The East Carolinian, April 29, 1999






Thursday
High: 57
Low: 48
Friday
High: 61
Low: 48
Online Surve
Do you think something like the Littleton
tragedy could happen at ECU?
yes 46 no 53
www.tec.ecu.edu
Carolinian
died out the climbing wall on the Mall today
as part of Barefoot festivitcis.
Seepaae7
THURSDAY, APRIL 29,1998 VOLUME 74, ISSUE 44
Barefoot returns
to traditional site
20th annual
celebration held today
Terra Steinbeisf.r
staff writer
As the semester comes to a close
and the stress of final exams sets in,
students can escape the pressure of
classes and grades in the customary
ECU way. Today's 20th Annual
Barefoot on the Mall celebration
returns to the Mall this year after a
hiatus in front of Mendenhall last
year.
In 1979, an undergraduate member
of the Student Union wondered
why there was no spring celebration
or festival at ECU like at other uni-
versities. She proposed that the
Union sponsor a band and have
some fun activities out on the mall.
Her idea generated interest and was
met with great student support.
Thus, another popular ECU tradi-
tion was born.
However, planners said pulling off
an event like this is no small task. It
requires numerous hours of work
and planning by the dedicated
members of the Barefoot
Committee, consisting of fifteen
students and 2 faculty members.
"It all starts with the selection of
the Barefoot Committee chairper-
son in February said Stephen
Gray, associate director of
University Unions. "The chairper-
son is sworn in in May. At the start
of fall semester, the chairperson
starts to select the committee
members. By mid-October, the
committee is deciding on a theme
and the type of performers they'd
like to have
The committee must also choose
the musical groups who are to per-
form, largely according to availabil-
ity and price of the performers.
This process alone takes about 3 to
4 months. The committee also tries
to make sure that there is a wide
diversity of musical groups to
ensure that there is something that
will appeal to all students.
"February and March are intense
said Gray. "That's when the details
are really worked out and put
together
After the initial planning process is
finished, a graphic arts designer is
employed to come up with the
year's logo, which decorates
numerous t-shirts, cups and
SEE BAREFOOT PAGE 2
Friends of Joyner
to hold book sale
Proceeds will
benefit library projects
Anisa Gmrairi
staff writer
The Friends of Joyner Library, an
organization here at ECU is holding
their biannual book sale. Usually
the book sale is held after Spring
and Fal Break, but this year there
will only be one book sale because
of the libraries' reopening. The
book sale will be held at
Mendenhall Student Center in the
Multipurpose Room on Sunday,
May 2 from 1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m
and on Monday, May 3 from 8:00
a.m. - 3:00 p.m. The books that will
be at the sale range from fiction, lit-
erature and history to business, sci-
ence, social sciences, education
and textbooks (not necessarily new
ones). At the book sale, there is a
little of everything. These books
cost between .50 and $2.00. The
books were donated by the com-
munity including staff and stu-
dents. All proceeds go toward the
purchase of library materials and
equipment.
"This sale is a good way to redis-
tribute books back into the com-
munity, and it is also a nice way to
recycle said Beatrice Behr, a
member of the Friends of Joyner
Library.
The Friends of Joyner Library not
only hold the biannual book sale
that has been going on for over 15
years, but they do other things like
establish scholarships for library
science majors.
' Funds from book sales fund projecti like this study area where Mitt Harrell it working.
PHOTO IT MICHAEL SMITH
Mav is mental health month
Pitt County services suffer budget cut
Jane Rots is om of two staff psycholooists at the Student Mental Health Center.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL SMITH
Amy Elliott-
staff WRITER
The month of May is'National
Mental Health Month. Mental ill-
ness is said to be more common
than cancer, lung and heart disease
combined, but still receives less
resources than these problems.
The month of May, which origi-
nated in 1949 as Mental Health
Week, features advancements in
the area of mental health, promotes
mental wellness and supports the
prevention and intervention of
mental illness. There is an estimat-
ed 40 million Americans affected
by mental illness.
The Mental Health Association,
the leading organization of its time,
has been involved in North
Carolina for many years. The goal
of the organization is "to further its
mission to overcome the stigma
that surrounds mental illness and to
win a victory for mental health in
our communities and in our state
Representatives of the associa-
tion said they hope to provide
advocacy, education, awareness and
program services that will enhance
the quality of life for mental health
clients and their families. They are
also dedicated to making sure that
public mental health policy is fair
and promotes equality and oppor-
tunity.
In this area, those who are trying
to cope with mental illness can con-
sult the Pitt County Mental Health
Center. The center provides outpa-
tient counseling, psychotherapy,
psychological and psychiatric eval-
uations, medication management,
group therapy, psychosocial reha-
bilitation, case management, voca-
tional rehabilitation, intravenous
drug alternatives, DWI assess-
ments and detoxification from
drugs and alcohol, as well as other
programs. 'However, the center just
experienced budget cuts and clos-
ings due to a $1.8 million budget
deficit
"We lost 30 percent of our direct
care outpatient staff said Lynn
Stelle, Area Director of Pitt County
Mental Health.
Experts say that this type of
cutbacks are the greatest obstacle
facing the treatment of mental
health today.
"The greatest problem con-
fronting the mental health system
today is the lack of adequate
resources to provide care for the
large numbers of unserved and
underserved seriously disabled per-
sons in our communities said
Secretary H. David Brution, of the
SEE MENTAL HEALTH PAGE 3
Construction will restrict parking, traffic
Loss of Resident
spaces expected
Amv Wagner
assistant news editor
Site preparation for Phase I of the
construction of the new Science
and Technology Building is sched-
uled to begin this summer.
The site preparation, which
should take about six to seven
months, is required before the
groundbreaking and will affect the
amount parking spaces available.
According to Dave Santa Ana,
director of Parking and
Trasnportation Services, this will
restrict current traffic flow and
parking.
"This will pretty much cut the
campus in half he said. "It's going
to reroute traffic
The site preparation will require
Founder's Drive to be closed form
Christenbury Gym to the English
Annex. East 10th Street will be
connected to Founder's Drive next
to Umstead Residence Hall and the
Central Receiving and Stores
Warehouse, allowing only 'con-
struction and warehouse traffic a
news release said.
In addition, there will be no
through traffic permitted on
Founder's Drive near Christenbury
Gym. Only maintenance, service
and emergency vehicles will be
allowed through.
The construction will cause the
loss of 42 Resident parking spaces
east of Umstead. Therefore, the
current 17 staff spots south of
Flanagan Building will change to
resident parking.
Santa Ana said that Dowell Way
next to Garrett Residence Hall will
be reversed to one-way leading off
campus to Fifth Street.
Furthermore,according to a
news release, the private lot next to
General Classroom Building will be
closed, and the spaces will be relo-
cated to the lot between Rawl and
Austin buildings, which will be
improved later this year.
SEE PARKINS PAGE 3
"Booze It and Lose It" hits drunk drivers
Campus officers help
atD.W.1checkpoints
Amy Wagner
assistant news editor
North Carolina recently launched
the 1999 "Booze It and Lose It"
campaign, a two-and-half-week
effort by Governor Hunt's Highway
Safety Program to curb drunk dri-
ving.
Currendy, there are two "Booze it
and Lose it" campaigns that take
place each year.
"We will have another one around
Thanksgiving for the holiday sea-
son said Frank Hackney, manager
of external affairs for the Highway
Safety Program.
Law enforcement officers joined
State Sen. Fountain Odom,
Mothers Against Drunk Driving
State Chair, Cheryl Jones and oth-
ers in Charlotte on April 16 to kick
off the event. According to a news
release, sobriety checkpoints were
held the following weekend all
over North Carolina. There will
be periodic D.W.I checkpoints
held by individual law-enforce-
ment agencies throughout the
year.
According to Capt. Frank Knight
of the ECU Police Department,
there will be several "Booze It
and Lose It" checkpoints in Pitt
County as well as several "Click-it
or Ticket" checkpoints. The ECU
Police Department will provide
manpower to these checkpoints.
"We will send two to three officers
Officers are out in force to stop drunkdrivino.
PHOTO BY MICHAEL MCOtSEH
to help the Highway Patrol, sheriff,
Greenville police, D.M.V. and other
small towns to help man these
checkpoints Knight said.
SEE
PAGES





2 Thyndty. April 29, 1889
news
.news
briefs
Williams' care on March 29, 1997.
The East Cirolinim
Hospital employee
found innocent in
death of patient
GREENSBORO, N.C. (AP)
� An aide at a psychiatric hospital was
acquitted Tuesday of involuntary
manslaughter for restraining a
patient by holding a towel and
sheet over his face.
The death of 16-year-old Tristan
Michael Sovern prompted an
investigation by the CBS show "60
Minutes II" into the hospital
owner. Charter Behavioral Health
System, which runs the nation's
largest chain of psychiatric hospi-
tals.
Sovern died in March 1998 after
he was restrained by Megan
Duffany and six other staff mem-
bers at Charter's hospital in
Greensboro, N.C.
Prosecutors alleged Duffany, 23,
held a towel and sheet over
Sovern's face and ignored his com-
plaints that he could not breathe.
Defense attorneys said Duffany
was using a standard restraint tech-
nique.
Man sentenced
up to 18 years
for infant's death
MORGANTON, N.C. (AP) A
judge sentenced a man to up to 18
years in prison for the shaking
death of a 7-month-old girl he was
baby-sitting.
Jameel Eli-Alimim Williams, 22,
pleaded guilty to second-degree
murder in Burke County Superior
Court on Monday. Judge James L.
Baker sentenced him to 14 to 18
years, with credit for 320 days
already served.
, Prosecutors said Nikara
Monique Corpcning died of brain
injuries she received while in
Uganda to hang 28 in
first executions since
1996
Marijuana seized
from Tanana mayor
FAIRBANKS (AP) Drug
investigators seized a half-ounce of
marijuana from the mayor of
Tanana on Friday afternoon as she
waited to board a plane back to the
village, Alaska State Troopers said.
Donna Folger, 44, has not been
arrested or charged with any crime.
The case will be referred to the dis-
trict attorney's office for prosecu-
tion, said Sgt. J.R. Roberts of the
Statewide Drug Enforcement Unit
Troopers, acting on an anony-
mous call, reportedly discovered
about 14 grams of marijuana in
Folger's purse at about 3:30 p.m. at
Warbelow's Air Ventures Inc. in
Fairbanks.
Male prisoners
pry open doors
to get to females
TEXARKANA, Texas (AP)
Male and female jail inmates had
sex after the men pried open the
doors to the women's section.
The incident occurred over the
weekend at the Bi-State Justice
Building, which holds inmates
from Arkansas and Texas and is
operated by the Arkansas prison
system.
The sex was apparently consen-
sual, Arkansas Correction
Department spokesman George
Brewer said.
"There was no allegation of
forced sexual activity he said.
Four men took a pole for hang-
ing clothes and used it to open a
series of doors leading to the
women's sector, which hold about
40 inmates.
KAMPALA, Uganda (AP)
Uganda plans to hang 28 con-
demned criminals this week,
among them a man convicted of a
political killing during the five-year
bush war that brought President
Yoweri Museveni to power in 1986.
Scheduled to be executed at the
Luzira Maximum Security Prison
on the outskirts of Kampala is Haji
Musa Ssebirumbi. He was accused
of having collaborated with former
dictator Milton Obote and killing a
peasant in northern Uganda who
refused to disclose where
Museveni and a member of his
rebel group were hiding.
Jamaican leader soft-
ens stance on taxes
after six die in riots
KINGSTON, Jamaica (AP)
Life began returning to normal in
Jamaica Thursday after the govern-
ment said it will reconsider pro-
posed tax hikes that sparked dead-
ly riots.
Six people died, dozens were
injured, and more than 150 were
arrested during the week of unrest,
which paralyzed the economy and
imperiled the island's vital tourist
industry.
Several airlines and three of the
cruise ships that bring 2 million
tourists a year had canceled trips
Wednesday.
On Thursday, schools, banks
and shops reopened. In Kingston,
where mobs had impeded traffic
for days, only some unmanned
roadblocks remained.
CANNABIS
STUPIDA
Partnership for a Drug-Free
North Carolina -�S$
Partnership for a Drug-Free America
1-888-732-3362
www.drugfreeamerica.org
.artoonists
artoontets
The East Carotin
BE A CARTOONIST
GET YOUR STRIP PUBLISHED
GREAT RESUME BUILDER
NOW ACCEPTING APPLICATIONS
FOR FALL CARTOONISTS.
APPLY IN PERSON AT THE OFFICES OF
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i
H
UNC-Chapel Hill � An
increase in the aggressiveness of
UNC-Chapel Hill chancellor
Michael Hooker's cancer has led
him to take his fight against the dis-
ease to the National Cancer
Institute in Bethesda Md.
Hooker said he decided to
Undergo experimental treatment
after consulting with his physician.
Although Hooker's cancer is
incurable, he had been receiving
chemotherapy treatments every
three to four weeks in an effort to
across other
campuses
put his cancer into remission. In
March, his oncologist recommend-
ed vaccines as part of Hooker's
treatments.
Acting Chancellor William
McCoy, who has been in his new
position for a week, said Hooker's
doctor had consulted with the doc-
tors at the National Cancer
Institute and decided the move to
Maryland would help.
University of Tennessee,
Knoxville �The University of
Tennessee will lose up to 500 facul-
ty and staff next year and have to
raise student fees if the state legis-
lature and Gov. Don Sundquist can
not reform the failing tax system.
UT Pres. Joe Johnson said if the
state government doesn't devise a
strategy to patch the projected $365
million budget shortfall, UTK
stands to lose $15.4 million.
Officials say the university will
take an intensified economic hit
next year because of the increase
of undergraduate to graduate stu-
dents.
crime
Attention Returning Students
Planning to live off campus? If so, you can eliminate at least one long line by arranging your utility service in
advance. By planning ahead, you can save valuable time - and possibly money. These options are available:
Option A: No Deposit Required
At your parents' request, your utility service may be put in
their name. Just pick up � "Request for Utility Service"
application from the University Housing Office in Jones
Hall; at Greenville Utilities' Main Office, 200 Martin Luther
King, Jr. Drive; or at GUC Express, our satellite office
located at 509 S.E. Greenville Blvd.
Have your parents complete the application (wliich must be
notarized) and mail itto GUC, P.O. Box 1847, Greenville,
N.C. 27835-1847, att: Customer Service.
�Remember to attach a "letter of credit" from your parents'
power company.
SI Greenville
j Utilities
Option B: Deposit Required
If you wish to have the utility service put in your name,
a deposit will be required. Residential deposits are as follows:
Water only J 25
Electric only $100
Electric & water $125
Electric, water & gas 175
Electric & gas $150
You can save Umeby mailing the deposit in advance. Be sure to
include your name, where service will be required, when service
is to be cut on and a phone number where we may reach you
prior to your arrival at the serv ice address.
The service charge of$20.00 for electric and water, andor
SJO.OOor gas will be on your fret bill
'GUC requires you to be home when natural gas is cut on.
While we do not require you to be home when electric or water
service is cut on, it is your responsibility to ensure that all
electrical appliances and water faucets are OFF during the cut
on procedure.
-
-
April'26
Damage to Property�A staff
member reported damage to three
trees north of the International
House.
r Damage to Property�A staff
member reported graffiti on the
east fence at the Chancellor's resi-
dence.
LarcenyDamage to Property�
A resident of Aycock Hall reported
that her mailbox was broken into
and a letter taken from the box.
Larceny�A student reported
tjie larceny of her book bag from
the School of Medicine.
Trafficking Cocaine�A resi-
dent of Scott I lull was arrested at
his residence based on a warrant
on an incident that occurred.
Simple Assault�A student
reported he was assaulted by a
non-student east of Clement Hall.
The student sustained minor
injuries and refused to press
charges.
Misuse of a Fire
Extinguisher�A student report-
ed that another student sprayed a
fire extinguisher under a door to a
room in Aycock Hall.
Weltoro
Men's Hair Styling Shoppe
Barber A Style
2800 E. 10th St
Eastgate Shopping Center
Across From Highway Patrol
Behind Stain Glass
Mon Fri. 9-
walk-Ins Anytime
7S2-331I
say Pirates
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Cut for $7
Every time.
Pirate Special
Haircut
Barefoot
continued Irom page I
' posters.
Several notable bands have per-
i formed at past Barefoot cclebra-
� dons, including the Edwin McCain
'� Band and Widespread Panic.
"One of the most memorable
I moments of Barefoot that I can
recall happened a few years ago
'�' when Edwin McCain played Gray
-said. "There were about 8,000 stu-
'Idents up and about and everything
'�was going so smoothly. It was a
'�great feeling
Although Chancellor Eakin is out of
town today, he expressed regrets
about being unable to attend.
"Barefoot on the Mall has been a
long and valued tradition at ECU,
Eakin said. "It provides a wonder-
ful opportunity for students to
enjoy end-of-the-year activities and
is an event long in the memories of
alumni
For students. Barefoot on the Mall
is something to look forward to.
"It is definitely my favorite activity
of the entire year said Mollie
Grey, a junior. "So many people
come out and everyone has a good
time. It's the best way for me to for-
get about finals for a little while
The EnterSoft Network
1-888-2 7 6-4ESN
INTERNET
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Located at 106 Trade St
(behind Outback
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� Em Carolinian
SIS
Free
nerlc
62
The East Carolinian
Thanday, April 29,1899 3
Mental Health
continued limn page I
Department of Health and Human
Services in a speech at the annual
meeting of the NC Chapter of the
National Alliance for the Mentally
ill.
� According to Bruton, it is esti-
�matcd that of the more than 84,000
�jpersons with serious mental illness
needing services from a communi-
ty-based public system, more than
50,000 arc unilerserved.
Stellc said that the cutbacks will
lead to larger case loads for workers
and the chance that people will not
be able to receive the care they
need. She estimated that 700
clients were losing their clinician,
therapist, or care giver as a result of
the budget cuts. The center has
also completely lost several pro-
grams. Their respite program,
which was a 24-hour center based
facility for developmental dis-
abled children and their families
was cut from the center. The center
also had several satellite operations
in Ayden, Bethel and Farmville
which were terminated. �
There are services offered at
ECU as well. The ECU Mental
Health Services provides two full-
time psychologists on staff to pro-
vide necessary treatment. Mental
Health Services is located in the
Student Health Center.
"Student Health, in general, is
attuned to the mental health needs
of the community said Dr. Jane
Ross, a staff psychologist.
There is also a 365-day a year
emergency service provided for the
campus. Other programs offered
on campus include the Center for
Counseling and Student
Development and the Department
of Health Promotion and Well
Being.
Students in need can also call I-
800-969-NMHA for free mental
health information and referrals to
local services.
Booze
cominued from page 1
In addition, cable television will air
public service announcements fea-
turing law-enforcement officers
from across the state reminding
motorists not to drink and drive.
According to Hackney, the cam-
paign, which ends in the first week
of May, has been a great success.
"Just in nine-day period, we had a
total of 550 checkpoints statewide
with 1,609 D.W.I arrests he said.
I lackney also said that there were
many other tickets given out for
other traffic violations. In total,
there were 29, 350 traffic citations
given out.
Students said they are pleased with
the state's effort to stop drunk dri-
ving.
"Driving 60-70 m.p.h can easily kill
someone, so I think it's a great idea
to have the checkpoints, especially
on the highway said Quint
Noordstar, junior.
In December 1998, new laws went
into effect that would double the
maximum fines for ail D.W.I
offenses. The "zero-tolerence" law
for underage drunk drivers was
reinforced. Also, the nation's first
"zero-tolerance" law for truck dri-
vers and school bus drivers is also in
effect, a news release said.
:amenca.org
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liable:
ur name,
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ance. Be sure to
id, when service
ay reach you
r. andor
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v that all
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t
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tonally
be held:
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Furthermore, a new bill was intro-
duced before the General
Assembly April 15 by the
Governor's Task Force on Driving
While Impaired that would make
D.W.I laws even tougher. The law
includes a stipulation to lower
blood-alcohol content (BAG)
level for repeat offenders. After a
first conviction of D.W.I, a person
could not drive with a BAG high-
er that 0.04 for seven years. The
current legal limit is 0.08. After a
second conviction, a person is
restricted to a 0.00 BAG level for
seven years.
Parking
cominued liom page 1
According to Santa Ana, the
construction will cause problems
for the parking and traffic on cam-
pus, but it's nothing that can't be
overcome.
"Every time we have construc-
tion, we must make the accommo-
dations in parking and traffic
Santa Ana said.
To see a campus map indicating
parking and traffic changes expect-
ed upon the start of construction
may be found on the Internet at
eee.ecu.eduservicesparkadjust.ht
mx
r
South
Africans;
celebrate
UMTATA, South Africa (AP)
President Nelson Mandela
rebuked political opponents who
tried to drown out his speech at
ceremonies Tuesday marking the
birth of South African democracy.
Mandela returned to the land of
his childhood. Eastern Cape
province, to mark his last Freedom
Day as president in a celebration of
the 1994 election that ended
apartheid.
He ended up attending what
seemed more a set of dueling'
political rallies at a packed soccer-
stadium, signaling passions are ris-
ing five weeks before the nationV
second democratic election June 2
More than 25,000 people, main i
ly supporters of the African
National Congress, cheered and'
waved ANC flags as they were
roused by a chorus singing the
party's praise. Several thousand'
backers of the rival United'
Democratic Movement gathered'
in one section of the stands, creat-
ing a small sea of yellow hats and
In an unusual challenge to the
country's beloved leader and anti-
apartheid hero, the UDM support-
ers chanted and sang while
Mandela spoke.
"Today in Umtata as every-
where in our land, we celebrate
five years in which we have tasted
peace, freedom and dignity
Mandela said.
The UDM block chanted,
"Thabo, we will kick you out,1'
referring to Deputy
PresidentThabo Mbeki.
Mandela's likely successor.
Eastern Cape is one of the few
places Mandela's party faces a
threat in the electin thanks ro
the UDM, though polls have put
that party's popularity in the single
digits nationwide.
After delivering his prepared
speech, an angry Mandela
denounced his vocal rivals as "stu-
pid" and "vagrants
"While we are busy trying to
improve the conditions of our peo-
ple, they are busy pushing their
selfish agenda, with ulterior
motives. They want there to be
bloodshed Mandela said.
He urged ANC supporters to
remain peaceful.
The two parties have a recent
record of tension, including the
unsolved slayings of party officials
and supporters in the Cape Town
slums and in the Indian Ocean
province of KwaZulu-Naml.





