The East Carolinian, June 16, 1999






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I
Wednesday
High: 80
Low: 68
Thursday
High: 84
Low: 65
pyf Online Survey
Do you think there are enough minority
organizations on campus?
Carolinian
Shagadelic baby!
Seepage4
www.tec.ecu.edu
WEDNESDAY. JUNE 16.1999 VOLUME 74. ISSUE 49
Campus organizations
offer diverse
II R I w P. Storrincs
STAFF WRITER
"ECU is a good place for minority
groups, however, in order to have more
diversity, more effort needs to be placed in
having more international students here at
ECU said Qiyin Fang, president of the
East Carolina Chinese Association.
"The population of international stu-
dents is small when compared to N.C.
State, but overall, ECU is a good place
Over 3,000 minority students attend ECU,
therefore the university has organized
minority associations to help them promote
ethnic support.
These associations range from Allied
Blacks for Leadership and Equality
(ABLE) to Sigma Omicron Epsilon�
Sisters of Earth, who promote Native
American issues. These groups promote
ethnic and religious diversity.
"ECU is extremely diverse, with repre-
sentation from all races and ethnic cultural
backgrounds said Na'im Akbar, Vice
President of the Adult Student Association
and member of the Minority Student
Coalition. "There are almost 2500 minority
Number of ft
NATIVE AMU
ASIAN,
EBlM
NATIVE AMERH
ASIAN
AFRICAN AMEI
HISPANIC
RACE UNKNOVt
NON-RESIDENT
TOTAL
students here, with the largest percentage
being African�American
Akbar feels it is up to organizations to
promote themselves. Although, he said it is
ECU's responsibility to make minority stu-
dents feel comfortable within the ECU
family.
"ECU is extremely diverse,
with representation from all
races and ethnic cultural
backgrounds
Nairn Akbar
Vice President. Adult Student Association
According to Akbar, interaction between
the different minority organizations is
through the Minority Student Coalition.
They meet to identify issues, research
them, determine a position and bring it to
the attention of the administration.
"The purpose of minority organizations
is to increase the sensitivity of the majority
population, as well as give minority stu-
dents a feeling of belonging, help them
deal with issues, or just partake in social
activities Akbar said.
Some students say they are unaware of
the different numbers of minority organiza-
tions on campus.
"I heard something about a Chinese
Club and a little about other minority
groups, but not much. ECU is not as
diverse as UNCC said Vaughn Roberson,
a transfer student from UNCC.
"It needs more festivals and other ways
to promote different ethnic groups
"I was surprised by the diversity of
ECU, not only the number of minorities,
but the numerous ethnic groups heresaid
Trice Hill, a sophomore, and member of
the ECU chapter of the NAACP.
"While I think that this is a diverse cam-
pus, there needs to be some work done to
promote other ethnic groups

Local U.S. Cellular center closes
Eliminates some
students'jobs
K r i s t v Daniel
NEWS EDITOR
In order to expand services to its
Southeastern customers, U.S.
Cellular announced June 8, it
would move its Communications
Center in Greenville to a Mid-
South Center in Knoxville, Tn.
The decision has effected over
100 people including recent gradu-
ates of ECU and current ECU stu-
dents.
According to Linda Baker, Vice
President of Customer Service, the
decision was made to improve the
service to the customers. U.S.
Cellular officials said that by mak-
ing this change, they will be able to
serve customers more efficiently
for a lower cost.
The change will be effective
August 15, leaving some without
jobs while others have the choice to
move to Knoxville or one of U.S.
Cellular's other locations.
'This realignment will allow us
to make vast improvements in the
quality, speed and efficiency of our
George Hollen of US Cellular
works at his desk
ROIIH VUCHNICH
customer service processes while
holding down operating costs
which affect pricing said Dave
Rivoira, Area General Manager, in a
press release.
According to a press release pro-
vided by U.S. Cellular, they are
working with other local companies
to assist associates choosing to pur-
sue other career opportunities.
"All of our Communication
Center associates are highly trained,
professional and resourceful said
Loretta Knight, manager of cus-
tomer service, in the press release.
U.S. Cellular officials told cur-
rent employees they would make
every effort possible to insure job
opportunities.
U.S. Cellular employs a large
number of ECU graduates and cur-
rent students. Sandy Lambertsen, a
1998 graduate in psychology, had
been working with them for four
months when the announcement
was made.
SEE U CELLULAR PAGE 2
University considers adding
pharmacy doctoral program
Results of study to
be available next year
Brian P. Storrincs
STAFF ��IIE�
A new doctoral-level program may be
in the works for ECl I. The feasibility
study for a new School of Pharmacy
will take place in July by a consultant
from the University of Arizona.
"The results of the study will be
available in the beginning of next
year said Dr. James Hallock, dean of
the Medical School.
"We will then present the results
to the board of trustees and examine
what funding will be needed to estab-
lish this program and whether this
program will be here
'Pie idea for this new program was
generated in a trustees meeting that was
examining the future growth of ECl I.
"The study will concentrate on
three things 1 lallotk said.
"First will be a study of the future
need for phannacists in North
(Carolina
'There is absolutely a great need
for pharmacists in North Carolina
said Kevin Phillips, a pharmacist at
CAS Phannacy. "ITierc is a very short
supply in this state
Phillips, who went to ECl! for two
years before transferring to UNC to
complete his phannacy training, said
that there were many students in his
program who came from other
schools, including junior colleges.
"The other points of the study are
examining what kind of resources we
have to support a phannacy school.
which includes those of the medical
school we already have, as well as addi-
tional resources we will need Hallock
said.
"We will also smdy whether there
will Ix; an adequate supply of students
for such a new program
'I"he program requires two years of
schooling before entering phannacy
school, followed by four years at the
pharmacy school itself. The other phar-
macy program in the state is at
Campbell I ;niversity.
According m officials at the Pin Gouncy
1 lospiral Pharmacy, there arc students from
(ampbell and UNC who come for pharma-
cy rotations at the hospital for training pur-
poses, as well as graduates who do residen-
cies at PCMH.
For future students, the program
would take four years and would, after
certification, allow one to be a pharma-
cist in either a hospital or dnig store.
I

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2 WtJuMdiy. Jun� IB, 1999
news
ANISA (illRAIRI
STACK �llllR
Gem Lanier working in his East Carolina University office.
PHOTO (V BIH KEITH
Professor says goodbye
r . . g. He first became interested in
Lanier'KlmS after first amendment rights when he
. - . became Chair of the Intellectual
JOrty yearS Of SerVlCe Freedom Committee, a part of the
North Carolina Library Association
in 1980. He has served on many
Intellectual Freedom Committees
including American Library
Association, American Association
of School Librarians, and the
Southeastern Library Association,
just to name a few. He has also
served as a director, a liaison, a sec-
retary, a chairman and a parliamen-
tarian to other associations and com-
mittees. He has received numerous
honors and was profiled in
Bookbanning in America: Who
Bans Books?and Why.
Lanier will give up all posts upon
retirement, except he will still chair
the state committee until Fall, and
he has obligations with the
American Library Association until
the summer of 2000. He has had
invitations to speak around the
country after July 1, but has
declined. He has also been encour-
aged to write a book on his experi-
ences as a professor and a speaker,
but has no plans to do so.
