their coaching
staff and then trust in those same
areas. I think it's any good team's
foundation, those two things
David Robinson scored a 1999
playoff high 25 points and grabbed
10 rebounds for the Spurs, who lost
on the road for the first time in
seven post season games. San
Antonio fell to 43-7 since a 6-8 start
had not lost anywhere since a
Game Two home setback to
Minnesota in the first round on
May 11.
"Our team just absolutely hates
to lose Robinson said. "We take it
personally when we lose. We
always respond well after a loss,
always. So this is something all of us
have to go back and get ourselves
reset and just come back out and be
more focused
Game Four is Wednesday at
New York.
A1
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Tennis .
continued from page 7
looks for in a tennis player
Holcomb said. "She has great on-
court skills with a great leadership
attitude towards her teammates
Kohl's talent had been recog-
nized even before she moved to
North Carolina. Before joining
Hoggard High, Kohl spent her
freshman year at Roncalli High
School in Wisconsin, where she
played No.l singles on the 19 pri-
vate school state team.
After maturing and moving to
Wilmington, Kohl continued to
excel, going 21-3 in regional and
state playoffs and advancing to state
singles semi-finals in both her
junior and senior years.
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INIAN

13
ille ?
a ?
1
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ID
eller
Jay
i
,9 Wedmidiy, Jum 23,1999
classifieds
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
S400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price. 551-3426.
TAKE OVER lease by August. 2 bed-
room. 112 bath. $450 a month.
Close to campus. Call 754-2840.
please leave message.
f
CLEAN. 1 BEDROOM apts. avail-
able July 1. Water, sewer included.
No pets allowed. Close to ECU cam-
pus. For more information call
Woodcliff Apts. 9 752-5005. Equal
Housing Opportunity Housing.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOR RENT
LARGE PRIVATE bedroom with full
bath, share the kitchen and den.
Completely furnished. Off street
parking. $300 monthly. Please call
746-3522.
FOR RENT: 1 bedroom. 1 bath
apartment across from ECU Recrea-
tion Center. $245 a month. Call 757-
3191.
1 BLOCK from downtown - 3rd
Street. Call 252-809-1922.
ECU AREA: TWO and one bedroom
duplexes. Heat and AC in both
units. One is $250.00. the other
$210.00 a month. Pets OK! Call 830-
9502.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
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DO YOU NEED MONEY?
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WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
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Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
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STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:00
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
ROOMMATE WANTED
GREAT DEAL for summer) Sublease
a 1 bedroom at Wesley Commons
North for $40 off a month! Perfect
for summer school. Lease expires
August 7th. Call 830-6842 or 931-
9455.
ROOMMATE WANTED
GOT AN extra room? Laid back,
clean, female grad student needs
place to live August to December.
Need to make plans' immediately.
Call Kelly. 758-7758. leave message.
SEEKING ROOMMATE starting Au-
gust for a two bedroom two bath
condo in Forbes Woods. Would pre-
fer non-smoking graduate student.
Call for more information. 355-9225.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Grad stud-
ent seeking female grad or upper-
classman to share 2 BR. 1 bath, rent
$195each. Reedy Branch Apts.
329-1438.
MF NONSMOKER for 2 bdrm 1
bath apartment 2 blocks from cam-
pus on East 3rd. $250 per month in-
cludes utilities, cable, etc. Available
for summer and school year. 752-
3769.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
BR, 1 bath furnished apt. Walking
distance to ECU. Large room and
closet. $212.5mo. Central AC. heat
& hot water included. Call 328-
0133(w) or 329-7137 leave message.
JESUS IS THE
ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
Daytime 756-3315 or
714-0718 Ministry Outreach
anytime after 7pm.
321-6012 confidential.
HELP WANTED
FEMALE SHARE 3 bedroom town-
house near ECU. Furnished wash-
erdryer. Beginning Fall '99.
$225mo. plus share utilities .
phone, cable. Call Mindy 365-2956.
Collingdale Court
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex. Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU. on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374, leave mes-
sage. Call now.
FEMALE ROOMMATE, non-smoker
to share 4 bedroom house, ECU bus
route. $215 month. 14 utilities.
ASAP 752-0281.
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse. On bus route. Call
355-2827.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 3
BR. 1 bath house on Student St.
with two graduate students. One
block to ECU. $133.4mo. Call 328-
0133(w) or 329-7137.
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apt. Downtown
above Catalog Connection. Half the
rent, half utilities. Perfect location for
students, washerdryer. Call Robin.
561-7889.
FOR SALE
COMPUTER AND printer for sale.
Mac with Hewlett Packard printer.
$150. word processing software;
also GE TV. color, with stand $50.
Call Jennifer at 758-6834 or 830-
0648.
GT TEQUESTA mountain bike. Only
one year old. Mostly Shimano STX
components and Indy Rock Shox.
Great condition. Asking $300. Call
561-7349.
'88 VW Cabriolet, red with white
convertible top. new clutch, 5 speed,
runs great! $3900. 439-1894.
HELP WANTED
SUMMER JOBS AVAILABU.
Joan's Fashions, a local woman's
clothing store, is now recruiting for
summer positions. Employees are
needed for Saturdays and weekdays
between 10AM and 6PM. The posi-
tions are for between 15 and 40
hours per week, depending on your
schedule and on business needs.
The jobs are within walking distance
of the university and the hours are
flexible. Pay is commensurate with
your experience and job perfor-
mance and is supplemented by an
employee discount. Apply in person
to store manager. Joan's Fashions.
423 S. Evans Street. Greenville.
9 PEOPLE needed to lose weight
and earn income. Call Darla for free
information at 252-322-7288
EXPERIENCED NANNY needed for
1-12 year old weekdays 8:15-2:15
beginning August 15. Requires 10
month minimum commitment, no
smoking, safe driving record, own
transportation. Send letter re qualifi-
cations & desired salary, include
phone number, to "Nanny PO Box
8088. Greenville. NC 27835.
WANTED: PART-Time sitter for
adorable 3-year-old boy beginning in
September. 8-9 a.m 12-1 p.m.
MonThurs. Must provide transpor-
tation to and from preschool. $30
week. 321-0512.
NURSERY WORKERS needed: St.
James United Methodist Church for
Sunday mornings, worship services
and Sunday School. Please call the
church. 752-6154.
THE DEPARTMENT for Disability
Support Services is searching for an
experienced Personal Care Attend-
ant for the Fall Semester 1999. An-
yone interested in this position
should inquire through the Disability
office located in Brewster A-117 at
328-6799.
HELP WAN
ATTN:
adult enti
Day and night
up lo $1000 a
at 747-7686.
Carolina's
is now hiring!
week. Cafl Playmate
TELECOMMUTING IB the regal
Work from home or office! $80O�
$1,600 PA. $2,000-$6.000 FA pan
monthi Only 6 people needed. W�
train. Serious inquiries only! Good a
titude a must! Call 252-661-3074.
if
17 PEOPLE needed to lose pound
6- inches like crazy! Rob lost 110 lbs
Bill lost 96 lbs. in 6 months! Phyfj,
lost 60 lbs! No exercise neededl Ea$
your favorite foods! Willpower Mra.
bottle! 100 natural. 19 years of
guaranteed results! Call 757-2292 for"
Free Samples!

NOW HIRING adult entertainers
and dancers. Up to $1600 weekly.
Must be at least 18. have phone,
transportation, be drug free. Call
758-2737 for information.
EXOTIC DANCERS $100041600
weekly, no experience needed. 919
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls. Gold-)
sboro.
GRAPHICSMARKETING assistant
needed for ECU campus dining
Must have experience with Mac.
Freehand. Photoshop. Pagemaker
WordExcel. Duties include creating,
promotional materials, maintaining'
website. 8- assisting with evalua
tionssurveys Hours are flexible 16!
20 hrs. per week. Please apply at1
Mendenhall Student Ctr ECU or
send resume to Amy. POB 3295
Greenville. NC 27836. EOE
LOSE WEIGHT like crazy! 30'
pounds or more safe. fast. easy, af-
fordable and all natural. Programs
start at $39. 95. Call now. 931-7526.
ADVERTISE IN U
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
��- - ' � �� �- ('f f
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Mama's By-product
liEWLET
C&p-C'jb.ms'
Jeremy Falls
SrtUT UP
fjO KEEP
PJUVM6
Four Seats Left
Jason Latour
Everyday Life
Mike Litwin






ADVENTURE
Register June 28 for White Water Skills Week which is scheduled for July $12-16.
Cost is $275.00.

Rafting - July 9-10 - Lower New River Gorge.
Cost is $135 for members and $155 for non-members.
Registration deadline July 2.
j
FITNESS PROGRAMS OOOOO
Free aerobic classes offered June 21-27.
D.A.N.S.E. Party-Wednesday, June 30 @ 5:30pm.

LIFE ENHANCEMENT PROGRAMS OOOOO
I Intermediate Yoga Classes, Session II - July 13-28. Register June 28-July 9.
Cost is $15 for members and $25 for non-members. SRC 238, Instructor Jihahn Lopin.

