The East Carolinian, May 4, 1999






Tuesday
High: 79
Low: 57
Wednesday
High: 82
Low: 58
Online Survey
Have you ever voted In a Tfcpoll?
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
Seniors reflect on their years at ECU.
See features page 7
TUESDAY. MAY 4. 1999 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 45
CIS to aid in development of Internet 2
UCAID hopes to create
faster research option
AnisaGhrairi
8TAF( WRITER
East Carolina University has
teamed up with the University
Corporation for Advanced Internet
Development (UCAID) to help in
the development of Internet 2.
UCAID is a collaboration of mainly
universities; 146 hold membership
including N.C. State, the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, Duke University and
Wake Forest University as well as
other universities across the nation,
industries and government. It is an
effort to build a high speed succes-
sor to the Internet which has
become too busy and slow in mov-
ing large amounts of data that will
benefit science and research. It is
not an attempt to replace the exist-
ing Internet, but merely allow sci-
entists, medical students, etc. to
share vast amounts of data, collabo-
rate easier across broad distances
and run complex equipment
remotely. ECU, who is one of
UGAID's newest members, had to
submit an application to be
approved by a review board. Jeffrey
Huskamp, East Carolina's chief
information officer, said joining
UCAID will bring about many
advantages.
"It will increase our band width on
the Internet, upgrade the 10
megabytes the computers have now
"Universities who join
UCAID to be apart of Internet
2 want to have better Internet
activities and better Internet
access
Jeffrey Huskamp
chief information officer
to 45 or possibly 150 megabytes,
and help students by accessing
other universities more quickly
Huskamp said.
Students at ECU will be able to
exchange data vials with other uni-
versities like the research library at
the University of California at
Berkeley. This is made possible by
NCLIVE, the UNC systems'
libraries. ECU will help with net-
work research like telemedicine. At
the Center for Telemedicine, part
of East Carolina's medical school,
students can access lab analysis and
receive medical information quick-
er and easier.
There are, however, some
restrictions when using Internet 2.
If you want to send information or a
message, you have to have someone
who is a member of UCAID (like
ECU) send it for you. You can not
be just anywhere and retrieve infor-
mation.
"Universities who join UCAID
to be apart of Internet 2 want to
have better Internet activities and
better Internet access Huskamp
said.
The time capsule, which contains more than 75 items, will be opened in the year 2029.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Time capsule buried
to mark 20th year
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
30 years from now students
will be looking at a most peculiar
sight-us.
Despite the disappointment
of the poor weather and student
participation, the Barefoot
Committee pulled together an
unusual success. On April 30,
the committee sunk ECU's first
and only time capsule in com-
memoration of the 20th anniver-
sary of Barefoot on the Mall.
The time capsule will be
opened in 2029 on the 50th
anniversary of Barefoot It con-
tains about 75 items, including a
1977 nickel, a 518 Apple com-
puter, newspapers, posters, a
pictography of Barefoot on the
Mall, CD's and a membership
card from The Attic.
"The committee thought it
would be a really neat idea to
earmark this event with some-
thing as major as a time cap-
sule said Stephen Gray, associ-
ate director of student unions.
"We brought the idea up to the
chancellor, and he approved it.
After that we worked closely
with the Facilities Department
to work out the details and find
place to bury it.
When you think about it,
some of these things will seem
so archaic to students in the
future
"I think it'll be interesting for
students to reflect on these
things in the future said Cliff
Webster, the new student body
president who was present at the
sinking of the capsule. "It will
SEE TIME CAPSULE PAGE 3
Air quality rapidly falling in Pitt County
Tourer emissions
standards possible
Amy Elliott
staff writer
Students and residents could face
rising prices in car inspections and
gas if the air quality readings in Pitt
Oounty don't decline.
, These readings could see Pitt
Oounty ending up as a "non-attain-
ment" area by the year 2000. This
classification could bring tougher
emissions standards and industrial
air quality requirements. These
areas may also face slowdowns or
halts in road construction.
The EPA's limit, effective July
1997, is .08 parts per million aver-
age. Pitt County's reading is .091.
The county's air quality monitor is
located in Farmville. In 1996, the
monitor reported a reading of .086,
and in 1997 the reading was .097.
The monitor measures ozone con-
centrations in the air. Automobiles,
plants and incinerators can lead to
increased levels.
Automobiles produce emissions that lower the air quality and threaten the ozone layer.
Graduation
slated for May 15
Morethan 2,000
students will walk
Terra Steinbeiser
staff writer
While most students are relieved
and looking forward to leaving
ECU until next semester, others are
ending the term with mixed feel-
ings of joy and sadness. On May 15,
over 2,000 students will graduate as
ECU's class of 1999.
"We have 2,215 students who
applied for graduation this May
said Sandra Joyner, Computing
Production Specialist.
"Unfortunately, a lot less will actu-
ally graduate because of unforeseen
problems with exams. Most just fin-
ish up their last requirement during
summer school
Many seniors said they are
apprehensive about finding a good
job after graduation.
"There are so many qualified
people in the job market that it's
hard to make yourself stand out and
be noticed by prospective employ-
ers said Kristina Arenals, a gradu-
ating senior.
Fortunately for seniors and other
concerned students, ECU has a
Career Services Department
designed to help students explore
their career options.
"We work with seniors all year
long said James Westmoreland,
SEE GRADUATION PAGE 3
Students cite diverse plans for life after graduation.
PHOTO COURTESY OF ECU NEWS BUREAU
Student troupe
dances for diversity
WheelPower holds
recital in Hendrix
Under an old
Raleigh-Durham,
standard, only
Charlotte -
Gastonia and GreensboroWinston
SEE AIR QUALITY PAGE 3
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
An integrated group of students
with and without disabilities held
a free dance recital for the public
last night.
The WheelPower Dance
Troupe performed in the Hendrix
Theatre at Mendenhall Student
Center at 7:30 p.m Monday in
front of an audience of spectators
and supporters.
"It was beautiful said Jay
Franklin, a junior who attended a
previous WheelPower event, "I
honestly didn't know what to
expect, but it was just as good as
any other dance performance I've
seen
The program included music
performed by ECU English profes-
sor and member of the dance group
Mike Hammer. Hammer sang a
musical piece from the children's
play "Wheelchair Dancer which
was recently performed in Durham.
Hamer said that for last night's per-
formance, he changed the lyrics to
better fit adults.
The program was sponsored by
the Department of Recreational
Services and Disability Support
SEE DANCE PAGE 2






2 Twwlty. Mty 4,1818
news
Tfct Emt Cirolinlin
Tht Ent Cin
Two students stabbed in
dispute at Tar River Estates
Suspectturns
himself in to police
Amy WaKNKR
assistant nkws kditcx
A man turned himself in to police
last week after a stabbing incident
that happened in Tar River Estates
the previous weekend.
According to Detective T.V.
Woolard of the Greenville Police
Department, David Johnson, 21, of
205 N. Elm St. 5 was arrested on
April 28. He is charged with two
counts of assault with a deadly
weapon with intent to kill inflicting
senous injury.
Woolard said that on April 25,
Johnson, his girlfriend, Jamie High,
and her mother, Debbie High,
were at the downtown bar the
Attic. They had a confrontation
with one of Jamie High's Sigma
Sigma Sigma sorority sisters. There
were also reported threats to other
Sigma Sigma Sigma sisters by
Jamie High and Johnson, Woolard
said.
Robert Craven, 23, and Kyle
Crumpton, 21, went to Johnson and
High's apartment to confront
Johnson about the threats. Johnson
stabbed the two, which are mem-
bers of the Kappa Alpha fraternity.
He almost killed one of the men,
Woolard said. A news release said
Dance
continued from page 1
Services.
The group was founded by
ECU student Jennifer Haynes with
the help of The Adapted
Recreation and Intramural Sport
Development (ARISE) program of
Recreation Services.
According to Hamer, there was
no special reason for the perfor-
mance, only to offer a chance for
disabled people to express them-
selves.
"One function of the
WheelPower Dance Troupe is to
provide disabled people with the
opportunity to dance Hamer said.
"They do it for the same reasons
able-bodied people do
The WheelPower Dance
Troupe performed three times in
March and April. On March 6 the
group performed at J.H. Rose
Performing Arts Center. On March
7 they performed at an annual con-
ference for teachers and students
with disabilities in Greensboro.
Finally, on April 14, the group
danced at Elmhearst Elementary
School in Greenville as part of a dis-
ability awareness program.
"The best thing you can learn
from something like this is that no
that the two were treated at the
University Medical Center.
Woolard said that the incident
involved heavy use of alcohol.
Johnson was secured under a
$10,000 bond which was posted by
his parents.
The news release also said that
Jamie High and Debbie High suf-
fered minor abrasions and bruising,
but no medical treatment was
required for the two women.
Regardless of the seriousness of
the attack, Woolard said that
Johnson does not face serious con-
sequences.
"He's facing a finger wagging
Woolard said. "A don't do that
again
matter what your disability is, or no
matter what you body looks like,
you can move around said Shawn
Hessce, a member of the dance
group. "We are all the same on the
inside
After being selected from a
national competition of performers,
the WheelPower Dance Troupe
will perform at the International
Special Olympics at Meredith
College in Raleigh on June 30.
For more information on the
June 30 performance, contact Terri
Edwards at ECU'S Department of
Recreational Services at 328-6387.
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Aii
SalemHigh
state limit.
State offic
attainment
not certain, v
summer of 2(
Ron Svejl
Planner for
Works, said tl
discussion an
of the problei
Svcjkovsk
three areas tl
on improving
the statcwid
low-sulfur fu
briefs
Man wins $10,000
settlement with NBC
on Geraldo challenge
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (AP) A
law school student is expecting a fat
check from NBC as payoff for
proving Geraldo Rivera was wrong
in asserting no one has been crim-
inally prosecuted for lying about
sex.
Rivera offered $10,000 to any-
one who could prove him wrong
on his CNBS show "Rivera Live
He made the challenge in
September as he discussed the
Clinton-Lewinsky scandal Steve
A. McCloskey, 46, of Chapel Hill, a
law student at North Carolina
Central University, checked the
computer databases and found
about a dozen such cases.
McClosky sued Rivera in March
for breach of contract when the net-
Bald Mountain and did not wake
up, said Lt. Matt Rice of the Uoicoi
County Sheriff's Department
About 20 hikers in the group
found McLeod Friday morning and
called authorities, who arrived
about three hours later after trudg-
ing through 8 inches of snow.
Authorities do not suspect foul
play because McLeod had previous
health problems, Rice said.
work wouldn't pay.
Hiker found dead
on Appalachian Trail
ERWIN, Tcnn. (AP) A hiker
from Maine was found dead in a
shelter along the Appalachian Trail
in northeast Tennessee, officials
said.
James F. McLeod, 53, went to
sleep Thursday night in a shelter on
Police: Parents put
baby in coin locker
while they dined
TOKYO, Japan (AP)
Firefighters rescued a 5-month-old
girl from a coin locker Saturday
after her parents left her there to go
have dinner at a restaurant,
Japanese police said.
A passerby heard the baby crying
inside the locker on the first floor of
a building in Kawasaki, southwest
of Tokyo, and called police.
Firefighters wrenched open the
door with a bar and rescued the
baby uninjured from the locker,
which was 13 inches wide, 13 inch-
es high and 24 inches deep.
The infant's 23-year-old father,
an employee at a pinball parlor, and
the 24-year-old mother returned
while the rescue was under way.
The baby had apparently been in
the locker for about half an hour.