"Writing a book would take too
much time. I'm a present and
future guy that just wants to relax
said Lanier said.
After July 1, Lanier will be at the
beach, spending time with friends
and family, reading novels and
watching HBO.
After more than 30 years as a pro-
fessor of Library Science at ECU,
Gene Lanier will retire July 1.
Besides living in Conway, N.C
where he is originally from, Gene
Lanier has spent most of his life at
ECU. He received his undergradu-
ate degree here in 1955, and went
on to receive his masters and doc-
torate degrees at UNC- Chapel Hill
in 1957. Shortly thereafter in 1959
he returned to ECU after serving as
a Counterintelligence Specialist in
Western Europe for two years.
"I've had a lot of offers to teach
at other schools throughout the
years, but I have found a good place
here (ECU), and I decided to stick
with it Lanier said.
As a strong advocate for First
Amendment rights, Lanier has made
over 200 speeches and presentations
on intellectual freedom to civic and
professional groups in North
Carolina and over 40 other states.
"I feel like I have an obligation
to spread the word about the impor-
tance of freedom of speech and
press Lanier said.
Students counsel
children at nature camp
Kids use creativity to
build mock habitats
I.kAwk Johnson
spa ik wki i !�:�
Bugs, bugs and more bugs. This is
what the children participating in the
Nature Discovery camps at the
Student Recreation Center are experi-
encing.
The camps are a week long, and
consist of forty participants that
come in half day intervals, with each
session having around 20 kids.
The first session each day is from
9 a.m. until noon, and the second
session is from 1 p.m. until 4 p.m.
These camps are sponsored by
the Adventures Program, and are
conducted by ECU students�
Virginia Walser, Jon Brandey and
Johnny Harris Jr
According to one of the counselors,
there was one camp held last week,
and the second began Monday and
will end Friday.
"The camps are going great for the
first week and a half said Steve
Bobbin, Adventure Programs director.
The first nature discovery camp is
"Plants, Bugs and Slugs
During this camp the kids teamed
how plants, bugs a"d slugs worked
together in nature. The counselors
took the kids on walks through ECU's
campus looking for different kinds of
bugs and plants.
As a farewell to the kids they took
the children to River Park North to go
on another nature walk and to see a
museum there.
The second nature discovery camp
is called "Crazy Animals" During this
camp the counselors teach the kids
about animal habitats and the different
kinds of food that animals eat
They are also teaching the kids
about the food chain and the place-
ment of different animals on the food
chain.
The counselors said this camp will
also be going on a nature walk to view
the different animals that are around
the ECU campus. They made binoc-
ulars with two paper cups strung
together, and collected rocks, leaves
and sticks to build mock habitats.
Friday they will be taking a field
trip to River Park North to go on
another nature walk.
"Its fun working with the kids, and
they seem to be having fun too
Brandey said.
"It's great to spend time working
with the kids and teaching them about
nature Harris said.
The Student Recreation Center
will be holding other camps as well
throughout the summer for other age
groups.
US Cellular
mummied from page 1
"I am not happy about the deci-
sion Lambertsen said. "I think it
was ridiculous to make a communica-
I lions center and then shut it down
The U.S. Cellular
I Communications Center was a
place of employment while some
twerc finishing school.
Criminal Justice and Computer
Science major, Tony Anderson said
he has been working with the com-
pany for eight months, but feels it
was a good experience for him.
�.
"It's a shock, but good experi-
ence Anderson said. "This is how
the business market works and it
only helps to prepare me for the
business world
U.S. Cellular is offering sever-
ance pay for employees that have
been working for the company for
more than six months. They are
also offering a pay-to-stay bonus for
those that stay with the company
until August 15.
For those that decide to move
with the company to one of it's other
locations, they are promised they
will receive a position, and will also
be compensated for the move.
acjQ-S s
campuses
Louisiana State University-
Controversy already surrounds the
latest proposal by Barnes and Noble
to privatize the Louisiana State
University Union Bookstore.
The plan offered up by the nation-
al-chain book retailer, which includes
either razing or altering at least one
building on the National Register of
Historic Places, is not finalized,
according to Union Director Shirley
Plakidas.
But that has not stopped the
Foundation for Historical Louisiana
from voicing its opposition.
Standing in the way of the Barnes
and Noble proposal is the historical
value of the LSU Honors Center,
which was originally the Old
President's Home, Plakidas said.
The building was one of the first
constructed on the present campus
and was the original residence of the
University's president.
Despite all the controversy sur-
rounding the proposal, no definite
plans have been submitted and
Barnes and Noble does not have a
contract with the University.
The original proposal submitted
to the University by Barnes and
Noble included three distinct possi-
bilities, Plakidas said.
The first would be to renovate the
current space occupied by the Union
bookstore, and building an addition
to the back of the Union on top of the
current parking lot was the second
option.
University officials turned down
the third option which placed a free-
standing structure across the parade
grounds from the Union in front of
Pleasant Hall.
University of Florida-Two
years ago, the prospect of a Student
Government career made Jocclyn
Moore wrinkle her nose in dismissal.
"No way University of Florida's
student body vice president told
Dean of Students Julie Sina in Fall
1997.
Moore had heard war stories like
that of Anita Williams, an enthusiastic
young woman active in the Black
Student Union and Black History
Month.
A little more than a year ago,
Williams - flashing the infectious
smile her friends know so well - told
SGP leaders she liked the entertain-
ment industry and wanted to help.
The cold response made her
reconsider.
"I didn't really know who they
were, and they weren't really recep-
tive to who I was recalled Williams.
"I basically ended my involvement
right there. They didn't want me
Today, Williams and Moore are on
the other side, urging students, espe-
cially those from diverse back-
grounds, to join SG. They are trying
to change the long-standing tradition
of minority students' exclusion - be it
real or perceived - from SG.
They are tired of minorities leav-
ing Senate meetings, wondering why
most faces are white.
Stuff like Student Senate, or one
of SG's 35 cabinets, or SGP or Accent
- SG's speakers bureau.
Stuff like the Coalition on
Minority Affairs, convening for the
first time later this summer.
Its purpose: to "make SG account-
able for the affairs of minorities
Moore said.
The coalition will collect data on
how SG's minority population com-
pares to that within UF's student
population, about 8 percent of which
is African American and 10 percent of
which is Hispanic, according to the
latest figures from 1997.
Iowa State University-After run-
ning molecular tests on the world-
renowned cloned sheep, Dolly,
researchers from the Scottish Roslin
Institute found that although Dolly is
only three years old, her cells are nine
years old.
Dolly was cloned from a 6-year-old
ewe in 1996, and since then, scientists
at Iowa State have been closely fol-
lowing the research.
Eric Henderson, professor of zool-
ogy and genetics, said new develop-
ments in cloning are important to
future research.
"It is really not trivial research he
said. "This kind of research has been
done before on frogs. This is the first
of its kind done on mammal cloning
According to a Washington Post
article in May, some scientists theo-
rize Dolly will die at an early age
because her telomcres, genetic mate-
rial that shortens as the cells divide
and the animal ages, are shortening
more rapidly than a normal sheep's
telomeres.
"I believe that this was a techno-
logical challenge but not a new scien-
tific breakthrough Henderson said.
'The experiment came long after the
theories, and this only confirms
them
The study suggests dividing a cell
to form an embryo does not rebuild
the telomere when the cell divides,
therefore causing the cloned animal
to age prematurely.