Child Swim Lessons - July 12-18, Mondays and Wednesdays, 9:00am-9:45am and
10:00am-10:45am. Register June 28-July 9. Cost is $30 for members and
$40 for non-members. Children must be at least 4 years old to participate.
1
I
� �
INTRAMURAL SPORTS OOOOO
June 28 Softball Registration Meeting, 4:00pm, SRC 202.
June 29 3-On-3 Basketball Registration Meeting, 4:30pm, SRC 202.
June 30 Racquetball Entry Deadline, 5:00pm, SRC 128.
July 07 4-0n-4 Flag Football Registration Meeting, 4:00pm, SRC 202.
L - - ���
AQUA THEATRE OOOOO
j
June 24 Snake Eyes, 8:00pm.
July 08 Rushmore at 8:00pm and a cookout at 8:30pm.
j July 15 A Simple Plan, 8:00pm.
At the SRC outdoor pool, free to all members. One
Guest with ID.
328-6387
www.recserv.ecu.edu
Fridays
10:00am-6:45pm
Saturdays
11:00am-6:45pm





'
the east Carolinian j m
ORIENTAT(PH
I
INSIDE:
� Dorm Life
� Financial Aid Tips
� Guest Coaches
� Safety on Campus
� Virtual Classrooms
� Sports Outlook
� Health and Fitness
� Campus Organizations
i

, �SWW!�liMWM��





�fefefiMtftthe
"Where to 60"�' How toUje'manj of the services in the small country we call East Carolina University
WHERE do I PARK?
Parkins on campus is by permit only. All vehicles parked
on university property must be registered and properly
display a valid parking decal. To register your vehicle,
visit Parking and Transportation Services, 305 E. 10th St to
complete a vehicle registration card. Online registration is available for
enrolled students at www.student.ecu.edu.
Questions? Call 328-6294.
�W
What is the
ECU 1 CARD?

Need EMERGENCY assistance?
Call the ECU Police directly by using any blue light phone, or
call 9-1-1 from any campus phone. ECU Police are on duty
24 hours a day, 7 days a week to assist you.
LEARNING LESSONS FOR LIFE.
As a supplement to your academic education at ECU, the ECU Police
Department provides workshops for better living! Self-defense workshops,
Alcohol and Drug Abuse Awareness classes, and other crime prevention topics
such as date rape, parking lot safety and security, etc. are presented by the ECU
Police Call 328-6787 for assistance or 328-6266 for details eed COPIES?
on scheduling a class for your group or organization.
The ECU 1 Card is the official identification card
for ECU. All students and staff must have an ECU
1 Card. In addition to being the ID card, the ECU
1 Card is also your library card, Rec Center card,
dining cardrand activity card. Show it to vote in
SGA elections or play intramural sports.
Use the Card INSTEAD of CASH!
Accounts can be linked to the ECU 1 Card for
dining, copying, vending, and miscellaneous
purchases on campus. For details, visit the 1
Card Office, located inside Dowdy Student
Stores, Wright Building, open Monday through
Friday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m or click to:
www.ecu.eduservices1 card
Call 328-2015 if you have questions.
Expecting some MAIL?
Student mail is delivered Monday through Saturday to resident
mailboxes by University Mail Services. Mail Services also provides a US
Postal Service customer window, Monday through Friday, for you to
purchase stamps, mail packages and overnight express, and pick up
packages sent to you via US Mail. Mail Services is located just west of the
mall, near the cupola.
Questions? Call 328-6091.
Need BOOKS? a COMPUTER? SUPPLIES?
SOFTWARE? ECU CLOTHES?
ECU-Dowdy Student Stores, located in the Wright Building, offers a great
selection of USED and new books, supplies,
computers, apparel and merchandise,
along with friendly service catered
specifically to ECU students!
� Fri 7:30 am - 7 pm � Sat 9 am - 3 pm
�OlI Ron.ld E. Dowdy
Student Stores
(252) 328-6731
www.studentstores.ecu.edu
Self-service, card operated copiers are
located in Joyner Library, some classroom
buildings, and at some community service
desks. Full service, RAPID COPY CENTERS
are located in Joyner Library basement
and at the School of Medicine, Brody GE-
101. The main center is located at 2612 E.
Tenth St. Rapid Copy Joyner is open daily,
including evening hours.
Central: 328-6171 Joyner: 328-0458 � Brody: 816-2261
Hungry for a SNACK
or SOFT DRINK?
ECU Vending Services provides snack
and beverage machines all over
campus. Most machines are operated
by coin, currency, or the ECU 1 Card
(if activated). If you have problems with a
vending machine, call 328-6294.
ECU Business Services Doing "whatever it takes" to meet the needs of the ECU community!





ORIENTATION ISSUE 3
Safety
Campus Dining
Student Health
Virtual Classrooms
S7 with the"
Chancellor
ANISA Giirairi
tfttt WRITKR
Richard Eakin has been chancellor of East
Carolina University since March of 1987.
Prior to ECU, Eakin was employed at
Bowling Green State I Iniversity in Ohio. It
was then that the president at Bowling
Green made him aware of the opening
chancellor position and encouraged him to
apply. Chancellor Eakin is from New
Castle, PA, and attended Geneva College, a
private liberal arts college in Beaver Falls,
PA. From there he went on to graduate
school at Washington State in Pullman, WA,
where he received a masters and doctorate
in mathematics. During college Eakin met
his wife, JoAnn, and they have been married
for 39 years. The Eakin's have two children,
Matthew and Maridy.
Here is a chance to get to know your
chancellor a little more.
The East Carolinian: What do you think
ECU offers incoming freshmen?
Eakin: " I think ECU offers students a
wonderful opportunity for a total college
experience. We have a rich curriculum, as
well as out of class experiences, whether it be
recreational, social, or cultural; all designed to
help us become total human beings. We also
have a sense of community, which I think
attracts a lot of people to ECU
TEC: Did you ever live in the dorms?
What dormfs) do you like the best here and
why?
Eakin: " I lived in the dorms all four
years of college. The dorms 1 like best are
Gotten, Fleming and Jarvis because of their
historical significance and their distin-
guished architecture
TEC: What is your favorite spot on
campus?
Eakin: " I like the mall and the copula,
but I admire the architecture of the newer
buildings like Joyner Library and the Sonic
Plaza, the Recreation Center and Todd
Dining Hall
TEC: Do you ever cat on campus?
Where do you go?
Eakin: "We sometimes hold luncheons
on campus catered by the school, but usual-
ly I go to Todd Dining Hall or the Wright
Place and get a sandwich, an apple and a
soda
TEC: What is your favorite sport, as a
viewer or participant?
Eakin " I like to watch basketball and
play golf
FYI- Chancellor Eakin played basketball
in college.
TEC: What advice can you give to
incoming freshmen?
Eakin: " As you arrive to East Carolina
University be attentive to your surround-
ings, realize you have to work harder and
more is expected out of you as an individual
You need to take responsibility for doing
your own work. If you adopt these attitudes
and are willing to work hard than success is
obvious
Night classes offer
campus parking problems
Safety still big
concern for students
A m v W ; n !�: k
Tkrra Stkinbkiskr
Sf.MIIK HITKKS
Night classes begin at 6:30 p.m. Most run
until 9:30 p.m. and sometimes even
longer. Some students have said that they
are concerned about safely getting to their
car in the dark after class.
According to Shirley Bazemore, Parking
and Traffic Control officer, there are park-
ingl lots that are not open to students until
6:30 p.m. such as the lot next to Rawl, where
many night classes are held.
"These are private parking lots
.Bazemore said. "If they have a registered
vehicle, they can park there
But there are other places to park before
6:30 p.m to avoid being tardy to class.
According to Bazemore, all registered
cars except freshmen can park in the
Brewster staff lot and in the lot behind
Speight after 4 p.m. All other lots open at
5 or 7 p.m. If students' cars are not uni-
versity registered, or are parked there
before these times, then they might
receive a ticket. Bazemore said that tick-
eting goes on from 5:30 a.m. to midnight.
Students who have night classes said
they feel that this puts their safety in jeop-
ardy.
"Even though the parking lots are pret-
ty well lit, I still don't like it when I have
to walk to my car alone after class said
LaToya Washington, a senior majoring in
business.
Bruce Flye. director of Facilities
Planning, says that there arc no plans to
move parking closer to night-class locations.
"But measures have been taken to
improve lighting and install new emergency
call boxes Flye said.
According to Flye, the new Reade Street
lot will have additional technological safety
measures.
"(The Reade Street lot will have the best
lighting as of yet and will lie equipped with
security cameras Flye said.
Richard Brown, vice chancellor for
Administration and Finance, said that safety
is a top priority for ECU, and that the cam-
pus is very safe.
Some students agree and said they do not
fear for their safety on campus after dark.
"I know it's not the best idea, but I walk
around campus alone after dark often
enough, and I've never felt unsafe said
� SEE PARKING PAGE I)
Financial aid helps fund college careers
Students must apply early
to take advantage of loans
Brian I Storrincs
STMf WRITER
Although the SATs may have gotten you
into ECU, a knowledge of financial aid will
keep you fiscally and physically secure
while you are here.
There are many types of financial aid
available for students at ECU. At the
Financial Aid Office, located in the Old
Cafeteria Complex, you can find the infor-
mation you need to gain access to grants,
loans and part-time employment, also
known as federal work study. Scholarships
and merit-based awards are awarded
through individual departments.
"In order to receive financial help, you
must apply for it and show need. 'The only
aid not based on need are unsubsidized
Stafford Loans said Karen Barbcc,
Associate Director of Financial Aid.
One senior, when asked what he would
have liked to know about financial aid said,
"I wish I had applied for it sooner
The process for obtaining aid is first you
must complete a FAFSA�Free Application
for Federal Student Aid, and list ECU as one
of your school options.
Sharon Roberts consults Senior Brian Lake
PHOTO BY MIKE PUIT0HAK
According to the Office of Student
Financial Aid, they feel you should apply
early, and make a copy of the FAFSA for your
records, as well as keeping copies of your IRS
forms and other income information.
After you send your FAFSA, you will
receive a federal acknowledgment in the
mail. Give a copy to Financial Aid. You will
then receive an award letter. Indicate what
aid you want, and turn in the award letter.
The faster you do this process, the more aid
you can receive.
Your financial aid can be affected by
your parent's income, and, under the
Higher Education Amendments of 1998,
any drug conviction can result in a loss of
financial aid.
If you have any questions about financial
aid, you can call the Office of Financial Aid
at 252-328-6610 or visit during their office
hours Monday�Friday from 10am-5pm.