The Eait Carolinian
AD
SES
Air Quality
coniinued liom page I
SalemHigh Point surpassed the
state limit.
State officials say that the non-
attainment designation, although
not certain, will not come until the
summer of 2000.
Ron Svejkovsky, Transportation
Planner for Greenville Public
Works, said that the county is in the
discussion and commenting phases
of the problem.
Svejkovsky said that there are
three areas the state is looking into
on improving air quality. The first is
the statewide implementation of
low-sulfur fuels. These fuels can
raise the cost of gasoline anywhere
from $.01 to $.06.
The second is the routine check-
ing of power plants throughout the
state. Pollutants from these plants
can increase ozone levels. Lastly
the state is looking into new emis-
sion tests for automobiles.
"The tests will probably be just
in the bigger areas Svejkovsky
said. The emission tests are costly
and the state isn't sure if they are
effective
Svejkovsky said that right now
there isn't a lot to do. Officials are
waiting on the state to provide sug-
gestions on what the county and
city can do to decrease the readings.
The state is now asking for feed-
back from citizens on how the state
can set guidelines for the non-
attainment areas.
He also said that the non-attain-
ment areas could possibly cover
Greenville, Winterville, and
Farmville or the designation could
be county-wide.
The potential for a decrease in
recruiting industry is a problem.
Possible factors for the increased
levels are vehicles idling at stops
and wind-blown pollution. The city
is currently looking into a comput-
erized signal system which will
limit a driver's wait time.
Mecklenburg County has the
highest average in the state at. 103.
"A great deal of pollution in
Charlotte is caused by motor vehi-
cles said Tara Pope, senior.
"During rush hours, cars are in
stand stills emitting fumes into the
air
Senior Eilish Lewis, also from
Charlotte, said that Greenville has
less of a pollution problem than
Charlotte, however pollution in
Pitt County is on the rise.
"Because of the numerous peo-
ple coming into Greenville, the
city is becoming much more pol-
luted said Lewis.
Gov. Jim Hunt will submit a list
of "non-attainment" areas to the
EPA in July. The EPA will then
determine the list of areas based on
levels measured from 1997 to 1999.
TwtHfc May 4, WM 9
Time Capsule
coniinued lion) page t
give them a good idea what life was
like for ECU students who came
here 30 years before them. I'd like
to be here when they dig it up
The capsule, which is about the
size of a 55-gallon drum, is made of
polyurethane and is sealed with air-
tight clamps to keep moisture from
getting in and damaging the items.
However, the time capsule was
not the only highlight of this year's
celebration � some hardy students
ventured out to attend the more tra-
ditional portions of the event
Despite the gusty winds and the
chilly gray weather, more than a


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9 A.M. to 5 P.M
May 4. 6-7. 10-13
thousand students attended the
20th annual Barefoot on die Mall
celebration. MoK said they enjoyed
the day anyway.
"The weather was disappoint-
ing, but I still went and had a good
time said Carry Doutier, sopho-
more.
When it became apparent that
the weather was not going to hold,
the celebration was moved inside to
Christenbury Memorial
Gymnasium.
"I think we really made the best
of a bad situation Gray said "We
had a big enough turnout that we
were able to give away all of the
cups and t-shirts. We didn't loose
�any money, but the weather did cost
us a lot of participation
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I'SYCIKH.O: An Ini
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INTERMEDIATE Al.U
Graduation
coniinued lion page 1
director of career services. "We
even work with employers who
start recruiting as early as October
to help students get jobs lined up
before they even graduate. If a stu-
dent is pursuing a career where the
employers don't recruit early, we
have shelves and shelves of job
notebooks and resources about dif-
ferent organizations to help that
student learn about possible
employment opportunities
Some of the services that
Career Services offer include
weekly workshops about resume
writing, interviewing and network-
ing skills.
"It's not too late for graduating i
seniors to come down and take
advantage of our services
Westmoreland said. "We offer the
1 workshops all year long, even
through exam week
Although some graduates are
heading straight out for the work-
ing wodd, many will enroll in grad-
uate school to further their studies
and go on to receive more
advanced degrees. In 1998, about
1,000 new students enrolled in a
I graduate studies program, raising
I the total number of graduate stu-
I dents to 3,166.
People enter grad school for all
different kinds of reasons said
Dr. Paul Tshetter, associate dean
I of graduate school. "For the most
part, I would say that those stu-
I dents who choose to attend grad
I school are much more career-ori-
lenred
There are different require-
I meqts for admission into a gradu-
I ate school, depending on the pro-
g�m.
"Some programs are more flexi-
I ble than others and require fewer ,
prerequisites. Ik really varies by
I discipline Tshetter said.
The single biggest graduate
I program at ECU is the masters in
I business administration. The edu-
I cation department is also quite
I large, and houses many different
programs. Graduate programs, like
I occupational therapy are very pop-
I ular, but have limited enrollment
Even with the variety of options
I available to graduating seniors,
I some still are unsure of what they
I want to do.
"I don't have a job lined up yet,
land I don't have any plans to go to
I grad school said Alan Bunal, a
� communication arts graphic design
I major who will be graduating in
I May. "I've applied at a few places,
I but I haven't heard anything yet
I If I happen to get a job i n the area,
� then I'm thinking of maybe
I attending one graduate class
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4 TtiV, Mty 4, 1999
rows
The East Carolinian
crime
April's
Felonious Larceny - An officer
recovered several items of comput-
er equipment from the east side of
Jenkins Art. Further investigation
revealed that the equipment along
with other items not recovered had
been stolen from the computer lab
in Jenkins An. 99-0225
Tampering with Computer
Equipment - A staff member
reported that her computer has
been used without her permission
during non-business hours. Her
computer is located in Ragsdale.
Domestic Dispute - A non-stu-
dent was issued a trespass warning
for being involved in a domestic
dispute and refusing to leave Tyler
Hall. There was no physical con-
frontation involved in the dispute.
Arson - Officers responded to a
fire alarm activation in Garrett Hall.
A staff member had extinguished a
small fire on the bulletin board on a
first floor hallway. The Greenville
Fire Department ventilated the
hallway due to heavy smoke and
fire extinguisher residue.
April 29
Dispute - An off campus student
and a resident of Belk Hall were
involved in a dispute in Belk Hall.
No criminal offense occurred.
False Report to Police - A stu-
dent was issued a campus appear-
ance ticket after calling the police
by a blue light emergency phone
and reporting he had just been
robbed. Further investigation
revealed that the student was not
robbed, but was requesting a ride
to his residence hall.
ApriJ(
Larceny - A resident of Fleming
Hall reported the larceny of his
book bag from Mendenhall Dining
Hall.
Harassing Phone Calls - A resi-
dent of Tyler Hall reported receiv-
ing harassing phone calls in her
room.
Simple Possession of Marijuana
- A non-student was issued a state
citation for simple possession of
marijuana. Officers found a bag
containing approximately two
grams of marijuana in his vehicle.
The incident occurred in the park-
ing lot near the old Substation on
Reade Street.
May 1
Damage to Property - A resident
of Garrett Hall reported that his
vehicle had been scratched while
parked west of Jenkins Art.
Failure to Appear - A resident of
Fletcher Hall was served a criminal
summons for failure to appear in
court.
Recovered Property - A student
reported that individuals at a resi-
dence on Tenth Street were hold-
ings daily planner that included his
checkbook. Social Security card
and other miscellaneous items.
The student stated that the resi-
dents of the house on Tenth Street
were refusing to return the items. A
campus appearance ticket was
issued to a student residing at the
house and the items were recov-
ered.
Injured Person - A resident of
Cotten Hall was transported by
Greenville Rescue to the hospital
after she fell in the bathroom and
injured her ankle.
May I
Damage to Property - A resident
of Scott Hall reported that an
unknown person broke the glass on
the fire extinguisher box near suite
211 Scott Hall.
Harassing Phone Calls and
Stalking - A resident of Greene
Hall reported that an unknown
male followed and chased her from
a house on Tenth Street to Greene
Hall. The suspect could not be
located. The victim also reported
an unrelated incident of receiving
harassing phone calls for the past
four weeks.
Indecent Exposure - Two stu-
dents were located at the Cupola
undressed, preparing to go streak-
ing throughout campus. There
were four other students present
that were fully clothed. The stu-
dents were referred to the Dean of
Students.
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LETTER
to the Editor
Williams should have chance to apologize
After reading your recent stories
about the Walter Williams incident,
I realized that you might find a con-
servative point of view on this sub-
ject interesting. As I am sure that
someone out there will soon brand
me racist, I would like them to
know that I am prepared for the
onslaught.
I was speaking with a co-worker of
mine yesterday. He happens to be
black. We were discussing the
recent resignation of Walter
Williams from the ECU Board of
Trustees. Williams was forced to
resign because he used the expres-
sion "nigger in the woodpile" in a
speech he made to the Pirate Club.
It was a mistake, a mistake that
should not have been made. My
co-worker felt that it was good that
he lost his position. I disagreed. I
feel that Williams should have
been given a chance to apologize.
Williams has not committed any
hate crime. He has not abridged
anyone's freedom. He has not
physically hurt a single soul, yet he
has been branded a racist. He has
been assigned a scarlet letter to
carry and wear for the rest of his life
simply for exercising one of his
inalienable rights, his freedom of
speech.
When I made this argument to my
co-worker, his response was "free-
dom of speech ends when you
offend someone This is a perfect
example of the rape this country is
enduring by the disease of political
correctness. According to my co-
worker, freedom of speech ends
when someone can't handle how
you feel, when it hurts his or her
feelings. I wonder if Thomas
Jefferson hurt England's feelings
when he informed them we would
no longer require their assistance in
governing our country? I wonder if
anyone was offended when
Americans fought and died in the
Revolutionary War for a few, certain
inalienable rights, that among these
are life, liberty and the pursuit of
happiness and the belief that all
men are created equal.
This country is founded on the
principle of offending others.
Offense is one of the best ways to
effect change, and it is one of our
greatest freedoms. Charlton
Heston spoke at the Harvard iaw
School Forum in February about
the effects of political correctness
on American society. He summed it
up best when he said:
"So that this nation may long
endure, I urge you to follow in the
hallowed footsteps of the great dis-
obedience of history that freed
exiles, founded religions, defeated
tyrants, and yes, in the hands of an
aroused nibble in arms and a few
great men, by God's grace, built
this country
I must join Heston in his invitation
to disobey, and i suggest you join
me, or you may one day awake to
find you no longer possess the free-
dom, or the right to do so.
Joshua Roberts
Junior
Communications,
Media Performance
�jm�4 urn 5
I
super,
if4V
fifffflfcl
OPINION!
Now that warm weather has finally arrived, downtown Greenville and the streets
surrounding campus are overflowing with weekend parties. That means more
chances to have fun and to meet new people.
But opportunities to be caught in a bad situation increase as the temperature rises.
More people at a party mean more arguments, and hot weather can only cause tem-
pers to flare.
� Sometimes a situation can escalate from an argument to a violent act in a matter
of seconds, especially if one of more of the participants have been drinking. Issues
i
like personal pride, sex and relationships can quickly turn from discussion to fist-
Jfight. That's why students need to be careful about where, and with whom, they
spend their time.
(' Small-town safety never really exists in a college town. It's important for students