Chris Tuggle, associate professor
in animal science, said he is unsure
about Dolly's chances of living an
average lifespan.
TTTTeTSr
Wednesday, June 16
The Real Crisis Center will be holding a talk about rape prevention at
Barnes and Noble. The session will begin at 7:30 p.m. and will feature
educated officials.
Thursday, June 17
The feature movie of the week is "You've Got Mail" featuring Tom
Hanks and Meg Ryan. The movie begins at 9 p.m. outside of Mendenhall.
Dinner will be served prior to the movie.
The East Carolinian
Brasswood
� Quiet Neighborhood
�1 Bedroom $300
�2 Bedroom $360
� WasherDryer Hookups
�Ceiling Fan
� Free WaterSewer
�Small Pet with fee
� Near Malls & restaurants
� furnished unit for
corporate leasing available
� Office on site
3216 Brasswood Court 1
Phone 252-355-4499 � Fax 252-355-1554
brasswood@greenvillenc.com
Brown & Brown
TVuthJEqualltyJustice
102B East. Victoria Ct.
Bedford Park, Greenville
RNKYS AT LAW
�Speeding Tickets
�Driving While Impaired
�Under Age Possession
�Possession of DrugsParaphenalia
�Drinking in Public
�Felonies and Misdemeanors
�Free Consultation
Phone 752-0952 752-0753
e-mail - ghb.greenvillenc.com
Get P�erC
eyebrow,
earcaptila9�'
navels5
to�
WewillbeAtany
competitor's advertised
prices!
Largo selection of imported
And domestic jewelry!
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body pierdag only
� We ere Greenville's only hearth
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� We nave beta � business ever 8
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Tuesday-iTiuRsday: 1-9 p.mFriiAy: 1-10 p.rru; Saturday: 12-10 p.m.
CALL US! 756-0600
NO APPOINTMENT NECESSARY
TATTOOING BY AWARD WINNING ARTISTS!
From downtown, go straight down Dickinson Avenue
Extension, located at 4685 US Hwy. 13, Greenville.
You drank.
You danced.
Youhadset)
ryissi3
Free Pregnancy Tests
Call Carolina Pregnancy Center 757-0003
209-B South Evaiis Street (downtown near Courthouse)
Aqua Theatre
Thursday, June 17th
9:00 p.m.
Outdoor Pool - SRC
"THE BEST ROMANTIC
COMEDY OF THE YEAR
Tom Hanks MeaRyan
"The Most Romantic Couple of the '90s
ScojjsAaajn
"A Fresh. Funny, Heartfelt Comedy-
You Never Want It to End
"See It With Someone
You Love
You've Got Mail Rated fg
Kathleen Kelly, owner of a little and famous
bookstore for childrerfs books, has an affair.
Being together with Prank Navasky, a well-
known journalist, she betrays him by e-
mailing secretly and anonymously with a
(also betraying) man whom she met in a
chat room. Suddenly, her business gets
endangered by the opening of Fox Books
discount store just "around the comer She
meets Joe Fox, son of the owner, and soon
gets annoyed by his arrogant way of man-
aging business matters. Although getting
advice by her anonymous mail-pal, she has
to close down her store. But Joe Fox's life
suddenly gets out of control when he learns
that his anonymous mail-pal is nobody
other than Kathleen Kelly.
For a good time call The Student Union
Hotline 8 262.328.6004 or visit our
website @ www.ecu.eduitudentunion '
The Em Cirolinln
I

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deals with thing
sure people we
and substance i
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ourvicw
While enjoying a cigar,
cigar smokers should
often take into considera-
tion the preferences of
others in the room.
Cigars have become one of the trend iest fads on the market today,
whether for smoking or other extracurricular activities.
Many magazines, CDs and even dinnerware, now have a
detailed styled inspired by cigars. Today cigar smoking is at an all-
time high, even spreading its influence to smokers who normally
smoke only cigarettes. Lately it appears as if this craze has replaced
good reason and stopped people from paying attention to the dan-
gers that smoking can present.
While lighting up a cigar may not be as bad for you as cigarettes,
there are still many risks which should be taken into account.
Smokers and manufacturers alike clearly point out that the
strength of a cigar could be dangerous if inhaled because they were
not designed for that purpose. However, some smoke from the
cigar will inevitably be drawn into the lungs rendering this experi-
ence a hazardous one.
While enjoying a cigar, smokers should take into consideration
the preferences of others in the room. Many may love the soothing
aroma of a stogie, but at the same time others around them might
not be as delighted by that lingering scent which clouds up the air
far worse than one cigarette. This problem causes concern for those
who do not wish to be around the second-hand smoke that results
from smokers of any kind.
We feel that while many may enjoy this trend, they should act
responsibly and take into account the risks about when and where
they choose to indulge. Cigar smoking, like any type of smoking,
should be enjoyed in the company of others who also like it, the
privacy of one's own home or in a bar specially designated for cigar
use -not in a crowded restaurant or club where many around may
gag at the scent. Remember these people are out just like you try-
ing to have a good time, they did not ask to inhale toxic fumes
which are considerably more dangerous to the second-hand smok-
er than to the person who originally lit up.
It may be no one's business if someone chooses to smoke in
their own homes or other private places, but once these acts are
brought out among crowds it becomes an issue among others who
have to put up with the smoke and the health risks.
OPINION
DEMOSTHENES
Laws impose silly restraints
agree that seat belts are a
good idea and that they save
lives and protect against
injury. What I do not agree
with is that we must wear one
under penalty of law.
The government's job, on any
level, is administration and organi-
zation. As soon as this assemblage
of administrators, which make up
government, takes it on to itself to
try to control the behaviors outside
of these areas, it is overstepping its
bounds.
Mostly, two kinds of laws bother
me: "for your own good" laws, and
laws which try to conform people to
a majority norm. The former kind
deals with things such as making
sure people wear their seat belts
and substance control, while the
later type attempts to keep people
living inside some sort of set "moral
boundary
An example of this type of law
are the sexual practice laws in
North Carolina and in many other
states which decree that oral sex
and anal sex are illegal. When I first
heard this one, I could not believe
my ears, but it gets better. I under-
stand that a couple must have
intercourse in the missionary posi-
tion which would outlaw all other
positions including women on top.
I will not even start on laws against
other sexual orientations.
Ridiculous.
Another such law deals with the
number of females living in a house
together. If this number exceeds
four, then legally, the house is con-
sidered to be a place of prostitution.
It makes me sad to think that the
next time I want to go visit my
friends at 1107, I'll have to leave a
tip.
I agree that seat belts are a good
idea and that they save lives and
protect against injury. What I do
not agree with is that we must wear
one under penalty of law.
Also, I can not understand what
the idea behind substance control
is. People are going to get inebriat-
ed; this is a basic biological fact. If
you take away their ability to do so
under relaxed and orderly circum-
stances two things will happen.
First they will have to find other
ways to play with their brain and I
can guarantee these methods are
not very sound. How many of you
sniffed glue when you were
younger, and what was the big deal
with magic markers? I missed that
one.
The second effect of strict sub-
stance control is a magnification
effect on consumption. People will
tend to use more of a substance
because they think they are being
"bad Binging on anything is defi-
nitely the wrong way to do it.