I flRIFHTATinfJ ISSUE
UCAID helps university develop Internet 2
� � � � .� A a. -t. Pantar fnr ' I dlamail iiin�
Qofcw developed as hi$-
stieed successor to internet
AN ISA (illKAIKI
STAFF WRITKI
East Carolina University has teamed up
with the University Corporation for
Advanced Internet Development
(UCAID) to help in the development of
Internet 2.
UCAID is a collaboration of mainly
universities; 146 hold membership
including N.C. State, the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Duke
University and Wake Forest University
as well as other universities across the
nation, industries and government
offices. It is an effort to build a high
speed successor to the Internet which
has become too busy and slow in moving
large amounts of data that will benefit
science and research. It is not an
attempt to replace the existing Internet,
but merely allow scientists, medical stu-
dents, etc. to share vast amounts of data,
collaborate easier across broad distances
and run complex equipment by remote.
ECU, who is one of UCAID's newest
members, had to submit an application
to be approved by a review board.
Jeffrey Huskamp, East Carolina's chief
information officer, said joining UCAID
will bring about many advantages.
"It will increase our ban with the
Internet, upgrade the 10 megabytes the
computers have now to 45 or possibly
150 megabytes, and help students by
accessing other universities more quick-
ly Huskamp said.
Students at ECU will be able to
exchange data vials with other universi-
ties like the research library at the
University of California at Berkeley.
This is made possible by NCLIVE, the
UNC systems' libraries. ECU will help
with network research like telemedi-
cine. At the Center for Telemedicine,
part of East Carolina's medical school,
students can access lab analysis and
receive medical information quicker and
easier.
There are, however, some restrictions
when using Internet 2. If you want to
send information or a message, you have
to have someone who is a member of
UCAID (like ECU) send it for you. You
can not be just anywhere and retrieve
information.
"Universities who join UCAID to be
a part of Internet 2 want to have better
Internet activities and better Internet
access Huskamp said.
Virtual classroom slated to be ready for fall
Courses will soon
be available online
I'KKKA STKINBKISKR
STAFF WRITF.lt
Everyone with access to the Internet will
now able to complete ECU courses on-
line.
According to Dr. David Watkins, spe-
cial assistant to the VCAA for information
resources, ECU Virtual University will
include virtual classrooms, exams, finan-
cial services, library research and office
visits with professors.
Watkins said that the option should be
up and running next fall, but there is "no
guarantee because they have to tie all the
loose ends He also said that there are
already a lot of class supplements up and
running.
"We're actually hoping to get it ready
before fall semester so that professors will
have enough time to become familiar
with the program and get their informa-
tion up before classes actually start said
Watkins.
Watkins said he did not know exactly
how many classes will be available
through the Virtual University.
"It depends on how many faculty
members want to get involved and how
students respond to it said Watkins.
ECU is planning to-purchase a license
to use a program called Courselnfo from
Blackboard, Inc. Courselnfo will help
standardize on-line courses and "help to
simplify things said Watkins. It will also
provide a template for instructors who feel
less than confident about their computer
capabilities.
Other colleges in the University of
North Carolina System already have some
of these capabilities, including NC State.
"I take an on-line class right in my
dorm room said Cameron Schwartz, NC
State freshman. "It's not any easier than a
regular class that you actually attend, but
it is more convenient
Some non-traditional students are very
excited about the Virtual University.
"I'd love to take classes on-line said
Cindy Targy, a non-traditional student
and mother of two. " I feel out of place in
some of my classes because I'm so much
older than the other students
"You will encounter many new places & with the knowledge
you've acquired at East Carolina University, you know there's
only one place that will brighten your future - CHICO'S
I
757.1666
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
(You Know Where That Is!)
And new open beside
Pitt Community Cofege
in Community Square!
439.0003
All ABC Permits
The Place
Where
Alumni Meet!
Mexican Restaurant
27
I i l ii4IilHi14iiifi't ikmilkli-
!S3iii.kaAAiAra
4ili iif�VeVW551IIjfli�Tf're
i 1� i ! 5 5 5" i. i i. a t a iliiVl'i





ORIENTATION ISSUE 5
D&MkyvTCeS lendsSUppOrt Campus dining offers wide selection
Department offers aid
to disabled students
Kristv Dasiki.
�T.�rr �bitk�
Being away from home is a challenge, but
imagine if that challenge was compound-
ed by a disability.
The university offers a great deal of
support and services to help in aiding
these disabled students. Much of the sup-
port and aid comes from the Department
for Disability Support Services.
ECU is home to around 365 disabled
students. According to Liz Shilliday, asso-
ciate director for the Department for
Disability Support Services, "It is not a
requirement for the disabled students to
let the university know they are disabled
when enrolling. Therefore, we only know
the number of students who are disabled
that have come to us for support, and not
the total number
The Department for Disability
Support Services offers services such as
mobility training for the blind or visually
impaired and interpreting services and
Portable Telecommunication Devices for
the deaf. Hearing impaired students are
provided with sign language interpreters
and the visually impaired are provided
with things such as books on tape and
items in larger print.
In addition to Disability Support
Services, the university also offers four
handicap accessible dorms and six handi-
cap accessible dining halls. ECU Transit
has eight handicap accessible busses and
one van.
According to Housing Services, the
handicap accessible dorms have special
doors that open with a remote control that
only disabled students who live in that
dorm have.
Renovations to many of the dorms and
other campus buildings are underway to
make ECU a more handicap accessible
university.
Beginning last year, ECU started to
renovate dorms and campus buildings by
adding elevators. Jarvis Hall's renovations
will start this year. Once renovations are
complete, Jarvis will be equipped with an
elevator.
According to Bruce Flye, director of
Facilities Planning, Jones Hall is the next
dorm in line to have an elevator installed.
The Austin Building and Rawl Annex
are two campus buildings that have
recently been under construction. Rawl is
complete, but Austin is still not finished.
ECU Transit has eight of their 18
busses available for the use of disabled
students. They are equipped with lifts for
access to the bus. Although all the busses
are not accessible, they eventually will be.
"The last five busses we have bought
have been accessible said Joey
Weathington, director of ECU Transit
"When we replace the old buses with
new ones, they will also be accessible
Each bus driver has been trained in how
to help disabled students get on the bus.
"When they are hired, and later in
each semester, they have training. And,
last semester it was in conjunction with
SEE SERVICES PAGE 1
Seven locations ensure
large mealtime variety
ANISA (illRAIRI
STAH- WHIIKII
You're running late and you're hungry,
but you don't have enough time to get to
your favorite fast food restaurant before
your next class. So, take time to stop and
enjoy campus dining.
There are seven dining spots located
conveniently throughout campus which
offer a variety of foods. There are two din-
ing halls�Todd, which is located on
College Hill, and Mendenhall on West
campus. Both are all-you-can-eat dining
halls that serve breakfast, lunch and din-
ner Monday through Friday, and brunch
and dinner on the weekends.
You can choose anything from hot
entrees and salads to made-to-order sand-
wiches and numerous desserts. In addi-
tion to these, the dining halls offer a cere-
al station for those of you who do not feel
like eating dinner for dinner.
If you do not have time to sit down and
eat a meal you can go to one of the other
five dining spots. If you are on Central
campus then you have two options, The
Wright Place and Croatan.
The Croatan is located in the heart of
the academic area of campus, and is an a
la carte cafe open for breakfast and lunch
Monday through Friday.
For breakfast they have biscuit sand-
wiches, bagels and an assortment of pack-
aged pastries and muffins. For lunch they
have sandwiches, fries and qucsadillas,
just to name a few options. The Wright
Place located next to the Student Stores is
the most frequented dining spot It is an
a la carte cafe open for breakfast, lunch,
dinner and late night dining Monday
through Friday, and on Saturday for
breakfast and lunch. "Beverages are our
top selling item at 15 percent of all food
and drinks sold on campus followed close-
ly by pizza said Frank Salamon, Director
of University Dining Services.
If you're on College Hill and want
something quick to eat then go to The
Galley which is located in Jones Hall. It is
an a la carte cafe that serves during
breakfast, lunch, dinner and late night
hours seven days a week. Located on
West campus, The Spot like The Galley,
is an a la carte cafe and operates during
SEE PARKING PAGE 1
John Eddings snacks at Mendenhall.
PHOTO BY Bill MITH
ECU Presbyterian Campus Ministry
Welcomes new students and their parents
PCM meets on Tuesday nights from 6 until 8
p.m. for a FREE home cooked meal and a program
at First Presbyterian Church (located at the corner of
14th and Elm Streets, just blocks from campus).
Join us for food, fellowship and friendly faces.
For further information, contact Ellen Crawford
True, Presbyterian Campus Minister 758-1985 or
ellencrawfordtrue@yahoo.com