to be vigilant in observing their surroundings, judging the situations they encounter
knd looking out for their friends.
s
j Don't think that a weapon will keep you safe. Carrying a knife or a gun is not only
llangerous to you, but to those around you as well. A weapon may make you feel
more secure than you really are, or you may be tempted to use it in an otherwise
nonviolent situation. And your chances of getting into trouble with the law are a lot
lower when you choose not to carry a weapon.
To protect yourself when partying or hanging out downtown, especially at night,
use your common sense. Don't start any conversations with strangers yoVrV'frTot
willing to finish. Don't make threats or act in a belligerent way towards bouncers or
policemen. Never get too drunk to make a decision. Only hang out with people you
feel safe around.
If you see anyone behaving in a bizarre way, keep your distance. And trust your
instincts; if they tell you to avoid a certain person or street, obey them.
Nighttime should be a fun time, but the danger inherent in the downtown scene
will always be present. Trust your own judgment, and let it keep you safe.
Amy L,
Royster
Editor says farewell, its been fun!
The fact that students are
entirely responsible for the
newspapers content is simulta-
neously the aggravation of
nay say en and the beauty of the
experience.
It's the end of a long road for me
and a fitting time for reflection.
There is no way to fully describe
the challenges and rewards which
have accompanied the position of
Editor-in-Chief the last two years.
I'm leaving with a narration of what
I have learned and a suggestion to
the university, concerning the
Student Media.
i I did not learn about journalism
in a classroom, although I believe it
is an effective and important way to
learn. lmid'iriiat I knowabout
journalisnljjn tB trenchesjjpf the
Student Media.
There are some people on cam-
pus who doubt the quality of this
type of hands-on education
because they are critical of the
quality of our product. Over the
years I have heard of their protests,
yet remain grateful that I learned
skills which complimented my for-
mal education under the pressure
of tremendous consequence. The
ever present feeling of having a
bullseye on my head was an ade-
quate motivation to learn.
As a rookie Staff Writer, 1 had lit-
tle to no idea of how to go about
gathering the information I need-
ed, let alone the rules of journalism
required to turn my words into a
news article. I was equally naive to
the scoffs and sneers of some of the
real journalists on campus. In an all
student work environment, I stum-
bled through my first stories.
I learned how to interview peo-
ple by forgetting to ask the right
questions and repeatedly having to
traipse back and forth across cam-
pus or town. The heart sinking hor-
ror of picking up a copy of the
paper on the way to class and find-
ing an error taught me the value of
OPINION
countless revisions. I learned the
fine line between searching for
newsworthy facts and being unnec-
essarily inquisitive one day when a
female student tearfully begged
me not to write about her arrest for
prostitution, saying she was only
trying to pay her tuition.
Later, as the Assistant News
Editor, I learned about the role of
the press as a watch dog when I
came nose to nose with members of
the campus government while cov-
ering a story about a SGA bill which
provided tuition for the Executive
Committee. It became immediate-
ly clear to me that the role of the
press and politicians are often at
odds and that perhaps this is as it
should be. I was mildly harassed by
several people who wished the
story would not run. As a result, I
learned that being a journalist can
make you extremely unpopular
and more importantly, that I could
live with that form of unpopularity.
In my first year as the Editor-in-
Chief I learned the suffocating
feeling of being accountable for the
work of others. There is nothing
else quite like having 12,000 copies
of your name on die top of a mast-
head twice a week and knowing,
when you wake up to your pager
beeping, that most people who
take the time to call you are mad as
hell. I learned how to find the
courage to pick up the phone and
call people trying to make amends
when I felt there was no real way to
convey to them how hard most of
us try and how seriously we take
our responsibilities. I have wrestled
with the obstacle of not finding
enough aspiring print journalists or
students unaffected by the perva-
sive apathy bug. I felt the wrath of
our readers and the frustration of
suspending my own personal
beliefs when I decided the
Minnesota Life Foundation could
pay to run their graphic pro-life
insert. At 5 a.m. during hurricanes
and computer meltdowns, I
endured along with Heather
Burgess, Amanda Austin,
Stephanie Whitlock and countless
Night Editors the realization that if
we did not persevere the paper
would simply not come out.
This year, in my final year as
Editor-in-Chief, I learned to appre-
ciate the tremendous rewards that
come from bearing a large responsi-
bility. I have learned to focus on
jobs well done in addition to work
left to accomplish. I have also
learned that the highest goals of an
organization can not be reached
without enlisting and encouraging
each member. Now, tough deci-
sions are not easier to make, but I
am more comfortable making
them.
I 'ndcrgrad taught me how to
learn in a classroom or from a text
book, but the opportunities provid-
ed by the Student Media have pre-
pared me to enter the real world
with confidence.
The East Carolinian will contin-
ue to make mistakes as every news-
paper docs. Whether or not it,
makes more than its fair share will
vary with each year's staff.
There1 are two pieces of advice I
feel qualified to give:
First, students interested in
journalism, communications, writ-
ing and leadership should compli-
ment rligir formal education with
the tyv rf hands-on experience
rhc Si tii Media provides. Even
an int. uship at a commercial puf
licatrpi while important, can not
usually provide students the same
level ol responsibility.
Secondly any administrator or
faculty.jqynber in a position to
lend tneW knowledge and skill to
the Student Media will not only be
helping to improve our end prod-
uct, but also the skills and lives of
the students they reach. Our Media
Adviser Paul Wright is invaluable,
but he is only one person. Students
turn over every few years.
Permanent faculty members can be
instrumental in suggesting new
directions and ideas.
The fact that students are
entirely responsible for the news-
paper's content is simultaneously
the aggravation of naysayers and
the beauty of the experience.
Pasted on the wall above my com-
puter the following axiom has hung
for two years: "Failure is not an
option. It is just an annoying possi-
bility that keeps us motivated
Thanks to my responsibilities at
the Student Media, this is one
mantra I will carry with me for life.
'Purely for indulgence, I would like
to tell a few people a fern things: Barnes,
thank you for your love. I love you.
Haven, thank you for your friendship.
Jeff, than Is for always finding a way to
make us laugh. Mom, your love and
support is important to me. Dad, thank
you for always being there without judg-
ment. To the staff, I have teamed so
much from all of you. I would be fortu-
nate to work with people as fun and
talented as you in the real world. And,
of course, thank you Mr.Wright �you
always are.
Ryan
Kenemur
Ryan shares touching farewell
Have a
neat sum-
mer and I 'll see you next year,
provided I still have vision at
that time.

You know, I sometimes feel that if I
were lying in the middle of the
street bleeding to death following a
tragic albeit comical squirrell acci-
dent, the people from the book
stores would hurry over and soak
up the blood with a sponge and sell
it. They are mean and greedy.
That's about all I have to say. Have
a neat summer and I'll see you next
year, provided I still have vision at
that time.
Mr
sometimes feel that if I were
lying in the middle of the street
bleeding to death following a
tragic alveit comical squirrel
accident





6 Tutaday, My 4. 1998
The East Carolinia
OPINION
Marvelle
buiiivan
Just one step closer to real world
OPINION
f Tuesday, May
Phillip
Gillfus
So long, farewell, auf wiedersehen
The closing of a semester is bitter-
sweet. On one hand, school is
almost over, summer weather is
i almost here and a change of pace is
about to occur. On the other hand,
all the positive aspects are accom-
panied with exams, papers, pro-
jects, friends leaving, jobs coming
and maybe even summer school
only a few days later.
Nevertheless, for good or bad, the
end ofa semester for most students
is just one step closer to entering
the real world. This is a time where
a college student is provided
lessons applicable for the life or the
next step ahead.
The first lesson: People come and
go before you know it. The college
lifestyle is extremely transitory.
Friends that you hang out with
daily, people that you love dearly,
and acquaintances that you talk
with briefly will most likely not be
a part of your future life and times.
Life on Tuesday
The fleeting nature of college rela-
tionships is not something anyone
wants to spend time on pondering,
but to ignore the fact that people
move in and out of our lives will
result in taking them for granted.
Take time to appreciate the people
you come into contact with, keep-
ing in mind that you have met
them for a reason and they proba-
bly have something important to
contribute to your perspective in
years to come. The second lesson:
Procrastination and inaction are two
evils in college that will probably
follow you for the rest of your life.
The pattern you set in school will
determine the pattern you will fol-
low in your life. What has to be
remembered though is that while
successful people can be procrasti-
nators, successful people can not be
plagued with a habit of inactivity in
life. College teaches people how
long they can really put something
off. For some people, it means
starting their semester term paper
when it is assigned, for other lucki-
er individuals, it means starting the
night before it is due. Regardless of
talent levels and basic scholastic
aptitudes, it amounts to not how,
but rather, how you will get what
you have accomplished with some
reasonable amount of timeliness.
Essentially, when push comes to
shove, can you perform under
intense pressure? As you can prob-
ably gather, this does not apply to
schoolwork.
The third lesson: College, like life,
isn't fair. You will have two or three
exams in one day with five days
free before your last final that is at
night for a class that was supposed
to be easy. ECU Parking and
Traffic Services will still ticket and
maliciously tow after reading day.
and May weather will be more like
February weather if you live in
Greenville. That's just how it is.
Fighting the system rarely works so
going with the flow can be a much
easier approach to college and life
in general. Accepting the fact that
every day can't be a wonderful,
stress-free day, makes the bad days
not so disheartening.
Some of the most important things
in college don't come out of the
books, but everyone knows that.
People, successes, and even crisis,
can make the most indelible
impressions. Not overlooking them
and not letting them be over-
whelming makes all the differences
"So long, farewell, auf
Wiedersehen, adieu. Adieu, adieu,
to you, and you, not you Yes, it's
once again the end of the academic
year, and we must all say our good-
byes. ECU's 1998-99 school year
has come and gone, and we now all
find ourselves asking the same
question: Why do they schedule
exams after classes are over? Who
wants to study then?! I mean, I may
be in my make-up biology class
today, but my mind is already gone
(in the non-hallucinagenic sense).
It has been quite the year. We
returned in August eagerly looking
forward to another two semesters at
ECU (just g� w'tn me here) and
what surprise by the administration
should await us? Pepsi. I bet you
forgot about that, didn't you? You
remember how the campus was up
in arms, faculty against students,
brother against brother, how Grant
managed to win at Vicksburg then
turn to the South wait, that's the
Civil War. But eventually we all
came to accept the change like civ-
ilized, decent people (who go to
Harris Teeter to buy a two-liter
Coke for 79 cents).
In September, the upper deck of
Dowdy-Ficklen Stadium was final-
ly opened. It turned out to be a
good deal, though at first everyone
had a pool going of how long it
would take for the deck to collapse
(I said five minutes). There were
also reports about how the G.P.A. of
ECU students was rising. The
increase in grades was largely
thanks to better standards, out-
standing professors and Aramark
agreeing to put those smart drugs in
the grilled cheese forget that last
one.
And who could forget October? Oh
sure, there was the infamous down-
town Greenville Halloween, but
even better than that, and I think
we can all agree on this one, was my
birthday. Yes, October 4 was a day
we all celebrated (technically I'm
not lying since that was the same
day as the ECU-Army game). This
was also the month of the biannual
mid-term burnout. A time when
students everywhere are as active
as the lovechild of a turtle and a
three-toed sloth. The only cure is
to count down the days until
Thanksgiving vacation.
Speaking of which, in November,
ECU was the site ofa visit by, then
candidate, Sen. John Edwards.
About this election, I would just
like to ask one little question to a
certain populace of this university:
WHO WON? WHO WON?! NOT
FAIRCLOTH! IN YOUR FACE
Moving on.
Things were pretty quiet arounc
the campus since December ant
January were both abbreviatec
months. In February, perhaps tht
most awaited, celebrated event or
campus happened. No, noi
Valentine's Day (not even), but tht
annual visit by the official preachei
of the campus mall, Gary Birdsong
Students everywhere united ir
yelling back at him at the top ol
their lungs, till their vocal chord;
bled. The love and sense of broth-
erhood during this occasion rivaled
Feb. 14.
March saw the advent of "ECU
Attempts to Mass Assimilate'
Surrounding Area The adminis-
tration was trying to gobble up land
faster than Homer Simpson at a
donut-eating contest. The universi-j
ty hopes to double enrollment in
the next three decades. So basical
ly, say goodbye to any grass on cam
pus. First the ampitheatre is going
to get bulldozed for a dining hall.
Probably next, the mall will be
ripped up for a new residence hall
Just you wait (foreboding music.
lightning flashes in background).
r