Th� Ellt Cirolimin
4 -Matin. �HH 29. t988
carnpJJS
briefs
Thruay
Festival�Students will gather
on the mall for ECU's 20th annual
Barefoot on the Mall spring festival.
The event starts at noon and will
run until 6 p.m. The rain site is
Minges Coliseum. The program
includes bands, food, novelty acts
and prizes.
Concert�The Symphonic Wind
Ensemble, Symphonic Band and
Concert Band will perform at 8 p.m.
in Wright Auditorium. The concert
is free and open to the public.
Performance�Todd Lovett, a
lecturer in the department of
English, will give a solo mixed-
media performance that examines
some of the visions of the future
portrayed at the 1939-40 World's
Fair. Lovett's "Objects in This
Mirror" is at 8 p.m. in the Jenkins
Fine Arts Center auditorium. The
program is a part of PeopleAct, a
Greenville-based community the-
ater project that is funded by the Z.
Smith Reynolds Foundation. For
more information call 328-13
Fritay
Jazz Festival�The Emerald
City Jazz Fest Volume II opens on
Friday at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. Performing will be the
ECU Jazz � Ensemble with Bob
Mintor on sax.
Baseball�ECU and George
Mason will play baseball at 7 p.m. at
Harrington Field.
Saturday
Workshop�Susan Grilli, author
of "Preschool in the Suzuki Spirit
will conduct a workshop related to
child teaching at 9 a.m. in Room
102 in the Rivers Building.
Walk�The Stop Abuse for
Everyone fund-raising walk will"
begin at 10 a.m. in the Willis
Building.
Art�The 18th Annual High
School Congressional Arts
Competition Exhibition and awards
ceremony will be held from 1-3
p.m. at the Jenkins Fine Arts
Center.
Jazz�The Emerald City Jazz
Fest will continue with the Yellow
Jackets at 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
Baseball�It will be the second
night under the lights at Harrington
Field for the ECU and George
Mason baseball teams. The action
starts at 7 p.m.
Sunday
, Books�The Friends of the
Joyner Library Book Sale starts at 1
p.m. and continues iwriJ 5 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center. The
sale includes donated volumes and
library discards that will be sold to
raise money for Friends of the
Library projects.
Softball�ECU and George
Mason will play a Softball double-
header at 1 p.m.
Baseball�The third game in the
weekend series between ECU and
George Mason University starts at 2
p.m. at Harrington Field.
Concert�The East Carolina
University Symphony Orchestra
will offer a spring concert at 3 p.m.
jn Wright Auditorium. The concert
is free and open to the public
'Engraved, bracelets
for graduation
210 E. Sth St. 758-8612
Mon-Sat 10-6 Sun 1-5
Gunman's diary of
destruction discovered
GOLDEN, Colorado (AP)
Investigators said they are focusing
on three camouflaged teen-agers
detained shortly after the
Columbine High School massacre
as possible co-conspirators who may
have planned to join the carnage.
"They were in combat fatigues.
They said they heard it on the
radio. Well, it wasn't on the radio at
ihat time Jefferson County Sheriff
John P. Stone told The Associated
Press late Tuesday.
For the first time. Stone laid out
the timeline for the attack and also
disclosed that a school surveillance
camera captured the attack in the
cafeteria. Stone's department is
leading the investigation into the
April 20 shootings in Littleton, a
suburb of Denver.
Although Stone called the three
his "best leads sheriffs
spokesman Jim Parr told other
media outlets late Tuesday that
investigators had questioned the
three men and cleared them.
The discrepancy between what
Parr and his boss said was not
immediately explained.
Stone declined to name the
teens, who have been questioned
but not formally named as suspects.
"They are subjects of our investiga-
tion Stone said.
While the drama unfolded on
national television, the three young
men in dark jackets were stopped
by deputies. They were frisked and
taken off for interrogation. The
men carried no weapons.
Inside the school, Eric Harris,
18, and Dylan Klebold, 17, killed 12
classmates and a teacher before
turning their guns on themselves.
The three young men, who
Stone said knew the gunmen and
had previously been associated with
their "Trenchcoat Mafia have
maintained their innocence.
Investigators tested them for gun
residue after the shootings and
found no evidence that they had
fired guns.
All three teens claimed to have
heard of the massacre on the radio
and were able to name the gunmen
before the names had been
released, Stone said. One of them
had been expelled from Columbine
High School, he said.
The Denver Rocky Mountain
News identified the three men who
were questioned as Matthew
Christianson, Matt Akard and Jim
Branetti.
"We were just three punks with
a lot of curiosity Christianson said
in Monday's editions.
A woman who answered a call
Tuesday night to Akard's home,
told the AP she had no comment.
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The Friends of Joyner Library
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from I p.m. - 5 p.m. on Sunday, May 2, and from 8 a.m.
� 3 p.m. on Monday, May 3. Approximately 5,000 books
of all types will be for sale at prices ranging from SO cents to
$2.00. Income from the sale goes toward the purchase of
unique library items. Past purchases have included such
diverse items as a standing press to repair fine bindings, musical
scores, and a copy of the rare eighteenth century work
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BE
EAST
CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
3to
Accelerate
toward graduation-
Skate through a semester of credits.
Contact your adviser.
The Division of Continuing Studies
328-6143
An equal opportunityaffirmative action
university, which accommodate the
needs of individuals with disabilities.
1
H
MA&k
Tilt Em Cirolinli
; JI ' 't � �
There has
'i
Should carr
police. Let
II
Jirohibited i
ff stories pi
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serve and j
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it
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deemed to
It seems as
pius police
wannabes.
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agencies in
Excellence
We need no
should carry
! LETT
Sometimes w
the things tha
of a university
ity to handle
emblems will
The manner
Eakin addres
Community, ar
Carolinian has
the unfortun;
made by Mi
should serve
viewing diffici
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the more cons
tive of the alte
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diven so mud
LETTI
A.s a student ;i
Eist Carolina
concerned witl
lvr. Walter Will
ed by many pe
c; mpus. He I
"r iked over tto
hi recent comr
In my opinic
forgetting all of
MJr. Williams I
Gjanted, what
bMt no one is pi
i!has been ma
Baa





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ThutUiy. April 29 1999 5
easicarolinian
Amv L.Kuvmtkr EdHOf
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K?.3W 6368
ouwiew
There has been a lot of controversy over whether or not campus police officers
should carry .guns. Many believe that if students can't have them, neither should the
police. Let's look at this situation rationally. First of all, even though weapons are
prohibited on this campus, not everyone abides by the rules. According to a couple
$f stories published in TEC, many students have been found with guns on campus.
�I
Second of all, we're the students, they are the cops. It's in their job description to
serve and protect. It's not like junior high where we had hall monitors around to
yatch our every move.
With crime continually on the rise, it's good to know that the campus police can pro-
it
�tbct us even under extreme circumstances. How would you feel if you were on cam-
pus, fearful that someone was trying to cause you some harm and the person
'I
deemed to protect you only had a flashlight and a baton?
It seems as if many people have underestimated our cops since they are only "cam-
pus police Sorry guys, we are not in Mayberry and this is not a crew of Barney Fife
wannabes.
0ur police department consists of 45 certified officers, vested with full law enforce-
- �.
rrtent powers and responsibilities. They were also one of eight law enforcement
agencies in North Carolina presented with the 1998 Governor's award for
Excellence in Community Oriented Policing.
We need not forget who the civilian and who the officer is in this scenario. Officers
should carry weapons in order to protect the ECU community.
Campus response true measure of lesson
Sometimes we forget that one of
the things that makes the context
of a university so special, is the abil-
ity to handle the most difficult
problems with civilized discourse.
The manner in which Chancellor
Eakin addressed the university
Community, and the way The East
Carolinian has chosen to report on
the unfortunate public remarks
made by Mr. Walter Williams,
should serve to remind us that
viewing difficult social issues from
the perspective of the glass being
lialf-full, instead of half- empty, is
the more constructive and produc-
tive of the alternatives. At issue is a
rjian who, without question, has
diven so much of himself to our
institution over such a long period
of time. I do not know him person-
ally, but I have observed and appre-
ciated his contributions from afar,
and others have told me he is a
decent, unselfish, caring man.
What do we do now? Simply cast
him aside, and try to expunge the
university of his presence and
influence? Even assuming that the
remarks he made might be, and
this is nothing but speculation on
the part of some, reflective of a
deeper problem, what is the right
thing to do? Remember that we are
judging a man that did not try to
cover up his mistake, who has apol-
ogized for his remark and has been
an important part of our university
LETTER
H Williams deserves second chance, respect
it
1
;
d
a
As a student and member of the
K ist Carolina community, I am
concerned with the way in which
M,r. Walter Williams has been treat-
ed by many people in and around
ci mpus. He has been basically
"r iked over the coals" because of
hi; recent comment.
In my opinion, these people are
forgetting all of the good things that
Mjr. Williams has done for ECU.
Granted, what he said was wrong,
but no one is perfect and an apolo-
has been made.
Most people would agree that
everyone desen'es a second
chance, and in NC, you get three.
However, it seems that there are
those who think that Mr. Williams
should be completely disassociated
from ECU because of his com-
ment. I believe that this would be a
grave injustice.
Mr. Williams has dedicated him-
self to making ECU a better place.
He has given to the university not
only financially, but he has also
given his time and effort He is a
man of integrity and a man of his
word. I believe that he is purple
and gold through and through and
that he is a pirate at heart.
It would be a shame for some-
one who loves ECU as much as Mr.
Williams to be excluded from the
university.
I believe, as a soon-to-be-gradu-
ate, that ECU is better off for hav-
ing known Walter Williams and for
having him as a part of the univer-
sity.
OPINION
Ryan
Kennemur
Crunch time blues strikes big
I'm not lying, player. This
stress thing is killing me.
Vo. Umm. I know we haven't
talked in a while, and let me just
say this. It's not youit's me. I have
not had much time to write for you
beautiful people for many reasons,
one of which does not include
I lerpes, of any form. So don't
believe the hype.
Everybody knows that the
Ryan-Dogg don't be frontin I
have a lot of stuff going on with me
right now, and I'm a little fearful of
what the future may bring.
I lopefully the future will bring me
a scantilly-clad supermodel draped
over a keg, wearing Mickey Mouse
ears and one of those candy neck-
laces that turns your neck into a
representation of the pastel work of
Claude Monet. But, if you know
how the real world (not the MTV
one) works, it will probably just
bring more crap for me to deal with.
Like the past couple of weeks, I
have been trying to just keep up
with all the papers and projects my
teachers have been throwing at me.
Leave it to me to get classes that
are all writing intensive. I was just
mesmerized by that little aster-
icksasterickthat star-thingy next
to the course name.
I remember saying, "Hey look!
This class has a star next to it! It
must be da bomb Of course you
can tell that I said that last semester
by the worn-out slang. This semes-
ter, I'd be saying, "This class has a
star next to it! It must be off the
hook Whereas, in the 60s, I'd be
saying, "This class has a groovy
sign next to it, my flower-smelling
brother. It must be groovy like
aaww nevermind. Anyone want
to do some mind-expanding drugs
and have unprotected sex in our
consequence-free environment?"
I'm just kidding. I wasn't even
alive back then. Sorry about that
tangent, but what else am 1 good
for? Back to my opinion, which so
far is something along the lines of
"man, do I hate being a responsible
grown-up
I'm not lying, player. This stress
thing is killing me. Aside of school-
work, I am in the midst of finding
an apartment. I have lived in Belk
for the past three years and it's time
for a change. But my funds aren't '
plentiful, and I've been planning
on spending my birthday money
(June 23, if you care) on a 4-track �
recorder so that I may put on tape '
my own laid back brand of adult
contemporary, bittersweet folk
rock. Okay, so that part's a lie. I'll '
be doing white boy rap, but with- '
out having to repeat "My Name
Is
So I'm in something of a prob-
lem here. I don't get the money I
need for an apartment by working �
at this here newspaper, but if I '
don't work here then I have no J
experience and no one would hire
me out of college. So it looks like
I'm going to have to write more for
the paper and get another job next
semester.
I guess I am just afraid of grow-
ing up. I'm almost a senior now, and
I'm getting to that point where the
word "Panic" should be painted on
my forehead. So if you have any
ideas as to a good job that would
take up about fifteen-twenty hours,
that doesn't involve the words
"lift "odor or "denounce sexual
preference I'm all ears. Until
then, I'll be hiding from responsi-
bility in mysighdorm room.
OPINION
Stephen
Kleinschmitt
Columnist says farewell, adios
for half a century. Surely these
things count for something!
As a classroom professor of more
than 30 years, I would opt for the
suggestion in The East Carolinian,
to wit, give Mr. Williams the oppor-
tunity to continue contributing to
ECU, this time by participating in
the healing process on the very
campus "hurt by his words And as
noted, the incident could be "a cat-
alyst for programs which challenge
students of all races to combat the
legacies of a bygone era Time will
judge the nature of this unfortunate
event as much by how members of
the university respond to it as by
the content of the remark, itself.
This final period in my chapter
at ECU is referred to as the
post-Lisa stage. It has been
filled with basically enjoying
the remainder of my time at
ECU.
It's time to say farewell. If you don't
know yet, I will be attending
Virginia Tech next year, and this
will be my final article. I would just
like to sit back for a moment and
recollect some of the various expe-
riences here at ECU. There has
been a lot of fun, and a lot of pain,
and well, it's been real. We'll leave
it at that.
I arrived at ECU last August still
wearing my reserve uniform, hope-
lessly searching for a place called
"Jones Hall" on a "College Hill
When I arrived at the residence
hall, I met my roommate, a guy
who had a taste for marijuana and
foul language. I suddenly realized
that not only were the residence
halls full of all sorts of weird people,
but that I still had to endure two
semesters of residence hall life. I
tried ROTO, but decided that serv-
ing the remainder of my term in the
reserves would be about the extent
of my future military- service. I then
decided to pledge a fraternity, but
depledgcd when I found that I was
incompatible with the group. I
made friends with two guys in
Jones who were from the New York
City area, Basil and Anthony. We
still keep in touch to this day.
My life changed drastically at
the beginning of my second semes-
ter. I decided to quit computer sci-
ence, and began pledging again.
This time I found perfection by the
name of Phi Kappa Psi. 1 will
always be indebted to the brothers
of my fraternity for all that they
have provided me. I will never for-
get all the trips, socials and good
times we have had together. And
for all you quality men out there:
rush Phi Kappa Psi!
The rest of the semester passed
without much incident, and in May,
I moved into my first apartment in
the crappy King's Row Apartments
on Tenth Street. In June, I began to
write for this newspaper. I went to
summer school, eagerly waiting for
the fall to begin. And when the fall
began, it was a lot of fun for awhile.
This was also the time when the
infamous "redneck" article was
released, and I received more neg-
ative feedback than Roseanne did
singing the national anthem.
Then, a major thing happened'
to me in October. I met a girl in my
music appreciation class, and we
began dating. We dated for several
months, but somehow things fell
apan. One week after I threw her a
(very expensive) birthday party, she
left me. I was in shambles for
weeks. 1 felt like somebody had
ripped my heart out of my chest
and started doing the Mexican hat
dance on it. So much for love.
This final period in my chapter
at ECU is referred to as the post-
Lisa stage. It has been filled with
road trips, Wednesday nights at the
bar, and a whole lotta frisbee golf. I
have been hanging out with the
brothers and the alumni, and basi-
cally enjoying the remainder of my
time at ECU. As I look back at my
time here at ECU, I have really
enjoyed meeting you all and read-
ing your letters. If you would like to
e-mail mc, my address is kleindad-
dy@hotmail.com. Tell me how you
felt about my articles, good or bad.
I would like to send some shout-
outs before I go: thank you to Phi
Kappa Psi, Delta Chi and Brian
Tuck; the sisters of Alpha Phi,
Alpha Omicron Pi and ZTA;
Fulton, Joey, Jason, Chris and the
rest of the I Iarry's crew. And finally,
thank you to all of my friends and
readers for allowing me to tinker
and fidget with your minds every
Tuesday and Thursday.
Gone with the wind,
Stephen William Kleinschmit
laMMaaaaaMaaaaBBBali