The only solution to this dilem-
ma is to have loose control over
substances and to supplement pun-
ishment with education. An open
and honest educational policy start-
ing at birth regarding substances
would create a safe and relaxed
atmosphere for people, and it
would allow them to make sound
decisions about what they really
want.
Think about what laws govern
your lives and if many of them are
really necessary. Take care and be
free, until we meet again.
OPINION
SCOTT
WILKINS
Tired of clock watching
Try to avoid looking at that
clock and just go forth hold
and carefree -� oblivious to
the infernal hands of rime.
Tick 'lock. 1 low slowly move the
hands of the clock. We wait, we
watch, we wonder � will it ever be
time to go? It seems we are watch-
ing a clock always.
As we sit in stalled traffic on
Greenville Boulevard, late for work
and irritable, we anxiously watch the
clock in our car. One minute late.
Two, Threc.soon it's five and ten
minutes late. Thanks, Greenville
traffic. As we watch the clock in our
car, we play the scenario in our
mindthe scowling boss wondering
why we are late for work.
Once we get to work we watch
the clock. Oh the agony! I could be
home watching Behind the Music
on VIII! I could be lounging by the
pool in my apartment complex or
even working on that assignment
due for my summer school class.
Speaking of summer school, there is
another clock to be reckoned with
as the professor drones and the sec-
onds slowly tick by.
Even when I am working out on
the stair climber, which I made
famous last week, I watch the
timer, wondering when my twenty-
five minutes will be up and I can
march to Wendy's for my usual cel-
ebratory frosty. (Yes, I do plan to
work in the frosty every week)
My short and sweet point is this:
we spend too much time watching
the clock. The other day I recog-
nized how much clock watching 1 do
and how useless it is. Watching the
clock doesn't make the time go by
any faster. It's a waste of time and
energy. Yes, sometimes watching
the clock is unavoidable, it is part of
life. Yet whenever possible, try to
avoid looking at that clock and just
go forth bold and carefree � oblivi-
ous to the infernal hands of time.
OPINION
SUSAN
WRIGHT
Paying too much to live
Sometimes I swear that a dol-
lar bill has wings because of
the way it flies from my wallet.
You have worked hard for twenty
hours this week, and you think that
maybe you beat your all time record
of hamburgers flipped in a clay
sometime last Saturday night. Now,
it is paycheck time. The boss smiles,
and he hands you a check for $100.
He says, "You've earned it
It's Saturday night, and you have
$100 to burn. What do you spend it
on? New shoes at $98.99 a pair, an
outfit from American Eagle that
conies to $89 or maybe you'll take
two of your best friends out to din-
ner at Lone Star. Any way you
spend it, the money goes fast. As a
college student. 1 am amazed at
how fast the money flies.
Sometimes I swear that a dollar
bill has wings because of the way it
flies from my wallet. Once you
break a twenty, you might as well
consider that $20 gone. Oh, I have
fifteen dollars, I can afford some
new shampoo and a toothbrush.
Well, I have ten dollars, I can afford
a Big Mac meal. Well, I only have
four dollars left, but I really need to
eat. Goodness, I am hungry, and
there the money goes.
Not only are there everyday
expenses, but there are also those
darn bills. I swear that I didn't talk
to by best friend in the mountains
for an hour and half last night.
Nobody has ever talked on the
telephone for that long! How can
two people have thirteen dollars
worth of stuff to say to each other?
Electricity is a whole other matter.
Why must I use so much power?
Some day, I think that I will go
without using electric lights. Sun
by day, candle by night; that's the
life for me!
Well, after extensive thought
and study, I decided that the cost of
good living is just too expensive. '
For now, I would advise buying
stock in candle wax. Until the glo-
rious day of graduation, I get the
feeling that I will be using more
than my fair share!
Write a letter to the editor
Got Something to say? Bring your letter to the
east Carolinian office located on the second floor
of the Student Publications Building
:
m
mm






4wedru�diy, Jum IB, 1999
features
The East Carolinian
Shag me
baby, yeah!
'Bratscri a.k.a Dr.
Evil was the $200
winner of the Austin
Powers look-alike
contest at PB's.
PHOTO BY CORY SHEELEB
Radio Station 99X hosted
Austin Powers party at Panfana Bob's
i
CORY SlIKKI.K K
IT Aft WD ITHI
Yeah baby, yeah! Austin Powers mania is sweeping the country,
and the public is eating it up in droves.
Mike Myers' brainchild, Austin Powers, stars in his second
film The Spy Who Shagged Me. The movie couldn't come soon
enough for many Greenville residents, and people are getting
randy, baby!
The radio station 99X WXNR threw a party in the movie's
honor at Pantana Bob's on Friday, and even gave away free tick-
ets to some of their lucky listeners so they would not be disap-
pointed by sold-out screenings of the movie.
"We gave away 99 tickets for the 7:30 show on the opening
night said Jeff "The Sandblaster" Sanders, 99X disc jockey.
"We're also having an after-movie party at P.Bs, and giving
away cash prizes for people with the best costumes representing
their favorite Austin Powers character
A $200 prize was given to a man who was known only as "Dr.
Evil for his portrayal of Mike Myers's evil character in the
movie. 99X also broadcasted live from P.Bs throughout the
night, and had many other giveaways and games.
"I was sick of hearing about Star Wars all summer Sanders
said.
"It was time to do something a little bit different
Different was exactly how the movie did at the theater all
weekend. In the first Austin Powers installment, International
man of Mystery, most of its followers saw the movie via video in
the more than 3 million copies that it sold world-wide. This time,
however, The Spy Who Shagged Me knocked The Phantom Menace
from atop the box office, by pulling in $54 million this weekend
alone.
So. .what is it about this slapstick, pop-culture-laden comedy
that has people so excited? Many students think that it is Myers
himself.
"Mike Myers is one of the funniest comedians in the
business today said Kevin Johnson, senior. "The
more times you see his movies, the funnier
they get because you're always picking
upon something you missed the first
time
Johnson also noted the Phantom
Menace syndrome that many peo-
ple have been feeling this sum-
mer.
"This movie actually man-
aged to take attention away from
The Phantom Menace. I'm tired of
hearing about that movie
Some moviegoers thought that
the most recent installment of
Powers was good, but it couldn't
compare to the original movie.
"The first film was better said Mike
Alberghini, senior.
"It's hard to build on a sequel; they had to revert
to a lot of jokes from the first
movie
However, popular
opinion seems to be
that Austin
Powers is here
to stay in the
'90's and
maybe even
into the
next millen-
nium.
"I hope
they make a
third movie
Alberghini
said.
"They're all
worth seeing over
and over again

Ifs
Mini-
me & Fat
Bastard stole the
show.
-Matt Gullo. senior.

the best movie
of the summer
so far.
-Jimmy Carver,
freshman
??
the
second time
I saw it, (
laughed even
harder
-Taylor Jones, sopho-
more
Austin Powers
look-alike Jason
Cone sets shaeadelic
with groovy babies.
PHOTO BV BILL KEITH
Cigar smokers encouraged
by new bars in Greenville
Gary Parsons, assistant manager at Onix. fires up a cigar in his downtown Greenville store.
PHOTO BY BILL KEITH
New fad supported
by specialized areas
Kkvin BkITION
.Hlu w Ml I t:n
Cigars have long been a sign of sta-
tus and wealth, but within the last
few years this habit has moved into
the mainstream.