l I






hi Eitt Cirolinia
rsehem
y quiet arount
December anc
h abbreviatec
ry, perhaps th�
irated event or
:d. No, noi
t even), but the
jfl'n ial preachei
Gary Birdsong
ere united ir
11 at the top ol
:ir vocal chords
sense of broth
iceasion rivaled
vent of "ECU
iss Assimilate'
The adminis
gobble up land!
Simpson at a
t. The universi-j
: enrollment in
des. So basical-
ly grass on cam-
theatre is going
r a dining hall.
: mall will be
residence hall.
�boding music,
background).
Chris Knotts
EM ION
'�I

d.
-7 Tuesday. May 4. 1999
I
features
The Eist CirotMM
As the official hosts of ECU, these senior Ambassadors pese proudly.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLASS OF 99 SENIORS
Seniors say goodbye to ECU
I! HOOK K I'O'fTS
STU I WHIT F.I
Seniors cheese it up before a night out on the town.
PHOTO COURTESY OF RYAN J HENNE
jeniors1 best memories of ECU
One highlight that will be missed by most seniors is the pre-game tailgating parties
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CLASS OF 99 SENIORS
Pis 7
f tailgatip
Beating NC State aVidfi
WjhgTrfe�tl tqpk
Summer in Greer)vlle
Itudy abroad trips
Club activities
, . Theater productions
Intrarriural sports
Disc golf
hen you first
arry�d at
ECU, a little
scared, con-
fused and
excited at the
rime, what did you think the "& W1-
r Jti uu l1 say thanks to Festu:
ew years of youyiTe would be FT. � . �"
c
Barefoot or
fguing with thejmall preacher
Going downtown
Making new friends
Seniors Ryan Jasen Henne and Danielle Woodward kick back at the downtown clubs.
PHOTO BY RYAN J HENNE
j
same
next few years ot your.
like? Did you expect freedom yoii"
never had before, of ditf ynu see ,
yourself hitting the?, botiks and
becoming the scholarly type? What
did you think would happen to you
as you worked toward your degree?
Regardless of who you thought
you would become, college brings
changes of great, irtlportanceQgn'
the tilings e exjfct to happen
don't, and irnfojreseetv.events are
really blessings iin disguise Many
people don't realize when they first
to KCll how much different
Ticy will become; before they leave.
ie type of prion you were wratn
aitivcd: ha become someone -
else and your college experiences
have caused you to grow and
niature more irjian you can ever
Graduation is the time when
ypf thjosf Jexperiences come
ie 0ay.
that graduation is fast
hing, seniors experience a
range of emotions. There is
excitement about the day itself,
sadness as friends say goodbye, and
anticipation of the unknown future
ahead. More than anything else
there is a sense of pride that
despite all the snags along the way,
you've made it to this point; a place
that takes a tremendous amount of
dedication and hard work to reach.
As college begins, students form
friendships that will last beyond
their years at EGU. Graduating and
surviving at least four years of col-
lege life takes a tremendous
amount of support, and seniors at
ECU all realize the valuable role
that friends have played in their
success.
"Until it's time for you to gradu-
ate, you don't realize how much
your friends mean to you said
Casie Chapped, senior. "I love all
of my friends, and I know I would-
n't have made it through without all
of their help
Certainly,
friends play a Key role in helping
smdejjltSifi'utkc it through both the
fun timesand the rough spots,
faculty members,also make a big
impact Ohj students as they go
estus
Hrilxi for berhg such a good adviser
and if giving me the opportunity
w go to Russia said Danielle
Pscheje, senior. "Thanks also to
Dr. Gocfiloid and Dr. fudge for
being the ECOO advisors and help-
ing to get
around
r Campuj organizations and activ-
ities also'gwfe students opportuni-
ties tojfiake the most of their years
hereptnd to make connections that
will last far beyond the time spent
at ECU. Jody Gore, senior, said,
"The people at alumni relations
have been so good toimc and given
me so many jcorjnecrions. Philip
Horne, Carojyn TJionjpson, Carol
�avis, and ill
adors jhave
Besides It
people who
llijs point,
holds.
"I'm really excited to be stai
graduate school said SelhS
Stoeppelwerth, senior. "It's going
�$ further me along my chosen p&lf
and give me more knowledge,
which is alwfys useful j gi
While many students ate nut
sure right nowivhat their future Wifl
hold, they seem to be optimistic
and confident that their education
has prepared them forchallfeWges to
come. Students will also miss some
the club off of the of the perks of higher education.
"One of the tilings I'mgoing to
miss is having school be my job
Pschcrer said. "I'm not going to be
able to he"� kid anymore in gfad
school
"(Jetting away, with skipping
class and having seniority over all
the- undcrdassniem was fr���gericesi ;
StoeppeKverth said.
For minythc real wrtrld is going
to 0c a seriotte reality check as gnid-
th E@U ambas- uates realize just how good they
lyfmearl a otlo � hnlc it.
"The happy-go-lucky student
lifestyle is the best said Gore.
$ But regardless of where the
fiSture leads the class of 1999, they;
will always remember where they!
in and how they
H� today. There i
lack of appreciation ail
graduating seniors, esp
itfSjmes to those'
along the wa
"My parents
Pjcherer said. "
thorn
deckfi
iking hack to all the
lave Igotten stem to
raduatcs are looking
ahead to the Possibilities the future
"And thanks o everyone else-j
know who you are
E( 1U also- appreciates
of '99. C.C. Rowe,
Department for Disabilii
d tJomri
hopes that the ur
always rerfiali dear l
?We tljeaiure,
ihopf WatVhW
hei ama
pridIRov,
Afbthel
BCl who
tljeirpwil
avici is
andft
Halloween stands as one of the most fun and inventive nights students experience at ECU.
PHOTO COURTESY OF CLASS OF 99 SENIORS
the �pportunities that ECU
offers.
"Have fun while it lasts,
because you really aren't
here that long Chapped
said. "Don't take anything
for granted
From tailgating to theater
productions, the campus
offers students so many ways
to make memories that will
stay in the mind long past
graduation day. All of these
experiences culminate in the
person that stands up to
receive their degree and
move the tassel on May 15.
Whether you are in a big
hurry to get out of here 01
you just can't seem to say
goodbye, there is no doubt
that whatever your college
days have been like, they
will definitely be one of the
bfest times of your life.





p.? I
. � Jf- "� �
y HHI -j �. �. tc1
8 Ttttfey. M�y 4.1S99
features
The East Carolinian
Summer Theatre
offers song, laughs
ifim win'f nra1 TimrJrir Yvw4 � Must tl�ve �i grammar & editlag skiMs
llyiMldlllllA Wllfl-pUU, ,KngliABwjorspreferred
� Apply it the second door of Student
Publications Building or call 328-6366
Copy Editors Needed
Playhouse kicks off
anniversary season
Pill I.I.I (ill.US
HliMOK WMTKI
If you think summer school means
that the campus dies down, prepare
yourself. ECU is about to come
alive with the sound of music.
The 30th season of the ECU
Summer Theatre is about to start,
and they are going all out.
"In keeping with our 30th sea-
son, and the fact that "The Sound
of Music' will also be celebrating its
30th anniversary, we will be pre-
senting this musical as the first
show of the summer said Jeff
Woodruff, managing director of the
summer theatre.
The summer theatre will try to
capture Rodgers and
Hammerstein's style of a good story
and memorable music.
"It's an amazing experience
said Aleah Charles, junior and
"Sound of Music" actress. "It's
great to get a chance to work with
some of the acting professionals
from New York
Besides the family-oriented
"The Sound of Music the pro-
ductions for the '99 summer season
will also include "Harvey" and
"Ain't Misbehavin
"Musicals are usually our most
popular productions, that's why
they will be the first and last
shows Woodruff said.
Casting for the shows was done
in New York during spring break,
while campus auditions were held a
SEE THEATRE PAGE 9
Students begin residence
hall cleanup for summer
Alternatives to moving
belongings back home
V. RICA 8 IK K S
SIU'K IIITII
The end of the school year is here!
Before you start making plans for
the summer, take a quick look
around your dorm room. Are you
noticing that you have a lot more
things now than what you came
with in the fall?
What in the world are you plan-
ning to do with all of the things you
have accumulated over the school
year?
If you're like many other college
students, there just isn't enough
room back home to store every-
thing. Younger siblings may have
taken over your space or you may
have just bought things over the
school year for your dorm room that
you really can't use at home.
"Why can't we just pay some
extra money and keep our stuff in
the dorm room over the summer?"
said Sonya Long, an ECU freshman
who plans to return to Tyler Hall in
the fall. "When I moved out of my
house, my little sister took my
room, so now I don't have my own
designated area to keep all my
stuff
During the summer, the resi-
dence halls host many activities
including orientation, summer
school and sports camps. That is
one of the main reasons that our
belongings should not be left for
three months. In addition to this,
there is limited security personnel
to provide every floor with the max-
imum security that is needed.
SEE CLEANUP PAGE l
East Carolina University
Literary & Arts Magazine
Pickup a free copy at:
� Brody Copy Center
� Department of English Office
� Dowdy Student Stores
� Mendenhall Student Center
Information Desk
� School of Art Media Center
-�-






9 Tuesday. May 4, 1889
features
Thi Eiit Carolinian
)linian

atalog
onnection
Shown in
Block & Script
210 E. 5th St. � 758-8612 � M-S 10-6, Sun 1-5
� � � �����������
SILXER Dolls