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6 Thursday, April 29, 1999
The Eiit Carolinian
Four Seats Left
ui ,o tmciM'lm lev Suto net
Jason Latour
Life on Tuesday
Chris Knotts
YAtS 1 TWlHK
&Powmt UP. WE
SHOULD MOST
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utilities included
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BE A I!
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o� V IH PEesc' AT THE OFFltES OP
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NEED AJOB THIS
summe
:RVICES
University Housing Services will be
hiring student painters($7.50 per hour)
for the paint crew this summer.
Full and part-time positions available.
For details and applications, please
come to Office Suite 100, Jones Hall.
If you are interested, please apply by
April 30, 1999.
7 Thursday, April
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Barefoot will be
events at ECU
ive acts Wide
Edwin McCain
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and relaxation.
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7 Thursday. April 29. 19
features
TIM East DiroliniM
Take off your shoes, kids It's
time once again for the campus
spring highlight, Barefoot on the
Mall. The ECU Student Union has
sponsored this free annual event for
the last 20 years, and it has become
i tradition on campus. This year's
festivities will include traditional
happenings such as novelty games,
giveaways and live music.
"There's a lot of buzz going
iiround the campus, and wc hope
that this will carry over into the
day's festivities said Marcus
Frederick, chairperson of the
Barefoot committee.
If the past is any indication.
Barefoot will be one of the biggest
events at ECU this year. Former
ive acts Widespread Panic and
Edwin McCain have entertained
crowds, and the games and booths
have annually brought together the
campus community for a day of fun
and relaxation.
The excitement this year will
Student Union sponsors Ba�aaI am Ua
20th annual 83161001 OH Ul6
Many games, activities planned
Brookk potts
ST.UK t'llTEl
hopefully overshadow
some of the difficulties
faced in the past. Due to
reseeding of the grass on
the mall last year,
Barefoot had to be moved
to the front of
Mendenhall. Some of the
bands also showed up late
for performances and the
crowd got restless. The
general agreement from
students seems to be that
the bands could be a little
more prompt in their
arrival.
"The bands need to
show up on time said
Padej Yakamma, senior.
This year, the event
will return to its original
spot on the mall, weather
permitting. To alleviate
band scheduling prob-
lems, the Student Union
has decided not to publish
One of the main activities taking plate today is the climbing wall.
PHOTO COURTESY OF THE STUDENT UNION
Take out your end of the year aggressions at the Pole Joust.
PHOTO COURTESY Of THE STUOENT UNION
Hundreds of students gathered together for New York MC, Biz-markie. at last year's Barefoot.
PHOTO COUflTESY OF THE STUOENT UNION
1. Time capsule ceremony location
2. Registration Tent
3. Pole Joust
4. Bungee Run
5. Bouncy Boxing
6. Climbing Wall
7. Velro Wall
8. Wax Hand
9. Frisbee Art
Jarvis Hall
10. Student Organization Booths
a list of performance times to
encourage students to drop by all
day long. The festivities will con-
tinue throughout the day and music
will be scheduled at various times.
With the stress of exams weigh-
ing down on everyone, Barefoot on
the Mall offers students a day to
relax and have fun on campus, and
to wind down the school year with
friends.
"Last year was fun, it was like a
big social get-together said Laura
Nelson, junior. "It'll be exciting to
see what new games and bands will
be there
Barefoot on the Mall also gives
students a chance to enjoy some of
what their fees pay for. Since the
university sponsors the event, the
funding comes from students alone.
"It's our way to give back to the
students said Frederick.
This year is no exception, and
the Barefoot Committee has
planned the largest number of
games and events in its 20-year his-
tory. Some novelty attractions will
include wax hands, frisbee art, a
bungee run, flight simulator, velcro
wall, climbing wall and bouncy box-
ing. T-shirts and other prizes will
also be given away to students.
In addition to all of these hap-
penings, four bands will be playing
at various times throughout the day.
Mandorico, who won the local
Battle of the Bands, will be show-
casing the talents of Greenville
musicians, while Groove Lily will
appeal to the crowd's mellow side.
Two of the top draws this year
are Far Too Jones, a local favorite
who is getting national exposure
and radio airplay, and the Lost
Boys, who will be performing
despite the recent death of one of
its band members. The Barefoot
Committee expressed concern ini-
tially as to whether the Lost Boys
would be able to make it, but the
act decided to come to ECU
despite the tragedy. Many students
will be wondering how they will
sound without one of their found-
ing members.
"I'm looking forward to seeing
Far Too Jones, and I'm curious to
see how the Lost Boys will recov-
er said Joe Joyner, freshman.
Aside from the live music and
games, there will also be a ceremo-
ny on Friday to commemorate this
year's event with a time capsule.
Campus organizations have donat-
ed various items to signify the past
school year and to commemorate
the 20th year of Barefoot on the
Mall. The capsule will be buried
and is slated to be opened at the
50th year of the event.
"We would really like to encour-
age the whole student body to
attend this first-time event,
Frederick said. The ceremony foi
the placement of the time capsule
will be at 2 p.m. on Friday on the
General Classroom end of the mall.
Barefoot on the Mall will be held
today on the mall in front of Joynei
Library from noon until 6 p.m and
the activities will be continuing
throughout the day. Shoes, ol
course, are optional.
r
Events of the day
- Wax hands
- Frisfceeart
- Bungee run
� Bouncy boxing
� Flight simulator
- Velcro wall
- Climbing wall
- Prizes and giveaways
Performing bands
�Mandorico
- Groove Uly
- Far Too Jones
- The Lost Boys
Friday: Time capsule ceremony)
On the mall at the Gena
Classroom end.
V
v
,��
MM





8 Thyrsday. April 29. 1999
features
The East Carolinian
Students experience
textbook buy back blues
t 9 Thursday. April 2
Prices set athalf
new book cost
I'ii11.1.ip Git.res
SKMOK WKITKII
There is that time each semester
before finishing exams that most
students dread. It is that one final
duty each one of us must perform;
the last rite all must pass before
leaving: the selling back of our text-
books.
When selling back books, every-
one at ECU has had (he experience
of either rejection or acquirement
of a marginal amount of money for
their texts.
"A flyer for our lgvegas.com
textbook exchange says, 'You paid
$75 three months ago, they're offer-
ing $8 now. Get more for your
books said Steven Marasco, grad-
uate student and www.gvegas.com
editor.
Marasco and his partners are
offering an online textbook
exchange for ECU students.
Students can buy and sell books
over the web page. Those wishing
to participate just need to log on to
www.gvegas.com, click on the
'textbook exchange' link and fill
out the form.
"Our idea is to charge a little bit
more than the bookstore, but less
than they charge in the beginning
of the year Marasco said.
As for Dowdy Student Stores,
they have set their own policy on
the book buyback procedure.
"We pay half the new book
retail price, even if it is a used
book said Wanda Scarborough,
director of Dowdy Student Stores.
Students may also deal with the
SEE BOOKS PAGE 9
Night jobs rake in money
This avenue of
employment not for all
Kim:a Sikhs
STAFF HI 11' K
It's 9 p.m. and while most students
are taking a shower and putting on
their pajamas, others are donning
uniforms and heading to work.
Students who take on night jobs
at clubs downtown work some of
the most strenuous hours of anyone
around. Some find it easy to juggle
school, a job and a social life. But,
whether it's to pay the bills or to
pass time away, most students find
that just having a job benefits them
in the long run. It also proves they
are dedicated and willing to work
under any circumstances.
Jason Corse, a freshman who
works two jobs, one at a car wash
during the day and the other at The
Attic downtown at night.
"I have to work to pay bills, but
I also like to work Corse said. "If
I'm not working, I'm not happy
Corse feels that working while
he attends school strengthens his
resume and makes him a more con-
scientious person. He feels that this
is an essential quality that will ben-
efit him later in life. Having a night
job also keeps him out of trouble.
"If I'm controlling the underage
drinkers, I can avoid the pressure to
become one Corse said.
Other students feel that a night
job is the only route for them to
take.
"I know that if I had a day job, I
would just oversleep said Roy
Lien, junior, who also works as a DJ
at The Cellar downtown. "If I have
to be at work at 9 p.m I don't have
to worry about my alarm clock not
going off and not being on time
Although Lien feels that his
night job saves him the trouble of
having to get up early, he overlooks
the fact that having to work until 4
a.m. hinders the amount of sleep
that he does get. This can have a
negative effect on a student's per-
formance in their earlier classes.
Sometimes a sacrifice needs to
be made if one really needs the
SEE SHOW ME MONEY PAGE 9
THE ECU SCHOOL OF MUSIC AND

ECU STUDENT UNION PRESENT
EMERALD CITY
n"K

V JAZZ f�ST1VAL
VOLUME TWO8PM IN WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
FRIDAY, APRIL 30IH
ECU JAZZ ENSEMBLE
AND BOB MINTZER
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� �For o good time) call the Student Union Hotline at 252.328.6004, or visit our website at www.ecu.edustudentunion.

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rolinitn
9 Thursday, April 29, 1998
features
Tha fan Carolinian
IS
��
It's the bi
HESTA
of the year
Cinco de Mayo! (5th of May)
$1.75 Mexican Imports
$6.95 Beef Fajitas for One
$6.95 El Pescador
12 Price Pizza Grande
Books
continued from page 8
fact that their books may not be
bought back.
"Some reasons that a book may
not be bought back would be if the
professor has not requisitioned the
book; if the condition of the book is
not good, if it has torn or missing
pages or if the new edition is out,
then we will not buy back the old
edition Scarborough said.
Students also have to contend
with the fact that professors may
change their texts. Scarborough
encourages students to talk to their
professors to see if they will be
using a new textbook next semes-
ter.
"It just depends on the profes-
sor said Tammy Burkett, book-
store office assistant.
Also, if only a limited number of
students are taking a class, the
bookstore will only buy back a cer-
tain amount of the textbook.
"If you come to sell your books
earlier, you get a better price
Burkett said.
Those looking for an alternative
to the bookstore can try their luck
at the Book Worm of Greenville,
located on Arlington Blvd.
"We have a book that we look
through for textbook buying
prices said Josh Collazo, salesper-
son. "We typically buy books that
are in good condition or those from
strange classes
Book sellers may receive cash or
store credit for their texts.
"We'll take most anything
Collazo said.
Students may sell back their
books to Dowdy at any time, but
the main selling period begins
Friday, April 30. Besides the book-
store, students may also visit sta-
tions at the bottom of College Hill,
in front of the Student Recreation
Center and in back of The Wright
Place to sell their books. These sta-
tions usually maintain the hours of
Dowdy Student Stores, which are
7:30 a.m. - 7 p.m. Monday through
Friday. They are also open on 9
a.m. - 3 p.m. on Saturday.
Show me money
continued In page 8
money. According to Brian
Wallace, sophomore, a night job is
the avenue many students need to
take since it's the only thing that
will fit into their busy schedules.
"I think it would be difficult,
but if you need the money, it is
possible Wallace said.
Then there are other students
who would never consider this
form of employment
"I would never take a night
job said Chrissy Miller, junior. "I
need all the sleep I can get it's
hard enough trying to get to class
on a full night's sleep
"How could you possibly get
your homework done with a night
job schedule?" Miller said.
The average person needs at
least six to eight hours of sleep each
night to be able to function proper-
ly the next day. Without this
amount of much needed sleep, 8
a.m. classes can become a pain or
even an absentee nightmare.
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Tkt East Carolinian
sports
Pirates stomp Tarheels
11 TtwHiy,
Homers spell
Carolina's demise
lA l: I. k API. AN
SKNIOI � KI IH H
3The No. 21 ECU baseball team
- took down No. 9 North Carolina
f Tuesday night in front of a sold out
crowd of 2,810 fired up fans at
Harrington Field.
Tuesdays win over the Tar
Heels was the first time the Pirates
took down Carolina since a 6-4 vic-
tory in 1995. The game was tied in
.the seventh inning when John
Williamson knocked out what
,would be the game winning home
.run as he hit in Steve Salargo to put
the Pirates up 7-5. Lee Delfino fol-
lowed later in the inning to put the
last nail in the
Carolina coffin
with a solo
Home Run to up
the score to 8-5.
"Steve was on
first and I was
just trying to get
a hit and luckily
I was able to
drive it out
John Williamson
said. "The wind
was blowing out
and I was able to
get a good piece
of it and was able
to drive it
The Pirates
improved their record to 36-10, but
an astounding 7-1 against ACC
teams this season. The Tar Heel's
Pirate outfielder John Williamson
FILE PHOTO
I
ECU trainer saves
runner's life
Keyeck receives
award at banquet
Maniiy Rkiitkh
STACK WRI'I'KR
What started out as a routine day on
the job for Kelly Keyeck, suddenly
changed with the sight of a col-
lapsed runner.
The 19-year-old sophomore
from Atlanta, Ga. was crossing
through the warm-up field at the
Duke
Invitational
when she came
across a George
Mason runner
laying on the
ground.
"I saw the
girl on the
ground, so I got her up and walked
her around said Keyeck
What happened next was totally
unexpected. Cydonie Mothersill,
the George Mason runner, went
completely limp and quit breathing.
All the rescue training that Keyeck
had received while in the sports
medicine program was now of
Personal Info:
Name:KeHy Keyeck
Age:19
Year:Sophomore
Hometown:Atlanta, GA
Major:Sports Med
Intramural team
travels to California
Ladies to play in
national championship
Kristv Daniki.
.SSISTNT SI'OH IS !�; I)l I OH
The third-year intramural basket-
ball team. Bomb Squad III, will be
heading to Los Angeles, California
to try and bring the championship
title home with them. ,
The team is one of 20 that will
be participating in the National
Championship for Intramural
Teams.
According to Steve Staton, coach
of the team, they played in the invi-
tational Regional Championship
tournament in Chapel Hill. They
won there and are now headed to
California to try for the national
title.
The tournament in California
will consist of different intramural
teams from across the country.
According to Hope Murray, cap-
tain and guard for the team, compe-
tition will begin on Friday.
record fell to 37-10 after the loss.
"This was a big win for our team.
The three years
since I've been
here, we
haven't ever
beaten
Carolina said
Josh Bucy,
Pitcher. "In
baseball, the
CAA is kind of
the benchmark
and to be 7-1
against a con-
ference like
that is a great
accomplish-
ment for our
team
The game
was all UNC for the first half of the
game as the Pirates gave up three
errors and four runs to find them-
selves in a 4-0 deficit going into the
bottom of the fourth inning. Then
after posting two runs in the bottom
of the fourth, the Pirates added one
run in the fifth and then tied it up in
the sixth inning as Lee Delfino was
hit in by Chad Tracy's RBI double
to bring the Pirates in with one.
Then Tracy scored on another RBI
double off the bat of Catcher Jason
Howard to tie the game up.
Last weekend, the Pirates fell to
the second spot in CAA, and
although they are still not ranked on
the Collegiate Baseball Poll, the
Pirates moved up to the 21 spot this
week in the USAToday ESPN Top
25 and stayed in the 23 spot in the
Baseball America Poll.
The Pirates will take on North
Carolina again tonight in Chapel
Hill. Game time is set for 7:00.
Thur�d�y. April 29, 1999 10 .
North Carolina at East Carolina
Apr 27,1999 at Greenville, N.C. (Harrington Field):
North Carolina 6 (37-10)
Name (Pos) AB R H RBI BB SO P0 A
M0YLAN, Dan c 5 2 3 3 0 18 6
HOOPER, Clay ss 5 0 2 0 0 12 3
LaMARSH, Chris 2b 4 12 1 10 13
SHEARIN, Adam cf 5 0 2 0 0 14 0
GODWIN, Tyrell If 5 111 0 2 0 0
EAREY, Ryan 3b 4 0 0 0 110 0
MADEIRA, Jay lb 4 110 0 2 6 1
McCAY, Matt rf 2 0 0 0 0 13 0
MATHEWS, Ryan dh � 3 1 0 1 0 0 0 0
Totals 37 611 6 2 9 24.8
East Carolina 8 (36-10)
Name (Pos) AB R H RBI BB SO P0 A
MOUNARI, James cf 4 10 0 115 0
SCHNABEL, Nick 2b 110 0 3 0 11
SALARGO, Steve If 4 2 3 1 0 0 2 0
WILLIAMSON, John rf 3 112 114 0
BAKICH, Erik 3b 4 0 0 1 0 0 0 2
DELFINO, Lee ss 2 2 2 2 10 0 2
TRACY, Chad lb 4 111 015 0
HOWARD, Jason c 4 0 11 0 2101
GENTRUP, Chris dh 2000 0100 J$
GODWIN, Cliff dh 2000 0200
SCOTT, Cory p 0000 0000
BUCY, Josh p 0000 0000
Totals 30 8 8 8 6 8 27 6
i
extreme importance.
"It took a few minutes to regis-
ter that she wasn't breathing said
Keyeck. "But I didn't think, I just
reacted
Immediately Keyeck surveyed
the scene and began rescue breath-
ing; that is, CPR without the com-
pressions. Mothersill stopped
breathing on three separate
accounts but was finally able to
breathe on her own after the third
attempt.
"The final time, I left her on her
side and kept yelling at her to stay
with me said Keyeck.
By this time, a crowd had circled
itself around the
two and para-
medics were
well on their
way. Included in
the crowd was
head athletic
trainer, Dave
Engleheart from
Duke University.
"By the time I got there, Kelly
had everything under control said
Engleheart. "The only thing I
could do was direct the ambu-
lance
Mothersill was diagnosed with
having an asthma attack and was
SEE TRAINER PACE I!
There are 10 men's teams and
10 women's teams.
"We'll begin with a pool play.
After the pool play, they'll take the
top two seeds from each pool to
make the top two men and women
teams Murray said.
According to Murray, this is the
fourth year they have been to the
national competitions. All three
previous years they have lost out in
the final game.
"This team has been together
for a while. We are like a close knit
family Murray said.
According to Coach Staton, with
this much experience in the tourna-
ment, the Bomb Squad III hopes to
be able to bring home the title this
year.
"This has been a working
progress. The girls have a good mix
up like any other team and we hope
this will be what makes them suc-
cessful Staton said.
According to former lady pirate
Tomekia "Fruky" Blackmon, this
year they are going for the revenge.
"This is a good chance for us to
SEE TEAM PAGE II
EASTGATI
I b"01 Miidiy
The track surrounding Bunting Field is the current practice facility for ECU'S track teams
PHOTO BY MIKE JACOBSEIt
The ECl' track team hasn't suf-
fered a loss at home in almost 20
years. One reason for this impres-
sive record is that the team has not
hosted a meet since the 1970s.
ECU lacks the facilities for
events like the high jump and the
pole vault and the track itself is
rapidly falling apart at its seams.
These factors prevent track and
field meets from being held at
ECU and frustrates track team
members.
"The conditions are horrible
and it's sad that this is a college
facility said Justin England, a
junior on the men's cross-country
team. "There are tons of high
schools that have better facilities
than this. The sprinters are by far
the best athletes at ECU. Having
to train on this is just horrible and
they deserve better
Track team members compete
in the steeple chase event, but lack
the water pit to train on. Long
jump and triple jump areas are out-
dated and cracks in the track sur-
face endanger runners. Track ath-
letes say the current facilities cause
them to suffer more shin splints
and muscle injuries, as well as put
them at a disadvantage when com-
pared to the equipment of other
Division I schools.
SEE TRACK TEAM PAGE II
ECU CAA Track Laurels
Men
Long Jump, 1995
100 meters, 1993
100 meters, 1994
100 meters 1997
100 meters 1998
100 meters 1999
400 meters 199
400 meters 1996
400 meters 1997
400 meters 1998
400 meters 1999
Triple Jump 1994
Triple Jump 1995
200 meters 1992
200 maters 1994
200 meters 1995
200 meters 1998
4x100 meter relay 1997
4x100 meter relay 1988
4x400 meter relay 1987
4x400 meter relay 1988
4x400 meter relay 1989
Despite all of
ECU track team:
Women
long Jump 1997
100 meters 1992
100 meters 1996
100 maters 1997
Triple Jump 1990
Triple Jump )996
200 meters 1990
200 meters 1992
200 meters 1993
High Jump 1996
4x100 meter relay 1990
4x100 meter relay 1897
5,000 meters 1994
10,000 meters 1890
Hammer Throw 1999
Discus Throw 1998
Shot Put IfftS
Kingston Gar
two bedroom
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Free Basic Cable
Tjg Bad. T�yp Batt
Central Air
Mini- Blinds
Elway announcement set for Sunday
No. 1 to retire
after 16 seasons
DENVER (AP)�On Sunday,
John Elway's football career will
officially end, brought down by the
sort of physical ailments that dog
many 38-ycar-olds, let alone one
who has been pounded for 16 sea-
sons.
Denver Broncos owner Pat
Bowlcn confirmed Monday that
Elway was leaving football because
he "felt in his own mind that he
had some physical problems he
didn't think he could overcome
Hamstring, back and rib injuries
caused the usually durable Elway
to miss all or part of six games last
season. Of more concern, however,
was a troublesome left knee. Elway
played with a brace on that knee
throughout his career. Limping
around a golf course in California
last weekend, he admitted he even-
tuallywill require an artificial knee.
Bowlcn said a news conference
to announce the retirement, already
delayed several times, will be held
Sunday at a time and location to be
determined later this week.
"We wanted to be very sensitive
to the families involved in the
Columbine (school shooting) situa-
tion Bowlen said. "We wanted to
make sure we did not in any way
intetrupt the grieving process.
"We feel that Sunday probably is
the time when we could put this
tragedy behind us, and perhaps
John's press conference could be
received as sort of a happy time
In Monday's Denver Post,
Elway left no doubt about his plans.
"Absolutely, I'm retired he told
the newspaper. "I seriously consid-
ered coming back, but I just could-
n't make it because of my knee
Bowlen was in Australia nearly
two weeks ago, promoting his
team's Aug. 6 preseason game
there, when he received a tele-
phone message from Elway.
"As soon as I got the message, I
knew what it was about Bowlen
said. "I called him back and basical-
ly it was a short conversation. He
said Pat, I've decided to retire and
go on with the rest of my life I told
him I respected his decision and
was really happy for him.
"Because I couldn't get back
until the following week, we origi-
nally decided to announce it on
Wednesday (April 21). With what
happened at Columbine (April 20),
that was very much not appropriate.
And it was just a matter of time
before the press figured out what
was going on
Bowlen, who said he will retire
Elway's No. 7, insisted he would
SEE ELWAY MGE II