Due, in part, to megastars such
as Arnold Schwarzenegger and
Demi Moore who smoke the big
stogies in public, cigar smoking has
now become more of a fashion
statement.
Ham's Brew House and Mesh
Cafe arc two of Greenville's newest
eating establishments that feature
"cigar bars
"We just turned our cigar bar
private said Mel Perez, Mesh
owner.
"We don't currently have any
college students who are mem-
bers Perez estimates that around
40 percent of his total clientele are
college students.
"Maybe 20 percent of the peo-
ple who use our cigar bar are stu-
dents said Brandon Clark, a floor
manager at Ham's.
"Almost everyone who comes
up to play darts has a cigar
However, Clark feels that most
of the students who purchase cigars
at Ham's are one-timers or people
who rarely smoke.
Now, cigar smokers are starting
younger and becoming more
numerous. One study of high
school students reported that 26.7
percent of U.S. students had
SEE CIGARS PAGE 5
Downtown tries to recover
after losing its usual crowd
Establishment adjust
to slower business
Com Siik K 1.1: h
S I I I H I I I H
It's 10 at night on a Friday, and
you're ready to go downtown. I lold
on just a minute. Where arc all of
the people? Where arc all of the
lines? Like most people, you've
noticed that the Greenville night
life changes in the summer.
The downtown establishments
are noticeably less crowded in the
summer. Greenville is home only
to those who are taking summers
classes and those who choose to
stay and work.
"The weekends are when we
usually notice the biggest drop-
off said Derek Helmik, co-owner
of Boli's restaurant.
"It's probably due to people
going out of town or going to the
beach for the weekend
While Boli's may have a lull in
business over the weekend, that is
not the case Tuesday nights at the
Fifth Street pizzeria. They have
live music and bar specials every
SEE DOWNTOWN PAGE !i
Austin Powers offers shagadelic fun
7 I L L. ' "That's what makes him
Yeah Oaby, JUSt (Myers) so awesome said Mike
. n jit Thorsby, junior. "He can make you
jOfget abOUt Otar WarS laugh so many different ways
Pa a Mi II k dk icks
SKNIUH RITKR
Are you ready to laugh, baby? If
you make the wise decision to see
Austin Powers The Spy Who Shagged
Me, you had better come prepared
for side splitting laughter and non-
stop antics.
At a nearly sold out opening day
crowd, almost all in attendance
were chuckling non stop.
"I just couldn't stop laughing
said Timmy Baize, senior.
"It was simply hilarious
Mike Myers shows off his acting
abilities playing several roles
including the villains Dr. Evil and
Fat Bastard as well as the title role.
Michael Myers plays Dr. Evil in Austin
Powers The Spy Who Shagged Me.
PHOTO COURTESY OF WORLD WIDE WEB
The humor in the movie is not
purely slapstick comedy. Some of
the laughs came from sophisticat-
ed, well thought out humor. The
blend of the two styles keeps you
laughing for hours.
"I was laughing after it ended,
even on the way home said Cory
Phoenix, senior.
Austin Powers, like the rest of
the world, has been prepared for the
Star Wars hype for the entire sum-
mer. The ads for the movie quote,
"If you see one movie this summer,
see Star Wars. But if you see two,
see Austin Powers The Spy Who
Shagged Me. Many actually think
that this movie will take over the
Phantom Menace's reign at the num-
ber one box office position.
If you enjoyed the first movie,
this one is an absolute must see.
Hey guys, Heather Graham looks
absolutely unbelievable in this
flick, and for you ladies, uhthere-
is a cute little midget. No really, it
is a hysterical movie that shouldn't
be missed. Don't forget to be pre-
pared to laugh, baby.
5 Wednesday, Jun
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Cigars
continued from page 4
smoked at least one cigar.
Although any high school tobacco
use is worrisome, there are no stud-
ies suggesting that these students
continue to smoke cigars on a regu-
lar basis. Although nicotine is high-
ly addictive, there are no studies
suggesting cigars are addictive.
On the other end of the scale,
there are restaurants around
Greenville that have banned cigar
smoking. O'Cool's is one of these.
The owners of such establishments
feel that cigar smoke is disturbing
to customers who may still be eat-
ing.
"There were more college stu-
dents buying cigars a few years
back said Rocky Deem, the assis-
tant manager of Onyx Fine
Tobacco. Onyx has been in
Greenville for three yean, and
Deem has been assistant manager
for two.
"Our customers are mostly
"males 20-40 young professionals.
If a woman comes in, she's usually
buying for a man According to
Deem there are a few female cigar
smokers, but they tend to smoke
smaller, cigarette type cigars.
Cigar smoking has been fash-
ionable for a few years now, and
most of the trend jumpers have
moved on. However, the diehards
who really enjoy their smoke may
be here for a while.
Visit www.cigargroup.com for
the most comprehensive internet
site about cigars and their health
risks.





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BULLET VOllS
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. Touch Of Class'
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aal�i5Mil�Wrtof&�nTai.o0!MAJL(Bdik1l.M�idkSmkoltLi�)
��A









Downtown
continued from page 4
Tuesday, and they have an enor-
mous crowd there to enjoy the
atmosphere and the deals.
According to sophomore Matt
Noe, the bars that he frequents
downtown are not as crowded as
they usually are during the fall and
spring semesters.
"O'Malley's and Corrigan's
have an average crowd on the
weekend Noe said, "but they're
definitely not as crowded during
the week as they usually are
While O'Malley's and Wrong
Way Corrigan's have only an aver-
age crowd on the weekend.
Manager Mark Fercll does not
seem to notice a decline in busi-
ness.
"It's a drop in the summer
Ferell said, "but it's not a notice-
able one money wise
Wrong Way Corrigan's is experi-
encing some renovations currently,
and Noe thinks that any change
will attract a crowd.
"I think people will want to
check anything out that's differ-
ent Noe said.
If something different is what
you crave, Ham's restaurant is still
relatively new to to the Greenville
night life scene. They are also run-
ning several bar specials this sum-
mer, along with live entertainment
"We have live bands every
Wednesday night on the patio
said Sara Fogel, a Ham's employee.
"We also have Super Sundays,
Mexican Mondays and Tropical
Tuesdays, which are bar specials
that we will be running throughout
the summer
Super Sundays offer discounts
on domestic beers and pitchers,
Mexican Mondays offer discounts
on Mexican beers and margaritas
and Tropical Tuesdays offer dis-
counts on smoothies and tropical
drinks. Other bars such as Hooray
Harry's, the Elbo, Pantana Bob's
and The Sports Pad Complex also
run weekend specials, all with the
intent of bringing the life back into
the Greenville night life.
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then follow directions above.
32
Ik
3
�M





Tki Etit Ciroliniin
sports
Wednesday, June 16, 1889 6
If you build it fans will come
PirateBaseball'may
build new field of dreams
CORV SlIKKI.KR
STAFF IIITKI
After a much heralded season, there is a possibility
that the Pirate baseball team may be getting a new or
upgraded facility in the near future.
According to Jerry Trickie, assistant sports infor-
mation director, any project to improve or replace
Harrington Field will not be started until ECU's new
strength and conditioning center is complete.
"It will be about two to three years before the
strength and conditioning center is finished Trickie
said.