BULLET
Doors Open: 7:30 p.m. ToudiOfC(ass'
Stage Time: 9:00 p.m. 75fi27fi
TUESDAY
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THURSDAY
Rock-N-Roll Night
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Theatre
continued Iran page 8
few weeks previous in March.
"We'll have theater regulars,
people who come to the shows may
recognize them from other cam-
pus) productions. We're also bring-
ing in out-of-state people
Woodruff said.
The non-musical, comedy of
the season will be "Harvey It is a
story of a man whose imaginary
friend is a six-foot rabbit The play
follows how the man's sister tries to
commit him and the hijinks ensue.
The play and movie, starring
Jimmy Stewart, was especially pop-
ular in the '40s and, according to
Woodruff, was the "Cats" of its
day.
"It's a mix-up comedy with a
happy ending said Ben Allison,
junior and "Harvey" actor.
This play is a three-week
process, with two weeks of
rehearsal and eight performances.
"It's a fast schedule, but for
summer stock it's normal said
Barbara King, senior and "Harvey-
actress. "We get to work with pro-
fessional actors, I'm learning a lot
from these people
The last show of the season will
be '30s music, jazzy production of
the Fats Waller musical, "Ain't
Misbehavin
"It's jazz-oriented and has very
exciting music said Dr. Scott
Carter, "Ain't Misbehavin con-
ductor. "It is funny and has excel-
lent choreography. If you don't like
this, you'd better check your
pulse
This summer will be the first
season that ECU students will get a
chance to buy subscription tickets
for the whole season. The prices
range from $20 to $30.
Tickets can be charged by call-
ing 328-6829, or by stopping by the
McGinnis Theatre Box Office.
"We feel this is going to be one
the best seasons. Each play really
offers a unique perspective on
life Woodruff said.
Cleanup
continued ftom page 8
You could always sell your
belongings or give some of it away
to the Goodwill. But, if you are like
most and can't image parting with
the memories there is another
. alternative.
One option students can consid-
er is renting a storage area for their
extra belongings. This should not
be a problem at all. Just let your fin-
gers do the walking in the
Greenville's yellow pages and you
will find about two pages full of
mini-storage ads.
Storage companies all over
Greenville have been expecting
students to supply them with busi-
ness for the summer, such as AA
MiniStorage. According to AA,
with less than two weeks left in the
semester, it's time for students to
move their stuff.
"We usually have about 40-45
students rent storage spaces from
us said Debra Cayton, manager.
Some storage companies offer
incentives encouraging students to
move their stuff in. Eastgate offers
a $10 dollars off coupon which can
be found in TEC.
The only disadvantage students
face while renting storage areas are
break-ins. However, most facilities
here in town have 24 hour security
on their lots.
"Our security consists of my
husband, my son and I Cayton
said. "We live here and in the 13
years that we have been here, we
have only had about three break-
ins
"My word of advice is to put
your stuff in a good part of town
Arnold said. "We live here at our
place of business, so that deters
much of the theft
So instead of trying to cram a
year's worth of your life in a car,
consider keeping it all here in
Greenville. The great thing is you
won't have to worry about moving
all of your stuff back in the fall.
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Tat Em Carolinian
sports
rr
BgJB ?�1989 10
African-American coaches still face obstacles
ECU coaches and
students speak out
Hi. A INK I) K MI'S
SKSIIH ��ITKK
Lady Pirates head basketball coach, Oee Gibson is one of the two African American head
coaches holding a position for ECU.
FILE PHOTO
Despite anti discrimination laws,
affirmative action and a general
attitude of better race relations
throughout the country, the color
of college athletics at top level
positions remains rather white.
Out of 16 head coaching posi-
tions at ECU only two are occu-
pied by African Americans. Those
positions are the women's basket-
ball and volleyball head coaching
spots. Both head and assistant
coaching positions for all sports in
the NCAA and even into the pro-
fessional ranks are dominated by
whites. Athletic directors and
other administrative positions also
lack the percentage of minorities
that one would expect so many
years after anti discrimination and
improved race relation programs
were implemented in all areas of
our society.
Although 51 percent of the ath-
letes playing Division I football in
1995 were African American, only
22 percent of the coaches were
black. In that same year, a mere
eight percent of the coaches in
men's revenue sports for all NCAA
divisions were African American.
By 1997, only 8.4 percent of the
coaches in all NCAA divisions of
men's basketball and football were
African American.
These fitrures lead to manv
questions regarding the race rela-
tions and practices in collegiate ath-
letics today. Why are there so few
minority coaches and how can more
minorities break into these high
level positions?
"All over the country there is a
need for more minority coaches,
whether it be black, Hispanic or
whatever said Dee Gibson,
ECU's head women's basketball
coach. "Anyplace you work it's
always nice to have people similar
to yourself to surround yourself
with
According to Gibson, black
coaches have fallen victim to
stereotypes and they must become
aware of them. She also believes
that blacks must work to overcome
these stereotypes in order to gain
access to top level coaching and
administrative positions.
"One reason I get really frustrat-
ed is black coaches are known as
recruiters and not coaches Gibson
said. "We have to change that
stereotype. We have to voice our
opinion and tret more involved.
"I think I was known as more
than just a recruiter and that helped
me get my job
African Americans made up .07
percent of the athletic directors at
all the NCAA member schools in
the 1997-98 season. In other admin-
istrative positions including associ-
ate directors and academic advisors,
blacks represented a mere 8.5 per-
cent.
"If you're a basketball coach 'I
hope you want to be a basketball
coach and not a recruiter and if
you're an assistant I hope you want
to be a head coach Gibson said. "I
hope everybody would want to be
the boss and not second in line all
the time
The low percentage of African
American head coaches at ECU has
many black students asking what
seems to be causing this problem
and what steps need to be taken to
find a remedy.
"It makes you ask yourself why
there aren't more than two African
American head coaches here at j
ECU j said Dwight Berry, a junior j
majoring in communications. "I am
busy asking myself are they just not.�
finding qualified ones or what B
Neither Athletics Director Mike 8
Hamrick nor Assistant Director
Henry VanSant were available for J
comment on this subject. VanSant
was said to be on vacation and
Hamrick was reported out of town
on business. Both men are key figi
urcs in the hiring of coaches at
ECU.
Pirates take GMU 15-0; win series 2-1
Thompson helps by
pitching a victory
Pah Kaplan Wfitt.
ItMIII WIITKH
It was a cold and wet weekend as
ihe Pirates played their last home
OPINION
conference games of the season
against George Mason University.
Foyc Minton got a shut out on
Friday as the Pirates tooke down
GMU 15-0.
Then on Saturday Travis
Thompson pitched the No. 21
Pirates into another win as ECU
took the W 11-1. Then on Sunday
GMU was able to hold ECU off
from a three game sweep as they
held off the Pirates 6-2.
Sunday's loss just another in
what appears to be a Sunday jinx
for ECU as they failed to finish out
the sweep of GMU.
"I don't know what the Sunday
jinx is? It is just one of those crazy
things about baseball that you
never know about Steve Salargo
Said.
Sunday was ECU's third consec-
utive loss on Sunday and their fifth
of the season on that day and with
only 11 loses on their season many
would think that their is something
awry with their Sunday perfor-
mance in particular.
"We have been losing on
Sunday's, I do not think it is from a
lack of effort, we have just go to put
the loss behind us and get ready for
Tuesday's game head coach Keith
LeClair Said.
With the loss on Sunday the
Pirates in no way helped their
struggle to regain dominance in the
CAA. With a record of 13-4 they arc
still second best in the CAA behind
Virginia Commonwealth who is still
in first. The Pirates are now 38-11
overall and 13-4 in the CAA.
"I really hope that the Pirates
can beat Camhell this Tuesday
night, it would be realy groovy if
they could win the Jsur home game
of the season Senior Scott Rose
Said.
ECU's Chad Tracey steps in against GMU
PHOTO BY STEPHEN SCHRAMM
After the Pirates take on
Camhell this Tuesday night, they
will be traveling to Wilmington to
take on UNC-W in a three game
conference scries.
Pirate fan in 98
Promising seasons
Jizhtvear
S IK I'll K Sell RAM l
St'DKIS KIll'I'OK
The 1998-99 Pirate athletics will be
remembered for its lackluster home
schedules and promising seasons.
Football and basketball suffered
from home schedules that lacked
the punch of other schools. Because
of this dearth of widely known
opponents, attendance suffered at
home games. In the case of football,
it wasn't entirely our fault.
In the spring of 1998, the
University of Kentucky backed out
of their game in Greenville slated
for September. This cost Pirate fans
a chance to see UK quarterback
Tim Couch, Heisman contender
and eventual first pick in the NFL
Draft. Instead of the Wildoats, we
got to see the Pirates post a shutout
against the hapless UAB.
ECU's football schedule was
played with giddy anticipation for
the 1999 season. Pirate fans knew
Miami, Duke and West Virginia
were on the docket for next year
and that the 1999 season would be
capped by NC State's first trip to
Greenville.
The big games in the Pirate's
future did not take away from pre-
sent ones. The 1998 Pirate football
season saw the team go 6-5, the
mergence of the option offense
nd the development of quarter-
racks David Gerrard and Bobby
Weaver. It saw Roderick Coleman
continue to work his way up the
draft board, the opening of the
upper deck at Ficklin and the
largest crowd for an ECU home
game in a win over Army.
Pirate basketball came and
went quietly. Home games were
played in front of meager crowds
despite the exciting young talent
the team had. Newcomers Evaldas
Joeys and Brandon I lawkins
sparked the Pirates to a 13-14 sea-
son. The small crowds were
brought on by a home schedule
that included out of conference
foes such as Francis Marion and
the University of Southwestern
LiouioHina.
After a season with low atten-
dance and concluding with yet
another first round exit in the CAA
tournament, changes were made.
Head coach Joe Dooley
stepped down and former Drexcl
coach Bill Herrion stepped in.
Hcrrion's arrival and possibly a
better home schedule could make
the 1999-2000 season more memo-
rable than this season.
While the men went through
this season without much fanfare,
the women had a seasons worth of
memories in one weekend.
The Pirates were the sixth seed
heading into the CAA Women's
Tournament in Richmond. The
Pirates posted upset victories over
George Mason and Richmond en
route to the finals. The Pirates fell
to the heavily favored Old
Dominion in a close game.
As spring rolled around, basket-
ball ended and Pirate baseball
began to take center stage. The
Pirates have led the conference for
most of the season and beat in-state
foes Wake Forest and UNC-CH in
front of huge crowds at Harrington
field. The team has been ranked in
the top 25 for a number of weeks
SEE OPINION PAGE I?
USATCWomei 5000 meter retry1

� (l)Abrial Hayes (jttaarangular wm2006.00
Meet(1) Abrial Hayes Long Jump11.41.00
(OToshima Dabbs10
Triple Jump
(3)Toshima Dabbs36-7
MenHigh Jump (2SaundraTeel54
(2) 4x100 meter relay45.94
(1)4x400 meter Relay team3:06.20100 meter hurdles
400 -intermediate high hurdles(l)Marshari Williams14.41
(1) Lynn Stewart2.73 2)SaundraTeel14.42
M) meter dash100 metscr dash
(I) James Alexander21.83 (2) Nicky Coins11.76
(2) Darren Tuit21.42 (4) Tonya Little1Z13
5000 meter relay run200 mere dash
(I)BrianBeil15:30.913) Rasleca Barrow24.43
(2) Steve Arnold6.00(4)CarrnenWcldon24.99
Triple Jump400 meter dash
(4) Michael Mercer12.94 3)KwriaKiiknatrick57.21
400 meter dashShot-Pu
(2) Damon Davis47.00 0) Crystal Frye4ZI1
(3) Darrick Ingram47.61 (4) Margaret Clayton37.6
100 meter dashDiscus
(2) Vaughn Monroe10.55 (Z) Crystal fryeimr
(7)BrittGox11.05 Hammer
(3) 4x100 meter relay41.13 l)Margiu�Qbrywtt158-a
Track brings home
first place finishes
Despite fatigue Pirates
have ten top finishes
STKPIIKN Sell K A MM
SI'OHTS KIU'I'OH
As the ECU track season hits its
stretch run, the squads have
begun to feel the wear of a sea-
son's worth of travel and racing.
This weekend the teams took
the 18 hour bus ride to New
Orleans to compete in the USAT-
FC Quadrangular meet with
Norfolk State, Southern, and
Texas Southern. The past few
weeks have seen the Pirates go to
Texas, Tennessee, Virginia and
Pennsylvania. The continuous
travel wore on the teams.
Abrial Hayes
Flit PHOTO
"We did really well coming off of
the Penn Relays. But, were just
tired said Head Men's Track
Coach Bill (larson.
Despite the fatigue, the Pirate
Men and women put of strong per-
formances.
The Women wit- pucod by
Freshman Abrial Hayes. Hayes
took home first place finishes in the
SEE USATFC PAGE II
Lady Pirates split doubleheader with one win
Polonius has two good
games to end career
RV.W DOWNKY
STAFF ttUITKK
This weekend the ECU Softball
team had both a great victory and
a disappointing loss. Isonette
Polonius, who was Big South play-
er of the week for the last week of
April, had two good games adding
to her already amazing season and
career totals.
The Pirates won the first half of
the doubleheader 4-1 in a game
that, until the sixth inning, was a
pitchers duel. Denise Reagan, the
Pirate pitcher for game one,
retired nine straight hitters before
any GM U players made it on base.
1234567
GMU 0001000
ECU 100012-
The only GMU run of the game
came in the fourth inning tying the
game at two. While some might
have gotten nervous at giving up an
already slim lead, Reagan was
undaunted giving up no other nins
on the day and finishing the rest of
the game
with confi-
dence.
ECU
started the
first inning
quickly with
A m e c a
McDougall
getting on
base with a
well placed
infield hit. After a wild pitch
advanced her to second base she
was brought home on an RBI single
by senior Isonette Polonius who as
usual was key in the victory.
The run gave the Pirates an early
5Ml
ECU
12 345 67 '
0002003
0100010
Chart provided by sports inter
one run cushion. The RBI was
Polonius' 56th on the season. The
ECll hitters were quiet until the
5th inning when another RBI by
Polonius gave the pirates a 2-1 lead.
The victory was scaled by a two run
double by fellow senior Sarah
Colea.
The sec-
ond game
was not as
kind to the
Pirates.
ECU started
well taking a
1-0 lead in
the second
off an RBI
single by
Amy Hooks. GMU had no runners
score until a big two- run homer by
Joanna Sanders in the fourth inning.
ECU answered back in the sixth
inning when Isonette Polonius,
after stealing second base and
advancing to third on an error, was
driven home by Jen Halpern. With
the score tied at two ECU went into
the seventh inning needing a
defensive stop and at least one run
to pull the game out. Unfortunately, I"
George Mason came back onto the
field ready to swing. The Patriots
loaded the bases at the top of the
7th before Denise Reagan was
brought back out in an attempt to
salvage the inning. She was able to
engineer one out with help from
good fielding before the bottom fell
out. In one quick sequence featur-
ing two errors the Patriots took a 4-
2 lead. The next GMU hitter got a
one run double giving GMU a 5-2
lead. Reagan finished up the inning
giving up no more runs.
The rain began to fall as the
Pirates took the field hoping for a
big finish, but the team was unable
SEE S0FTBAU PAGE I?
11 Tuesday. M
An
t
5c
have
Swimm!
Don't 1
Move