May 1,
AtTta
70C
ite
HKfHr�L�






I 29, 1999 10 .
na
igton Field);
11 Thundiy. April 29, 1999
sports
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n the track sur-
ners. Track ath-
it facilities cause
rc shin splints
s, as well as put
tage when com-
pment of other
M PAGE II
ire 19
dp 19
iter relay 1990
itef relay 1997
ters 1834
eters 1990
Throw19
hraw 1999
1999
iy
)ack and basical-
onversation. He
ded to retire and
of my life I told
lis decision and
r him.
jldn't get back
week, we origi-
announce it on
21). With what
ibine (April 20),
not appropriate,
matter of time
gured out what
id he will retire
iisted he would
PAGE II
EASTGATE MINI STORAGE
KOI Mmtoy Ir. � (Off L 101k Street)
752-6900
Features editor &
writers needed
�Must be creative, responsible self-motivated,
and able to meet deadlines. Also have good
grammar & editing sMIIs.
� Apply at the second floor of Student Publications
Building or call 328-6366

easir- �
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land
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sector 9
Track Team
Continued from pigi 10
"What we have cannot be justi-
fied as facilities said Vaughn
Monroe, a senior on the men's
team. "I feel the track is atrocious
and if you can spend $2 million to
see the football team get burned up
on the screei then you can spend
$1 million to resurface a track for a
team that is going to win. The track
hinders us and we are more prone to
muscle pulls and strains
Track and field for both the men
and women, is one of the most suc-
cessful sports at ECU. Most recent-
ly, the Pirate track team notched
two third place finishes at the Penn
Relays, track's biggest event of the
season. Head coach Bill Carson is in
his 31st season and has coached 42
Ail-American award winners, 24
CAA individual champions, and
won the '88 District Coach-of-the-
year award. Women's coach Charles
Justice, in his eighth season, posted
equally impressive marks, winning
the '97 Coach-of-the-year award
and led his team to four consecutive
second place finishes at the CAA
Championships from '9497. With
the track team's impressive records,
many team members believe they
deserve new facilities.
"Wc are working our butts off
going to ECAC, placing high and
we are the only school in our con-
ference who cannot host conference
championships said senior sprint-
er Nicky Coins. "We are winning
and the administrators aren't giving
us what we deserve and that is my
opinion. We always hear about the
cost, but I don't think the adminis-
tration knows how fast we could
make our money back
Athletic department administra-
tors were just recently posed with
the task of providing new track
facilities after a deal with the
Walker Center fell through in the
summer of '98. The Walker Center
is affiliated with the International
Olympic Committee and these
organizations had planned to fund
and build a new track facility at
ECU. The new track would have
been part ofa larger project to bring
Olympic athletes from around die
world to train in Greenville.
Following the IOC's recent
monetary scandals and internal con-
flicts; along with a lack of sponsor-
ship on the local level, the Walker
Center project was dissolved. ECU
was then left with the problem of
finding other means of revitalizing
current track facilities.
"I think our athletic department
knows that the need for a new track
is there Justice said. That costs
money and it is in their hands to
come up with the funding for it"
The lack of track and field facili-
ties has also affected the recruiting
process at ECU. According to
Justice, many outstanding recruits
have come to ECU and their visits
have gone well, but when they view
the current facilities they often
decide to go to school somewhere
else.
"I'm turning down kids that are
coming for the high jump and we
don't take pole vault kids Carson
said. "Even the long jump and
triple jump is not something I'm
comfortable with as far as recruiting
because of the facilities
According to Carson, the track
location is ideal but there is no
question it needs to be resurfaced.
Carson believes the track will be
refurbished next year and perhaps
as soon as the fall of '99. Despite
Carson's expectations, many ECU
track athletes are not holding their
breath.
"Working with ECU is like
you're on a ten-year plan Coins
said. "Like 'maybe 'hopefully'
and 'someday' are words that con-
tinually pop up from administrators
when it comes time to really lay the
money on the line and get it done
Team
Continued from page 10
take revenge on last year. We have a
good chance of winning
KINGSTON RENTALS
3002 Kingston Circle � Greenville, NC 27&5S

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Pastii � Pizza � Salads � Sandwiches � Homemade � Soups � asserts
Dine In or Take Chit � Boxed Lunches Available
Dining Room Open
Mon-Thurs 1030AM -9PM Fri St Sat 1030AM - 10PM
Closed Sundays � Full ABC Permits
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May 1, 1999 from 1pm to 6pm
At The Kappa Sigma House
700 East Tenth Street
757-1005
Capt Cook and The CoconiltS
Going to be around this
summer?
The East
Carolinian
is looking for summer
advertising representatives
Enjoy working with people?
Want to polish your customer
service skills?
Training providedl
Enthusiasm requiredl
Become a team player at
The East Carolinian
t
Apply at TEC office
Second Floor
Student Publications Bldg.
before May 1, 1999
J
Blackmon said.
The ladies will be leaving
Thursday morning and returning
home Monday, hopefully with the
title.
Trainer
Continued from page 10
kept in the hospital for four days
before being released.
Unfortunately, she is not the only
one living with this constant obsta-
cle. Asthma is a frequent occur-
rence in many athletes and can
only be controlled with the con-
stant use of medication.
"Where asthma becomes a
problem is when the athlete does
not use medication properly said
Mike Hanley, ECU head athletic
trainer. "They are supposed to use
it before practice and throughout
the day. It is a very common prob-
lem
At the annual Student Athletes
Award Banquet, Keyeck was rec-
ognized for her heroic deed and
was presented with a commemora-
tive watch.
"What Kelly did points to need-
ing qualified people at all athletic
events said Hanley. "We are very
luckv to have her
Keyeck didn't know specifically
what caused the runner to collapse
that day; she was just merely react-
ing to the signs. The sports medi-
cine program, CPR and first aid
training had taught Keyeck exactly
wh-d to dp.
For anyone who wishes to work
with an athletic team at the univer-
sity must first go through a first
year of rookie training which con-
sists solely of observation, before
being given hands-on experience.
Every two weeks students are
evaluated and graded, and if their
application is accepted, they are
considered a curriculum student
after a year.
W&diforTECs I
latest publication '

t
� :





Till E�t Carolinian
Elway
Continued Iron page 10
not lower his expectations for the
two-time Supc. Bowl champions
this season, despite the loss of the
Hall of Fame-bound quarterback.
"John will be missed, for sure
Bowlen said. "But our expectations
are going to be the same. I think
we've got a ver solid football team.
Bubby Brister is going to play well,
and, of course, we have Terrell
Davis and many other very good
players on this team.
"I would have loved to have had
John come back for another year.
I'd love to see him three-peat, do
something that no other quarter-
back has done in history. But that
wasn't to be. So we'll go forward.
We'll be fine. I think we'll be a
good football team, if not a great
football team
The leadership void left by
Elway's exit might be harder to
overcome, Bowlen said.
"Everybody loves to talk about
the comebacks and all the rest of
those things, but there is much,
much more to John's participation
on this team than that he said.
"His physical accomplishments are
unparalleled, but my biggest con-
cern right now is the man that John
was�the guy he was in the locker
room and the stability he brought.
Losing that is going to be difficult
for us, quite frankly
Linebacker Bill Romanowski
said he saw the retirement coming.
"Last year when he came back,
he s Jd that definitely was going to
be his last year Romanowski said.
"You have to believe what he said.
In my mind, it's always been offi-
cial.
"In the two weeks prior to the
Sup' r Bowl last year, John's inten-
sity was unbelievable. I've never
seen him like that. He wanted that
game so badly. You just knew
But several other teammates,
even when confronted with the
evidence of Elway's decision, were
in a state of denial Monday.
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NC lagandary Nightclub, j
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- f
East Carolina Paintball
Take Hwy 33 West from Greenville, 8 miles
past the airport. Turn right at the Belvoir
Cornerstop, on to Porter Rd. Go 2.5 miles
and turn left at the yellow signs. Park
in front of our Army tent.
jkidentDiscount Call
C� SUN, 11:00AM TILL 5:30PM "T C ti
Rations during the week w"T
Byour phone book for
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s5 mask rental
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s8 field fee
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for 100 paintballs
coupons
COINI
sports
Thunday. April 28.1989 1�fl
L� M
rrpperty I lonoywwni
Aoartm8rts& Rental Houses
Pf) Hnt ATS ' tw nmnnhn TMaa �� a
r�Mll Ur4r,Cnrtr?7KVUn
(262) 768-1921 � fX252) 767-7722
Langston Park Apartments
Tyyn Bflrfroom Units

DW
a
KITCHEN
Hook Up.
ASK ABOUT
SECURITY
DESPOSIT
SPECIALS
OMHOAItEA
1bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat at Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks
Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU Bus route
24hr Emergency
Maintenance Service
Wesley Commons South
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
GErnvi
I
HThunsnf, Apri
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route
Mi
12
LIN
Everyday Unlimited A
Double Coupons 511
I
tip to K Including
Caffeine Free Piet Coke, Sprite,
Diet Coke or
Coca Cola Classic
See Store For Details.
n
Nabisco 5�8-oz. Snackwell's
Chips Ahoy!
Cookies
14.5-18-oz.
?�199
1
Fresh Express
Variety
Salad Mixes
10-14-oz.
2
5
Regular 18-oz.
Wheatles or
Cheerios
15-oz.
Pizza Mini's, Hot or
Chef America 3
Lean Pockets
9-Ui-oz.
100-oz Liquid or 83-oz.
Wisk Laundry
Pefergent
33-42-Load
4
99
Regular or Thick Sliced
Jimmy Pean
Premium Bacon
1-lb. Pkg.
Buy One-Get One
FREE!
Tyson Mexican Originals
Burrito Style
Flour Tortillas
1975-oz. Pkg
Buy One-Get One
FREE!
WED
28
THUR
29
FRI
30
SAT
1
Items Prices Good Through May 1,1999 In
Greenville. Copyright 1999 Kroger Mid-Atlantic, we
reserve the right to limit quantities. None sold to
IffiSC
f
I
�eii
Taco
s
Su
Ic

i
taSa�
�Copyrighi





11

HThundiy, April 29, 1989
sports
THE EAST CABOUMIAM
UNIT 6! GOOD THRU TUESDAY, NAY 4,1999!
� Coupons up to 50$ are Tripled. � Over 50t are face value.
� One coupon per item purchased. � Limit 6 Tripled Coupons.
Limit one manufacturers' couxn per item. Items must be purchased In
sizes specified on coupon. Tills offer applies only to Manuracturei-s' Cenls
0(T coupons for items sold at Winn-Dixie and not to FREE or tobacco
product coupons. Coupon value cannot exceed the price of the item.
i
Superbrand
Ice Cream
64 oz. size
35
" vanilla ice cream
SUPERBRAND-
mniLMmw
Mai Maid
i Ji miu j - .Premium
100 PURC
Minute Maid
Orange Juice
64 oz. size
1
78
Prices good Wednesday, April 28, thru
Tuesday May 4,1999. Effective In
Our Greenville, NC Location Only!
�Copyright 1999. Winn-Dixie Raleigh. Inc. Quantity Rights Reserved, www.winndixie.com
Baseball
continued from page 10
Then the Pirates will travel will
travel back to Eastern North
Carolina to take on George Mason
University this weekend in in
Greenville for three critical con-
ference games this weekend.
"It's a big game on Thursday
It's also a big weekend with a big
conference series against George
Mason said Keith LeClair, head
coach.
ECU needs to play well this
weekend if they expect to pull
themselves back up first place in
the CAA. t may be tough
because they have to outplay
Virginia Commonwealth who are
12-2 in the CAA and also outplay
Richmond who is not going to be
left out of the mix in third place
with a 12-5 record.
"We dropped to second, but we
feel like were in good shape. We
feel comfortable and confident and
we're going to try to get back up
into first Steve Salargo said.
Score by innings:
North Carolina
East Carolina
020 210 001
000 212 30 - 8
RHE
6110
83
North Carolina IP
ELMORE, Chris 6.0
HORNEY, Michael. 2.0
East Carolina IP
SCOTT, Cory 4.0
BUCYJosh 5.0
H R ER BB SO AB BF
5 5 5 6 5 21 28
3 3 3 0 3 9 9
H R ER BB SO AB BF
8 5 3 1 2 19 22
3 11 1 7 18 20
Win-BUCY2-0. Loss - HORNEY 6-1. Save - None

E-
P
m&tsrwmm
mmsm
hk
Now Leasing � (252) 321-7613
1526 S. Charles Blvd. � Greenville, NC 27858
Equal Huuiing
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for the Summer?
Let Penske Truck Rental Take
You Where You Want To Go.
� Low Rates
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with Student I.D.
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10TH STREET BP
2704 East 10th Street
Greenville, NC 27858
Truck Rental (919) 758-6100