6 0BIEWTAT1DW ISSUE
Student Health extends services Student employment offered on campus
University 'doctors office'
offers all routine care
Siiana Woodward
stafk w hi i ik
ECU's Student Health Services is not
only a health care center, but an excellent
resource for education and assistance in all
areas of personal health.
Located between Fleming Science
Building and Joyner Library, the Student
Health Office is open 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday, and 9 a.m. to 12
p.m. on Saturday and Sunday.
"We are open like a doctor's office, and
do all routine care from treating sore
throats to giving immunizations said
I leather Zophy, director of health educa-
tion.
"You may be seen by calling and mak-
ing an appointment, or by using urgent
care if you don't have an appointment and
need to be seen immediately. For exam-
ple, if you sprain your ankle and can't
walk, come to the office and we get you to
a doctor
According to sources at Student Health
Services, making an appointment to see a
doctor is not difficult, and can be done
one or two days in advance unless it is flu
season and many people are sick.
Student Health Services also has a
pharmacy located in the building which
allows prescriptions and over- the-counter
medications to be purchased quickly and
inexpensively.
"Access is convenient and fees are less
than private offices, but we have good
care as well said Linda Sanderson,
physician extender.
Mental health is another service pro-
vided by the Student Health Office. This
department has two staff psychologists
who students may make an appointment
with through Mental Health Services
which is located in the same building as
Student Health.
"We work closely with the counseling
center, and we see students that are going
through serious problems said Jane-
Ross, staff psychologist.
"We are not here for the students who
are going through the normal stresses of
college life, they should lie referred to the
Student Counseling Center, but instead
we see those who have exceeded the
point of functioning normally. Loss of
appetite, bipolarism, and other health
problems which are on the more serious
end of the spectrum are what we see
Student I lealth Services is a great way
to learn how to prevent health care prob-
lems, and maintain a strong and healthy
personal and physical life. According to
Zophy, Student Health furnishes informa-
tion and treatment through pamphlets,
and the health care providers on such sub-
jects as nutrition, eating disorders, preg-
nancy and sexually-transmitted diseases.
"One of our goals is to provide educa-
tion Zophy said.
"Not only are we taking care of stu-
dents, but educating them on how to pre-
vent problems and use the health care
system.
Numerous locations need
students willing to work
It K I A N I STOKKINtiS
SI UK tH'lEI
If you want to work, the jobs are here. There
arc many places on campus where you can
find jobs that will fit your schedule.The key is
knowing how to get these jobs.
At the Mendcnhali Student Center, job post-
ings are on a bulletin board outside the Business
Affairs Office on the second floor. Applications
are there for you to fill out and drop in the box
next to the bulletin board. " There are 55-
65 students employed at the Center every year
said Stephen Gray, Associate Director uf The
Mendenhall Student Center,
"Jobs range from graphic artists and Ixiwl-
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ORIENTATHW ISSUE 7
?US
e key is
jbpost-
usincss
icatkms
the box
are 55-
yycar
of The
i lx)wl-
Dining
continued from page 5
Services
the same hours. Both offer foods like
pizza, grilled cheese, french fries and sal-
ads. Those who work out at the Student
Recreation Center can visit Center
Court, an a la carte juice and snack bar.
Center Court offers anything from power
bars, to fruit and fruit smoothies. For the
students' convenience, ECU offers meal
plans and declining balances for those
who want to have a limit on how much
they spend and who don't want to carry
cash on campus.
"Whether you live on campus or not,
there are advantages to owning a meal
plan or having a declining balance, cost
ivinps and convenience said Salamon.
continued liom page 5
the Disability Services to aid the stu-
dents Weathington said.
Minges Coliseum and Williams Arena
are also handicap accessible.
"When the new level of the stadium
was built, ramps were added for the dis-
abled, as well as elevators, to allow them
to get up to the new level Flye said.
"Williams Arena has some accessible
seats and when the new addition on the
north side of the football field is done,
there will be additional seating for the
disabled
"I am very proud of where the uni-
versity is with its accessibility on the
campus Shilliday said
Employment
continued liom page 5
ing dley attendants, to office assistants and
technical staff. Each job posting contains a
complete description of the position, as well
as a pay rate. Each department screens its
own staff, but you must have a minimum
G.PA of �25, have a class schedule which fits
what the position needs and be in good acad-
emic standing"
Students can also work is the Student
Store. Applications for these jobs are found in
the main office next to the Student Store.
"Ask the receptionist for an application and
fill it outsaid Wanda Scarboro, Director of the
Student Store.
"Your employment will be based on your
class schedule, but each department supervi-
sor in the store does its own interviewing and

Green mill run
apartments
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larger 1 and 2 bedroom apartments
low utility rates
water & sewer
basic cable furnished
onsite manager
24 hr emergency
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1.5 blocks from ECU
large pool
on site laundry
convenient to
downtown &
shopping mall
252.758.2628
hiring. The Store employs 25- 28 students a
year, and many students who are hired as
freshmen stay for all four years
Another possibility foremptoyment iswith
ECU Transit You must apply at the Transit
Office located in the basement of
MendenhalL
"In order to be a driver with Transit
Services, you must have a good driving record
and pass a drug screen said Dean Wheeler,
Director of Transit Services. While driving
routes and hours are signed up by seniority
there are hours available from 6 am to mid-
night, with more hours on weekends. You
must also have a minimum G.RA of 2.0 to
qualify"
There are many other employment oppor-
tunities for students. The key is to look
around and ask.
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? 300-400 off-campus students
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freshmen.
? 2,400 undergraduates are over
25 years old.
21 of undergraduate non-traditional students are minorities.
59 of non-traditional students at ECU are between 25-30 years old.
Over 65 undergraduate students are over 50 years old.
ACSS PROVIDING SUPPORT SERVICES AND PROGRAMS FOR ECU COMMUTERS AND STUDENTS OVER 24







8 ORIENTATION tSSUE
Safety
coniinued liom page 3
"I know it's not the best idea, but I walk
around campus alone after daik often
enough, and I've never felt unsafe said
Rachel Jcnu, freshman.
Not everyone is so optimistic
"I hate walking to my car after class at
9:30 said Chrissy Buckley, sophomore.
"They need to do something before some-
one gets hurt
Brown said he feels that students also
have a responsibility to themselves for their
own safety,
"The real key to safety is personal
responsibility and people acting responsi-
bly Brown said. "If you look at police
records you notice most accounts of crime
occur after midnight and alcohol is
involved
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Job descriptions and applical
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-

10 ORIENTATION ISSUE
Features
� Dorm Life
� College Budgets
� Financial Aid
� Campus Organizations
Ij
One of ECUs latest addition to the list of over 200 organizations is the Bridge Club. The club
consists of students and professors, who recently posed with their new shirts.
FIU PHOTO
University offers
200 organizations
Development Office helpS SLDO provides assistance to the indi-
� , vidual student wanting to become
StudentS find their niCfie involved in the planning, management
and evaluation of programs and organiza-
tional activities geared towards meeting
the wide'variety of student needs and
interests represented on campus.
"The many organizations provide stu-
dents with the chance to meet new
friends and establish lifelong relation-
ships said Robert Sturms, Director of
the SLDO.
In his office students can submit an
interest card detailing their personal
goals and information. The card will
then be forwarded by the SLDO to the
organization of the student's choice. The
organization will contact the student
with further membership information,
including requirements, meeting times
and places.
Stkvk Davidson
STAKf W1ITKI
There are over two hundred student
organizations at ECU with a wide variety
of different groups. Every member of
the campus community can become
involved in a organization with their own
special interests.
The Student Leadership
Development Office, located in 109
Mendenhall Student Center, in coopera-
tion with many university organizations,
provide students with practical, real-life,
social experiences that complement
their traditional classroom education.
In keeping with this mission, the
SEE ORGANIZATIONS PAGE II
Tips to make your
dorm room more livable
Contact roommate
before moving day
1'RANK II KN I) KICKS
STAH WHITISH
"Just leave your door open while
you're playing Spivey said. "People you
never knew will stop by and take a look
Leaving your door open seems to be a
general idea throughout campus. Part of
making your dorm room more livable is to
find friends to live the dorm life with you.
One of the most important things to do
when moving into the dorms is to cus-
tomize your room. Personalizing your
room establishes your college identity.
If you already know your roommate,
that is a great start Get together and
brainstorm. If you don't know who you
will live with yet, it doesn't hurt to call
himher. It is very important to bring all
of the necessities that a home would
have.
"I remember my first day of my fresh-
man year senior Cory Phoenix said.
"I was playing this Pearl Jam song
really loud while I moved in. Some guy
came by and asked me about it and we
were friends all semester
Jason Spivey, president of Garret Hall,
says that video games are considered
another way to meet people.
Cotton Hall has oiKampus housing opportunities.
Once you get the friends, you have to
find a place for them to sit.
"There was this one room wherc
everyone hung out, I mean like ten peo-
ple at a time sophomore Mike
SEE DORM ROOMS PAGE II
Study abroad programs offered
McGowan assists students
in achieving travel goal
Nina M . D k y
H-lATl'KKS KIMTOH
Imagine yourself in a whole new world
with new faces, beautiful places and
exotic scenery. ECU has made this pos-
sible for students who study in other
countries through the International
Studies Program.
"ECU has provided various opportu-
nities to students for the last 25 years
said Linda McGowan, overseas opportu-
nities coordinator.
According to McGowan, approxi-
mately 30-35 students participate in the
ECU exchanges each year. Some go for
one semester while others go for the full
year.
A lot of preparation goes into study-
ing abroad. McGowan said she encour-
ages students to begin the thought
process at least eight to nine months in
advance.
Once it has been decided that the
student is ready to go abroad, McGowan
holds information and advising sessions.
"I explain the option students have
when they study, work and travel
abroad McGowan said.
SEE ABROAD PAGE 14