rr
y. 4, 1988 10
les
ecruiter and if
hope you want
Gibson said. "I
uld want to be
cond in line all
tage of African
lies at ECU has
ts asking what
g this problem
I to be taken to
k yourself why
an two African
iches here at i
Berry, a junior V
ications. "I am 3
re they just not
s or what Si
Director Mike J
tant Director J
9 available for !
bject. VanSant
vacation and
d out of town
:n are key fig-i
of coaches ai
in against GMU
CHRAMM
:s take on
i night, they
Wilmington to
i three game
me
les
turning off of
t, were just
len's Track
the Pirate
if strong pcr-
pucud hy
yes. Hayes
nishes in the
vin
n error, was
Ipern. With
I' went into
needing a
ast one run
fortunately,
k onto the
he Patriots
top of the
cagan was
attempt to
was able to
help from
bottom fell
nee featur-
ts took a 4-
liitter got a
JMU a 5-2
the inning
rail as the
ping for a
was unable
L
11 TuMdiy. May 4,
sports
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USAFTC
continued ftom page 10
5,000 and 3,000 meters. Hayes-
double was made more impressive
by the distances she run.
"She ran at least six miles said
Head Women's Track coach, "It's
not like she ran the 100 and 200
ECU got wins from Toshima
Dabbs in the high jump and
Crystal Frye in the shot put. In the
shot, Frye finished ahead of team-
mate Margaret Clayton, who fin-
ished second. Clayton did notch a
victory in the hammer throw and
qualified for the ECAC in the
process.
In the 100 meter hurdles,
Marshari Williams and Saundra
Tecl finished first and second
respectively. Both qualified for the
ECAC Championships.
The Pirates finished second in
the four team meet, behind only
Southern.
"Southern, the team who beat
us was very good, the others, Texas
Southern and Norfolk State were
good but didn't have enough
depth Justice said.
The men's team headed down
to New Orleans secure in the
knowledge that they could not win
the meet. The squad does not field
enough events to score the neces-
sary points to win.
"We went down there with the
goal to outscore everybody in the
sprint events Carson said.
The Pirates did just that. The
Pirates got first place finishes from
Lynn Stewart, James Alexander,
Brian Beil and the 4x400 meter
relay squad.
Stewart won the intermediate
high hurdles. Alexander finished
ahead of teammate, Darren Tuitt to
win the 200 meter dash. Tuitt
placed second.
"James Alexander had a great
meet. He won the 200 and ran the
anchor leg in the 4x100 and ran the
third leg in the of the 4x400
Carson said.
In the 400 meters Damon Davis
placed second while Darrick
Ingram wound up third.
ECU's distance runners
returned from a week off to per-
form well in Louisiana. ,
"We did really well said ECU
distance coach Leonard Klepack.
"There were 64 possible points to
get. We got 63. I'll admit the com-
petition wasn't as strong in the dis-
tance events as it was in the sprints.
But I'm still proud of the team's
performance
Brian Beil won the 5,000 meters
while teammate Steve Arnold
placed second.
The teams will take a much
needed week off next weekend
and return to competition on May
15.
Elway ends career with
numerous victories and yards
DENVER (AP) � They can't
replace his 148 victories, more than
any other quarterback in NFL his-
tory.
They can't replace his 51,475
yards passing or his 54,882 total
yards, which rank second only to
Miami's Dan Marino.
They can't replace his swagger
with the game on the line in the
closing minutes and his never-give-
up attitude that led to a record 47
game-saving drives.
The Denver Broncos, of course,
will find a quarterback to succeed
John Elway, who will officially
announce his retirement on
Sunday.
They will probably line up next
season with Bubby Brister as the
starter.
But no one can replace magnifi-
cent No. 7. And Brister knows that
as much as anyone.
"Nobody will ever be John
Elway Brister said. "I can fill my
own shoes, that's all I can do, and
hopefully that's enough for us to
win. I'm going to miss him as much
as everybody else
Seattle Seahawks linebacker
Chad Brown got it right when he
said, "Whoever replaces him can-
not really replace John Elway.
They can play the quarterback role,
but they cannot do the things that
John would do to give his team a
better chance of winning
Added Broncos owner Pat
Bowlen, "You're never going to
find somebody like him again
"We might get another player
who is just as talented as John from
a physical standpoint he said.
"The most worrisome thing to me
is losing a person of his caliber,
right at the heart of your organiza-
tion, because so many people
looked up to him, including his
teammates. When you lose that
type of leadership, that's the gap
that has to be filled, not the gap at
quarterback
Bowlen, who bought the
Broncos in 1984, has never known
the team without Elway. Neither
have the current players.
"I can't imagine not seeing him
in the huddle running back
Terrell Davis said. "It's definitely
going to be tough
www.attic-niqhtclub.com
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ApFpTlf
NC Lmamndmry Nightclub,
Votmd 1 at ecu and
Top too CaUmm Sam In ,
th Nation by Playboy Upmwn OreenviHa
mmgmtlnm OttOtm 1��7 209 E. 5tfl St.
752-7303 j
five bands
I Reading Day Eve Party
? -Slip Joint -Cold Sweat
? - One Step Beyond - Possible World
- Treading Evans
?
1.50 High Balls
1.50 Domestics
WEDNESDAY
JOE
fMORRISON
$2.00 ADM. 9-9:30 WECU ID
Friday
Local 420
In the new
Pneonix Room
FRIDAY
x Mike Corrado
? Special Guest Lucky Town
SATURDAY
t
Chairmen
of the Board
Beach music's 1 show
Last Greenville appearance until July
X
www.livewireonl ine.com





Tht Eist Carolinian
sports
Tuaiday. May 4, 1899 12
Opinion
cominued liom page 10
and as of now looks to be well on
its way to securing an NCAA
Tournament bid.
Being a Pirate fan over the last
year has been fun. The present
might not have had all of the glory
and winning that a fan desires,
however most Pirate teams did not
experience heavy loses and will
come back strong next year.
Stronger schedules and more
experience should make the 1999-
Softball
continued Itom page 10
to put together a comeback. Ameca
McDougall, when asked about the
first game, said "We played well,
but not our best game
That loss put ECU at an impres-
sive 11-3 in the Big South. The
team is 44-17 all together.
Coach Tracey Kee had mixed
feelings on the loss.
"If we can take this loss today
and turn it into a positive in practice
this week I believe it can help us
going into the tournament
Isonette Polonius, who was
drafted by the Durham Dragons,
said "I feel good about the season as
a whole and look forward to the
tournament
tp2�to
ntball
TEAMMATES.
PARTNERS
FRIENDS
��TflT When your career's at Tenet, you don't have co-workers. You have teammates. You have partners. You have
i' friends. People who are there for you. To share your joy. And your sadness. People like my colleague, who
Vy gave up nine of her vacation to 1 could ray home with my ikk daughter. You might call that a little thing.
But to me, it made all the difference in the world.
You'll find the four seasons at their finest in South Carolina- and a work climate to match at Piedmont Healthcare System,
a member of the Tenet Health Sytem. We're small enough to offer you a real family feeling, but big enough to give you
every opportunity to ihine. And we're getting even bigger, with a new state-of-the-art Open Heart Surgery Program and a
newly expanded Emergency Room.
Opportunities are now available for
new graduate RNs in a variety of areas.
Piedmont Healthcare System is located in the friendly, thriving town of Rock Hill, South Carolina. Here you'll find great
schools, affordable neighborhoods, a relaxed, hometown place just minutes from all the big city advantages and
attractions of Charlotte, North Carolina.
And, because Piedmont is part of Tenet HealthSystem, the second largest healthcare provider in the United States, you'll
be supported by a wide range of outstanding benefits, including:
$2,000 student loan � competitive pay
repayment with two year � employee stock
commitment purchase plans
� medicaldental insurance
tuition reimbursement
� 401(k) Plan
Experience the difference at Tenet. To find out more, please call (803) 329-6855
or forward your resume to:
Piedmont Healthcare System
Human Resource Dept.
222 S. Hwtong Ave Rock Hill, SC 29732
Fax (803) 329-6798 JOBUNE: (803) 366-1400
!6piedmon
?A Health.
An Equal Opportunity Employ
$?� Healthcare System
All the difference in the world.
Phone: 328-6387
Hotline:328-6443
www.recserv.ecu
.edu
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RECREATIONAL
SERVICES
Summer Recreation 99
FITNESS
Free Special Events - For SRC Members
Celebrate Fitness
Thursday, May 27
Free admission to all classes including prize drawings and
fitness tips at even' class.
DAN.S.E. Party
Wednesday, June 30 @ 5:30pm
Free DANSE workout featuring great moves, music.and more.
Aerobics
Group Fitness Passes
Gold Pass: $30.00 May 24 & July 30
White Pass Session I: $20.00 May24-Junel8
White Pass Session II: $20.00 June 28 & July 30
Purple Pass: $10.00 Any five class sessions
Free Aerobic Classes
May 17-May 23 June 21-June 27 Aug.9-Aug.22
Intramurals Sports
MAY 1999
Tues. 25 Softball Reg. mtg. 4:00 pm SRC 202
Tues. 25 5-on-5 Basketball Reg. mtg. 4:30 pm SRC 202
Wed. 26 Tennis Singles entry deadline 5.00 pm SRC 128
JUNE 1999
Tues. 14-on-4 Volleyball Reg. mtg. 4:00 pm SRC 202
Weds. 2 Racquetball entry deadline 5:00 pm SRC 128
Tues. 8 Basketball Shooting Challenge 4:00 pm SRC Sports Forum
Tues. 29 Softball Registration mtg. 4:00 pm SRC 202
Tues. 29 3-on-3 Basketball Reg. mtg. 4:30 pm SRC 202
Wed. 30 Racquetball entry deadline 5:00 pm SRC 128
JULY 1999
Weds. 7 4-on-4 Flag Football Reg. mtg. 4:00 pm SRC 202
Weds. 21 Frisbee Golf Singles 3-6 pm Frisbee Golf Course
Lifestyle Enhancement Programs
Intermediate Yoga
Date: Session I � May 25-June 17
Time: TThur 5:15 pm -6:15 pm
Register: Session I � May 10 - May 24
Instructor: Jihahn Lopin
Cost: $15 members; $25 non-members
Meet: SRC 238
ECU Employee Health & Fitness Day
Date: Wednesday, June 2
Time: 12:05-12:50
Cost: FREE
Adventure
qir'i
Sea Kayaking
Registration Deadline one week prior to trip
May 22 - 23 Sea Kayak & Hammocks Beach
$48 mem. & $68 non-mem.
May 27 Sea Kayak & G�)se Creek
(3pm & 7pm) $10 mem. & $20 non-mem.
June 11 Sea Kayak & Shackleford Banks
(8am & 5pm) $25 mem. & $45 non-mem.
White Water Kayak
Registration Deadline one week prior to trip
May 26 Kayak Roll Session (7- 9pm) $5 mem. & $10 non-mem.
June 9 Kayak Roll Session (7- 9pm) $5 mem. & $10 non-mem.
Rafting Registration Deadline one week prior to trip
July 9 -10 Lower New River Gorge$135 mem. & $155 non-mem.
Backpacking
Registration Deadline one week prior to trip
June 4 - 6 Grayson Highlands State Park, VA $48 mem. & $68 non-mem.
Outdoor Living Skills Registration Deadline one week prior to trip
June 2 Beach Camping
7pm Free mem. & $5 non-mem.
June 9 Introduction to Backpacking
7pm Free mem. & $5 non-mem.
Week Long Adult Programs
Registration Deadline three weeks prior to trip
May 17-21 Over 30 Adventure Week $225
July 12-16 Whitewater Skills Week $275
,j
13 Thurid
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762-2879.
HOUSE P
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for months
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i 8664. ASAi