$ 14 Thursday, Apnl 29. 1889
Th' East Carolinian
FOR RENT
1 BEDROOM f it. available for sub-
� lease June-Sept. Can be rented
t; monthly after Sept. $370. Call 353-
J 2563.
J- 3 BR. 1 bath house 4 blocks from
I ECU campus. Cantral heat 6 AC.
� Fenced in yard, pets OK. $650mo.
I Call 561-5025.
SPACIOUS TWO Bedroom apart-
f. ment for rent, including pool and
I tennis courts. Sublet from end of
I May til July 7. Then you can rent it
I from there as you wish. Call Holly at
t 353-5871.
I THREE BEDROOM house available
I 2 blocks from campus. Big enough
I for 4 people. Washerdryer hook-up.
I Large backyard area. Call Mike 9
I 752-2879.
. NEED 4 people to sublet 4 BR apt.
i for Summer. Sublease for Summer
1 wopp. to take over lease for Fall. In-
i terested call 756-1395.
Z
2 4 BR. 2 bath house 4 blocks from
i ECU campus. Central heat and AC,
I fenced in yard. Pets OK. Available
I Aug. 1. $800mo. Call 561-5025.
� WALK TO ECl' - 1 bedroom apt.
B $295month available now & Aug.
1st. 705 East 1st St. or 125 Avery
I Street, near campus 758-6596.
FOR RENT: 3 bedroom apartment 1
I bjock from campus. $186 a month.
Large bedrooms. Available June 1st.
I Take over lease. Call 413-0330 for
t more info or leave message w Den-
J nis.
TOWNHOUSES NEAR ECU. 3 or 4
bedrooms. 2 12 and 3 12 baths.
WD hook-up ample storage spa-
cios. 752-1899 day (M-F). pr.ger
561-2203 night.
ECU AREA big three bedroom, one
bath house. Washerdryer with cen-
tral heat and air. Paved drive with ga-
rage. Call 830-9502.
SUBLEASE 1 bedroom apa tment
(houses 1-2 people) at Ringgold
Towers starting May. $367 a month.
AC, on campus location. & fully fur-
nished. Call ASAP 83CM3161.
3 FEMALE roommates nee' ed to
share large, 5 BR. house 12 block
from campus, May-Aug. Rent $190
plus 15 bills. If interested, call Jen-
nifer, 561-7600 or Kim 561-7700.
TAKE OVER apartment lease. 2 bed-
room, 1 12 baths, washerdryer
hook-ups. Driveway, back deck, large
back yard. $485 per month. 110-B
North Elm St. Call for information,
752-1725
DUPLEX 2 BR. 1 bath, heat pump,
washerdryer hook-up. private drive,
close to campus, no pets. $430.
Please call 756-8444 or 355-7799.
Available immediately!
2 BR. apartment in Ringgold Tow-
ers, fully furnished. 2 bathrooms,
rent for Summer only (May-July)
$550 per month. Call 355-6707.
MALEFEMALE NEEDED to share
2 BR. apt. Non-smoker, responsible,
must be neat! No pets, to move in
first week of June. Call Joh 757-
0610
ECU AREA! Huge 6 bedroom. 2
bath house. Big common areas. Cen-
tral heat and air downstairs. Pets OK.
$1000 month. Call 830-9502. leave
a message.
MOM COMING? Room available in
lovely private home close to cam-
pus. On-site parking. Walk to China
10 and Antonello's restaurants. No
smoking. No pets. 752-5644.
FOR RENT
PRIVATE ROOM available for sum-
mer and fall. Walking distance from
campus. $175 per month. Private
phone linecable in room. Wash-
erdryer included. Call Mike � 752-
2879.
2 BR. apartments downtown above
Catalog Connection & Percolator.
Available now, $500-$550 per
month. Call 717-0860, ask for Rick
Smiley.
HOUSE FOR rent, four bedroom. 2
bath, close to campus and down-
town, pets allowed, big front porch.
Sublease for summer and or lease
for full year. Call 931-9056.
ROOMMATE WANTED
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed in
May to share a 2 BR apartment for
both Summer sessions andor Fall.
Call 328-3607 ASAP, ask for Kelly or
leave a message.
ROOMMATE NEEDED ASAP to
share 2 bedroom, 1 12 bath, spa-
cious apartment. Furnished wwash-
er & dryer. Rent $230 per month
plus 12 utilities and phone. Call
Mike at 353-8960.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share two bedroom townhouse at
Tar River starting mid May. $265
month 12 utilities. Ask for Leah
at 828-266-7100. or 910j453-4887,
or leave a message.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed be-
ginning Aug. 1st to share 2 bedroom
apt. close to campus. Very large
bedroom with plenty of closet space.
On ECU bus route. Rent $205
month. Cable and water included.
Call Shellie at 329-1342.
FRIENDLY. FUN, & tidy female
roommates needed for Players Club
townhouse Fall 1999. Prime location
next to pool, tennic courts, club
house, & short walk to shuttle.
$260mo. 14 utilities 6 cable.
Call Kristen, 353-2665.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed to
share 2 bedroom townhouse in
Stratford Arms Apts. Rent: $225
plus half utilities. Call 321-3243.
FEMALE. SHARE three bedroom
home with two female students.
Campus three blocks. Prefer gradu-
ate student. Central air. ceiling fans,
washerdryer. $250 plus utilities.
(703) 680-1676.
SUMMER ROOMMATE wanted
to share three bedroom apart-
ment near campus. Includes
washer and dryer and outdoor
pool access. 13 rent and utili-
ties. We're clean and friendly.
Call 752-8910.
1 OR 2 female roommates needed
for summer to sign over lease. 2 BR
2 bath, very spacious and unique.
Can move ASAP. Call 353-8857. Free
tanning beds!
RINGGOLD TOWERS
Now Taking Leases for
1 bedroom, 2 bedroom &
Efficiency Apartments.
CALL 752-2865
FOR SALE
GA 1Y FISHER Taikai mountain bike,
aluminum frame. Rock Shox, 7-
speed grip shift. Call 757-1687.
FURNITURE FOR sale: dresser with
mirror and chest of drawers, full size
maress. lamps. All good condition.
Must be sold by May 16. Will sell for
very cheap! 752-7526.
FURNITURE! GRADUATING, sell-
ing everything including: sofa, dou-
ble papazan. coffee table, entertain-
ment center, tables, chairs, end ta-
bles, dresser, desks, TV stands, skis.
fishjajikJjte.752ja093
GOOD CONDITION bedroom furni-
ture. Must gol Call Stephanie. 754-
2824.
1992 TOYOTA Celica for sale: white
with blue interior, very nice condi-
tion, spoiler, sunroof, good miles,
$6,400. Must sell. Call Christina.
758-9672.
HELP WANTED
EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITY
Student to function part-time in inno-
vate e community pharmacy practice
in Greenville serving patient needs
and assisting in patient care. Must
possess excellent people skills, su-
perb telephone etiquette, ability to
multi-task under pressure. Good
computer skills a definite plus. Posi-
tive attitude, willingness to work at
any task, a yearning to tackle new re-
sponsibilities and cooperation with
co-workers definitely a must. No
nights and Sundays. Send resume
and hours available to: Job Opening.
615-B South Memorial Drive. Green-
ville, NC 27834.
NANNY WANTED for four children
- ages 6 to 12 over Summer. Respon-
sibilities include driving. Previous ex-
perience and references required.
Call Janice, 355-1597.
NEEDED! ATTRACTIVE girls for re-
gional TV commercial andor video
productions. Actressesmodels pre-
ferred but no experience required.
Call Action Video. 521-1760.
WE NEED your experience! The
REAL Crisis Center is recruiting vol-
unteer crisis counselors to help our
community. Training class will begin
June 7. 1999. Foi more information.
call 758-HELP
WANTED: PAYING $6.50 an hour
plus bonuses for qualified telemar-
keters. No Friday or Saturday work.
Hours: 5:30-9 p.m. Monday-Thurs-
day. 4:30-8 p.m. Sunday. Apply in
person between 5-6 p.m. at Energy
Savers Windows Et Siding. Inc
1806 Dickinson Ave Greenville, at
the side door.
FOR SALE
FREESTYLE BIKE for sale: chrome
1995 GT Pro Freestyle Tour, excellent
condition. During past year - rode
twice. Top of line accessories. Best
offer will sell. Call Marc, 758-7664.
SAVANA MONITOR with large cus-
tom cage. King snake with large
tank. Extra reptile cages and heat
rocks available. Call Scott or Ryan at
329-1205.
BEDROOM FURNITURE: head-
board, two dressers, desk, and
shelves. Also for sale, a new fitness
flyer. Call Jill. 758-5350.
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AND OTHER NAME BRAND MEN'S CLOTHING
SHIRTS, PANTS, JEANS, SWEATS, JACKETS, SHOES, ETC.
WE ALSO BUY AND SELL:
GOLD SILVER � Jewelry & Coins � Also Cold Pieces
� Stereos, (Systems, and Separates) � TVs, VCRs, CD Players � Home, Portable
QUICK, EASY, HELPFUL
STUDENT SWAP SHOP
414 S. EVANS (UP THE STREET FROM CUBBIES)
752-3866
TUESDAY - SATURDAY, 9:00 - 5:00
(DRIVE TO THE BACK DOOR BEHIND PARK THEATRE)
ONE OF THE FAVORITE STUDENT STORES FOR YEARS
(IF YOU ARE SELLING, ID IS REQUIRED)
Programmer
Full time, Knowledge of
SQL and OOP very helpful.
Mail resume to:
Discovery Insurance
P.O. Box 200
Kiniton. NC 28S02
or fax to: 523-1305
ATTN: Jarry Amtlll. IS Sit! Minigir
Raleigh Area
Summer Jobs
$100 Signing bonus
if hired by May 10th
Work 40 hrswk
Nights off
Many 3-day weekends
Crew Painters$300-320wk
Crew Leaders$408-451wk
Plus profit sharing!
Collegiate House Painters
(919)460-6061
Not a student franchise company.
HELP WANTED
HAM'S RESTAURANTS is nc y in-
terviewing for immediate openings
for entry level management posi-
tions in our North Carolina locations.
Please fax your resume andor cover
letter to David, 336-855-6688. or
mail to Director of Human Resourc-
es, Chelda Inc 3017 High Point
Road. Greensboro, North Carolina
27403.
RELAXING LOCAL summer job.
Four days a week. Keep our second
grader and seventh grader. They en-
joy being outside and playing in our
pool. Call 752-7398 nights; 355-
4544 days.
KONSTANTIN'S STEAKHOUSE is
looking for individuals who are ener-
getic, professional, cooperative, have
a positive attitude, work well with
the public and as part of a team.
Konstantin's Steakhouse is opening
in the Atlantic Station Shopping Cen-
ter; Atlantic Beach. NC. Now hiring
experienced kitchen managerchief,
line cooks, food runners, waitstaff
and hostesses. Earn competitive
wages in a friendly atmosphere. Ap-
ply in person by appointment 252-
240-2224 M-F 11a.m6p.m.
NEED SUMMER help at Hatteras
Beach. Free housing. Need two
males or females for retail seafood
market. Bonus offered. Call 252-986-
2215 or e-mail riskybainterpath.com
SUMMER CHILDCARE needed for
two children (ages 4 8 8) from June
7 through Aug. 13. Prior experience
and own transportation required.
Call 758-5806 between 6p.m. and
10p.m.
HIRING: WAITSTAFF and hoststaff
for new Italian restaurant. Positions
available immediately. Experience
preferred. Please apply in person,
Antonello's Italian Restaurant. 2601
East 10th Street.
EASTERN CAROLINA'S finest
adult entertainment is now hiring.
Call for interview. Playmates. 252-
747-7686.
COUNSELORS NEEDED for a
Christian, co-ed residential camp on
Kerr Lake for ages 7 - 16. Contact
Phillip at 919-789-9631 or e-mail:
plpoplinapellsouth.net
EXOTIC DANCERS $1000-$ 1500
weekly, no experience needed. 919-
580-7084. Sid's Showgirls, Gold-
sboro.
CHILD CARE help needed for 12
year old. Mornings and afternoons
until. Must have car. Pay neg. 353-
5317
HELP WANTED
HAVE FUN at the beaqh and earn
money too. Henry's, a sporting
goods distributor in Morehead City
may be your ticket to a productive
and enjoyable Summer. Work Mon-
day through Friday. 8 till 6 in tee
shirts and shorts and still have the
weekend to. er. study for Fall! Call
Hubert Talley at 800-545-5654 ext.
5289 today.
A FEMALE executive with a local
company is seeking an individual to
help with childrens' needs. Children
are 10 and 14. so your own transpor-
tation is needed. Part-time during
school, full-time this summer. Experi-
ence working with children needed,
and references. If interested, please
contact Denise Keel at 752-2111 ext.
297. Potential candidates will be in-
terviewed. Resumes can be faxed to
752-4217.
I NEED a babysitter for anywhere
from 3-5 hours a week. Can work ar-
ound your schedule. Must have
transportation. Please call me at
355-0562.
NEED A part-time person to work in
a professional office serving as re-
ceptionist for a couple of hours a day
as well as being an assistant to oth-
er personnel in the office. Must en-
joy working with the public and be
easy-going since this is the overall
office atmosphere. Hours are 11:30
to 5:00 Monday through Friday, and
more during the summer, if needed.
Also, position may extend into the
fall, approximately 11:30 to 5 Mon-
day through Friday. Please contact
Polly Piland 8 756-8886.
SUMMER WORK7 Disabled wom-
an looking for female personal care
attendant, flexible hours, drivers li-
cense necessary, request references
and background check. Call 355-
9161
SUMMER JOBS! Cooks and bus
staff wanted on Outer Banks. Hous-
ing iailable. Call Linda, 252-261-
0629.
EXPERIENCED BABYSITTER want-
ed to care for two girls this summer,
from 8:30 to 5 on Mondays and
Wedi asdays (days may be flexible).
Call 756-0941.
SUMMER WORK
19.7S ufr hour appl-
i 'rr Hour .ippi.
Ifl For Si-dent!
l-om peri live sclioijrihiut
.ill nliion Considered1
flexible schedule 10-60 hr.week
Reuil Service and Sales
training provided
Condition! applv.
756-7122
THIS YEAR A
LOT OF COLLEGE
SENIORS WILL
BE GRADUATING
INTO DEBT.
Under the Army's
Loan Repayment
program, you could get
out from under with a
three-year enlistment
Each year you serve
on active duty reduces
your indebtedness by
one-third or $1,500,
whichever amount is
greater, up to a $65,000
limit. The offer applies
to Perkins Loans,
Stafford Loans, and cer-
tain other federally
insured loans, which are
not in default. And debt
relief is just one of the
many benefits you'll earn
from the Army. Ask your
Army Recruiter.
ARMY.
BE ALL YOU GUI BE:
www.goarmy.com
252-756-9695
Work Outdoors I
Want Honest, Reliable Students
Wdependabletruckoar
TO MONITOR COTTON
(No'experience necessary)
$7.00hr. mileage
mallfax resume
MCSI-Box 370
Cove City, NC 28523
Fax: 252-637-2126
(Nr. Greenville, New Bern, Kinston)

GREEK PERSONALS
TO THE ladies of Z ita Tau Alpha, ve
really enjoyed our trip to Margarrta-
ville with Jimmy Buffett. Let's get to-
gether again real soon. Love. Phi
Kappa Psi !
WELCOME NEW Delta Chi broth-
ers, Jose Ten Kids" Garcia, Jpe
"Steroid Chest" Romain, Greg fEl
Presidente" Stilley, Aaron "Slim Jim"
Wetherington, Derrick "Cousin BeaV
Roberts. Matt "Cousin Luke" Mob�r-
ly, Craig "Karaoke Machine" Fair-
cloth, Johnathan "Golden Glovfes
Catcher" Hassler. and Fred "Piljip
Daddy" Moreno. Congratulations
and welcome to the brotherhoodjof
a lifetime.
OTHER
HABITAT FOR Humanity of ECU
�oaks a new president for 1999-
2000. If interested. Call Michael
Aho, president and founder, at
328-3653.
THE CARD Post Report 324 Dif-
ference Inn. Concerned of the bad
influence of those 'hang 'n around'
the mall they discouraged their
child from applying for a job there.
Aware of the great influence their
child would have on those "hang n
around' the mall they encouraged
their child in applying for a job there.
T.K.D
SUMMER FUN - Free pictures.
Would you like to have special pic-
tures to give to your family or boy-
frieno! I enjoy shooting pictures of
young women for my portfolio.l If
you model for me. I will give you free
pictures. Reputable amateur photog-
rapher. References available. Please
send a note, phone number, and a
picture (if available - it will be re-
turned) to Paul Hronjak. 4413 Pine-
hurst Dr Wilson, NC 27896-9001 or
call 252-237-8218 or E-mail hron-
jakOsimflex.com
PERSONALS
BE SUM and trim in time to swim
100 natural. Doctor approved. 1
in Europe! Call 757-2292. Free sam-
ples. Limited time offer.
GREEK PERSONALS
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new-
ly initiated sisters of Delta Zeta; Mel-
issa Andrews, Rory Criscuolo, Bon-
nie Crone, Brianna Honea. Brigitte
Isles. Aimee Ouelleite. Jamie The-
vaos. and Annie Riebsel. We love
you guys!
CONGRATULATIONS TO Gamma
Sigma Sigma on your student organ-
ization award for Outstanding Philan-
thropy 1990-1999. You deserve it!
LAMBDA CHI Alpha - thanks for
the social! We had a great time, and
look forward to doing a lot together
next year! Love. Alpha Xi Delta
THE JIMMY Buffett Social was
great) Thanks so much. Phi Kappa
Psi! You guys always show us a good
time! Love. Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS TO Delta Chi
brothers Mike Lynch and Chris
Strathey on their lavaliers to Zeta
Sweethearts Melissa and Jenn, wel-
come to the family hdies.
ALPHA XI Delta thanks all who at-
tended our Grab-A-Date! We hope
everyone had a blast
CONGRATULATIONS TO Anna
Marie Ellerson, Amanda Vance arid
Kerry Essex. Welcome to our Z4ta
Tau Alpha family! We love you girls!
Love, the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new
officers of Gamma Sigma Sigma.
President: Jenny Love; Service VP:
Beth Ann Smith; Membership tfP:
Karen Flores; Treasurer: Christie
Kiesling; Corresponding Sec: Bianca
Dishman; Recording Sec: Erica Avel-
lo; Alumni Liason: Jenny Kassen;
Nat'l. Representative: Amanda
Laeng; Social Chair: Mary Ruth Da-
vis; Parliamentarian: Heather Burg-
ess; Historian: Reagan Willianjs;
Chapter Betterment: Kirsten Wur-
zinger
THANKS, DELTA Sigma Phi. we
loved wearing your ties! We had a
blast, but the good times went by
too fast! Love. Zeta Tau Alpha
CONGRATULATIONS TO the new-
ly elected officers of Phi Kappa Psi:
President: Brendan Lynch, Vice Pres-
ident: Rob Smith. Treasurer: Lee Wil-
liams, Corresponding Secretary: Bob
Smith, Recording Secretary: Mat' 6n-
sley. Historian: Larry Hudson, Mes-
senger: Michael Smith. Chaplin: Jeff
Kimbro, and Sargent at Arms: John
Batchelor
ANNOUNCEMENTS
THE BRYAN Adrian Baske.jall
Camp Final registration is now opi&n
for The 21st Annual Bryan Adrian
Summer Basketball Camp. Boys and
girls ages 5-19 are eligible. Locations
include: Hickory. NC; Rocky Mount.
NC; Charlotte, NC; Greensboro, NC;
Elkin, NC and Raleigh, NC. Included
on the camp staff are: Jerry Staek-
house(Pro), Antawn Jamison)Prd),
Vince Carter(Pro), and Steve Wjp-
jeiechowski. For a free brochure csll
704-372-3236 anytime.
��i-
CHOOSING A Major or a Career
Workshop: 3:30-5PM. The Center f�r
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop on
Thursday April 29. If you are interest-
ed in this program, contact the cen-
ter at 328-6661.
WANT TO hear local speakers talk
about their experiences in radio or
TV? If so. then come to the Media
Society's Forum on May 3. It will be
held from 1-5 p.m. on the secotjd
floor of Joyner. It's free and refresh-
ments will be served, so be sure to
check it out! 1;
THE EXERCISE and Sport Science
Motor and Physical Fitness Compet-
ency Test is scheduled as follows:
Minges Coliseum (Williams Arenfc).
Wednesday, May 5 at 8 a.m. A pass-
ing score on this test is required if
all students prior to declaring Exer-
cise and Sport Science,as a major.
Any student with a medical condi-
tion that would contraindicate partic-
ipation in the testing should contact
Mike McCammon or Michelle Brun-
son at 328-4688. A detailed sum-
mary of the test components is av$-
able in the Human Performance Lai)
oratory (Room 371, Sports Medicitj
Bldg.) "Students must bring ECU
student I.D.�
TEST PREPARATION: MONDAY
3:30-4:30 p.m.The Center for Couji-
seling and Student Development is
offering this workshop on Monday,
May 3. If you are interested in this
workshop, please contact the Center
at 328-6661.
�-
TEST ANXIETY: The Center fp
Counseling and Student Develop-
ment is offering this workshop op
Monday. May 3 at 11 a.m. If you afr
interested in this workshop, pleaM
contact the Center at 328-6661. ;
L
ONLY ONE MORE &
ISSUE OF THE EAST 3
CAROLINIAN LEFT
THIS SEMESTER! �
PLACE YOUR
CLASSIFED AD BEFORE
FRIDAY� 4 P.M.