While a panel of ECU officials will make the deci-
sion, Athletic Director, Mike Hamrick, has a consid-
erable amount of input in the decision. While
Hamrick was unavailable for comment, Trickie con-
firmed that a project to improve the team's facilities
is something the Athletic Department would like to
particinate in.
"It's hoped that down the road something will be
done to improve it (Harrington Field), and maybe
build something new, but there's nothing concrete
right now Trickie said.
Any project to build or improve upon any of
ECU's sports facilities is usually financed in some
part by the Pirate Club. According to the Executive
Director of The Pirate Club, Dennis Young, a lot of
the responsibility of raising money for such a project
would be placed on the Pirate Club.
"Most, if not all, of the funding would have to
come from the private sector Young said. "I'm
assuming that the next fund raising campaign would
involve raising money for such a project
The Pirates' season was capped off with a trip to
the finals of the Southern Regional, as well as a
national ranking throughout much of the year ending
at 19th in the nation.
Young also said that there are some plans being
made to at least upgrade Harrington Field.
"The baseball team this year has called attention
to the program Young said. "In the master plan,
there are some plans to upgrade the facility
Harrington Field, which was dedicated to the
school on May 9, 1971, has been renovated several
times throughout it's long history. .Most notably, a
new light system was installed so the Pirate's could
play night games, which in turn increased attendance
at home games. However, the maximum seating
capacity is still only 2,500 people. Harrington Field's
highest attendance record was set when 3,000 fans
came out to see the ECU vs. N.C. State game in
1993, which is sparse in comparison to other stadium's
attendance records. For instance, University of
Miami's Mark Light Stadium, has a seating capacity
of over 4,200 people, which allows Miami fans to pack
into their stadium every night, and cheer
their school on to victory. While the
Pirates did walk out of Mark Light
Stadium with a win this year, they were
not able to obtain the same results in
Alex Box Stadium against Louisiana
State University in this year's regional
final. LSI! played in front of a sell-out
crowd of over 7,000 people, which is
something the Pirates simply cannot do
at Harrington Field.
"If the Pirates want the national
recognition they deserve, they have to
play in a facility that is comparable to
HMMMMHNMRMi
Baseball brings the hope of improved facilities
PHOTO BV ROBIN VUCHNICH
Updated facilities coming soon to ECU
PHOTO BY ROBIN VUCHNICH
Jfc



� & r
Orioles select
Salargo in 20th round
Salargo named second
team All-American
Frank II kndricks
HKNIIIR IIITKH
The Baltimore Orioles selected
Pirate outfielder, Steve Salargo,
with the 607th overall pick of this
month's draft.
The Wilson, N.C. native set
ECU's career records in hits (301)
and led the Pirates to a Colonial
Championship as well as an NCAA
birth, where the Pirates were even-
tually beaten by Louisiana State
University.
Salargo set numerous single sea-
son records this season including
games played (62), at bats (244),
doubles (20), RBI (77), and runs
scored (70). He also finished one hit
(97) and one total base (167) away
from those records, held by Pirate
great Pat Watkins.
Along with his hits record,
Salargo set career records for games
played (223), at bats (862), doubles
(54) and runs scored (198).
This year, Salargo finished with
base hits in 49 of 62 games. He had
a 13 game hitting streak which was
the highest among all the Pirates.
Salargo also had 27 multiple hit
games including six four hit games.
Salargo had multiple RBI's in 23
games including one in which he
drove in five.
Throughout Salargo's career, he
started and played every game, set-
Clayton earns
All-American honors
Ninth place finish
ensures another title
Frank II knd ricks
SKSIOR WRITER
On Wednesday, June 2, Michele
Clayton became the third East
Carolina women's track performer
in history to earn All-America hon-
ors when she finished 9th in the
hammer throw at the NCAA
Championships in Boise, Idaho.
Clayton's second throw of 189
feet, 11 inches was her best of six
throws on the day and enabled her
to finish 6th among American
women. Clayton had been waiting
for this day as long as she can
Michele Clayton
FILE PHOTO
remember.
"At the beginning of the season,
the one thing I hadn't accomplished
was being named All-America
Clayton said.
" I am excited to have reached
that goal, but 1 feel I could have
thrown better
Clayton's career best throw is
194 feet, 3 inches, but the Idaho
weather kept that from being dupli-
cated.
The hammer throw was split
into two flights of eleven partici-
pants. Each athlete got three
attempts for the first round, and the
top nine advanced to round two for
three more throws. The top eight
Americans were given All-America
honors.
"After her second throw, she was
in second place said Choo Justice,
head coach for women's track and
field.
By the end of the first flight,
Clayton was in fifth. In the second
SEE CLAYTON PAGE 7
Senior Stove Salargo flatted every game for the Pirates in his last season.
FILE PHOTO
ting a school record for consecutive
games played at 223.
After one of ECU's best individ-
ual single season performances in
history and arguably the most out-
standing career of any Pirate ever,
Salargo was rewarded by being
named a second-team All-American
by the National Collegiate Baseball
Writers Association.
SEE SALAHB0 PAGE 7
Coaches nominate favorite athletes
Students encouraged to
participate in selection
I'KTKR IJAWYOT
SPORTS KI1ITOR
After a strong season for many of
ECU's athletic programs, coaches
are given the chance to nominate a
standout athlete of the year. The
athlete that the coach nominates
I cannot be on their team.
Nominees are selected for their
outstanding achievements and con-
tributions to the team on and off
the field.
Steve Logan, head football
coach, was among the many who
were impressed with the athletic
talents of Michelle Clayton, a ham-
mer thrower for women's track and
field. Logan saw Clayton as a strong
competitor on and off the field, call-
ing her a 4.0 student athlete.
"She is the real deal all around,
student, athlete, everything. She is
what I wish every student athlete
were, football, baseball, all of
them Logan said.
Associate Athletic Director
Henry VanSant also saw strong
promise in Clayton. " She
(Clayton) was an All American in
track and field. No one else has
achieved that status at ECU
VanSant said.
"She is one of the top finishers
in the country
Due to its extraordinarily suc-
cessful season, the Pirates baseball
SEE ATHLETES PAGE 7
7 Wednesday, J
Ross
Coursed
by man
PINEHURS1
99th U.S. Ope
to Donald Ros
to what has b
test of golf.
Of the rout.
Ross designed
was always his
first nine hole:
of North
Carolina in
course in 1907
last 41 years of
feet it.
Clearly, Pi
stood the test i
Sand green
grass in 1935,
won the PGA
next year. Bei
first professior
the 1940 Non
The United S
Cup there in
the best golfer
Paul Azinj
Championship
What Pine!
when the
Thursday is an
happiness and
The hollow
that serve as
any ball that si
est bit offline i
called a joyf
Scottish course
learned the gai
According t
give the green
larity, posing
thing to think
? R
�f r





16, 1999 6
e
7 Wednesday, June 16. 1999
sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Ross legacy found at Pinehurst No.2
Course designer feared
by many pro golfers
PINEHURST, N.C. (AP)The
99th U.S. Open is as much a tribute
to Donald Ross as it is a testament
to what has become the toughest
test of golf.
Of the roughly 400 golf courses
Ross designed, No. 2 at Pinehurst
was always his pet. He shaped the
first nine holes from the sand hills
of North
Carolina in 1901, completed the
course in 1907 and then spent the
last 41 years of his life trying to per-
fect it.