ORIENTATION ISSUE 11
College budgets puts squeeze on students
Whereabouts of money
baffles many minds
Kit it: a Sikks
STAH- �BIT KB
FREE! During your college years, this
becomes your favorite four-letter word.
Many of us know from experience
what it's like to hit financial rock bottom.
We all wonder where all the money goes,
and we want to know the best ways to
make more. There's got to be a better
way to save money than to break up with
someone right before the gift-giving holi-
days and wearing dirty underwear inside
out.
It has been said that the best way to
make money is to get an honest job.
Nude dancing, by the way, is not the most
dignified way to support your habit for
extravagant clothing.
Programs sponsored by the University
such as the Co-op program and various
job placement programs are offered to
the financially challenged. Although the
job placement programs are not need-
based, they help students find jobs with-
in their area of study.
"It is, however, a good way to defray
the costs of your education said Mary
Cauley, director of the Co-op program.
Finding a job that is related to your
major has numerous benefits that
include the hands-on experiences you
get while in the process of paying for and
supporting yourself through your educa-
tion.
When students were asked to analyze
their expenses, needs and wants, they
gave the most interesting responses.
Puzzled, they tried to rationalize their
expenses and splurging habits.
"I spend most of my money on stupid
things such as food, going out and so
many other things said Mary Beth
Fleming, freshman.
"I think that people just blow their
money on small things that add up
"I'm usually pretty good about spend-
ing my money, but it always seems to dis-
appear any time I take an unnecessary
trip to Target or Wal-Mart said Melissa
Tilley, sophomore.
"I always get home $30 short and
nothing to show for iL"
Students remain baffled as to where
their money is going. Frequent trips to
the grocery store, the department store
and downtown, suck away all of our
money without us ever realizing it. The
cost of living has also just increased,
which leads to the conclusion that no
matter how much the average college stu-
dent saves, they may never be able to
keep up with the Jones
I'm sure you are all familiar with thrift
shops such as Goodwill and Salvation
Army. On a good day, you can find the
same clothes sold in stores like American
Eagle and the Gap for almost a third of
the price. Todd Dining Hall also supplies
those of us who hate to wash dishes with
plastic utensils that work just as well as
the fancy silverware.
So when you're looking to cut your
budget, use your resources and think
about what you are about to purchase. If
you can't eat it, wear it or hang it on the
Christmas tree, then you probably don't
need it
Top 10 list of what students
spend their money on
1. Clothes
2. Groceries
3. Rent
4. Recreational activities
movies, restaurants
5. Boyfriendsgirlfriends
6. Tuition
7. Books for school
8. Going downtown
9. Alcoholic beverages
10. Laundry
Organizations
continued from page 10
Different departments throughout
the university sponsor honors pro-
grams, and numerous service organiza-
tions that contribute charitably not
only to the ECU community, but also
to the city of Greenville and surround-
ing areas as well. Other special interest
groups range from those with military
concerns, to those interested in ani-
mism, the belief in the existence of
spirit and soul. There are also music
groups, both large and small, religious
organizations, and the popular social
fraternities, the Greeks.
Whatever your tastes, there is some-
thing for everyone. So take your time,
don't feel pressured into joining any
group, make lots of friends and most of
all enjoy yourself.
Dorm Rooms
continued Irom page 10
Thorsby said.
"The guy had couches and all kinds
of cool stuff, so it was just somewhere to
go and chill
If you need furniture for your new
room, don't assume that you have to
bring it with you. A love seat can be pur-
chased for around $20 at local thrift
stores. If you have all the cool stuff
though, you run the risk of being the one
with ten people in your room. A key to
having a great dorm room is creativity.
Sure, you can only do so much with a 12'
by 12' room, but you would be surprised
what you could accomplish with a little
ingenuity and creativity.
Carolinian
We are now accepting applications
for all sections of the paper.
News, Sports, & Features Writers
� Opinion columnists
� Advertising Reps.
� Photographers
� Copy Editors
� Cartoonists
of lifetime
Apply at our office on die second floor of the Student Publications Building.
' 1
: I.
.
,��







itm
12 ORIENTATION ISSUE
Special Collections wing holds hidden treasures
The Sonic Plaza' serves as a new entrance to Joyner Ubrary, the main research option for many students. This valuable source is divided into four categories, and located on the third floor.
FILE PHOTO
Variety of interests
and resources available
Dan ik I. Kktcimm
iniNTmirnvi; illT��
For the scholar and historian, one of the
hidden treasures of ECU is the Special
Collections section of Joyner Library.
Here, for those willing to do a bit of dig-
ging, there exists a wide array of materi-
als encompassing a variety of interests
and needs.
The Special Collections are divided
into four main areas. The first of these is
the Manuscript Collection, which con-
tains letters, diaries, photographs and
numerous other items with great
research potential. The Manuscript
Collection concentrates on four things,
the first being materials from or related
to North Carolina (the North Carolina
Collection on the third floor of Joyner is
a part of Special Collections).
The second part of the Manuscript
Collection is composed of military
papers. According to Donald R. Lennon
of Special Collections, the large number
of naval papers in this collection are,
"the largest repository outside the mili-
tary There is also a considerable
amount of material in this section related
to the U.S. Civil War.
A third area of interest covered by this
collection are materials accumulated by
the tobacco industry and its employees.
These include documents from many
different parts of the world, 'such as
China and Rhodesia, where this industry
has had a presence.
The fourth category in the
Manuscript Collection is missionary
records. These materials come from all
over the world, and include records
returned from Africa, South America and
the Orient.
Material destined for the Manuscript
Collection must first be carefully orga-
nized, itemized and protected against
deterioration. It can arrive at the offices
in boxes, cases, bags or in one case, even
a barrel.
The archivist must sort through the
documents, organizing them as best he
or she can (since they are rarely in any
sort of order). The scheme used is usual-
ly either topical or more frequently
SEE JOYNER PAGE lb
tM
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far
V&
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w&s
Ypy
Enjoy the sun and
stay cool by the
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Hit the tennis courts
day or night! v
214 Elm St 5
Greenville, NC 27858
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Get fit and trim at
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ORIENTATION ISSUE 13
Students balance college experience with family life
Couples speak out
on married life
BROOKE I'OTTS
STAFF � in i i- n
How many times have you said, "I think
this could be the one Daily? Twice?
Never?
Often, we toss around phrases like this
without them ever coming true. But
among the student population at ECU are
many students who have said this and
meant it. Not only do these couples com-
mit their time to their schoolwork, but
also have to dealing with the pressures of
being married.
Devotion to a spouse and trying to
make time for school keeps these stu-
dents busy, but overall the pleasures of
being married outweigh the negative
aspects.
The following three couples all have
unique situations, but face similar chal-
lenges. Kelly Bumpass, a graduate stu-
dent who is finishing his degree, feels that
he made the right decision to get married
while still in school. "I wouldn't trade it
for the world Bumpass said.
According to Bumpass, he appreciates
the security of having his wife Dora at
home when he gets in. And the financial
security that his wife's job provides takes
pressure off of him as he finishes his
degree.
He also realizes that there are some
drawbacks to balancing his time.
"Sometimes I can get overwhelmed with
school and work, and then she feels
neglected Bumpass said.
"I basically have to slow down and try
not to do too much
He advises students who are thinking
about getting married and going to school
at the same time to carefully consider the
additional responsibilities that married
life will bring. Not only do you have to
consider the impact of your decisions on
your own life, but on your spouse's as
well.
Unlike single ECU students, he has to
think about the future not just in terms of
school, but of long-range consequences.
"You're living a life outside of school,
at the same time that you are in school
Bumpass said.
"You have to get your priorities straight
to make it work
Other married students face similar sit-
uations. Junior Jeff Ellis and his wife
Roberta have been married since August
and have a baby girl. They also feel the
pressures of balancing home and school.
"When you love someone and are
committed to them, you can work
through anything Roberta said.
This way, they don't have to worry
about finding time to see one another or
have to experience the apprehension of
being single and dating.
One of the keys to their relationship is
understanding and support. Jeff realizes
the difficulties Roberta has in caring for
the baby, and Roberta encourages him as
he tries to finish school and support the
family.
Looking back,
the decision to marry
and start a family
definitely caused a
major change in
Jeffs life.
"I really had to
grow up overnight
Jeff said.
Jeff decided to
put his family first,
even if it meant
putting school lower
on his list of priori-
ties. Even though
sometimes it is diffi-
cult, he doesn't give
up. "It's definitely
worth it Jeff said.
Another couple,
Don and Martina
Froning, have to
deal with a particu-
larly unique situa-
tion. Don is a gradu-
ate student, while
his wife still lives in
Hawaii, where they
met. They have
been married for
nearly two years, and Don has been going
to school here in Greenville since the fall.
Due to the separation, he is trying to fin-
ish school as quickly as possible and
resume his life in Hawaii.
The couple is also trying to buy land
for a home and deal with finances, and the
distance between them creates additional
Many students find their partner for life on the campus of their college.
Flit PHOTO
frustration that most couples don't have to
deal with.
Overall, all three of these couples share
the same feeling. Being married and
going to school is difficult and creates a lot
of extra responsibilities, but if you are
committed to one another and willing to
work hard at both, it is all worthwhile.
�i��
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Mates,
Florida
BIRKENSTOCK
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Back
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530 Cotanche St.
Greenville, NC 27858
(Inside Bicycle Post)
Downtown
252-757-0713
THE
NORTH
FACEI