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WW��II
jiiiii"n.iViii'ii'ii i'li" unrhr r r i J � ' "
ECU Telefund
ds sincere thanks to
bllowing businesses for
cipating in the Sponsoring
Business Partner's Program
VMS, -flUlEl
. K&W Cafeteria
LUMBER CO. ynVI
PC AGE
Red Roof Inn
wetside Steak aft
STAPLES
Mic'4. deli Malpass Mufflers
' tnK S M0.
Western
iSIZZLINl
Office Depot
p;A Cut Above
Tanning Salon
SHOE CARNIVAL
Designing Women Hair Salon
GORDONS Golf & Ski
Red Lobster
BURGER KING RESTAURANTS
OUTBACK
5TEAKHOU5E
little Caesars (g)Kzza!Pizza!
DIXIE QUEEN RESTAURANT MonkstCIS
HOMEY OI.AEED AflDSPIRAI SLICED
IROWOOD
(OGol & Co n ii fry Club
Steve Briley's
Automotive
Service Center

The
Emerald City Grill
STANTON SQUARE
TRADE OIL COMPANY
Ryan's LOUIE'S
RESTAURANT & BAR
W I I I � F I It I � .1 IIJL
ILTORO
men's hair styling shoppe ,� 'fnfi�
Bath & Body Works
LandMark Pick-up
(ftaiwtotv
Neighborhood Grin Bar
Home Improvmtit Warehouse
cnemad
LLYWOO
We would like to thank the following students for a great year:
Charlie SigmonAshley DavisJaime Marcum
Emily GaillardLydia DickensEmily Matrix
Jenny KassenMavis GantHeather Moss
Ashley AverySherry GarrisJaime Newsome
Jacqueline BelkMarygrace GravetteCoreen Odonnell
Jennifer BenjaminShannon HaireJennifer Parks
Jason BoydAmy KrolakJay Pittman
Alyson BucoloLiz LaughlinMichael Putnam
Brandi Cobb,Christy Lynch,Sarah Rountree
Kyle RushGina Valenti
Allison Shidal Tamara Stafford Brooke ToomeyAmy Vanvoltenburg Crystal Whittington Marlene Everette
Sandy Traynor David TumageCasey Armstrong Kristi Baker
Stephanie Turnage Leigh GravesMelissa Berger Kira Bertram
Joanna HerringJessica Capps
Stephanie Cox
Matt Cubell
Lynsey Durishin
Scot Gordon
Leigh Graves
Janna Greene
Ashley Grickis
Diane Hill
Margaret Prince
Natricia Simmons
Derrick Spencer
Alison Tilley
Justin Tuck
Scott Woolief





Arts & Entertainment Magazine of The East Carolini
�m
Thursday, April 29,1999
UMiccah Smith
Fountainhead Editor
You can't go under it. You can't go over it. You can't go around it, so you'll
have to pass through, and enjoy, Barefoot on the Mall This year's head-
lining band, Lost Boyz, will be performing with Mandorico, Grooveliry
and Far Too Jones on a sound stage near the cupola, and all the goofy
activities, bake sales and student organizational booths you've come to
expect from Barefoot will draw students from 12 to 6 p.m.
Today marks the 20th anniversary of Barefoot on the Mall.
"We're expecting 5,000 (students) throughout the day? says Marcus
Fredrick, barefoot committee chair.
The order in which the bands will play is a secret so that students won't
just come to see a favorite band and then leave.
"We really want people to come out and stay throughout the entire
event says Fredrick.
While many students can't wait to see hip-hop's Lost Boyz, others will
appreciate the Latin ska rhythms of Mandorico, alternative tune by Far
Too Jones or Grooveliry's jam sessions.
WZMB will provide coverage of the celebration at their live remote
booth, as the Club 91 DJs and rotation DJs take turns broadcasting from
the scene of the action. Any students interested in college radio will have
a great opportunity to see what ifs all about.
"Well be giving away CDs and whatever we've got in the 'prize vault
says WZMB's acting manager Neil McFayden.
Students are happy to see Barefoot back on the Mall, instead of last
See Barefoot continued on page 6
Come celebrate the anniversary ofECU's best-loved event
Your favorite
childhood author
helped with
this one
CD Review
Nasty teens cut
loose in this
hit flick
Movie Review
"Fear and
Loathing" lite!
Video Review
The
Yellowjackets
will lay down the
tunes at
Jazzfest 99
wimck
fountainhead � 2nd Floor Student Publications Building Greenville. NC 27858 � Phone 328-6366� Fax 328-6558 � Advertising 328-2000� www.fountainhead.ecui





CDReview
Bring on the boo-tay!
Ryan Kennemur
BootyAam
The title of the disk aIoneBoo-Tay
says it all, I think. Bare Jr. is a band
that is not about to take itself seriously
in the face of a society bent on over-
emotional three chord pop,like today's
Barefoot on the Mall mistake "Far Too
Jonesa band that would be more aptly
tided "Far Too Typical" if I had my way.
But I don't. So that's why I, as a music
lover and part-time lumberjack, am
happy to be given the choice to turn off
the radio and listen to a CD by a lesser
known but nonetheless great artist.
Truth be told, Bare Jr. isn't "great" � in
fact, at times it is grating. But this
album is pretty solid Rock and Roll
fare.
Bobby Bare Jr son of the great old-
time country cowboy Bobby Bare,
fronts this five-member tapestry. Make
no mistake, though. This is not coun-
try music. Not at all. Think of it as
Everclear with a dulcimer player, and
then add smarmy lyrics and off-kilter
and off-key howling by the lead singer,
and there's Bare r.
The first track features 29 seconds of
big bass drums and high-p ched voic-
es repeating the word "booty This
song, though pointless, does a good job
of leading into the rest of the CD. The
following song "Nothin' Better to Do"
sets up the cockiness that will surface
again and again throughout the disk.
The chorus goes "You dig me more
than 1 dig myselfI'm in love with you
cause I've got nothin' better to do
What a nice boy he is. And talk about
romantic! The next song "THE MOST"
asks the question, "Do you care enough
about me to beat the hell out of the
one who loves me the most?"
It doesn't stop there, friends and fol-
lowers. The next song of this rollicking
barrage of self-confidence is called
"YOU Blew Me Off" His true feelings
come out of hiding behind a crunching
guitar riff and a fuzzy bass line as he
screamsYou blew me off tnd it
turned me on You get the feeling that
this guy enjoys the opposite sex, but is
sick and tired of being treated, and
maybe even treating others, like a
monument of mule excrement.
The fifth song is pretty radio-friendly,
despite being aptly called "Tobacco
Spit The next dirge is called "Faker
one of the better songs I've heard any-
where since 1999 began just a few
months ago. And the radio-friendli-
ness continues with "Patty McBride
which sounds at home on the local
radio station sandwiched between
Pearl Jam and Matchbox 20.
Skipping a couple of passable songs, we
come to'l Hate Myself which was
written by Bobby Bare Srs long-time
collaborator Shel Silverstein, the author
of such cutesy poetry books as "Where
the Sidewalk Ends" and "A ight in the
Attic He also wrote the Johnny Cash
See CD REVIEW, continued on page 3
Amy LRoyster Editor in Chief
Amanda G Austin Managing Editor
Mkxah Smith Eater
CalebRoK Assistant Edrtor
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qy
Video Review
Check out Bill Murray's "high" side
Ryan Kennemur
Cereal ladykiller
"Where the Buffalo Roam"
There are a few writers in this world
that I consider to be my literary heroes.
Dave Barry, of course. Then comes
Carl Hiaasen, the guy who wrote
"Striptease which was a much better
book than a movie. And then, the man
who rewrote the handbook to journal-
ism single-handedly, Dr. Hunter S.
Thompson.
Though you probably didn't see it,
there was a movie out last year based
on his most famous book entitled "Fear
and Loathing in Las Vegas and it was
nothing short of brilliant. The story
behind it was a journalist and his
attorneydrug-dealerbest friend tak-
ing a trip to Las Vegas in the late 60s to
cover a motorcycle race for Rolling
Stone.
The real story, however, is the drugs
they take along the way and the effects
of them. It was visually stunning to see
life through the eyes of those guys you
see at parties looking around nervously
with sweat pouring off their foreheads.
Great spec'al effects and top notch act-
ing by Johnny Depp and Bcnicio Del
Toro made for a fantastic cinema expe
rience and the best part, it was all
based on a true story.
But did you know that this is the sec-
ond movie to come out that deals with
the life and times of America's premier
"Gonzo journalist? On a quick note,
"Gonzo is a term that refers to the fact
that a reporter can only truly report the
news if they get right into the middle of
it, and in Thompson's case, the news
was experimental drugs. Indeed, there
is a movie that came out in 1981 called
"Where the Buffalo Roam that focused
not so much on what he saw during
this time (the early 70s), but more on
what he did.
Starring none other than Bill Murray as
Thompson, this movie doesn't hold a
candle to the nightmarish barrage of
special effects of the newer film, but ii
See Buliih. continued on page 6
To Catch A Free Filch
APRIL 29-MAY 1 AT 8:00 P.M AND MAY 2 AT
3:00 P.M. IN HENDRIX THEATER
Patch AdamsR) Hunter Adams, in 1969. found him-
self committed to a mental institute, and was dis-
tressed by the treatment his fellow inmetes endured.
He decided thattiis life calling was the medical pro-
fession, but soon found out that the prevailing med-
ical philosophy was "better them than me "Patch"
Adams became determined to find a more humane
way to improve patients' emotional states and qual-
ity of life. But the establishment was not on his
side. You and a guest get in free when you present
your valid ECU One Card.
To Get Worh Done
Its the end of the semester and all of your big pro-
jects are due S00NI Our computer lab has extended
� hours for the year-end
,aj"2is rush- Fr�m April 28-
Jll May 5, the lab will
-aajjg33 be open until 12:30
Jj a.m and can be
�, T accessed through the
basement in the NW
stairwell (ring door bell). From May 6-12, the lab
will remain open until 12:30 a.m and can be
accessed as normal. Than is also an assistant on
hand wafting to help you.
To Hear Jazz
8:00 P.M. FRIDAY, APRIL 30 AND SATURDAY,
MAY 11N WRIGHT AUDITORIUM
Jazz up your spirits with
swing music played the
way it's supposed to be
played at the Emerald City
Jazz Festival.
Proudly presented by the
ECU Student Union and
ECU School of Music are
the ECU Jazz Ensemble
with special guest Bob
Mintzer on April 30 and
The Yellow Jackets on May 1. Tickets for this hip
show are on sale now at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center, so get yours early!
To Be In The Spotlight
7:00 P.M. MAY 3 IN THE MENDENHALL
STUDENT CENTER GALLERY
Whether you entered an exhibit or if you just admire
finely executed artwork, this could be your night to
shinel This is the closing reception and awards cer-
emony of the 23rd Annual lllumina Art Show, and is
open to any interested students who appreciate art
in its many forms. See some great artwork and con-
gratulate these fine artists.
msc Hears: MoThur�, j n w t 8 uu hm � .





q
Jazzfest 99: a cool lineup
Lee Howard
StaffWritcr
Are you on your last nerve because
of the end of the semester is nigh?
Well, friends, the ECU School of
Musk and the Student Union have
just the remedy to help you cool
down and chill out. Check out this
weekend's Emerald City Jazz Festival
1999: Volume 2. The performances
will begin Friday night at 8 p.m. at
Wright Auditorium, featuring the
ECU Jazz Ensemble and special
guest Bob Mintzer of the
Yellowjackets. Mintzer will be joined
by the rest his band members for an
all-star performance Saturday night.
Members of the ECU Jazz Ensemble,
which is under the direction of
Carrol V. DashieD, Jr are looking for-
ward to showing off their skills on
the Friday night performance.
"I'm really excited about the show.
We've been working a tot lateryf said
Peter Lamb, alto saxophonist.
The troupe is composed of about
twenty musicians with a repertoire
of classic and contemporary jazz
standards, some of whkh have been
arranged by Dashicll.
The School of Music is buzzing with
activity this week as musicians pre-
pare for the arrival of the
Yellowjackets. According to the
Yelkmrjackets'co-manager.SaUy
Poppe, the band is currently on tour
in Europe and will return to the
States to fulfill their ECU dates.
For the benefit of the students and
the public, the band will fly into
Greenville a few days before their
performance in order to begin a
series of workshops and open
rehearsals.
Tin ECU Jan EmmMi wi parta" Fndiy.
The Yellowjackets is an L. Abased
band whose formative years was
spent as a back-up band for guitarist
Robben Ford in the late 70s. The
band actually emerged on the music
scene as the Yellowjackets in 1980
and a year later released a self-titled
debut recording. The mainstays of
the band have been keyboardist
Russell Ferrante and bassist Jimmy
Haslip. Saxophonist Bob Mintzer
joined the band in 1990 with the
recording of "Greenhouse
The latest addition to the band is
drummer Peter Erskine, who
replaced William Kennedy this year.
Each band member is a veteran
musician and has independently
worked with such personalities
Aretha Franklin, Jaco Pastorius and
Crosby, Stills, and Nash.
Bob Mintzer has been at ECU for the
last year as an artist-in-residence. He
will sit in with the Jazz Ensemble on
Friday night
Commenting on sharing the stage
with a musician of M intze r's reputa -
tion, Lamb saidlfs kind of intimi-
dating and exciting at the same
kynn
time
The key to the euowjackets' longevi-
ty is their "flexible" sound. Poppe
confessed the difficulty in describing
the Veltowjackets' style because their
compositions run the gamut of
musical genres. Groove, fusion, R&B,
gospel and classic jazz blend to cre-
ate a multi-disciplined sound, which
was categorized by one student as
"cool contemporary jazz
The Yellowjackets have been nomi-
nated for 10 Grammy's throughout
their career arid actually bagged two
awards. Their last disc, "Club
Nocturne is their fourteenth
recording release.
This weekend's performances are an
excellent departure from the tension
caused by a busy schedule, so come
out and groove to the swinging
sounds and the naughty, naughty
beats of Jazz Fesm
Friday's performance of the ECU
Jazz Ensemble is free for students, $4
for facultystaff and $5 for the pub-
lic. The Yellowjackets'show on
Saturday is $5 for students, $12 for
facultystaff and $15 for the public
MovieReww
Drugs, decadence and debauched
teens take the screen
Patrick"I can't think of catchiT nick-
names that Ryan Kennemur" McMahon
StoffWriter
When the assignment to review a
movie dropped onto my desk, I thought
to myself, "Now this is just great. I have
to pay to get into a movie which costs
more than the amount 111 be paid for
the story just so you, the reader, can get
an idea as to whether or not the movie
is worth your seven bucks to get in
(plus five dollars for a handful of pop-
corn and nine dollars for a mouthful of
non-carbonated Dr. Pepper).
So needless to say I was not very
enthused about this assignment, but it's
a whole lot better than the assignment
that Kennemur is working on. I won't
tell you what it is but trust me, you will
never again look at pimento cheese and
fold-down Converse Chuck Taylor All-
Omimtiimmi ��
Star sro-akers the same way ever again.
"So get on to the movie already Shut
up, it's my story and 111 write what 1
wanna. Anyway, I lazily walked into the
gigaplex movie theater, paid my $29.85
for a ticket, drink, and candy bar (is
this on my meal plan?) and sat down
for what I thought was going to be an
uneventful evening watching the new
movie "Go I was wrong.
Let me go ahead and say this: the
movie kicked butt (I thought I'd write
one story without the word ass in it�
oops I did it again.) The almost
unknown cast is led by no particular
character, with each individual one
providing an even amount of storyline
advancement and intrigue. Probably
the only actor you will recognize in this
movie is the oh-so scrumdiddilyump-
tious Katie Holmes, cast as the straight
arrow in the movie who tries to keep
everyone else in line. The others actors
are extremely talented and pull off each
scene with amazing ease;
While mainly an action flick, the movie
is never without comedy. I mean, who
doesn't think a guy rolling on eXtacy
while dancing the tango with an aging
checkout clerk in the produce aisle of a
run down supermarket in the middle
of suburbia is funny?! Every step of the
action is joined by comedic aspects
which could only come from the
demented mind of an unknown script
writer.
"So whafs the catch, pussycat?" Well
See Movii, continued on page 6
CD REVIEW'continued from papa 2
song "A Boy Named Sue and he even
came up with the idea for the show "I
Dream of Jeanie Talented fella, that
She).
Anyway, the lyrics go something along
the lines of "I hate myself and its all
your faultI hate myself and I oughta
notI hate myself when I should be hat-
ing you This should have been the last
song on the disk, leading into the secret
track "Pearl
It begins with a girl on an answering
machine remarking that she knows that
Bobby has cheated on her and that their
rettTonshipTsove'r. SheaIso"sta'testhat
he shouldn't talk to her anymore and he
shouldn't write her a song.
And of course, he writes her a song.
Lets face it, this guy is a bastard. But
he's a likable bastard, and that's no easy
feat Buy this CD if you like good Rock
and Roll that doesnt so much wear its
heart on its sleeve so much as cram it
down your throat. In conclusion, this is
the type of music that would have Bobby
Bare Sr. spinning in his grave. but he
can't exactly do that since he's still alive.
Unless he's some morbid freak who's
into that junk.
This movie is awesome
The guy from "Idle Hands"
Guest Writer
Whoa, hey urru. Watch my movie, K?
It's, like totally not like any horror
movie ever! I play this guy who- "OH,
&$!MyhaaaandMY
HAAAND
See, my hand is, like, possessed and
stuff Dude. But I'm still cooL'cuz I've
got my friends, and we'll be dose for-
ever, even if we all go to different col-
fegesSWEET MARY AND JOSEPH
That humlte a &$$
So, anyway, come and see this movie!
tfsl'lte.anedcoming-of-aT dark
comedy about typical suburban
teenagers you could find anytime at
the mall, except for my hand, that is.
And I think MTV helped, or maybe
they're just hyping it up. I just want
you to know that all of our characters
are really cool. 1 mean, this movie is
just so much deeper than aiiything
else you'll find out there. America real-
ly needed a movie like this to make it
a truly great nation.
And this, my friend, is what makes the
whole thing special. This makes a peek
at my sick, depraved pre-aduh life
'rtMifti ;i
worth your seven bocks, man. should
think so. I'm in it, right?
!S
� .V.v.
���Av.
Thursday, Apnl 29.899 3