Clearly, Pinehurst No. 2 has
stood the test of time.
Sand greens were replaced by
grass in 1935, and Denny Shute
won the PGA Championship the
next year. Ben Hogan earned his
first professional victory at No. 2,
the 1940 North and South Open.
The United States won the Ryder
Cup there in 1951. The last time
the best golfers set foot on No. 2,
Paul Azinger won the Tour
Championship in 1992.
What Pinehurst is likely to bring
when the U.S. Open starts
Thursday is an agonizing balance of
happiness and trouble.
The hollows around the greens
that serve as a collection area for
any ball that strays even the slight-
est bit offline came from what Ross
called a joyful memory of the
Scottish courses where he lived and
learned the game.
According to Ross, such hollows
give the green "a charming irregu-
larity, posing to the player some-
thing to think about, and making
him use care in handling recovery
strokes Oh, they have something
to think about, all right.
Payne Stewart thought so much
about it that he pulled nine clubs
from his bag during a practice
round on Sunday, from a mid-iron
all the way through the bag to his
wedges and putter. Tiger Woods,
Lee Westwood and others went the
opposite direction, preferring to use
a 3-wood or 5-wood to roll the ball
up toward the pin.
Ross didn't have that many
options when he was playing - he
tied for fifth in the 1903 U.S. Open
- since he never carried more than
six clubs in his bag.
The bunkers, such as the deep
pit down the right side of the 18th
fairway, were designed to give the
best players in the world one last
thing to consider before they pull
the trigger on a drive that could
ultimately determine the champi-
onship.
"I have evidence in my work at
Pinehurst that a course blinkered
fairly and scientifically is the most
attractive Ross once wrote.
"There is no such thing as a mis-
placed bunker. Regardless of where
a bunker may be, it is the business
of a player to avoid it
His comments can be found in a
book titled, "Golf Has Never
Failed Me containing the lost
commentaries of one of golfs great-
est architects.
Ross never fancied himself as a
writer.
Then again, he never had
designs on becoming an architect.
A carpenter by trade, his golf
club in Dornoch wanted a profes-
sional, which in those days meant
someone to build clubs and give
lessons. Ross trained under Old
Tom Morris at St Andrews, spent
another year at Carnoustie and took
the job at Dornoch in 1893.
He also became the greenskeep-
er, a task he deplored at the time.
"What I really did was to go out
in overalls and get down on my
hands and knees, and care for the
turf and the bunkers and the
greens he wrote.
"And how I used to hate it. But,
as it turned out, that was the best
training I could have had for what
turned out to be my future
The future unfolded when a
Harvard professor, Robert Willson,
played Dornoch and encouraged
Ross to come to America, where he
felt the game was ready to take
hold. Ross arrived in Boston in
1899, and was hired away by James
Tufts, who had dreams of a golfing
mecca in the pine barrens of North
Carolina.
Ninety-two years later, after it
first was completed, Pinehurst No.
2 will finally stage what is tradition-
ally the toughest major champi-
onship of them all.
Rain may have an impact on
scoring, but it won't significantly
alter the character of Ross' favorite
design, the first course he built
from scratch.
"I am firmly of the opinion that
the leading professionals and
golfers of every caliber, for many
years to come, will find in the No. 2
course the fairest yet most exacting
test of their game he once wrote.
Great trouble will present itself
across the bumps and mounds, in
the pits and bunkers and through
the contoured, humpback greens.
Happiness usually comes only to
one man in a U.S. Open, but some-
where, Ross will surely be smiling.
Athletes
continued Irom page 6
team has three nominees voted for
by different coaches.
Devin O'Neil, head coach of the
men's soccer team, liked the chem-
istry between pitcher Foye Minton
and the ECU baseball team.
Minton tossed a rare no-hitter early
in the season against a formidable
N.C. State team.
"Foye was instrumental in early
wins, after he was hurt it really
affected the team during the tour-
nament O'Neil said.
Other athletes, such as "Iso"
Polonius, the third baseman for
ECU's softball team, were also
among the outstanding athletes of
the year nominations. Leonard
Klepack, men's track coach, liked
the skills which have been shown by
Iso in her senior year at ECU.
Klepack felt that Polonius was well
balanced lxth in the field and at the
plate.
"She was a central figure with the
team and had a good year, she is well
balanced on both sides and strong in
her position Klepack said.
Polonius currently holds almost
Athlete of the Year
Nominees
Name
Michelle Clayton
Foye Minton
"Iso" Polonius
Chad Tracy
Steve Salargo
Grade
Sport
Senior Women's Track & Field
Sophomore Baseball
Senior Softball
Freshman Baseball
Senior Baseball
place your vote at www.studentmedia.ecu.edusportssurvey
every hitting record in the ECU
softball program. She is currently
first in career home runs, beating
her own record from last year, as
well as having a top batting average
for the season.
Chad Tracy is the only freshman
nominated. The first year standout
for ECU's baseball program is
among the selected for athlete of
the year because of his ability to
help the team through the season.
Dee Gibson, softball head coach,
found him to be a strong pace setter
for the team.
"(Tracy) helped the team have a
good year and will be back with
most of the other players for a good
year next year Gibson said.
Along with others from the base-
ball team, standout Steve Salargo
was also nominated for his excep-
tional year. Salargo, a senior, set
numerous records in the CAA and
ECU's record books. VanSant
believes athletes such as Salargo
come around only once in a while.
"He was a great outfielder who
practically rewrote ECU's baseball
book VanSant said.
Salargo
conlinued Irom page 6
Salargo became the ninth Pirate
in history to be earn All-America
honors, and he is the second this
season after Chad Tracy was named
a Freshman All-America. Salargo is
the first upperclassman at ECU to
be named an Ail-American since
Watkinsin 1993.
Salargo's career statistics:
YR BA GP AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB-SBA
' ,281 46 160 25 45 6 2 2 24 11-16
�97 .374 56 219 52 82 14 3 10 44 15-23
'98 .322 59 239 51 77 14 3 7 44 11-18
'99 .398 62 244 70 97 20 I 16 77 14-15
total .344 223 862 198 301 54 9 35 189 51-72
Source: ECU Sports Information Department
Clayton
connnued Irom page 6
flight, four passed her but she
remained in the top nine to
advance to the finals.
"I knew I was fifth out of the
first flight, so I had to wait it out
during the second flight. I was ner-
vous until the next to last thrower
Clayton said. "The wait was hard
because it was so cold. It seemed
like forever but it was only 45 min-
utes
For Clayton, the end result was
definitely worth the wait.
akaaamMAjc �� .wfl
A R 0 N A f JJ JJ C

I could have
icst throw is
ut the Idaho
n being dupli-
ow was split
:leven partici-
e got three
round, and the
round two for
rhe top eight
n All-America
throw, she was
IChoo Justice,
en's track and
tie first flight,
In the second
PAGE 7
etes
eball, all of
tic Director
0 saw strong
:on. " She
1 American in
one else has
js at ECU
e top finishers
ordinarily suc-
'irates baseball
PAGE 7
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�guu
t WtdmUiy. June 18. 1999
classifieds
The East Carolinian
TORRENT
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now 6 Aug.
1st. 706 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 758-6596.