rrrr.wwww�.M vw
M�?M
A nRIFHTATIQW ISSUE
Abroad
continued fiom page 11
"I (also spend time with students in
the application process
Through the exchange program, stu-
dents do not have to worry about extrav-
agant tuition fees. Studying in another
country costs the same amount as study-
ing here at ECU.
"Participating in the exchange pro-
gram gives students a different view of
the world McGowan said. "It also
allows students to look at their own
country in a different perspective
Samantha Dunn, an English major,
received the opportunity to study abroad
at the Manchester University in
England. She was initially introduced to
International Studies when her older sis-
ter participated in the program.
According to Dunn, her experiences
there were very interesting.
The major language differences that
she encountered were found primarily in
the British slang.
"Their slang words were quite differ-
ent than ours Dunn said.
For instance, when the British say
that a man was "pissed they mean he
was intoxicated.
A few other cultural diversities from
the American way of life that Dunn rec-
ognized were in the educational system.
"The classes were very different
Dunn said. "I only went to class on
Mondays and Tuesdays and had the rest
of the week to myself
Although Dunn only attended one
semester, she was able to interact with
students of other cultures as well as the
British. She had three roommates: one
German, one Polish and one African.
When asked if they would opt to
study abroad, the opinions of students
varied.
"It would be weird being in a strange
place where I wouldn't know anyone
and all the unfamiliar surroundings
said Cindy Horrell, freshman.
Other students seemed enthused at
the idea of studying in another country.
"I would try it out for a semester just
to get the experience said Vinny
Cardillo, graduate student.
"I think it would be an awesome
experience said Robin Skipper, Junior.
Any students interested in studying
abroad or participating in the ECU
exchange program should contact Linda
McGowan at the Office of International
Affairs at 328-1937.
7 W
Wei
tUjJent Exchang
ad Programs:
y�
Australia (5)
Belize (1)
Canada (1)
Costa Rica (1)
Ecuador (1)
England (1)
Finland (5)
France (3)
Germany (18)
Japan (1)
Mexico (14)
Sweden (2)
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'I
J
ORIENTATION ISSUE 15
Joyner
continued Irom page 12
chronological. In those instances where
the paper is acidic, and the document is
being destroyed, it is sent to the lab
downstairs to neutralize the acid and
prevent further decay.
The next section of Special
Collections is the University Archives.
Records and memorabilia of ECU from
its early years to the present day are
stored here. There are business office
records, yearbooks, photographs and
other objects reflecting the day-to-day
operations of this university, as well as
the activities of some of its previous stu-
dents and faculty. For those wishing to
do research in either the Manuscript
Collection or the University Archives, it
will be necessary to use the card catalog
in the manuscript room, since most of
this material is not yet in the computer
catalog.
The third section of Special
Collections is the Rare Book Collection
which, while small at present, is growing
again thanks to contributions from the
Friends of the Library. Books arc found
about maritime architecture (and mar-
itime studies in general) as well as trav-
el accounts of the 18th and 19th cen-
turies. In addition, there arc a number
of works relating to slavery, many pub-
lished before 1865.
The fourth section is the Hoover
Collection, which is a vast assortment of
items relating to international commu-
nism and radicals.
"It is an accumulation of published
material dealing with communism by
both the left and the right Lennon
said.
The Special Collections of Joyner
Library are generally an underused but
very valuable resource that will provide
pleasant surprises for those who choose
to make use of them.
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from
Head to Toe.
'
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And everything in between
Largest Selection of New & USED Textbooks
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Educational Discount Pricing on Computer
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Official Headquarters for ECU Insignia Apparel
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Reference, Tradebooks & Magazines
School & Art Supplies
Student Football Tickets
Newly Expanded Medical Bookstore!
Customer satisfaction is our 1 priority!
Ronald E . Dowdy
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Wright Building �(252)328-6731
Wright Store Hours:
Monday - Friday: 7:30 am - 7 pm
Saturday: 9 am - 3 pm
www.studentstores.ecu.edu





ff
�" " ���" VViVWft 1 t-UVWyrWWiMI
�.vnaeiBBBcasrawjft��
ORIENTATION ISSUE 17
� Rec Center
� Guest Coach
� Scholar Athletes
� "Pure Gold'Dance
Don t just spectate - participate
Student Rec Center off en
something for everyone
Stkvk. I) ax i i)son
SIM' I- RI'I'KH
Student Rec Center offers professional assistance for weightlifting equipment.
The Student Recreation Center at ECU
boasts outstanding recreational and fitness
facilities for keeping your body tuned up.
The SRC is committed to providing
quality recreational opportunities for the
ECU community. To meet the diverse
needs and interests of students, faculty
and staff, a comprehensive and innovative
recreational program has been developed.
A variety of options exist to enhance
interests, knowledge and behaviors. They
promote healthy lifestyles, positive
human relationships, productive leader-
ship skills, responsible attitudes, sports-
manship and fair play.
The basketball courts provide students
with the opportunity to exercise as well as
enhance their athletic skills.
"I enjoy coming to the SRC every
day sophomore John Evans said.
"The activities offered here are great
for handling the stress of classes
The weight lifting and fitness area, the
most widely used area of the SRC, offers
treadmills, exercise bikes, stair climbers,
nautilus equipment and free weights. If
assistance is needed the fitness area is
staffed during normal operating hours.
"My friends and I come three times a
week junior Kclli I Icld said.
"It keeps us in great shape
For those who enjoy a more relaxed
workout atmosphere, the swimming pool
can be both cool and refreshing. ITiere is
also a state-of-the-art indoor track for
SEE SRC PAGE 19
Professors serve as guest coaches for Pirates
Student hthletes
pick guest coaches
Travis It a kk iky
shiiii Hira
When ECU plays a home game there are
usually a couple of extra coaches on the
sidelines.
Several faculty members are selected
as guest coaches for selected home events
in football, volleyball and both men's and
women's basketball.
The program is administered by the
student development office of the
Athletics Department as a way for profes-
sors to see what a student athlete goes
through in practice and on game days.
Chris Hargravc works in the student
development office and hosts the faculty
members participating in the program.
Hargrave says the professors chosen for
the program are selected by athletes.
"Students nominate a teacher they feel
close to Hargrave said.
"They have to be attending their class
at this semester. It's a way for the athletes
to say thank you
According to Hargravc, professors take
this chance to experience competing
Pirates up close.
"Upperclassmen usually get first
choice Hargrave said. "Sometimes they
(the teachers) say no, but most of them are
willing when asked
There are usually two or three coaches
selected for every home game in football.
Guest Coaches Schedule
of Activities for Football
Friday:
Arrive to watch Practice at 3:30
Tour athletic facilities
Meet coaching staff
Dinner with team at Todd Dining Hall
Saturday:
Tour of press boxlunch
two hours before kickoff
Watch warm-ups from field
Locker room for pregame speech
Watch game from field level
Post game press conference
In basketball and volleyball, guest coach-
es are selected only for home conference
games.
Broadcast communications professor,
James Rees, has participated in the pro-
gram several times, one was last year dur-
ing ECU's home football game against
Army on October 3.
"I've done it twice for football and
once for basketball Rees said.
"It's really a moving schedule. It's a
schedule that keeps you busy and it's a
very enjoyable schedule
For football games, guest coaches visit
practice on Friday afternoon then tour the
weight and training rooms in the sports
medicine building. After practice they
tour the football office and meet the rest
of the coaches.
"It all culminates with a nice visit to
Coach Logan Rees said.
"You go into his office and you get to
talk with him and ask any questions you
might have
From there they go to Todd Dining
Hall where they eat dinner with the team.
On game day, the guest coaches arrive a
couple of hours before game time for
lunch and a tour of the press box. After
SEE GUEST COACH PAGE 19

ECU professor joins the football coaching squad.
PHOTO BV KIM MCCUMBER
' fc, a - - ,