. .� m i ' � i� �
Your complete guide to upcoming events in Greenville;
Thursday
The Attic
-Mike Mesmer "Eyes"
Cafs Cradle
-Cancer Research Benefit featuring
DagThe Gladhands
The Cellar
-Karaoke 00-close
Chefs 505
-ArvidRayMunson
Mendenhall
Movies
Patch Adams"
Peasant's Cafe
-BaabaSeth
Sports
PadSplash
-Karaoke lO00-dose
Stacatto
-PauITardif
Wright
Auditorium
-Symphonic Wind Ensemble,
Symphonic Band and Concert Band
(8:00 PM)
� �������������.�����.���
Friday
The Attic
The Breakfast Club
The Beef Barn
-Cynthia White
Cat's Cradle
-Gran Torino
Cellar
-Karaoke 9fl0-close
Chefs 505
-Arvid Ray Munson
Deadwood
-Persona Non Grata
Hard Times
Hurricane Willie
Mendenhall
Movies
"Patch Adams"
Peasant's Cafe
-Nothingface7 Ton Dieseland
Kuttphatt
Son II Studio
-Line Dancing
Southern Nites
Nightclub
-8 Second Ride
Sports
PadSplash
-Karaoke lOOO-dose
Wright
Auditorium
-Jazziest 99 (8:00 PM)
��i���i��ltl�li�fti�a�(M�a
Saturday
The Attic
-DagflTie Ultraviolets House of
Dreams
Big Jake's Bar
-Karaoke and open mic
Cat's Cradle
-CARE relief benefit with
CanivalitoCrepuscullo Andino &
Camakon
Cellar
-Karaoke 9)0-ckse
Deadwood
-Persona Non Grata
Chefs 505
-ArvidRayMunson
Hard Times
-Hurricane Willie
Mendenhall
Movies
Patch Adams"
Peasant's Cafe
-Snake Oil Medicine Show
Son II Studio
-Sound of Country
Southern Nites
Nightclub
-8 Second Ride
Walnut Creek
-Volunteer Jam'99 with Hank
Williams Jr. The Charlie Daniels
Band, The Marshall Tucker Band
and Molly Hatchet
Wright
Auditorium
-Jazziest 99 (8:00 PM)
Sunday
Big Jake's Bar
-Flashback
Cat's Cradle
-Ranier mariaSargeSean Na Na
Courtyard
Tavern
-Scott Mueller and Amy Wallace
Mendenhall
Movies
Patch Adams"
Peasant's Cafe
-Open Mic Night
Wright
Auditorium
-East Carolina University
Symphony Orchestra (3:00 PM)
ATTIC
��-����-���-�����-��.�������
Monday
A.J Fletcher
Recital Hall
-Guitar Ensemble (8:00 PM)
A Matter ofTheAtti
Taste-Comedy Zone
-Live BluesCaris Cra
The Attic-G.LovewSpecia
-Reading Day Eve PartyHard Til
Boli's-Shaggin'mixat6
-Groove Ridersfiardy's Original ft
Cat's Cradle
-The MakeupSharking Teeth
Peasant's Cafe
-(Mugnite)
Sports
PadSpk
-Karaoke lOflO-do

4 Thursday. Apri 29. 899
, . � . .�
�. ,
mimMj






ar
events in Greenville and surrounding areas
iday
:cher
Hall
e (8:00 PM)
day
jrof
ic
e Party
adle
arking Teeth
'sCafe
JpasaRfcs
Wednesday
The Attic
-Comedy Zone
Cat's Cradle
-G. Love w Special Sauce
Hard Times
-Shaggin'mixat6wSteve
Hardy's Original Beach Party
Sports
PadSplash
-Karaoke KMJO-close
��������������"
For More Information
The Attic
Greenville, NC 752-7303
Backdoor
Greenville, NC 752-7049
The Beef Barn
Greenville, NC 756-1161
Big Jake's Bar
Williamston.NC 799-0022
BW-3
Greenville, NC 758-9191
Cat's Cradle
Carrboro, NC
(252) 967-9053
The Cellar
Greenville, NC 752-4668
Chef's 505
Greenville, NC 355-7505
The Corner
Greenville, NC 329-8050
The Courtyard Tavern
Greenville, NC 321-0202
Deadwood
Greenville, NC 792-8938
TheElbo
Greenville, NC 758-4591
Hard Times
Greenville, NC 758-9922
On-Campus Activities
328-6004
Pantana Bob's
Greenville, NC 757-3778
Peasant's Cafe
Greenville, NC 752-5855
Sports PadSplash
Greenville, NC 757-3658
Son II Studio
Greenville, NC 830-5279
Southern Nites Nightclub
946-5785
Texas 2 Step
Greenville, NC 752-3600
Underwater Cafe
Greenville, NC 754-2207
Wrong Way Corrigan's
Greenville, NC 758-3114
���������?������������������������������������������?�
I.IIHl
Preview
The Breakfast Club at The Attic
One question; "Who's gonna drive
you home tonight" when the
Breakfast Club rocks The Attic? Well,
if you care to witness their "Weird
Science then "Take On Me" and
"Spin me Around" as we "Shout" and
"Walk the Dinosaur? But "If you
LeaveDon't you Forget About Me
just "Take These Broken Wings" and
lead me out because I cannot see too
well since "I wear My Sunglasses at
Night"
What to expect: a retro 80 s party
full of college students having fun
living out Caleb Rose's worst night
mare.
Saturday May 1
Volunteer Jam'99
at Walnut Creek Pavilion
Ok, time out. Hank Williams Jr The
Charlie Daniels Band, The Marshall
Tucker Band and Molly effing
Hatchet! I am sorry I didn't catch
those namesWalnut Creek is
gonna be the site of a redneck ram-
page when these fellas throw
downBY0B.
What to expect Cowboy hats,
Confederate flags out the ying yang,
and many, yes, many Chevrolet Z71
pickup trucks with superchargers
and straight pipes and "gutted cats
WHOOODAWGIES!
HsfMB
weekly top hits
Top 15 Songs
15. Collective Soul
14. Loudmouth
13. Gigolo Aunts
"TAeBfelJe"
12.Hirvey Danger
"Save it For Later"
11.Poster
Children
"Accident Waiting to
Happen"
lO.ImperialTeen
"lipstick"
9.Michael
'�Gravity's Pilot"
8. Trinket
"Unbehaved"
7.BooRadleys
"High as Monkeys"
6.MxPr
"NtverLeara
5.Sebadoh
"Flame"
4. Jimmy Eat
World
"Lucky Denver Mint"
3.Big Rude Jake
2.Sparklehorse
"Sick of Goodbyes"
1 .Built to Spill
"Tfou Woe Right"
Carmike12
lOThings I Hate About TfouPG-13
Anjdy?eThkR
Doug's First MovieQ
BdTVPG-13
Forces Of NaturePG-13
GoR
Never Been KissedP613
The MatrixR
Pushing TinR
TheOutOfTownersPG-13
lifeR
TwinDragonsR
Located at Buccaneer 1685 East
Fire Tower Rd Greenville, NC
Telephone 353-4988
Buccaneer
The Deep find of the Ocean PG-13
Stepmom PG-13
Saving Private Ryan R
Locate irt Greenville Square
Shopping Center 275 Arlington
Blvd. Greenville. NC
Telephone 756-144
Carolina East 4
Shakespeare In Love
EDtv
Foolish
The Mod Squad
R
PG-13
R
R

Locatedat Carolina East
Convenience Center Memorial
Drive Greenville, NC Telephone:
756-1449
���
lrusttay.Apri29.B99 5
.





p
ODDITIES
DALLAS (AP) More than a dozen
patrons of the Mansion on Turtle
Creek fled Friday as a man armed
with a crowbar began smashing fix-
tures at upscale hotel's restaurant.
The man screamed "I can't take this
any more said Jim Hiud, a Houston
businessman who was eating break-
fast when his table was smashed in
half.
Mansion officials, who estimated
property damage at more than
$50,000, said the 34-year-old man
previously had been a guest at the
hotel
He surrendered to police about 8:40
am. Friday and was held pending
charges including criminal mischief.
Police were unable to determine a
motive for the violent outburst.
"He was very lucid and very talkative
until I asked him (why he did it) and
then all he said was he had to make a
statement said Senior CpL Frank
ReedHe would not say what that
was
Nobody was hurt and the hotel said
the restaurant would be available
Saturday for two weddings.
COVINA, Calif. (AP) Horror buff Rene
Odioa lived by the motto of his
beloved Phantom Coaches Hearse
Club: "Put the' fun' back in funeral"
On Thursday, his fellow club members
did just that.
Ochoa, known for tooling around in
his faded 1965 hearse with vanity
license plate"GOULISH recently died
of kidney failure at 30.
Ochoa once said he wanted to be
buried in a sharkskin suit and his red
bowling shirt, after a last trip in his
hearse with a motorcade of hearses
behind him, friend Kri Kendall said.
All of his wishes were carried out
Following a service at the tuneral
home, Ochoa's hearse, which he had
nicknamed "Patty Hearse began the
procession to Forest Lawn Memorial
Park.
Fourteen hearses in all took part, with
plates like "LAS RYD and
"MBALMED A Bonneville's name-
plate was altered to read Bone Ville
whik another funeral car had fake
skulls and cobwebs.
"The dub meant a great deal to him
Kendall said. "I wont say we were his
life, but we were his lifestyle
Barefoot, continued from page 1
year's cramped and hot Brickyard.
"I like it on the Mall, because it's
close to everything There's more
open space. It's more like you're at a
show that's outsider says Jesse Mcjill,
senior media production major.
Students will now have plenty of
room to toss a frisbee, sunbathe or
stand in line for one of the aforemen-
tioned goofy activities. So just what
has the Student Union cooked up for
your amusement?
"This year we're having'wax hand
'frisbee art boxi ng bouncing a flight
simulator and a velcro wall says
Fredrick, just to name a few.
And, as always, "Everything is freer
headds.
In the face of such overwhelming
evidence, ladies and gentlemen, the
verdict should be clean Be there, or
TEC has teamed up
wiUt Barnes and Noble
to bring book reviews to '
Wednesday s fcuntainhnd
'm �" � � ���'
in our new program
easti
Carolinian
le are looking far fellow book lovers to read and review best setters far
a good cause. Each Semester we will donate these best sellers to the
Ronakl McDonald House where they will be avaitil. (ur the family
members of terminally ill children to read.
If yui would like to write a review please call Miccah at 328-6360
6 Trusty April 29,899
ttW
Vast and present collide in
tonight's performance
D. Miccah Smith
Founlainhead Editor
Witness the collision of two worlds
tonight as Todd Luvitz presents a live
multimedia performance art piece
entided "Objects in die Mirror" in
Speight Auditorium in the Jenkins Art
Building.
The 8 p.m. performance, which is
open to die public, focuses on ways in
which the modern era fulfills, sur-
passes and falls short of predictions
made 60 years ago at t he 1939 World s
Fair in New York
Called"The World of TomorrowT the
fair was a venue for artists, architects
and dreamers to ponder the future
and to express their ideas of how the
world would change in years to come.
"They envisioned a kind of mdem
democratic society says Ijjvibf, who
listed "massive modern highway sys-
tems and cars guided by computers"
as just a couple of the innovations
dreamed up by the fair's contributors.
Luvitz hopes to draw attention to what
we're doing as a society.
"We sometimes inherit a lot of bag-
gage with die good he muses.
Luvitz will combine a video presenta-
tion with synthesized music he wrote
for a performance that will last nearly
an hour. His project was funded by
PeopleAct.
"PeopkAct is a nonprofit community
organization says Luvhz.
The organization sponsors art pro-
jects year-round, and requests (a $3
donation a the door.
Buffalo, continued from page 2
does let us get to know the main charac-
ter in a friendly light. The first scene
opens with Murray typing in his
obscurely decorated home office, and we
see what were getting into about the
exact millisecond that he fills his annoy -
ingly primitive fax machine with bullets.
Indeed, this man is not the picture of
sanity or even beauty.
The story follows Thompson as he cov-
ers the story of his best friend and
lawyer Oscar Zeta Ocosta, played by
Peter Boyle-the monster from "Young
Frankenstein The two buddies do drugs
and give away their Super Bowl tickets
so that they can watch it from the com-
fort of their hotel room. And, somehow
within the madness, Thompson winds
up standing at the urinal next to none
other than President Richard Nixon.
The acting is good enough. The biggest
problem here is that in "Fear and
Loathing we were immersed in the
main character. In this film, we (ust see
Bill Murray doing a crude, albeifldead-
on, impersonation. Another proMem is
that the movie drags in a coupleblaces,
and the drug use is not shown "ll
enough to evoke the desired response
from the viewer. But don't be dufcour-
aged, druggies. This movie still advo-
cates the use of extracurricular medi-
cine. As the tagline saysI hate to advo-
cate weird chemicals, alcohol, violence or
insanity to anyone, but they've always
worked for me
where the Buffalo Roam is won a
watch, but it's really for the Thompson
fans. The soundtrack is great, though,
featuring Neil Young, Bob Dylan,
HendrixandCCR. But take this review
for what it's worth. If you want to know
if this mivie is for you, take the initiative
and rent "Fear and Loathing in UN
Vegas If you don't want to just tKY
drugs after viewing it, check your pulse.
MtnM, continued from pays 3
the obvious catch is the basis from
which the storyline is advanced in the
movieSay what?" Well ID simplify it
for you (no more complex sentences,
right Randy?). The movie basically bites
the hell out of Quentin Tara nt ino's style.
I'm not talking about nibbling around
the edges to try and fake it like some
writers over at T.E.C, I'm talking mouth-
wide-open, hey-look-at-them-tonsils,
man- what-did-you-have-for-breakfast
biting of style going on here.
We all know how Quentin flip-flops on
his stories to make them all come
together at once at the end, right? Well
"Go does it right from the beginning.
Each character is explained in the
Tarantino fashion. Tell a story for one
character, then one for another, an d
another, and another, then have lie sto-
ries all come together at the endi Rven
though they do copy this horn aiother
director, it does not dampen the effect of
the movie. It still kicks, um, bottom.
In all, it's a great movie with lots to see
and lots to figure out. Oh, and bf the
way, Scott Wolf and Jay Mohr's charac-
ters in the movie are really, realty gay (I
mean homosexual Don't want t offend
any rainbow huggers out there)





�������������?�������.
����������������������������A

ARIES:
(March 21-April 20)
Avoid taking yourself to seriously
this week. You have a tendency to
work yourself into the ground - are
you just a conscientious worker or a
workaholic? Lighten up. Pay dose
attention to an important relation-
ship, you may be in way over your
head.
TAURUS:
(April 21-May 21)
Its time to take a softer approach in
expressing your love and apprecia-
tion for someone you care for.
Avoiding any problems which are on
the front burner will not make them
go away, lake a deep breath and
jump in. The resolution will be easier
than expected.
GEMINI:
(May 22-June 21)
Your financial situation seems to be
steadying this week, and will remain
so for at lea;t the next several
months. Build a solid foundation
now - you can never be too sure of
what the future holds. If you're feel-
ing restless and bored, go do some-
thing new.
CANCER:
(June 22-July 23)
If you are bursting with energy this
week, take the opportunity to get
some fresh air and exercise. If you
are trying to break free of a difficult
relationship or habit, a dose friend
may be able to help. Changes may be
difficult to face, but will be best in
the long run.
LEO:
(huy 24-August 23)
This week is not time to be taking
major risks with a primary relation-
ship. Any changes must be made
slowly, keeping in mind the feelings
of others involved. Yfou are experi-
encing a feeling of contentment, that
everything is wdl, in spite of con-
trary evidence.
VIRGO:
(August 24 - September 23)
There is some surprisingly good
advice concerning money coming
your way. Take financial advice of a
dose friend. A conservative
approach is definitely best, and any
investments should be well thought
out first. Time just for you will help
to unwind putting things in perspec-
tive.
LIBRA:
(September 24 - October 23)
You are in a great mood this week,
and can remain so if you look on the
bright side of what is really quite a
wonderful life. Use your wit and
charm on those stick-in-the-mud
folks who always want to play it safe
and rarely have much fun.
SCORPIO:
(October 24 - November 22)
Your work is a major concern during
this week. Start to organize and dele-
gate more than usual, and you'll be
surprised how quickly goals are
accomplished. If you are over-
whelmed by choices regarding mon-
etary purchases, sleep on it first It is
time for introspection and much
needed rest.
SAGITTARIUS:
(November 23 � December 21)
Use your creativity to the max to
solve problems which you would
usually put off to the side. By the
week's end you may feel quite secure
and successful in your present quest
to provide the best use of your
resources. You may get caught up in
a project and lose all sense of time.
CAPRICORN:
(December 22-January 20)
.
0
�������������
Any connections you make in your
present love relationship will reflect
the interconnection you have culti-
vated within yourself. Take a leader-
ship role where money matters are
concerned. You may not know what
is best, but you know enough to
bring about success.
AQUARIUS:
(anuary21 - February 19)
Are you suddenly being drawn into
an unusual relationship? Pay atten-
tion to your hunches and intuition,
particularly where love is concerned.
Don't act out of ego if you expect to
get anywhere. You will emerge victo-
rious in a situation due to your abili-
ty to reason things through.
PISCES:
(February20 -March 20)
Your feminine side is present, and
this may make you fed a bit uncom-
fortable in a society where everyone
is encouraged to act and think in a
macho way. Don't be your worse
enemy, thinking things through may
only take you out of the game. Know
when to leave well enough alone.
IF THIS WEEK IS YOUR BIRTH-
DAY: You are able to handle almost
anything life may throw at you in the
way of surprises. You tend to put alot
of faith in those you love, and it can
be quite a shock when they let you
down. Keep your self-esteem intact.
wewant
Did you see newt happen? Did you nuke newi happen?
Do you belong between our coven? Call fu&rotaua at 328-6366.
Layout
Designer
till' I .1st .1
Freshman quarterback
Garrard to rough up season
ittm VI h�1W.
n&Gmmri
: SSmS
�sss�
Apply at the Student
publications Building
7TrusfcApi29.B99





e�-gfc� ii i n�
H

Go to our wtearQujpl-eiTO on the calendar link.
Just below &eek'1iitinairtothe event subm.ss.on form.
Or if y!u S MrJZ.ecu.eduerns into your browser.
Then jusftfnter your event onto our campus calendar.
It's just that easy. And it's one more free service of The East Carolinian