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- North Elm 2
1 762-1725
ECU AREA:
j houses avail
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yards. Call �
� sage.
� NEED A pla
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(M-F), 661-2:
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2 BR. apt. Ni
must be nea
first week of
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SUMMER Si
1 bath on 11
ECU and Gre
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Available Mid
WASHERS A
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NEED 2 peof
room in Doc
washerdryer
air, fully furnis
7619.
SUBLEASE 1
(houses 1-2
Towers startin
AC, on camp
nished. Call A:
HOUSE FOR
bath, close tc
town, pets alk
Sublease for s
for full year. Ci
DUPLEX 2 BF
washerdryer I
close to cami
Please call 75
Available immc
SUB-LEASE O
August. St
$355month. (
2 BR. apartm
ers. fully fumi
rent for Sumr
$550 per mont
MOM COMINi
lovely private I
pus. On-site pa
10 and Antonc
smoking. No pc
TOWNHOUSE!
bedrooms, 2 1,
Wp hook-up
cios. 752-1899
561-2203 night.
1 BEDROOM.
tion. Ceiling fan
miles off camp
Call 355-5678.
Chris.
PRIVATE ROOF
mer and fall. W
campus. $175
phone linecab
erdryer include
2879.
WALK TO ECL
$296month avi
1st. 705 East 1
Street, near cam
RINGGOl
NowTakin
1 bedroom,
Efficiency
CALL 1





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13 Thundiy, M�y 4. 1988
classifieds
Tin East Carolinian
FOR RENT
. NOD 4 people to sublet 4 BR ipt.
J for Summer. Sublease for Summer
r wopp. to take over lease for Fall. In-
r terested call 756-1395.
I THREE BEDROOM house available
2 blocks from campus. Big encugh
for 4 people. Washerdryer hook-up.
� Large backyard area. Call Mike 0
! 762-2879.
� HOUSE FOR Rent 3 blocks from
� campus, 3 bedroom. 1 bath, central
' air, completely updated kitchen,
I available July or Aug. depending on
; renters needs. Contact Beth at 561-
8347 for details.
: NEEDED: STUDENTS to sublease
; for months of May - end of July. Play-
' ers Club Apts. Rent $240. Call 321-
� 8664. ASAP