1$ pRIFWTATinN ISSUE
Smart and efficient on and oft the fields
Student Athletes earn
scholar awards
KKISTV I) AN I HI.
NEWS Klin�
The ECU Athletic Department named
and honored its outstanding student-ath-
letes at the annual PCS Phosphate
Breakfast of Champions on April 17,1999.
The breakfast was a part of the 16th
annual Great Pirate PurpleGold Pigskin
Pig-out.
The breakfast was held at the
Greenville Country Club.
Isonette Polonius was named ECU
Outstanding Female Student-Athlete and
Justin England was named as the ECU
Outstanding Male Student-Athlete for
the 1998-99 season.
Along with Polonius and England, the
PCS Phosphate All-Academic Team was
also honored at the breakfast.
The awards given to the female and
male scholar-athletes of the year includ
an athletic grant-in-aid, which is spon-
sored by PCS Phosphate.
The scholar-athletes were chosen
based on their academic and athletic
achievement, leadership qualities and
service to the university and community.
Polonius, a senior softball "All-
American is a native of Curacao,
Netherlands Antilles. This season was her
final season performing for the Lady
Pirates.
According to sports information,
Polonius ranks in the top two of every
ECU offensive category in the softball
record book, including the top position in
home runs, RBI's and doubles.
"This award really lets people see and
learn what we are all abput Polonius
said.
In 1998, she was a first team College
Sports Information Directors of America
Academic All-America selection. Polonius
carries a 3.875 GPA in business manage-
ment.
"I am so honored in winning this
award. It is a great award to be nominated
for and win Polonius said. "I must say I
have to thank my mother for all of her
support during my playing here in the
United States
More recently, the Lady Pirate's third
baseman was named the Big South
Conference softball Player of the Week,
announced by ECU's sports information
department on May 4,1999. Polonius,
who has received this honor four times
this year, helped the Pirates to a record of
3-1 that week to clinch the Big South reg-
ular season title and a first place seed in
the Big South Tournament which was
held May 7-9 in Rock Hill, S.C The
pirates won and went on to play the
Arizona Wildcats in the first round of the
NCAA's tournament in Arizona.
England, a junior and native of Apex,
N.C earned the title of male scholar-ath-
lete with his strong determination in cross
country and his 3.512 GPA in exercise
physiology.
"It is a honor to win such a prestigious
award. It is nice to know that hard work is
noticed England said. "I have to thank
my coaches, teammates and parents for
the honor of wining this award
Last fall England earned All-Colonial
Athletic Association honors with a ninth
place finish individually. 1 le also qualified
Scholqr
Awards
Isonette Polonius
softball
Hometown: Curacao, Netherlands Antilles
Major: Business Management
GPA: 3.875
Position: 3rd base
Records: Leads in home runs. RBI's. doubles
Justin England
men's cross country
Hometown: Apex
Major: Exercise Physiology
GPA: 3.512
Awards: 1998 NC state title
Cliff Godwin
baseball
Hometown: Snow Hill, N.C.
Major: Business Administration
GPA: 3.95
Position: hitler and catcher
Awards: W99GTC Academe Erst Tarn AMistrict I
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for the NCAA Region III
Championships when his 25th place
finish gained him all-district. England
also won the 1998 state title.
"This is great for Justin because he
is an outstanding young man. This is
good recognition for the team said
Leonard Klepack, men's cross country
coach.
According to Coach Klepack,
England is a role model. He stresses
the importance of academics that
Coach Klepack feels many other ath-
letes do not focus on.
"It is the way he does things, his
actions. They are what influences
everyone. He has a good character and
he handles himself very well
Klepack said.
Following the tradition of success-
ful Pirate Academics is Cliff Godwin,
who has been named to the 1999
GTE Academic First Team All-
District III baseball team as a desig-
nated hitter, announced May 18, 1999
by the GTE-Academic All-America
selection committee. First team selec-
tions from each region will now be put
on the national ballot for a chance to
earn Academic All-American status.
A native of Snow Hill, N.C,
Godwin has played in 43 games for the
Pirate baseball team this season,
including starting 22 as designated hit-
ter and 11 times as catcher. The
SEE SCHOLAR PACE 19
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' �
ORIENTATION ISSUE 19
Pure Gold team
shows love for game
The "Pure Gold" Dance team supports the Pirates' basketball team during halftime at Minges Coliseum
FIU PHOTO
Dance team supports
Pirate basketball
Jason I.atoi'r
SIM V Kl I KH
When thinking of the term 'student ath-
lete some general perceptions come to
mind. Many of us think of the 250-pound
linebacker or the wiry 6-foot-6 shooting
euard. What most of us don't realize,
however, is that we may be sitting next to
a different kind of student athlete in class
everyday.
These athletes commit their life to
just as much practice, give just as much
effort and have just as much love for their
sport as any all-american power forward.
Ladies and gentlemen, we are speaking
of none other than your ECU Pure Gold
dance team.
Along with the usual stress of college
life, these girls commit an average of 15
hours a week to practice, not to mention
SEE PURE GOLD PAGE 21
The United Methodist
s Ministry at E.C.U.
Christ-centered place for
dig friendships and faith
Swirig Dariee Lessons & fiances
� Thursday Night Dinners and Bible Study
� Christiaii snglngDrama Group (NEW)
� Sunday Night Informal Worship Services
� Work Missions and Habitat Work Days
� Beach Weekends and Spiritual Retreats
"Three Nights of Open House"
August 15-17, SunTues.
Food, Fun and Fellowship; 7:00-9:00 p.m
501 E. Fifth Street & Holly
Rev. Scott Wilkinson, Director, 788-2030
SRC
continued Irom page 17
walkers and runners, and racquetball and
squash courts for competition between
friends. For those with a desire for a
extreme challenge, the climbing wall
puts both strength and endurance to the
test.
The Club Sports program offers stu-
dents the chance to participate in athletic
events against students from other uni-
versities, while the Intramural program
allows competition between students at
ECU. The SRC also offers an Adventure
Program, where participants enjoy back-
packing, camping and kayaking. Both
weekend and one-day trips are offered,
for a small fee, to several nearby outdoor
recreational areas.
There are over ninety activities in
thirty five different sports designed to
help meet the physical, social and recre-
ational needs of the university popula-
tion.
Your participation will help you feel
more a part of the university, and many
new friendships and experiences result
from such participation. Experts say a
healthy body is the perfect complement
to.an educated mind. So don't just spec-
tate - participate.
All recreational facilities are open to
students, faculty, staff and their guests.
Scholar
continued Irom page IB
hitting .252 with three homers and 17 RBI
while adding 21 runs and seven doubles.
Godwin is a business administration
major and earned the honor by carrying a
3.95 Cil'A into the spring semester. Mc is
one of three players from the CAA�along
with shortstop Tim I lummcl ofODU and
outfielder Chris Clarke of William &
Mary�to be named to the first team.
The selection for All-District honors is
open to student athletes who reached
sophomore status and played in at least 50
percent of all the team's games while
maintaining at least a 3.0 cumulative GPA.
District III is comprised of all Division I
schools in Virginia, North Carolina, South
Carolina, Georgia and Florida.
Guest Coach
cominoed Irom page 17
lunch, they are taken inside the locker
room for pregame preparations and they
are then allowed to run onto the field with
the players.
Guest coaches have the option of watch-
ing the game from the sidelines or up in the
press box. After the game they are taken to
the post game press conference as well as
Logan's press conference on Monday.
"They treat you like a million bucks and
make you feel like you're really part of the
program Rees said. Margrave called the
program a good learning experience for the
teachers who participate.
"It's a good experience for them
Margrave said.
"Jt's a good chance for them to see their
students outside of class and it forms a pos-
itive relationship between academics and
tbe Athletic Department"
Rees says he now has a much better
understanding of what athletes go through
both athletically and academically. . "I
heartily recommend it to anybody who ever
gets the opportunity Rees said.