WmmvKf
1







"You will encounter many new places & with the knowledge
you've acquired at East Carolina University, you know there's
only one place that will brighten your future - CHICO'S
757.1666
DOWNTOWN
GREENVILLE
(You Know Where That Is!)
And now open beside
Pitt Community College
in Community Square!
439.0003
All ABC Permits
BEDROOM
FTW
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� JOINING A
r" MM
LIVING ROOM
MX 15'
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a
2 bedroom units
contain 1050
square feet
WILSON
APARTMENTS
BEDROOM
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The Place
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3 bedroom units
contain 1350
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752-0277
1806 E. 1st Street
Greenville, IMC 27858-0772
We Charge No
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Now Offering $300 Security Deposit for
2 Bedrooms, & $400 Security Deposit for
3 Bedrooms.
2 and 3 Bedroom
Townhouses 1 Baths
Water, Sewer, and Cable Included
Small Pets 0k With Fee
Each unit contains a self cleaning oven, a large frost-free refrigerator,
dishwasher, washerdryer connections, utility room, large patio with private
fence, extra outdoor lighting and deadbolt locks on all doors for added security,
wallpapered bathrooms and ceiling fans.
All units have large walk in closets and storage areas
as indicated by the diagonal lines .
Washersdryers available upon request for 3 bedroom apartments.

5 BLOCKS FROM
ECU WITH BUS
SERVICE
AVAILABLE
'












�������"
HBWHB
j
ifer Graduating geriioSiilii
Leeanne Vaughan
JiNKamarek
Kristin Wheeler
Amanda Garner
Erin Relay
KateGiiayi
Christy Lee
tracy Hibler
Amelia Burney
Heather Wellman
mtmttfty
Green mill run
apartments
Smart Choice
larger 1 and 2 bedroom apartments
low utility rates
water & sewer
basic cable furnished
onsite manager
24 hr emergency
maintenance
1.5 blocks from ECU
large pool
on site laundry
convenient to
downtown &
shopping mall
252.758.2628
KINGSTON RENTALS
3002 Kingston Circle � Greenville, NC 27858 � (252)758-7575
�-
5i �Jib j "1-f-ffif-
Kingston Garden Unit
two bedroom two bath
townhouse
Fnse Water & Stiver
Free Basic Cafcfe
Central ir
Mini- Blinds
But- Service
Ice Makers
Dishwashers
Equally Sized Rooms
Furnished Or
Unfurnished
� ' !E
farkview (reverse)
two bedroom two bath
I it-r AUir A �-�rn
1 . lilt- II. 1
Hiif. fulNjf,
' r lllr.il A
Mini- Pliri
�'I ir-r ,� ftr-r
' -i.i M I ii tl
t3lJ A r.
( ftttl'O, r rJll vVslrV
I. r- Mikrir-i
PfcJ III irr.
fl'f iillv irvJ r� fija
Kingston Condo Style Unit
two bedroom two and 12
bath (reverse)
I rt-r .v�t-f-r Htlti n.v-i
Mini- piiri
f'll rrvicr-
t-r- lyUkrr"
r.ll.v.�rlM
Ell flJ Ki'lll
I tnriiiJ 1 Jr IJiitiiiniir-J
Tiw Bdl 1 .tAAr
fJi-nuf. Hall-Bi�t.li I i
('yUf.
?nfril Alt
fJfi viii Lial.rv4
IJ'rIcifr-
Pinnacle
Property
Management
Company
offering apartment & duplex communities convenient
to ECU, Pitt Community College, & the Medical District
all units are carpeted & serviced by a great maintenance
program. Call once and it's fixed!
Wvndham Court
5 blocks from ECU
2 bedroom apts.
energy efficient
central heatair
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
on ECU bus route
pets ok with deposit
Dockside Duplexes
3 bedroom units
2.5 baths
5 blocks from ECU
on bus route
central heatair
dishwasher
garbage disposal
washer & dryer in each unit
back deck
carport parking
storage room
Eastgate Village
2 bedroom units
1 bath
washer & dryer in each unit
dishwasher
refrigerator w icemaker
ceiling fans
range spacious closets
Cheyenne Court
behind Plaza Mall
1 bedroom
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer in each unit
patios
laundry facility on site
small pets ok in some units
Eastgate Duplexes
2 bedrooms
2 bath
kitchen appliances
washer & dryer hookups
ceiling fan
range
spacious closets
Summerfield Gardens
convenient to Pitt
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
no pets
Hampton Court
spacious 1 & 2 bedrooms
3 miles to ECU
1 mile to hospital
ceiling fans
energy efficient
central heatair
dishwasher
washerdryer hookups
watersewer provided
back deckpatio
no pets
Caldwell Court
convenient to Pitt
Community college and
Medical District
1 & 2 bedroom units
energy efficient
watersewer provided
kitchen appliances
washerdryer hookups
small pets ok with deposit
jrsity Terrace
Condominiums
3 bedrooms
3 bath
kitchen appliances
dishwasher
spacious closets
central heatair
on ECU bus route
no pets
Office located at:
104 WYNDHAM Cr.
APARTMENT D
561-Rent






MICHAEL JOSEPH SHEEHAH III
Always remember: "IF IT IS TO BE -
gWIT IS UP TO ME
4 Congratulations, Mike! 1 am so proud of you.
Love, Your Baby Sister REGINA
� iifMiSARAH JANEROUNTREE
SjlJKr-Congratulations, girl!
�fl JH�We are so proud of you and will always love you!
W�Wishing you the best!
WmMom, Dad and Daniel

SANDRA BROOKE JOHNSON
Congratulations, Brooke.
ishing you success in life
but above all happiness.
Congratulations on all
your accomplishments.
We're proud of you and
we love you.
Mom, Dad & Riki
'�
MICHAEL SCHRIMPF
Michael's graduating!
We always knew that
you would make it
Congratulations
Mom, Dad and Bodo
ERICA ELIZABETH M1 QUEEN
Congratulations Erica!
God has blessed you in so
many ways - always give
him thanks.
I love you and I'm very
proud of you.
Mom
JENNIFER DIANNE DANIELS
Jenn,
We are so very proud of
you! We wish you all the
happiness & success
the world has to offer!
Love, Mom & Dad
ROBIN ELIZABETH STARNES
(you finally made it,
though at times
it was bard.
you did your very best,
and went the extra yard.
Congratulations. We
love you
JOHN DANIEL HOLLOMAN
AYourbesthas always beeto good enough. Mom & Dad We'reproud ofyou








The ECU Student Media says
CONGRATULATIONS
to all Spring 1999 graduates.
Virgin
SYiofts
Center
i v e r s i t y
Virginia Commonwealth University s
SportsCenter offers an exciting approach to grad-
uate education in sport leadership by emphasiz-
ing practical, hands-on experiences through plac-
ing students in real-world sports environments.
The SportsCenter provides two possible
tracks to a master's degree: a traditional sport
management program and the unprecedented
avenue of coaching.
Under both tracks, students will benefit from
a curriculum designed to provide the necessary
foundation for a career in sports and will be
involved in mentoring situations in amateur
and professional sports programs and events.
Such leaders in the field of sports industry
as Joe Alleva, Robert Wrenn, Randy Cross, Willie
Lanier and Del Harris serve on our Advisory
Board and will be involved with training our
students, sharing their insights and knowledge,
and providing guidance and opportunities.
By combining a quality educational program
and VCU's world-class facilities, the new VCU
SportsCenter will become a national model for
preparing sports professionals for the 21st century.
For men Information on how to boconw a part of
the VCU SpomCenter ell: 18041 828-TEAMI8328I
(877) 799-4287 (toll free) � Fan: (8041 828 7526
An Equal OppodunrtyAtlitmitt Action Untvarnty
Not paid lor with tlilifundi
Woodcliff
Apartments
2 Bedroom 1 Bath. Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
WasherDryer Hookups
Water & Sewer
Also Available
I Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
WasherDryer Hookups
Water & Sewer
Da-Site Manager
ECU bus pickup
758-5005
Dogwood Hollow
Apartments
2 Bedroom 2 Bath Apartments
Range, Refrigerator, Dishwasher
& Garbage Disposal
WasherYDryer Rentals Available
Water &Sewe
Abo Available
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
Btsage & Refrigerator
On-Stite Laundry Eaeties
OhleManager
2 Blocks fromECU Orrpus
752-8900
Eastgate
Apartments
2 Bedroom 1 Bath Apartments
RaiJge & Refrigerator
WasnerDryerHookups
Water & Sewer
Also Available
1 Bedroom1 Bath Apartments
Range & Refrigerator
WasherDryer Hookups
Water & Sewer
On-Site Manager
ECU bus pickup
7528900
AM with 24 hour emergency maintenance and no pets allowed
Professionally managed by: Joyner & Associates Management
lliOEoM Tenth St Apt IQ
wwweenvilleapartmentsxom





ri:5i.
VtltfVl
I 4
I '
I
AMANDA MARIE BAYLISS
We remember the little
girl you once were,
And admire the woman
you have become.
We're so proud of you!
Love always, Mom &Diddy
JEFFREY GLENN WETHERINGTON
JAMES ALLEN TRIPP
tOe aye so ptekb
fyoii finally ?i? it.
Aeae, Hanta,
Dcnnie A efb
To the one who holds my heart
Because you mean so much to me, your
graduation is a joyful time in my life, too
a time for wishing you a future full of
dreams and the courage and confidence
you need to make them come true.
Love always, Sunshine & Baby, too!
Congratulations to all of the Student Media
staff members who are graduating.
rroperty
Apoftmonte & Rental Houses
PO Box 873 � m Browtoa Orm Suite A
GwxM&. Nbdh Coroftva 278&-Q&72
(252) 758-1921 � FAX (252) 757-7722
Now Preleasing
for Fall Semester
Langston Park Apartments
Wesley Commons South
p
JLJ.S.L
JTOWI
ASK
ABOUT
SECURITY
DEPOSIT
Sf
�.�AWVA V�
All Apartments
Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
1 Block from ECU
Bus route
Two Bedroom Units
1bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air
Dishwasher
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks
Each Unit Has a Patio or Balcony
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
OneTwo Bedroom Units
1 bath
Free Water and Sewer
Central Heat & Air in 2 Bdrms
Wall AC Unit in 1 Bdrms
RefrigeratorStove
WasherDryer Hook Ups
Mini-Blinds
Deadbolt Locks and Hall Closets
1st Floor Patio with Fence
2nd Floor Front or Back patio
Pets Allowed with Pet Fee
I
All Apartments Just 5 Blocks
from ECU Campus
On Site Laundry Facilities
On ECU Bus route





iinm�iiinii ii
ZEOMI LYN TAYLOR
1 'TAEOBO'
expert
II JLYou made it
We love you!
m StMom&Zelda&
I - � �Zoletta & Dad
AN ANT A PARMAR
v Congratulations, Anant
;� 9twas a long journey from
driving stroller to driving
Gamry. We have enjoyed
every moment from day 1
to the present. May Qod
fulfill your dreams.
Love, Mom, Dad & Chandresh
CARRIE ROGERS
Cattle,
What a special 'bauqhut
yeu kaoe always Seen
ti)e ate sc ftetib fif you!
Congratulations en ifOUt
graduation.
m, Da), Jteqlna Anbteto
ANGELA MARIE OAKLEY
Your hard work and
determination has finally
paid off. We are very
proud of you and wish
you the very best in life.
We Love You,
Mama & Diddy

BENJAMIN EUGENE TEAL
Ben, you have begun a
voyage on that great sea
called knowlege. May you
conquer many waves. You
make us proud.
We love you, Pap & Maw
JAMES MICHAEL KALTENSCHNEE
We knew you could do it!
Jbok a lot of bard work -
but you bung in there.
We &r very proud of you
and love you!
Mom, Dad & Robbie
JEFFREY GLENN WETHERINGTON
Jeffrey,
We are so proud of you.
And we love you alot.
Love, Dad, Mom, Daniel,
Granddad & Grandmom
CHRISTOPHER PAOL RAGGETT
1 To the cutest, sweetest,
Imost precious grad in the
i whole wide world. We are
sooooo proud of u.
Mom, Willis, Dad, Judy
1' � � WPJand your sister Cheryl
m s&jjgki






SCOTM'INTOSH
CELENADENISEHAALAND
You fallowed the
hopes and dreams of
your heart and accom-
plished so much.
We love you and
are so blessed.
Love, Mom & Dad
ROBERT WILLIAM NEISWONGER
Way to go!
gob graduating
with honors.
ffere proud
of you.
Love, Mom & Dad
From Pooh Bear to tassel,
It's all a big whirl.
We're a proud mom &
dad, as we shout,
"You go girl
Love you.
AMANDA L. WEIGAND
Amanda, you have
worked very hard
and we're proud of
you!
We love you
Mom. Dad. Patti. Mike,
Allison, Gmaw & Pop-
pop, Grandma & Grandpa
AMANDA CHARLOTTE ROBERTS
Amanda,
Happy Graduation!
"Every step is an end,
and every step is a fresh
beginning
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
We are so proud!
Love, Mom, Dad,
Suzanna & Megan
CHAD MARSHALL FISHBURNE
Chad,
It's a long way from a big
wheel to a Corvette, but
you're almost there!
Congratulations son,
we love you.
Mom, Dad & Kevin
EMILY SOWELL PING
Congratulations
Emijy!
We are all very
proud of you!
Love, Mom, Rich,
Dad and Jan
LISA FAYE JONES
Lisa,
We are so proud of you!
You are a wonderful
person; a terrific daugh-
ter and a great sister.
Love, Mama & Sandra
H





RUSSELL JOSEPH SAPUTO
M Thanks for fulfilling a
dream I have had for you
m since the day you were
TL born. We are all proud of
, you an your perseverance
to graduate from ECU.
This Bud's for you son!
Love, Dad & Renee
ROBERT JAMES WILLIAMS
With hard work and
determination you
made it happen.
Congratulations!
Love, Mom, Dad, Iufa
Tudibaker, Cocoa,
Grandma, and Sara
SHOMARI MASHAMA DAVIDSON
Shomari,
Thank God you made it!
We're all proud of you!
May God always bless
you.
Love, Mom, Dad &Jabari
HOLLY ANNE HONAKER
Holly Who is
coming home! No
more waving
goodbye with eyes
red and baggy
while Holly drives
away in her laser
with Maggy
Mom & Dad
MEGAN LEIGH DAVIS
Once again, you've
made us smile and
filled our hearts with
pride. Way to go, Meg!
Congratulations -
you've earned it!
Love, Mom & Dad
PAMELA LYNN GODFREY
Pammy,
From a "precious little
girl" into a "fine young
lady Oh how proud we
are of you and your
accomplishments!
Congratulations!
With Love, Mom & Dad
ERIKA LEIGH HAMRY
Eureka!
Congratulations Erika!
YouVe earned your
Bachelor degree! We are
very proud of you! We love
you very much!
Mom, Pete, and Rachel
.
SHAWN FRANCIS MCKENNA
Congratulations, Shawn!
We're so happy and so
proud that someone as
special as you is our son.
Have a wonderful life!
Love You, Mom & Dad
xxxo

j�afj�gj





KIMBERLY MILLS
YouVe cone a
lon way,
Kimbo.
proud of you.
Love, Mama, Daddy,
Kevin & Jon
TERRIGAYLEABERNATHY
Our 'little sunshine"
is graduating. We are
proud of you and love
you very much!
Mama & Daddy
DARREN LEE SUTTON
Darren,
you finally made it!
We're so proud of
you and your
accomplishments.
With our love,
Mom& Dad
MARK BENNETT EDINGER
Congratulations
Today is your day!
You're off to great places!
You're off and away!
We're all so proud of you.
We Love You, Mom
BENJAMIN P. TAYLOR ' BENJI
Congratulations, Benji!
We are very proud of
you and your
achievements.
We love you!
Mom & Brant
JONATHAN EDWARD JENKINS
Congratulations!
Today-is Your Day!
You're Off to Great Places!
You're Up and Away!
We're proud of You!
Love, Mom & Dad
CLAYTON CAMPBELL BATTIN
$gses are red,
Violets are blue,
cyje are very proud
qfbat (fjocle cfilay is
through!
Love You, Mom, Dad,
Linda, William & Lexi
BBET JOHNSON CBEECH
Hurray for Bret!
Words cannot
express our pride
in you our Dad
would have been
proudest of all.
Love, Aunt Anne & Uncle Al





sat
��MHBi
I !

w
-k
We are now accepting applications
for summer help in all positions.
News, Sports, & Features Writers
� Opinion columnists
� Production Assts.
� �
s.
Copy Editors
� Cartoonists
i
Kpeuence
ft2&jetim6
.
Apply at our office on the second floor of the Student Pubfications Building.


Title
The East Carolinian, April 29, 1999
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 29, 1999
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.1337
Subject(s)
Spatial
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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