! AVAILABLE JUNE 1: Young profes-
J sional couple wished to share
2400 sq. ft. house with serious
student. Spacious, second- floor
rooms with private baths available.
Access to all areas of house. Free ca-
ble and laundry; private phone line
available. Located in a secluded
� neighborhood within 10-15 minutes
of medical school and university.
J References available. Non- smoker a
must very affordable. Please call Ja-
son O 756-2636 for appointment
i more information.
I TAKE OVER apartment lease. 2 bed-
room, 1 12 baths, washerdryer
; hook-ups. Driveway, back deck, large
; back yard. $485 per month. 110-B
i North Elm St. Call for information,
! 752-1725
n ���������.��
ECU AREA: Five and three bedroom
houses available for June and Au-
gust. Pets OK. some with fenced in
yards. Call 830-9502. leave a mes-
; sage.
� NEED A place to stay for the sum-
� mer? 3 bedrooms. 2 12 baths
' townhouse near ECU. 752-1899 day
; (M-F), 561-2203 pager, night.
MALEFEMALE NEEDED to shere
�z BR. apt. Non-smoker, responsible,
must be neat) No pets, to move in
first week of June. Call John 757-
0610
SUMMER SUBLEASE 1 bedroom,
1 bath on 10th St. WD hookups.
ECU and Greenville bus route. Possi-
ble free furniture$346 per month.
Available Mid May. Call 758-7504.
WASHERS AND Dryers, X-large ca-
pacity. For rent and sale. Great pric-
es. Call 561-7614.i ,
NEED 2 people to sublease 3 bed-
room in Dockside, 2 12 baths,
washerdryer with central heat and
air, fully furnished. Call Andrew. 561-
7519.
FOR RENT
SPACIOUS TWO Bedroom apart-
ment for rent, including pool and
tennis courts. Sublet from end of
May til July 7. Then you can rent it
from there as you wish. Call Holly at
353-6871.
FOR SALE
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students,
ucrinpua uuee Dfcoor. rrewjr giaou-
ate student. Central air. ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $260 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
1 OR 2 female roommates needed
for summer to sign over lease. 2 BR
2 bath, very spacious and unique.
Can move ASAP. Call 363-8857. Free
tanning beds!
MALEFEMALE NON-SMOKER to
sublease 3 bedroom townhouse 2
blocks from campus. 12 utilities.
$200 rent, move in end of May or
1st of June. Call 830-6069. For Sum-
mer only.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath, spa-
cious apartment. Furnished wwash-
er 6 dryer. Rent $230 per month
plus 12 utilities and phone. Call
Mike at 363-8960.
ROOMMATE WANTED for summer
to share 3 bedroom house close to
campus. Private room and bath-
room. $235 per month. Call Brian at
752-2116 or 328-4215.
NON-SMOKER roommate wanted
for Summer sublease at Oakmont
Sq. Apartments. Rent $205 12
utilities. Call Dave, 363-7038.
FRIENDLY. FUN, 6 tidy female
roommates needed for Players Club
townhouse Fall 1999. Prime location
next to pool, tennic courts, club
house, 6 short walk to shuttle.
$260no. 14 utilities & cable.
Call Kristen, 353-2665.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom townhouse at
Tar River starting mid May. $265
month 12 utilities. Ask for Leah
at 828-266-7100. or 910-453-4887,
or leave a message.
1892 TOYOTA Celica for sale: white
with blue interior, very nice condi-
tion, spoiler, sunroof, good miles.
$6,400. Must sell. Call Christina.
768-9672.
1989 FORD Bronco II 4x4. New
clutch, brakes, Sony stereo with 10
CD changer. Runs well! $3600 OBO.
Call 766-4410 for more info. Must
sell, make offerl
FURNITURE! GRADUATING sell-
ing dryer and dresser. Both very
fljaad. onnrlitinn, and $6Q each. Call
7SS-63T2.
BODY 8HAPER Kit! Lose cellulite &
inches like crazy. Only $63.96. Call
252-767-2292.
SPECIALIZED HARD Rock 21"
Shimano brakes 2 yrs. old. exc. con-
dition. Best offer. 758-7901 nights;
707-3068 days
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER want-
ed to care for two girls this summer,
from 8:30 to 5 on Mondays and
Wednesdays (days may be flexible).
Call 756-0941.
ARTISTS NEEDEDI Servant's Heart
Christian Gifts. Cal 931-0773. Our
designs are fun and simple. 8"x10"
approximately. We pay per design.
Help us spread God's Wordl
NEED A part-time person to work in
a professional office serving as re-
ceptionist for a couple of hours a day
as well as being an assistant to oth-
er personnel in the office. Must en-
joy working with the public and be
easy-going since this is the overall
office atmosphere. Hours are 11:30
to 5:00 Monday through Friday, and
more during the summer, if needed.
Also, position may extend into the
fall, approximately 11:30 to 5 Mon-
day through Friday. Please contact
Polly Piland t 756-8886.
CHILD CARE help needed for 12
year old. Mornings and afternoons
until. Must have car. Pay neg. 353-
6317.
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls. Gold-
sboro.
HELP WANTED
CAMP STAFF: available positions
include: lifeguards, business manag-
er, counselors, and program director.
June to August resident camp in
Johnston County. Programs include
swimming, canoeing, horseback rid-
ing, arts and crafts, and outdoor
skills. Contact Kate Hoppe at 919-
782-3021 or 800-2844476. EOE
HAVE FUN at the beach and earn
money too. Henry's, a sporting
goods distributor in Morehead City
may be your ticket to a productive
HELP WANTED
SUMM-R FUN - Free picture.
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
friendl I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio! If
you model for me. I will give you free
pictures. Reputable amateur photog-
rapher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson. NC 27896-9001 or
call 262-237-8218 or E-mail hrorv
iaJc9simflaxxom
GREEK PERSONALS
day through f-rrdey. 8 aa fn tea
shirts and shorts and still have tfw
weekend to. er, study for Fall! Call
Hubert Talley at 800-545-5664 ext.
5289 today.
17 PEOPLE needed to lose weight
and earn income. Call Darla for free
information at 262-322-3316.
PERSONALS
FOR SALE
FURNITURE FOR sale: dresser with
mirror and chest of drawers, full size
mattress, lamps. All good condition.
Must be sold by May 16. Will sell for
very cheap) 752-7526.
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom apartment
(houses 1-2 people) at Ringgold
Towers starting May. $367 a month.
AC. on campus location, & fully fur-
nished. Call ASAP 830-0161.
HOUSE FOR rent, four bedroom, 2
bath, close to campus and down-
town, pets allowed, big front porch.
Sublease for summer and or lease
for full year. Call 931-9056.
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up, private drive,
close to campus, no pets, $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 355-7799.
Available immediately!
SUB-LEASE One bedroom May thru
August. Small pets OK.
$355month. Call 758-8642.
2 BR. apartment in Ringgold Tow-
ers, fully furnished, 2 bathrooms,
rent for Summer only (May-July)
$550 per month. Call 355-6707.
MOM COMING? Room available in
lovely private home close to cam-
pus. On-site parking. Walk to China
10 and Antonello's restaurants. No
smoking. No pets. 762-5644.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms, 2 12 and 3 12 baths,
WD hook-up ample storage, spa-
cios. 752-1899 day (M-F), pager
561-2203 night.
1 BEDROOM. 1 bath, great loca-
tion. Ceiling fans, air, heat, about 3
miles off campus. $285 a month.
Call 356-5678. ask for Jenny or
Chris.
PRIVATE ROOM available for sum-
mer and fall. Walking distance from
campus. $175 per month. Private
phone linecable in room. Wash-
erdryer included. Call Mike O 752-
2879.
WALK TO ECU - 1 bedroom apt.
$295month available now & Aug.
1st. 706 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
Street, near campus. 768-6696.
FURNITURE! GRADUATING, sell-
ing everything including: sofa, dou-
ble papazan, coffee table, entertain-
ment center, tables, chairs, end ta-
bles, dresser, desks, TV stands, skis,
fish tank, etc. 752-8093.
FICHIHUAHUA PUPPY - 7 weeks
old- all shots, male, chocolate tri-
color, Fice & Chihuahua breed. Will
be smart. Feisty. 975-0709.
TICKETS FOR sale: four Gold Circle
Lenny Kravitz Black Crowes and
Everlast. Call 524-5045. leave mes-
sage.
OAKLEY SUNGLASSES. E-wire
style. $90. Whistle and Bel radar de-
tectors. $50 each. If interested, call
355-3183.
SAVANA MONITOR with large cus-
tom cage. King snake with large
tank. Extra reptile cages and heat
rocks available. Call Scott or Ryan at
329-1205.
GARY FISHER Taikai mountain bike,
aluminum frame. Rock Shox. 7-
speed grip shift. Call 757-1587.
FREESTYLE BIKE for sale: chrome
1996 GT Pro Freestyle Tour, excellent
condition. During past year - rode
twice. Top of line accessories. Best
offer will sell. Call Marc. 758-7664.
KONSTANTINS STEAKHOUSE is
looking for individuals who are ener-
getic, professional, cooperative, hav?
a positive attitude, work well with
the public and as part of a team.
Konstantin's Steakhouse is opening
in the Atlantic Station Shopping Cen-
ter; Atlantic Beach NC Now htnng
experienced kitchen managerchief,
line cooks, food runners, waitstaff
and hostesses. Earn competitive
wages in a friendly atmosphere. Ap-
ply in person by appointment 252-
240-2224 M-F 11a.m5p.m.
INDUSTRIAL TECHNICIAN. Seek-
ing manufacturing student for tem-
porary position. Requires time stud-
ies and documenting information.
Please fax resume' to 752-4217 or
call 752-2111 ext. 297.
A FEMALE executive with a local
company is seeking an individual to
help with childrens' needs. Children
are 10 and 14, so your own transpo
tation is needed. Part-time during
school, full-time this summer. Experi-
ence working with children needed,
and references. If interested, please
contact Denise Keel at 752-2111 ext.
297 Potential candidates will be in-
terviewed. Resumes can be faxed to
752-4217.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
I NEED a babysitter for anywhere
from 3-20 hours a week. Can work
around your schedule. Must have
transportation. Please call ma at
355-0552.
HIRING: WAITSTAFF and hoststaff
for new Italian restaurant. Positions
available immediately. Experience
preferred. Please apply in person.
Antonello's Italian Restaurant. 2601
East 10th Street.
WAREHOUSE HELP needed at The
Carpet Bargain Center. Apply in per-
son, 758-0057.
GREENVILLE COMMUNITY Shelt-
ers, Inc. need: temporary case man-
ager July 1-Sept. 15. 1999. Respon-
sible for caseload of residents. Skills
in basic assessment of needs, crisis
intervention, counseling, agency net-
working, referrals, and human serv-
ice experience. Please send letter of
interest and resume to Job Search,
PO Box 687, Greenville, NC 27835.
For any questions, call Sarah Harri-
son at 752-0892.
SUMMER WORK. Need motivated,
hard workers to laminate fiberglass
at local boat company. Great pay.
Please contact 762-2111, ext. 297.
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY.
Student to function part-time in inno-
vative community pharmacy practice
in Greenville serving patient needs
and assisting in patient care. Must
possess excellent people skills, su-
perb telephone etiquette, ability to
multi-task under pressure. Good
computer skills a definite plus. Posi-
tive attitude, willingness 10 work at
any task, a yearning to tackle new re-
sponsibilities and cooperation with
co-workers definitely a must. No
nights and Sundays. Send resume
and hours available to: Job Opening,
615-B South Memorial Drive, Green-
ville, NC 27834.
HAM'S RESTAURANTS is now in-
terviewing for immediate openings
for entry level management posi-
tions in our North Carolina locations.
Please fax your resume andor cover
letter to David. 336-855-6688. or
mail to Director of Human Resourc-
es. Chelda Inc 3017 High Point
Road, Greensboro, North Carolina
27403.
CONGRATULATIONS TO Heather
Carroll, Jennifer Boyd, and Suzanne
Brown. 'Reach high, for stars lie hid-
den in your soul. Dream deep, for
every dream precedes the goal. -Pa-
mela Starr. Love. Paige
THE CARD Post Report 325 Ad-
vance inn: ECU with many years of
experience as a center for studies in
psychology 8- being as close cultur-
ally as geographically is a valu-
able resource for Wayne Co. in ad-
dressing a mental healthsuicide cri-
sis. To progress in providing the for-
um's firm foundation for education
The Card Post welcomes ECU'S pres-
ent 8 past administration, faculty &
students to share ideas, opinions,
questions & suggestions in address-
ing the causes 6- cures of this crisis.
With thoughts presented on post
card(s) they will be provided (via
photo copy) to all who wish to be in-
formed. Till more info in next re-
port please practice & polish the
writing or typing of your thoughts.
Prosper 'n Live Long. Tom Drew
HAPPY BIRTHDAY, my Darling An-
gel Tiffany (Winnie Cooper). Hope
you have a wonderful day and a su-
per party. You are very special to me.
Love always. Mom
GREEK PERSONALS
GOOD LUCK to everyone on exams.
We hope everyone has a fun. safe
Summer. Love. Alpha Phi
PI DELTA thanks all those who sup-
ported and participated in Relay 4
Ufa.
CONGRATULATIONS, LINDSAY
KaHav and Leslie on your schoiar-
Chi Omega sisters
CONGRATULATIONS, KELLY Du-
gar, on your job at Duke Hospital.
You are going to make a wonderful
nurse. Love, your Chi Omega sisters
ALPHA OMICRON Pi. good luck on
your exams and have a fun and safe
Summerl Love, your sister sorority
THANK YOU, Pi Delta new mem-
bers and Tau Kappa Epsilon. for
twisting the night away with us Sat-
urday. We loved the beach! The sis-
ters of Pi Delta
CONGRATULATIONS,
Brewer, on your acceptance into
grad school at Radford. Wa will miss
you. Love, your Chi Omega sisters
ZETA TAU Alpha would like to con-
gratulate our seniors! Thanks for ail
you have done! We love you and will
miss you all. Love, your Zeta Tau Al-
pha sister
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha - Good luck
sisters, on your finals! It's bean a
great semester. Wa hops everyone
has a good Summari See you in the
Fait
Pf DELTA thanks Zeta Tau Alpha for
a great time playing softball. Heads
up! Next time we'll bring helmets.
THE NEW sisters of Delta Zeta
would like to thank Erin McCracken
for the time, effort, and understand-
ing that you have given us. Any girl
would be happy to have a Mom like
you. We love you. Love, your Spring
pledge class
BEST OF luck to the graduating Chi
Omega seniors: Jen Harper, Jennifer
O'Connor. Meri Hines. Leslie Brewer,
Leslie Pulley, Patricia Hill, Patricia
Epling. Stacey Curtis, Mary Denning,
Kelly Dugar. Lauren Causey. Pam
Godfrey. We will miss you. Love, your
sisters
CONGRATS TINA Overbee on your
Betty Feezer Scholarship. You have
worked hard and earn it. We're
proud of you, your Pi Delta sisters
CONGRATULATIONS TO Ellen Bur-
leson. Lisa Woodliaf, Jen Mock. Jen
Cooper. Erin Kulbieda. and Amanda
Roberts on your graduation. Ws wish
you the best of luck, and will miss
you very much. Wa love you. Love.
your sisters of Alpha Phi
THANKS TO all of our dates for
Spring Fling. It wouldn't have been
the same without you! The sisters of
Pi Delta
THANK YOU. Phi Beta Sigma, for
sharing the grass with us at Relay 4
Life. We hope to see you there next
year. The sisters of Pi Delta
HELP! SUBLEASE 3 bedroom. 1
12 bath apartment in Wilson Acres
beginning June 1st. $700 month
OBO. Call 8300990.
OTHER
across from library. $300 a month
flat rate. Call 758-1348. ask for Wil-
lis.
WANTED: USED Macintosh G3 or
similar. Please contact Mimosa at
758-8283.
ANNOUNCEMENTS
SUMMER JOBSI Cooks and bus
staff wanted on Outer Banks. Hous-
ing available. Call Linda. 252-261-
0629.
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
Programmer
Full time, Knowledge of
SQL and OOP very helpful.
Mail resume to;
Discovery Insurance
P.O. Box 200
Kinston. NC 28502
or lax to: 523-1305
ATTN: Jirry ArntMi. IS Siti Minigar
The East Carolinian is
seeking applicants for
summertime positions.
Apply in person at The
East Carolinian office.
DELTA ZETA would Hkj to welcome
our eight new sisters: Melissa An-
drews. Rory Criscoulo. Bonnie
Crowe. Brianna Honea, Brigitte Isles.
Aimee Ouellette. Annie Riebesehl.
and Jamie Thevos. Congratulations,
you guys, we love youl
CONGRATULATIONS JAIME
Hand on your engagement. We wish
you 6 Frank the best of luck. Love.
your CI � Omega sisters.
EPSILON SIGMA Alpha would like
to congratulate their 34 new sisters.
We are so proud of you. Welcome to
our family. We love youl
SUMMER WORK
19. 5 per hour iippt.
competitive ichourihjpi
jll majors CmiiiHertd
ilegiblf schedule 10-60 hr.weck
Retail Service and Sale
(raining provided
Conditions apply.
756-7122
THE MATH Dept presents a Fluids
Mini Conference Thursday, May 6. 2-
4 p.m. room GCB 1011. Refresh-
ments available. Prof. KB. Ranger
(FRSC) Toronto; Prof. J.M. Dorrepaal.
Old Dominion. More info, contact
David Pravica. 328-1901.
ROCKY MOUNT Police Department
Special Olympic Torch Run Golf Tour-
nament at Maccripine Country Club
near Pinetops May 20 at 1 p.m.
$120 per team. Superball format.
Contact Sgt. Sikes 252-972-1425 or
Cpt. Wells 262-972-1485.
ADVERTISE IN
THE CLASSIFIEDS.
IT WORKS!
'
BIOIX)GY,SCIENCE,EDUCAnON
AND LIBERAL ARTS GRADUATES
NO EXPERIENCE REQUIRED
FREE TRAINING IN A FIELD WITH SUPERB OPPORTUNITIES:
BIOMEDICALINFORMAnON TECHNOLOGY
STARTS AT 28K. MOST PEOPLE EARN 34K WITHIN A YEAR, PLUS FULL
BENEFITS. IMS, INC IS OFFERING A FREE 4 WEEK PROGRAMMING
COURSE. IN THE LAST 2 YEARS. IMS, INC. HAS HIRED OVER 90 OF
THE STUDENTS WHO HAVE TAKEN THIS COURSE COURSES START
JUNE 7 OR JULY 12. POSITIONS LOCATED IN SILVER SPRING, MARY-
LAND 8 MILES OUTSIDE DC CALL 888-680-5057 WWW.IMSWEB.COM
Raleigh Area
Summer Jobs
$100 Signing bonus
if hired by May 10th
Work 40 hrswk
Nights off
Many 3-day weekends
Crew PaJnters$300-320wk
Crew Leaders$408-451wk
Plus profit sharing!
Collegiate House Painters
(919)460-6061
Not a student franchise company.
NEED A JOB?
YOU'RE LOOKING IN THE RIGHT PLACE!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN CLASSIFIEDS
This is the last issue of
The East Carolinian
The summer edition of
The East Carolinian will publish
once a week EACH WEDNESDAY
beginning MAY 26.
The classified ad deadline during the
summer is 2 P.M. MONDAY for each
'Wednesday issue.





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Title
The East Carolinian, May 4, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
May 04, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1338
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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