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2f1 flRIFNTATION ISSUE
Welcome,
new Pirate fans
Promising season
highlights year
Mario Sc.ii er ii ai i k R
Stephen Sciiramm
SI'OHTS EDITORS
You applied to several schools and
weren't sure where to go? Honestly,
did you choose ECU when you found
out about our 1999 football schedule?
I cannot blame you and I really
envy the newest edition of all incom-
ing Pirate fans for several reasons.
While some veteran Pirate fans like
myselves have had to remember the
1998.99 Pirate athletics for its lacklus-
ter home schedules, now we will have
promising seasons with breathtaking
opponents ahead of us.
Football and basketball suffered
from home schedules that lacked the
punch of other schools. Because of this
dearth of widely known opponents,
attendance suf-
COURTESY OF ECU MARKETING
fered at home
games. In the case
of football, it was-
n't entirely our
fault.
In the spring of
1998, the
University of
Kentucky backed
out of their game
in Greenville slat-
ed for September.
This cost Pirate
fans a chance to see UK quarterback
Tim Couch, Heisman contender and
eventual first pick in the NFL Draft.
Instead of the Wildcats, we got to see
the Pirates post a shutout against the
hapless UAB.
ECU's football schedule was played
with giddy anticipation for the 1999
season. Pirate fans knew Miami, Duke
and West Virginia were on the docket
for next year and that the 1999 season
would be capped by NC State's first
trip to Greenville.
The big games in the Pirate's future
did not take away from the present
ones. The 1998 Pirate football season
saw the team go 6-5, the emergence of
the option offense and the develop-
ment of quarterbacks David Gerrard
and Bobby Weaver. It saw Roderick
Coleman continue to work his way up
the draft board, the opening of the
upper deck at Ficklin and the largest
crowd for an ECU home game in a win
over Army.
Pirate basketball came and went
quietly. Home games were played in
front of meager crowds despite the
exciting young talent the team had.
Newcomers Evaldas Joeys and
Brandon Hawkins sparked the Pirates
to a 13-14 season. The small crowds
were brought on by a home schedule
that included out of conference foes
such as Francis Marion and the
University of Southwestern Louisiana.
After a season with low attendance
and concluding with yet another first
round exit in the CAA tournament,
changes were made. Head coach Joe
Dooley stepped down and former
Drexel coach Bill Herrion stepped in.
Herrion's arrival and possibly a bet-
ter home schedule combined with new
recruits like Travis Holocomb-Faye
could make the 1999-2000 season
more memorable than the last one.
Replacing Alico
Dunk, the only
senior of last year,
Holocomb-Faye, a
6-1, 175-pound
product of R.J.
Reynolds High
School, was signed
as a highly regard-
ed point guard,
averaging 16
points, six
rebounds and eight
assists per game in
his last year of high school.
While the men went through this
season without much fanfare, the
women had a seasons worth of memo-
ries in one weekend.
The Pirates were the sixth seed
heading into the CAA Women's
Tournament in Richmond. The
Pirates posted upset victories over
George Mason and Richmond en route
to the finals. The Pirates fell to the
heavily favored Old Dominion in a
close game.
As spring rolled around, basketball
ended and Pirate baseball and softball
began to take center stage. The
Pirates have led the conference for
most of the season but finished second
SEE FANS PAGE 22
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ORIENTATION ISSUE 21"
Pure Gold .
continued from page 19
a few hours of weight lifting.
Furthermore, they sacrifice many week-
end evenings to perform at basketball
games. All of this is done for the pure love
of performing for your enjoyment No
scholarships, free books or free meals are
provided as incentives for these hard-
working athletes.
"Sure, it takes up a lot of my free
time freshman Jessica Mauch said.
"But I couldn't imagine it not being a
part of my life, it is very much worth the
effort"
In order to make the team, the girls
must try out One tryout is held during
the fall and one in spring. They are
judged heavily on the criteria of basic
dance techniques in jazz, funk and cheer
dance. They are also judged on their atti-
tudes.
"Few people realize the effort and
ability that goes into being a dancer
coach Amy Graham said.
"Most of these girls have been dancing
for years. They all have some prior back-
ground in dance or cheer teams
Once selected to the team, the girls
then begin to prepare for the National
Cheer Association summer camp. A good
performance at the camp is a key factor
because it is one of the two ways to qual-
ify for the National Cheer Association
championship held every April. Hoping
to improve from a disappointing 13th
place at last year's championship, the
team has already qualified by finishing
with an impressive second place at the
camp this year.
"We are pretty pleased with the show-
ing at the camp Graham said.
"We are right now shooting to make a
top 10 finish at the national finals
A top 10 national finish could possibly
could make some of these girls just as rec-
ognizable to you or me as that 250-pound
linebacker, but maybe just a little bit eas-
ier to look at
PI2ZI&4K
Block Buster Square
315 SI Greenville Blvd.
3214862
(GUM-B)
Sunday 111:30 CRAW TUESDAY
M-W 11-2:00 MEDIUM 1-T0PP1NG
Th-S 11-3:00 $2.99 PIZZA
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We Deliver
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LARGE 2-T0PPING
PLUS A MITER
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NEW PIZZA COMBO
I MEDIUM 2-TOPPING PIZIA
110-INCH CHEESESTIX
good ran a immo tmi osir
ANCHOR
AUTO AND CYCLE INSURANCE AGENCY, INC
TICKETS � DWI � CANCELLED � NON-OWNERS
ALL DRIVERS IMMEDIATE COVERAGE � INSTANT DL123
LOW RATES FOR INEXPERIENCED DRIVERS
AUTO � MOTORCYCLE � BOATS � JET SKIS
l-JQ PAY DAY ADVANCE $100 TO $255 INSTANTLY
HOURS 8:30-5:30 MONDAY THRU FRIDAY
9:00-1:00 SATURDAYS
FOR YOUR CONVENIENCE
Call now for a frei; quote 252-756 17nC
Community Square Shopping Cente
Next to Pitt Community College
4052-E South Memorial Drive
Greenville, NC 27834
Kropefty
Gnogemeft
Apartments & Ronjol Houses
FO Box 873 � m tanloo Owe. $ufe� A
Gnemft North Carolina 283&-UB73
(252) 758-1921 � FAX (252) 757-7722
Now Preleasing
for Fall Semester
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Langston Park Apartments Wesley Commons South
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Two Pedrwrp Unit?
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat 6 Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Oeadbolt Locks
Justus Blocks'5 acn "nit Has a Patio or Balcony
ASK
ABOUT
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
ITOXO vwu ���
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU
Bus route
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat 6 Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
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AM Apartments Just 5 Blocks from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities � On ECU Bus route
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U nHIPWTATION ISSUE
Fans
continued Irom page 20
during regular season after losing two
out of three on the road against rival
UNC-Wilmington. During their suc-
cessful games the Pirates beat in-state
foes Wake Forest and UNC-CH in
front of huge crowds at Harrington
field. Not to mention the nation's num-
ber one Miami who had to put up with
the defeat in their own stadium. The
ECU crowd supported the Pirates in
nearby Kinston where the Pirates man-
aged to win the CAA conference title
in a record-breaking final over Old
Dominion. The team had been ranked
in the top 25 for a number of weeks
and secured an NCAA Tournament bid
with the 21-15 victory overODU. The
Louisiana State Regional series will be
remembered by many as unlucky but
still with pride. The Pirates showed
they had the potential to beat every-
body but their luck ran out in the 'Box'
at Baton Rouge.
Breaking the school record by one,
the Lady Pirates won the Big South
Tournament championship title over
Coastal Carolina and clinched the con-
ference's automatic berth in the NCAA
tournament. The team (50-18) took on
the top-seeded host University of
Arizona Wildcats in the first round of
the NCAA Regionals and finished
their successful season.
Being a Pirate fan over the last year
has been fun. The present might not
have had all of the glory and winning
that a fan desires, however most Pirate
teams did not experience heavy loses
and will come back strong this year.
Stronger schedules and more experi-
ence should make the 1999-2000 Pirate
athletics memorable, especially to you,
the newest edition of Pirate fans.
.1 �
,redW�rk5
Q
A Paint- yew Own
�kn P&Hhry SHuttc
Hand Paint Your Own Masterpieces!
Frat Parties Dorm Halls
Sorority Groups Clubs
Special Group Rates.
Bring this ad in for 20
off a Piece of pottery
1920SmyfbewyckOr.
foff Charles Blvd. at Belts forty
T8cs.iwc.iiq 7. JSfi-639
' Stftf �
CYCL
SAVINGS
Last Year's Bikes at
Close-Out Prices
vinn � And More!
FREE
Trek � Cannondale � GT

ALL BIKES AS
3
Bicvca
P0S
Come & Register for a free
Bodyboard to be given away in July
ifr�s
� "V �"?
OVL discount on
all accessories






Pirates Cove
APARTMENTS
100 off
)eposit
Call
Today
phone: 752-9995
But With Parents In Mind!
Limited access.
Monitored alarm
systems in each unit
with panic buttons in
each bedroom.
Well lighted grounds
and parking lots.
Free roommate
matching,
individual leases.
Every bedroom is a
master suite.
Fully furnished.
On ECU Bus Route.
Surprisingly Affordable
at $375 per room
(includes utilities)
Now Pre-leasing for
August 1999
4 BEDROOM4 BATH Apartments!
Only $375 per BedroomIncludes Utilities
Reserve Your New Master Suite Now While
there is Still Limited Availability!
Designed and Built For Students
Computer center equipped with the latest
software, hardware, printers & internet access.
Equipped Fitness Center.
Clubhouse wbig screen TV
Swimming Pool WLarge Deck.
Washer and Dryer in each unit.
Plush carpeting & designer ceramic tile floors.
Kitchens featuring microwave, dishwasher,
self-cleaning oven disposal,
refrigeratorice maker
FREE Cable television includes HBO
Two phone jacks in all bedrooms
Plus Basketball, Tennis & Sand Volleyball!
Brand New!
- � �
You can have it all in the Fall!
3305 E. 10th Street
From ECU (10th St. side) go left on 10th
Street, across Greenville Blvd. we're just past
Bojangles on the left. From ECU 5th Street
side, take a right and follow 5th to 10th,
then follow directions above.
'v�VA�V'�"����'V'�?��'
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mm
Pinnacle
Property
Management
Company
offering apartment ft duplex communities convenient
to ECU, Pitt Community College, ft the Medical District
all units are carpeted ft serviced by a great maintenance
Call once and tt's fixed!
5 blocks from ECU
2 bedroom apts.
energy efficient
central heatair
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
on ECU bus route
pets ok with deposit
Dockside Duplexes
3 bedroom units
2.5 baths
5 blocks from ECU
on bus route
central heatair
dishwasher
garbage disposal
washer & dryer in each unit
back deck
carport parking
storage room
Iroom units
1 bath
washer & dryer in each unit
dishwasher
refrigerator w icemaker
ceiling fans
range spacious closets
behind Plaza Mall
1 bedroom
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer in each unit
patios
laundry facility on site
small pets ok in some units
Eastqate Duplexes
2 bedrooms
2 bath
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer hookups
ceiling fan
range
spacious closets
convenient to nti
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
no pets
Hampton Court
spacious 1 & 2 bedrooms
3 miles to ECU
1 mile to hospital
ceiling fans
energy efficient
central heatair
dishwasher
washerdryer hookups
watersewer provided
back deckpatio
no pets
Caldwell Court
convenient to Pitt
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
small pets ok with deposit
Condominiums
3 bedrooms
3 bath
kitchen appliances
dishwasher
spacious closets
central heatair
on ECU bus route
no pets
Office located at:
104 WYNDHAM Cr.
APARTMEfNTT D
561-Rent
NoPbolAtYour
hfjy rVfVrwMiVV
QS2) 3217913
mmm
fi
3t
M
Green mill run
apartments
Smart Choice
larger 1 and 2 bedroom apartments
low utility rates
water & sewer
basic cable furnished
onsite manager
24 hr emergency
maintenance
1.5 blocks from ECU
large pool
on site laundry
convenient to
downtown &
shopping mall
252.758.2628


Title
The East Carolinian, June 23, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 23, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1343
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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