GREAT DEAL for summer! Sublease
a 1 bedroom at Wesley Commons
North for $40 off a month! Perfect
for summer school. Lease expires
August 7th. Call 83f6842 or 931-
9455.
ECU AREA: Five and three bedroom
houses available for June and Au-
gust. Pets OK. some with fenced in
yards. Call 830-9502. leave a mes-
sage.
1 BLOCK from downtown � 3rd
Street. Call 252-809-1922.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOR RENT
2 BR. apartment in Ringgold Tow-
ers, fully furnished. 2 bathrooms,
rent for Summer only (May-July)
$550 per month. Call 355-6707,
THREE BEDROOM house two
blocks from campus available first of
July or August. Prefer responsible
students. Pets OK. All major ap-
pliances including washerdryer.
Call 321-6937.
2 BEDROOM, 1 bath duplex. 3
miles from campus, city bus avail-
able, newly renovated, short term
leases. Pets OK with fee.
$400month deposit. 1st full
month 12 price. 551-3426.
ROOMMATE WANTED
GOT AN extra room? Laid back,
clean, female grad student needs
place to live August to December.
Need to make plans immediately.
Call Kelly. 758-7758. leave message.
DO YOU NEED MONEY?
WE WILL PAY YOU
$CASH$
FOR USED MENS SHIRTS, SHOES, PANTS, JEANS, ETC
TOMMY HILFIGER TIMBERLAND
NAUTICA ABERCROMBIE
POLO EDDIE BAUER
AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD & SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Any Condition Gold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, � CD Players -
Home, Portable
Microwave Ovens � Dorm Refrigerators
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 10:00 - 5:00
(FRONT AND REAR ENTRANCE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
ROOMMATE WANTED
ROOMMATE(S) NEEDED BEGIN-
NING Aug. 1st to share four bed-
room townhouse. On bus route. Call
365-2827.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share a 3
BR. 1 bath house on Student St.
with two graduate students. One
block to ECU. $133.4mo. Call 328-
0133(w) or 329-7137.
FEMALE SHARE 3 bedroom town-
house near ECU. Furnished wash-
erdryer. Beginning Fall '99.
$225mo. plus share utilities .
phone, cable. Call Mindy 355-2956.
Collingdale Court
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted to
share 2 bedroom apt. Downtown
above Catalog Connection. Half the
rent, half utilities. Perfect location for
students, washerdryer. Call Robin.
561-7889. .
MF NONSMOKER for 2 bdrm 1
bath apartment 2 blocks from cam-
pus on East 3rd. Includes utilities,
cable, etc. Available for summer and
school year. 752-3769.
ROOMMATE NEEDED to share 2
BR. 1 bath furnished apt. Walking
distance to ECU. Large room and
closet. $212.5mo. Central AC, heat
& hot water included. Call 328-
0133(w) or 329-7137 leave message.
FEMALE OR male roommate, du-
plex. Wyndham Circle, short walk to
ECU. on bus route. No pets. Move in
August 15. 919-231-0374. leave mes-
sage. Call now.
FOR SALE
MOVING, MUST go! Two couches.
$20 each, matching end tables. $5
each, mauve upholstered chair, $10.
nine drawer dresser and mirror, $25.
Call Kelly ASAP. 758-9862.
'88 VW Cabriolet, red with white
convertible top. new clutch. 5 speed,
runs great! $3900. 439-1894.
the
Carolinian
We are now accepting applications
for all sections of the paper.
� News, Sports, & Features Writers
� Opinion columnists
� Photographers
� Copy Editors
� Cartoonists
of Lifetime iv
Apply at our office on die second floor of die Student Publications Building.
FOR SALE
COMPUTER AND primer for sale.
Mac with Hewlett Packard printer,
$150, word processing software;
also GE TV. color, with stand $50.
Call Jennifer at 758-6834 or 830-
0648.
CONQUEST TSi, has 12K miles on
rebuilt engine. Gold with black leath-
er int turbo. Ready for quick sale,
asking $1500. Call 757-2658. ask for
John.
HELP WANTED
LOOKING FOR a Summer job? Play
at day and work at night. The ECU
Telefund is hiring students for the
Summer and Fall of 1999 to contact
alumni and parents for the ECU An-
nual Fund Drive. $5.50hour. Make
your own schedule. If interested, call
328-4212. M-Th between the hours
of 3-6 p.m.
CNC COMPUTER programmer for
sheet metal fabrication co. Salary
will depend on exp. Call for details
andor appt 919-734-1700.
ATTN: EASTERN Carolina's finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Day and night shifts available. Earn
up to $1000 a week. Call Playmates
at 747-7686.
9 PEOPLE needed to lose weight
and earn income. Call Darla for free
information at 252-322-7288
IKS US IS Tl II
' ANSWER
If you're having a
crisis in life, Jesus is
the answer! For prayer, or
just to talk, call one of our
crisis hot line numbers:
Daytime 756-3315 or
714-0718 Ministry Outreach
anytime after 7pm.
321-6012 confidential.
HELP WANTED
PRE-SCHOOL Teacher to teach full-
time at Harmony Child Care. Must
have experience and credentials I &
II or a 2-4 year degree in child devel-
opment or related. Also, substitutes
needed. Call 756-6229. License
� 7455138
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
THE CITY of Greenville MIS Depart-
ment is seeking a part-time PC sup-
port person to install applications
and troubleshoot issues. Solid ex-
perience with PCs and PC applica-
tions required. Experience with
WordPerfect, Word, Lotus 123, Ex-
cel, Lotus Notes Email. Novell and
NT servers and networks, hardware
(printersmodems) is highly desired.
Please send resume and hours avail-
able to: Mary Peterson, MIS. City of
Greenville. PO Box 7207. Greenville.
NC 27835-7207 or fax to 252-329-
4399.
NOW HIRING adult entertainers
and dancers. Up to $1500 weekly.
Must be at least 18. have phone,
transportation, be drug free. Call
758-2737 for information.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
LOSE WEIGHT like crazy! 30
pounds or more safe, fast, easy, af-
fordable and all natural. Programs
start at $39. 95. Call now, 931-7526.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
GET INVOLVED! SGA is looking for
students to sit on Summer Commit-
tees. If you would like to know what
is happening at Your University, then
call us today! 328-4726. Experience
the Difference You can make!
DOES SUMMER School have you
stressed? Come on out Thursday
night, June 17. at 9 p.m. and relax by
the pool at the Student Recreational
Center and watch a movie.
THE BRYAN Adrian Basketball
Camp Final registration is now open
for The 21st Annual Bryan Adrian
Summer Basketball Camp. Boys and
girls ages 5-19 are eligible. Locations
include: Hickory. NC; Rocky Mount.
NC; Charlotte. NC; Greensboro. NC;
Elkin. NC and Raleigh. NC. Included
on the camp staff are: Jerry Stack-
house(Pro) and Antawn Jamison
(Pro). For a free brochure call 704-
372-32S6 anytime.
NEED A JOB?
YOU'RE LOOKING IN THE RIGHT PLACE!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
It's summertime!
You should be surfing!
Surf the web over to L
www.clubhouse.ecu.edu
.
The Gross is CUweujs Greener
a.
Sastbroofe S, Village. Green (tyutmeats!
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2- & S-BwJreowOfortment Womes
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Free Cable TV, Water &Se�
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 16, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 16, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1342
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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